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0508-11: New York Times Crossword Answers 8 May 11, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications


CROSSWORD SETTER: Daniel A. Finan
THEME: Working in Opposition … all of the theme answers are composed of words that are opposites:
23A. Capris? : LONG SHORTS
30A. Domes to let in London? : ROUND FLATS
38A. Pre-2004 purchase from G.M.? : NEW OLDS
47A. Sour notes? : FAULTY SOUNDS
56A. Fractions of acres? : LITTLE LOTS
70A. Shabby wares sold at an expo? : BAD FAIR GOODS
83A. What socialists campaign for? : LEFT RIGHTS
91A. B and O, for presidents #43 and #44? : LAST INITIALS
101A. Career criminals? : PRO CONS
111A. Material for a biographer with a recorder? : TAPED LIVES
121A. Best-looking rear ends? : TOP BOTTOMS
COMPLETION TIME: 37m 58s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 3 … NOURI (NOTWI), SUA (STA), RISIBLES (WISIBLES)


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
Unlocking the Masters Series: Exploring Haydn - A Listener's Guide to Music's Boldest Innovator - Book/CD5. Nickname for Joseph Haydn : PAPA
Josef Haydn was an Austrian composer, often called the "Father of the Symphony" due to his prolific and output of symphonies that helped define the form. Haydn was also the "father" of the big three composers of the Classical period, Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Hayden was a good friend to Mozart, and a teacher of Beethoven.

19. Needle case : ETUI
An etui is an ornamental case used to hold small items, in particular sewing needles. We imported both the case design and the word "etui", from France. The French also have a modern usage of "etui" ... a case for carrying CDs.

Hideki Irabu Autographed/Hand Signed New York Yankees 8x10 Photo22. Pitcher Hideki ___ : IRABU
Hideki Irabu is professional baseball player born near Okinawa in Japan. While playing in the Pacific League in Japan he held the record for the fastest pitch in Japanese professional baseball from 1993 to 2005. He joined the New York Yankees in 1997 but famously ran foul of George Steinbrenner for putting on so much extra weight that it affected his game.

MARY TYLER MOORE 8x10 COLOR PHOTO23. Capris? : LONG SHORTS
Capri pants were first made popular on the island of Capri, apparently. They were invented in Europe in 1948, but only became popular in the US in the sixties, as they were often worn by Mary Tyler Moore on "The Dick Van Dyke Show". After a lull in the seventies and eighties, there was a resurgence in sales after Uma Thurman wore them (and danced in them) in "Pulp Fiction". Can't stand them myself ...

25. Dweller along the Tigris : IRAQI
The Tigris and Euphrates Rivers run parallel to each other through Iraq, and parts of Syria, Turkey and Iran. The fertile land between the rivers was known as Mesopotamia (Greek for “land between two rivers”). The Tigris is mentioned twice in the Bible including a reference in the Book of Genesis in which it is named as one of four rivers branching off the river flowing out of the Garden of Eden.

30. Domes to let in London? : ROUND FLATS
A flat is a word more commonly used in the British Isles than here. It basically describes an apartment or condominium. The word "flat" is Scottish in origin, in which language it meant a "floor in a house".

32. Southern city known as the Horse Capital of the World : OCALA
Thoroughbred horse farming in Florida started in Ocala, back in 1943. Some folks today call Ocala the "Horse Capital of the World", but I bet that's disputed by others ...

34. It may bring a tear to your eye : WASABI
Sometimes called Japanese horseradish, wasabi is the root used as a condiment in Japanese cooking. The taste is more like mustard than a hot pepper in that the vapors that create the “hotness” stimulate the nasal passages rather than the tongue. Personally, I love the stuff …

36. Squeezes (out) : EKES
To "eke out" means to "make something go further or last longer". So, you can eke out your income by cutting back on expenses.

37. Verizon forerunner : GTE
GTE was a rival to AT&T, the largest of the independent competitors to the Bell System. GTE merged with Bell Atlantic in 2000, forming the company that we know today as Verizon.

Ransom E. Olds: America's First Automotive Pioneer38. Pre-2004 purchase from G.M.? : NEW OLDS
Oldsmobile was an automobile brand founded by Ransom E. Olds (REO) in 1897, and then phased out by General Motors in 2004.

