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0124-10 New York Times Crossword Answers 24 Jan 10



This is my solution to the crossword published in the New York Times today. If you are doing the New York Times crossword in any other publication, you are working on the syndicated puzzle.

NOTE: The print version of this puzzle originally published in the New York Times  on January 24th is slightly different in the southwest corner (three clues and answers are different).

Here is a link to my answers to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword.



Here is the "folded" version of the grid, displaying the hidden words.



Completion Time: N/A (watching TV ... but slow!)
Theme: MAD FOLDING (emulating the celebrated MAD fold-in feature). When folded as directed by the answers to 7&14-down, the grid reveals a list of items that are commonly folded.
Answers I missed: 2 B-TEN (D-TEN), BRAHE (DRAHE)

TODAY'S GOOGLIES ...
Across
11 IGLU: Who knew? The Inuit word for house isn't actually "igloo", but "iglu".
21 FLORIO: Jim Florio governed New Jersey from 1990 to 1994.
22 OMOO: Both "Omoo" and "Typee" are autobiographical works by Herman Melville.
29 ARLO: "Arlo and Janis" is written by Jimmy Johnson.
32 ALDA: Alan Alda won Emmy's for directing, acting and writing in "M*A*S*H".
33 TOYS: Robin Williams starred in "Toys", which was also the film in which Jamie Foxx made his debut.
49 GOULD: Stephen Jay Gould was an influential writer of popular science.
58 APICES: Apices is the plural of "apex".
63 HIDALGO: Miguel Hidalgo was a Mexican priest and leader of a peasant's revolt that developed into the Mexican War of Independence.
69 ARNE: "Rule Brittania!" was a poem by James Thomson, for which Thomas Arne composed the famous music.
70 POE: "The Oblong Box" is a short story by Edgar Allen Poe.
11 COMTE: "Comte" is the French word for "count", as in "The Count of Monte Cristo" by Alexander Dumas.
115 ARR: "Arr." is short for "arranged by", when written on a musical score.
122 I, ROBOT: "I, Robot" is a collection of short stories by Isaac Asimov, and perhaps my favorite work of science-fiction.
127 NOEL: "Joyeux Noel" is joyous, or "Merry Christmas" in French.
135 ULEE: Peter Fonda played the title role in "Ulee's Gold" in 1997.
139 PATRIA: Patria is a form of the Latin word for "father", and is used for "homeland" or "fatherland".
146 ARETHA: Aretha Franklin is the "Queen of Soul".
147 ESAI: Esai Morales played Bob Morales in the 1987 film "La Bamba".
149 ICHIRO: Ichiro Suzuki plays baseball for the Seattle Mariners.
151 DEKE: "Deke" is short for "decoy".
152 SENS: There are a century of (100) senators in Washington.

Down
2 CLARO: A claro is mild cigar made with light-colored tobacco. The name comes from the Spanish for "clear".
4 ARNOS: Cartoonist Peter Arno's real name is Arnoux Peters.
5 MIB: The 1997 blockbuster "Men in Black".
16 BBC: The BBC World Service is a radio broadcast service that started of as the British Empire Service in 1932.
18 NEALE: Greasy Neale was head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles from 1941-1950.
19 ENIDS: Enid Bagnold wrote "National Velvet" and Enid Blyton wrote stories for children that were very popular when I was growing up in the British Isles.
40 LILI: Lili Taylor played Valerie Solanas in "I Shot Andy Warhol".
50 LEIA: Han Solo's honey was Princess Leia in "Star Wars".
55 FELDMAN: Corey Feldman played Teddy Duchamp in "Stand by Me".
59 ETAPE: "Etape" is the French word for "stage".
62 DAR: The Daughters of the American Revolution.
78 YAT: Sun Yat-sen is known as the Father of the Nation in china, and is uniquely revered in both the mainland of China and Taiwan.
84 ANITA: Anita (played by Rita Mareno in the film) is the girlfriend of Bernardo, the leader of the Jets, in "West Side Story".
86 LESHAN: Eda LeShan wrote "When Your Children Drive You Crazy".
106 DODI: Dodi al-Fayed died in the car crash with Princess Diana.
115 AKELA: Akela is the wolf in the "Jungle Book", and gave the name to the Akela, the cubmaster in the scouting movement.
117 ROSALIE: Gershwin's "Rosalie" was made into a movie released in 1937.
121 LESLIE: Leslie Nielsen is a Canadian actor that plays the zany Sergeant Frank Drebin in "The Naked Gun".
123 BAIO: Scott Baio played the title role in "Charles in Charge".
131 BRAHE: Tycho Brahe lost his nose in a duel, and wore a replacement made of either silver or gold pasted onto his face.
133 EVERT: Chris Evert also won a total of 18 Grand Slam singles championships.
134 NERO'S: The Circus of Nero was also called the Circus of Caligula, as it was started by Caligula, and finished by Nero.
138 ENSA: The complete motto is "Ense Petit Placidam Sub Libertate Quietem", and translates as "By the sword we seek peace, but peace only under liberty".
143 CHI: The Greek letter chi is written as "X", although the sound is more like a "j".
145 PCB: Polychlorinated biphenyl ...

6 comments :

Anonymous said...

Still don't understand the wording used in 7 Down, namely OA and BA relined

Anonymous said...

Never mind; just figured it out: SO A and B are Lined up...

Bill Butler said...

That's the way it is with a crossword, I guess. You just look long enough :)

Thanks for stopping by ...

Mike Perino said...

Bill - - thanks for the "note" in the heading. I was going nuts trying to figure out how "aloe" could have been used twice in the puzzle but went ahead and used it anyway since nothing else fit. I grew up reading Mad Magazine, maybe that's my problem today.
Take care,
Mike

Bill Butler said...

Hi Mike,

It's good to hear from you again. Hope you are doing well.

I'm glad I left the note up there from last week. I had expected the ALOE/ALOE error (corrected last week online, but not in the print version in the NYTimes) to be corrected in the print version used in syndication, but apparently not!

Mike Perino said...

Bill,

I am thanks. I guess with the syndication version, you get what you pay for.

Hope all is going well with you too. Have a great week.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost everyday as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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