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I am currently on vacation in Ireland, returning on October 9th. I am hoping to complete a blog post each evening, even if it is only the basics (solved grid and clues, plus explanation of theme). I apologize in advance if I am late in posting.

Bill

1203-09 New York Times Crossword Answers 3 Dec 09



This is my solution to the crossword published in the New York Times today. If you are doing the New York Times crossword in any other publication, you are working on the syndicated puzzle.

Here is a link to my answers to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword.



In this puzzle, the # symbol represents the word ROME.

As referred to in 7-down, the theme of the puzzle is ALL ROADS LEAD TO ROME. The diagonals spell out four types of ROAD:
  • LOGGING ROAD
  • PRIVATE ROAD
  • WINDING ROAD
  • UNPAVED ROAD
A tough puzzle for a Thursday, but a good one!

7 comments :

Anonymous said...

Save one like this for Saturday. I feel robbed of one that (usually ) I can actually solve!

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, my anonymous friend.

Thanks for stopping by.

It was a tough one, wasn't it? Pretty clever though, I thought!

Anonymous said...

What's the significance of "(3,5,4,2,4)" in 7 Across?

Bill Butler said...

Hi there,

I think you mean 7 down. The answer is ALL ROADS LEAD TO ROME, with ROME being the center square. If you read the diagonals as shown by the arrows that I have drawn on the grid, you'll see that the four types of road mentioned (LOGGING, PRIVATE, WINDING, PRIVATE) all point to the center square, namely Rome.

Complex, huh?

Anonymous said...

Thanks Bill; but I'm still confused. What's the significance of "(3,5,4,2,4)" in the clue to 7 down? What do these numbers refer to? The length of the words? That makes sense, but it'd make more sense if they were all words in the puzzle somewhere... which is impossible, since "to" is only 2 letters.

Bill Butler said...

Hi again,

It's a very unique puzzle, and I found it hard to work this one out. But maybe, the version that is in your newspaper doesn't have the right clue. In my version, the clue for 7-down reads:

"There are four hidden in this puzzle, which together suggest a familiar five-word saying (3,5,4,2,4)"

The answer to 7-down is ROADS, and the hidden "roads" referred to in the clue are in the diagonals of the grid:
1. LOGGING ROAD
2. PRIVATE ROAD
3. WINDING ROAD
4. UNPAVED ROAD

Each of the "roads" above start at different corners of the grid, and end at ("lead to") the center square. The center square contains not one letter, but four ... ROME (the center of denve-R OME-lette, and o-ROME-o). So, the four hidden roads lead from the corners of each grid to the center square ... ALL ROADS LEAD TO ROME.

Hope that helps.

Anonymous said...

The parenthetical numbers in 7-down (3,5,4,2,4) refer ti the letter count in the ther=me statement- All (3) roads (5) lead (4) to (2) Rome (4).

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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