Historic Print (L): Fred Stone as the Scarecrow in "The Wizard of Oz""41. "___ Only Had a Brain" : IF I
“If I Only Had a Brain” is a song from the 1939 film “The Wizard of Oz”. The song is sung three times in the movie, each time with different lyrics, by the Scarecrow, the Cowardly Lion and the Tin Man. The other versions of the song are, “If I Only Had the Nerve” and “If I Only Had a Heart”.

44. "Spaceballs" and the like : SPOOFS
“Spaceballs” is a 1987 spoof of sci-fi films, mainly poking fun at the “Star Trek” franchise. It was co-written and directed by, and indeed stars, Mel Brooks.

50. "___ Poetica" : ARS
The full name of Horace's work is "Ars Poetica, Episula ad Pisones" (The Art of Poetry, Letters to Piso). The work describes the technical aspects of poetry in Ancient Rome, and the term "ars poetica" has come to mean the poetry of that period.

Estes 1469 Tandem-X Launch Set54. Toy rocket company since 1958 : ESTES
Estes Industries was founded by Vernon Estes in 1958, and is the country’s biggest manufacturer of rocket engines for model rockets.

55. Verdi aria "___ tu" : ERI
The aria "Eri tu" is from Verdi's opera "Un ballo in maschera" (A Masked Ball). It tells the story of the assassination of King Gustav III of Sweden, during a masked ball.

59. Boston Tea Party issue : TAX
The famous destroying of tea in Boston Harbor to protest against the Tax Act took place on December 16, 1773. The action was referred to as the “destruction of the tea” for decades, and it wasn’t until 1834 that the term “Boston Tea Party” first appeared in print.

John Dryden and His World60. He wrote "None but the brave deserves the fair" : DRYDEN
John Dryden was a highly influential poet and playwright in the late 1600s. He came from good literary stock, and was a cousin once removed of Jonathan Swift.

63. Towers in the high country? : T-BARS
A T-bar is a type of ski lift in which the skiers are pulled up the hill in pairs, with each pair sitting either side of T-shaped metal bar. The bar is placed behind the thighs, pulling along the skier who remains standing on his/her skis (hopefully!). There's also a J-bar, a similar device, but with each J-shaped bar used by one skier at a time.

MICHAEL NOURI 8x10 COLOUR PHOTO64. "Flashdance" actor Michael : NOURI
Michael Nouri is a Lebanese-American actor whose most famous role was that of Nick Hurley (Alex’s boss) in the 1983 movie “Flashdance”.

66. "King ___," song premiered on 27-Across on 4/22/78 : TUT
(27. See 66-Across : SNL)
Comedian Steve Martin wrote the comic song "King Tut" himself, and it appeared on his 1978 album "Wild and Crazy Guy". The song was later released as a single, and made it as high as number 17 in the charts. Some of the song's success might have been due to the fervor surrounding the exhibition of the real king's tomb artifacts that were touring the country at the time.

67. Month before Tishri : ELUL
Elul is a month in the Hebrew calendar occurring in August-September.

69. "___ Do Is Dream of You" : ALL I
“All I Do Is Dream of You” is a song published in 1934, with music by Nacio Herb Brown and lyrics by Arther Freed. It was written for the movie “Sadie McKee”, and has been recorded numerous times since then.

Everything To Lose74. Featured singer on Eminem's "Stan" : DIDO
Dido is an English singer and songwriter. Dido’s real name is Florian Cloud de Bounevialle Armstrong. She was born on Christmas Day 1971, and celebrates a second birthday every year on June 25th. In this regard Dido is just like Paddington Bear, with one birthday on December 25th, and another on June 25th.

76. Org. whose functions follow forms? : IRS
The IRS came into being during the Civil War, to raise money to pay for war expenses. Prior to the introduction of income tax in 1862, taxation was limited to levies on trade and property.

Hear, See & Speak No Evil Monkeys - Collectible Figurine Statue77. "___ evil ..." : SEE NO
The old adage "see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil" originated in the 17th century. The phrase comes as an interpretation of a wood carving over a door in a shrine in Nikko, Japan. The carving depicts the "Three Wise Monkeys":
- Mizaru, covering his eyes
- Kikazaru, covering his ears
- Iwazaru, covering his mouth

The Best of Josie and the Pussycats (Best of Josie & the Pussycats)78. Lead singer of the fictional Pussycats : JOSIE
“Josie and the Pussycats” is a comic book aimed at teens, published regularly from 1963 to 1982.

Jeopardy79. Famous answer giver : TREBEK
Canadian-born Alex Trebek has been the host of the game show "Jeopardy" since 1984, a run of about 26 years.

81. HBO's ___ G : ALI
Ali G is a fictional character created by British comedian Sacha Baron Cohen. Baron Cohen achieved international fame playing another of his personae, Borat, the protagonist in the 2006 movie "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan".

86. Pokey : CAN
"The pokey, poky" is a slang term for prison, possibly a corruption of "pogie", a term for a "poorhouse".

The Last Hero: A Life of Henry Aaron89. First player listed in "Total Baseball" : AARON
The great Hank Aaron has many claims to fame. One notable fact is that he is the last major league baseball player to have also played in the Negro League.

91. B and O, for presidents #43 and #44? : LAST INITIALS
That would be Presidents Bush and Obama.

95. Battlefield sorting system : TRIAGE
"Triage" is the process of prioritizing patients for treatment, especially on a battlefield. The term "triage" is French and means "a sorting".

97. Spanish pot : OLLA
An olla is a traditional clay pot used for the making of stews.

98. Crucifix letters : INRI
The letters on the cross on which Jesus died were INRI. INRI is an acronym for the Latin "Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum", which translates into English as Jesus the Nazarene (or Galilean), King of the Jews (or Judeans).

105. Eastern wrap : OBI
An obi is a sash worn in some forms of dress in Japan both by men and women, although the styles for women tend to be more ornate.

ROBERT DAVI 8X10 COLOR PHOTO106. Actor Robert who played the villain in "Licence to Kill" : DAVI
The roles I know Robert Davi for are in “Die Hard” (one of the two FBI agents) and the James Bond film “Licence to Kill” (the “bad guy”). Davi is a classically trained singer and he has an album coming out very soon, “Davi Sings Sinatra - On The Road To Romance”.

Lights Out (Radio Edit)107. Rick who sang "Never Gonna Give You Up" : ASTLEY
Rick Astley is an English singer, best known for his 1987 worldwide hit “Never Gonna Give You Up”. He retired in 1993 but became a huge hit on the Internet in 2007 when a YouTube video of “Never Gonna Give You Up” was chosen by tricksters as a link (labeled as something else) that was sent around the world so that the clip was seen by millions online. The phenomenon was given the name “Rickrolling”. With all the new exposure that the song received Astley made a whopping $12 in royalties from YouTube. Yep, 12 whole dollars.

114. Monkeys : SIMIANS
Simians are the higher primates with which we are familiar, the monkeys and apes as well as ourselves, humans.

117. Disco ___ : ERA
Discotheques started up during WWII in Occupied France. American-style music (like jazz and jitterbug dances) was banned by the Nazis, so French natives met in underground clubs that they called discotheques, where records were often played on just a single turntable. After the war, these clubs came out into the open. One famous Paris discotheque was called "Whiskey a Gogo" and its method of operation, with non-stop music from two turntables next to a dance-floor, this concept spread around the world.

Minicraft Models B-29A Enola Gay 1/144 Scale118. ___ Gay : ENOLA
As we all know, the Enola Gay was the B-29 that dropped the first atomic bomb, on Hiroshima in August 1945. Enola Gay was the name of the mother of the pilot, Col. Paul W. Tibbets, Jr.

119. Church gift : TITHE
A tithe is traditional payment of one tenth of a person's annual income, usually given to a church. Tithing is a practice taught in many traditions and according to a 2002 survey, about 3% of American adults donate 10% or more of their income to a church.

121. Best-looking rear ends? : TOP BOTTOMS
No comment …

Enter Computer Key Doormat124. Key key : ENTER
A key key on a keyboard (i.e. a crucial key) is the “Enter” key.

127. Some encls. : SASES
Self-Addressed, Stamped Envelopes.

Complete Pre-War Recordings129. Pianist Myra : HESS
Myra Hess was a British pianist who earned the title of Dame due to her efforts to uphold morale in WWII. During the war all concerts were suspended due to blackout restrictions, so Myra Hess organized 1700 concerts that took place at lunchtimes throughout the conflict.

130. Numbers game : KENO
The name "Keno" has French or Latin roots, with the French "quine" being a term for five winning numbers, and the Latin "quini" meaning "five each". The game, however, originated in China. It was introduced to the West by Chinese immigrants who were working on the first Transcontinental Railroad in the 1800s.

Down
1. Hold on a mat : NELSON
The full nelson and half nelson are wrestling holds in which one wrestler secures the opponent by encircling his or her arms under the armpits and around the neck. Some say the hold is named after Admiral Nelson, who was renowned for using encircling tactics in battle.

Ulysses S. Grant (The American Presidents)3. N.R.A. concern : GUN LAW
The NRA is the National Rifle Association, an organization that has been around since 1871. The group has had some celebrity presidents, including US President Ulysses S. Grant. It's often said that the NRA is the most powerful lobbying group in Washington.

4. Mr., in Milano : SIG
Signor, Mister in Italian.

5. March Madness activity : POOL
March Madness is the name given to (among others) the NCAA Men's Division 1 Basketball Championship, held in spring each year.

Nabataean Traders Stand in the Doorway to the Monastery in Petra, Jordan Photographic Poster Print by Richard Nowitz, 30x407. Millennia-old Jordanian city that's a World Heritage Site : PETRA
The archaeological city of Petra in Jordan sounds like a fabulous sight. It is known for its beautiful buildings that have been carved out of the natural rock. It is Jordan’s most visited tourist attraction.

8. St. Clare's home : ASSISI
The Italian town of Assisi is famous as the birthplace of St. Francis and as the home to the Franciscan religious order. It was also the home to Saint Clare and her order of the Poor Sisters (later known as the Poor Clares).

9. Asian title : SRI
Sri is a title of respect for a male in India.

Walsh, Kerri / May, Misty Autographed/Hand Signed 11x14 Photo By Misty May Kerri Walsh10. Walsh with 2004 and 2008 gold medals in beach volleyball : KERRI
Kerri Walsh-Jennings was partner with Misty May-Treanor when they won gold medals in beach volleyball in the 2004 and 2008 Summer Olympic Games. The pair will be trying out soon for the 2012 Games in London. Beach volleyball in London? Bring your brolly …

11. Golf's Aoki : ISAO
Isao Aoki is one of Japan's greatest golfers, now playing on the senior circuit. His best finish in a major tournament was runner-up to Jack Nicklaus in the 1980 US Open.

14. Secs : JIFFS
A jiff, an instant, is short for “jiffy”, thought originally to be thieves’ slang for “lightning”.

15. Asia's ___ Sea : ARAL
The Aral Sea is great example of how man can have a devastating effect on the environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the original lake's volume gone. Sad ...

16. Ideal : PARAGON
A paragon is an model of excellence, a peerless example. Ultimately the term derives from the Greek "para-" meaning "on the side" and "akone" meaning "whetstone". This derivation comes from the ancient practice of using a touchstone to test gold for its level of purity by drawing a line on the stone with the gold and comparing the resulting mark with samples of known purity.

Carlisle Sport Trail Bias Trailer Tires Standard White Rims 5 Lugs 20.5 x 8-1035. Radial alternative : BIAS TIRE
A bias tire is also known as a “cross ply”.

42. Genus of holly : ILEX
The wood from the holly bush was once a favorite for construction of Scottish bagpipes, until dense tropical woods became readily available.

Respect for Acting48. Actress Hagen : UTA
Uta Hagen was a German-born American actress. She married Jose Ferrer in 1938, but they were divorced ten years later after it was revealed that she was having a long-running affair with Paul Robeson. Her association with Robeson, a prominent civil rights activist, earned her a spot on the Hollywood Blacklist during the McCarthy Era. This forced her away from film, but towards a successful stage career in New York City.

57. Ambitious track bet : TRIFECTA
To win the bet called an exacta, the bettor must name the horses that finish first and second, in the exact order. The related bet called the trifecta requires naming of the first, second and third-place finishers in the right order.

58. ___ sponte (legal term) : SUA
“Sua sponte” is a Latin term meaning “of their own accord”. In the law it describes the action of say a judge who acts on his own initiative without a request from the parties in a case.

Elisha Cuthbert 8X10 Photo - New!! - Wow!!! #5161. Actress Cuthbert of "24" : ELISHA
Elisha Cuthbert is a Canadian actress who came to world attention playing Kim Bauer, Jack Bauer’s daughter on TV’s “24”. You can see her now on the sitcom “Happy Endings”.

65. Sense of humor : RISIBLES
I am not sure I fully understand this clue. “Risible” is an adjective meaning capable of laughing, or capable of eliciting laughter. The corresponding noun is “risibility”, although I think that might be “risible” in the US, meaning “a sense of humor” perhaps. So the answer “risibles” would mean “senses of humor” in the plural. But maybe I am missing something as usual …

68. Windblown soil : LOESS
Loess is a wind-blown accumulation of silt. The word is German in origin and was first used to describe the silt along the Rhine Valley.

How Do Apples Grow?72. Pomade alternative : GEL
Pomade is perfumed ointment, mainly used for grooming the hair. The word “pomade” is derived from the Latin “pomum” meaning “apple”, as the original ointment recipe used smashed apples.

78. International bully : JINGOIST
Jingoism is an extreme form of nationalism, exhibited by a country that uses threats or force internationally in order to advance its national interests. The term originated in England and comes from the expression “by Jingo”, a euphemism for “by Jesus” used as an oath.

BAI LING 20X24 COLOR PHOTO80. Actress ___ Ling of "The Crow" : BAI
Bai Ling is a Chinese actress who moved the US in 1994. Apparently she claims she is from the moon, and her grandmother still lives there …

81. Et ___ : ALII
Et alii is the equivalent of et cetera, with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names.

82. "Long," in Hawaii : LOA
Loa is the Hawaiian word for “long”, as in Mauna Loa, “Long Mountain”. By the way, Mauna Kea translates as “White Mountain”.

88. Certain N.C.O.'s : SSGTS
Staff Sergeant is a rank of Non-Commissioned Officer in the army.

91. Targets of martial law : LOOTERS
Martial law is military rule imposed usually as a temporary measure when civilian rules appears to be failing. The imposition of martial law often involves curfews, suspension of civil rights and the use of military justice.

92. Modern locale of ancient Illyria : ALBANIA
The Illyrians were a coalition of tribes that lived in the western part of the Balkan Peninsula. The Romans conquered the area in 168 BC after a conflict known as the Illyrian Wars. Illyria is now part of modern Albania.

96. Heart meas. : ECG
An EKG measures electrical activity in the heart. Back in Ireland, an EKG is known as an ECG (for electrocardiogram). We use the German name in the US, Elektrokardiogramm, giving us EKG. Apparently the abbreviation EKG is preferred as ECG might be confused (if poorly handwritten, I guess) with EEG, the abbreviation for an electroencephalogram.

102. Fútbol cheer : OLE OLE
"Ole Ole Ole!" is chanted at soccer games by many Spanish-speaking (or -shouting) fans. I am very proud to claim that the fans of the Irish national team have adopted the chant as their own, and it can be heard practically non-stop when Ireland is playing (with some inventive melody behind it!).

103. Oklahoma city : NORMAN
Norman is a city that is part of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. Back in the 1870s the undeveloped land where Norman is today was surveyed by a 23-year-old federal employee called Abner Norman. His work crew carved a sign and posted it on an elm tree where they set up camp, and wrote on it “Norman’s Camp”. That name stuck, and the railroad used it as the name for the station they built there. Settlers in the area decided to keep the name “Norman” when they started to develop the land in the late 1880s.

106. Pivotal times : D-DAYS
The most famous D-Day in history was June 6, 1944, the date of the Normandy landings in WWII. The term "D-Day" is used in the military to designate the day on which a combat operation is to be launched, especially when the actual date has yet to be determined. What D stands for seems to have been lost in the mists of time although the tradition is that it just stands for "Day". In fact, the French have a similar term, "Jour J" (Day J), with a similar meaning. We also use H-Hour to denote the hour the attack is to commence.

ELKE SOMMER 16X20 COLOR PHOTO112. Sommer in Southern California : ELKE
Elke Sommer is a German-born actress who was at the height of her success on the silver screen in the sixties. She won a Golden Globe as Most Promising Newcomer Actress for her role opposite Paul Newman in 1964's "The Prize". She also sings and has released several albums. Now she focuses on painting, producing artwork that is strongly influenced by Marc Chagall.

Definitive Collection113. Jazzy James or Jones : ETTA
Etta James is best known for her beautiful rendition of the song "At Last". Sadly, as she discloses in her autobiography, James has lived a life that has been ravaged by drug addiction, leading to numerous legal and health problems.

Etta Jones was a jazz singer, sometimes known as the "jazz musician's jazz singer". Because she has a similar name to Etta James, Jones was often confused with the more popular singer. Jones never really had any huge commercial success though, despite the respect that she engendered within the inner sanctums of the jazz world.

115. "___ le roi!" : A BAS
“À bas le roi” is French for, “Down with the king”, a phrase often heard during the French Revolution.

116. Athos, Porthos or Aramis : NOM
Athos, Porthos or Aramis are each a name (“nom” in French).

The "Three Musketeers" were Athos, Porthos and Aramis, and their young protégé was D'Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, Alexander Dumas' "Three Musketeers" really didn't use their muskets, and were better known for their prowess with their swords.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Rides : NAGS
5. Nickname for Joseph Haydn : PAPA
9. Part of a girl scout's uniform : SKIRT
14. Home for 22-Across : JAPAN
19. Needle case : ETUI
20. Tender areas : SORES
21. Fix, as a hem : RESEW
22. Pitcher Hideki ___ : IRABU
23. Capris? : LONG SHORTS
25. Dweller along the Tigris : IRAQI
26. Ending with sea : FARER
27. See 66-Across : SNL
28. Kind of intake : CALORIC
30. Domes to let in London? : ROUND FLATS
32. Southern city known as the Horse Capital of the World : OCALA
34. It may bring a tear to your eye : WASABI
36. Squeezes (out) : EKES
37. Verizon forerunner : GTE
38. Pre-2004 purchase from G.M.? : NEW OLDS
41. "___ Only Had a Brain" : IF I
42. Cruise stops: Abbr. : ISLS
43. Convention conclusion? : GOER
44. "Spaceballs" and the like : SPOOFS
47. Sour notes? : FAULTY SOUNDS
50. "___ Poetica" : ARS
53. Accustom : ENURE
54. Toy rocket company since 1958 : ESTES
55. Verdi aria "___ tu" : ERI
56. Fractions of acres? : LITTLE LOTS
59. Boston Tea Party issue : TAX
60. He wrote "None but the brave deserves the fair" : DRYDEN
63. Towers in the high country? : T-BARS
64. "Flashdance" actor Michael : NOURI
66. "King ___," song premiered on 27-Across on 4/22/78 : TUT
67. Month before Tishri : ELUL
69. "___ Do Is Dream of You" : ALL I
70. Shabby wares sold at an expo? : BAD FAIR GOODS
74. Featured singer on Eminem's "Stan" : DIDO
75. Shipwreck site : REEF
76. Org. whose functions follow forms? : IRS
77. "___ evil ..." : SEE NO
78. Lead singer of the fictional Pussycats : JOSIE
79. Famous answer giver : TREBEK
81. HBO's ___ G : ALI
83. What socialists campaign for? : LEFT RIGHTS
86. Pokey : CAN
87. Unkempt types : SLOBS
89. First player listed in "Total Baseball" : AARON
90. Shakespearean assents : AYS
91. B and O, for presidents #43 and #44? : LAST INITIALS
95. Battlefield sorting system : TRIAGE
97. Spanish pot : OLLA
98. Crucifix letters : INRI
99. Batter's need : EGG
101. Career criminals? : PRO CONS
105. Eastern wrap : OBI
106. Actor Robert who played the villain in "Licence to Kill" : DAVI
107. Rick who sang "Never Gonna Give You Up" : ASTLEY
110. Overly air-conditioned room, facetiously : IGLOO
111. Material for a biographer with a recorder? : TAPED LIVES
114. Monkeys : SIMIANS
117. Disco ___ : ERA
118. ___ Gay : ENOLA
119. Church gift : TITHE
121. Best-looking rear ends? : TOP BOTTOMS
123. ___-dink : RINKY
124. Key key : ENTER
125. Sub-sub-players : C-TEAM
126. Blind piece : SLAT
127. Some encls. : SASES
128. "Great Scott!" : EGADS
129. Pianist Myra : HESS
130. Numbers game : KENO

Down
1. Hold on a mat : NELSON
2. Chop-chop : AT ONCE
3. N.R.A. concern : GUN LAW
4. Mr., in Milano : SIG
5. March Madness activity : POOL
6. Lane marking : ARROW
7. Millennia-old Jordanian city that's a World Heritage Site : PETRA
8. St. Clare's home : ASSISI
9. Asian title : SRI
10. Walsh with 2004 and 2008 gold medals in beach volleyball : KERRI
11. Golf's Aoki : ISAO
12. D.J.'s considerations : REQUESTS
13. Like stars at night : TWINKLY
14. Secs : JIFFS
15. Asia's ___ Sea : ARAL
16. Ideal : PARAGON
17. Covered for, maybe : ABETTED
18. Baby bottles : NURSERS
20. Doo-wop syllable : SHA
24. Masked people wield them : SCALPELS
29. ___ latte : CAFFE
31. Courses people look forward to? : DESSERTS
33. Part of L.A. : LOS
35. Radial alternative : BIAS TIRE
39. Through : DONE
40. "O my prophetic ___!": Hamlet : SOUL
42. Genus of holly : ILEX
43. One in a harness : GUIDE DOG
45. Palm features : FRONDS
46. ___ circumstances : SET OF
48. Actress Hagen : UTA
49. Suffix with audit : -ORY
50. Union locale : ALTAR
51. Barbecued bit : RIBLET
52. More clichéd : STALER
57. Ambitious track bet : TRIFECTA
58. ___ sponte (legal term) : SUA
60. Fizzler : DUD
61. Actress Cuthbert of "24" : ELISHA
62. Reason for a TV-MA rating : NUDITY
65. Sense of humor : RISIBLES
66. How some practical jokes go : TOO FAR
68. Windblown soil : LOESS
70. Like House elections : BIENNIAL
71. Animal shelter? : ARK
72. Pomade alternative : GEL
73. ___ a time : ONE AT
78. International bully : JINGOIST
80. Actress ___ Ling of "The Crow" : BAI
81. Et ___ : ALII
82. "Long," in Hawaii : LOA
84. Lead-in to -meter : TRIP
85. Jet's noise : ROAR
87. Giving it 110%, so to speak : STRIVING
88. Certain N.C.O.'s : SSGTS
91. Targets of martial law : LOOTERS
92. Modern locale of ancient Illyria : ALBANIA
93. Loafers, e.g. : SLIP-ONS
94. One asked to R.S.V.P. : INVITEE
96. Heart meas. : ECG
100. Snag : GLITCH
102. Fútbol cheer : OLE OLE
103. Oklahoma city : NORMAN
104. In order that one might : SO AS TO
106. Pivotal times : D-DAYS
107. Incinerated : ASHED
108. Express shock or happiness, say : EMOTE
109. "Great Scott!" : YIPES
112. Sommer in Southern California : ELKE
113. Jazzy James or Jones : ETTA
115. "___ le roi!" : A BAS
116. Athos, Porthos or Aramis : NOM
120. Signs of ineloquence : ERS
122. Utterance of a finger wagger : TSK

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6 comments :

Calvin said...

I just discovered this page tonight and it is wonderful. I admire the work you put into it. Please keep it up. It is highly informative and entertaining.

Bill Butler said...

Hi Calvin,

Thanks for stopping by, and leaving the nice comment.

I've been doing this for over two years now and still find it a stimulating little hobby. No sign of stopping :)

I'm delighted you found the blog, Calvin, and I hope it proves to be of service.

Anonymous said...

Thank you, you are a true lifesaver.
If i could post a link I'd Rick Roll you.

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, anonymous visitor.

Thanks for stopping by, and for the offer of some "Rickrolling"! :)

I'm not sure what to say ... lol

Thanks anyway!

Anonymous said...

Hi -- I don't think you missed anything with the "sense of humor" clue; I think you caught Will with his Shortz down. My dictionary (Webster's New World College) says "risible" is an adjective only, no noun usage (therefore no plural) possible, and "risibility" is "[usually plural] a sense of the ridiculous or amusing."
Also, we in Lexington, Ky., the REAL horse capital of the world (it says so right on our water towers), did not appreciate the Ocala clue!
I too enjoy your blog, thank you for doing it so well. Lela

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, Lela.

Thanks for stopping by.

And thanks for taking time to back me up on the "risible" usage. That one definitely gave me pause for thought.

Re OCALA
Yes, I did suspect that there might be other contenders for the title of "Horse Capital of the World". I can also think of a couple of spots back in Ireland that would raise their hackles seeing that one :)

Thanks for the kind words about the blog. It's a lot of fun writing it up every night.

Come back soon, Lela :)

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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