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0911-11: New York Times Crossword Answers 11 Sep 11, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications


CROSSWORD SETTER: Kay Anderson
THEME: Cornered … all of the themed answers “turn a corner” and need to be read across to the “corner” and then down, or else down and then across:
1A. Nitty-gritty, as of negotiations : BRASS/TACKS
6A. Boater : STRAW/HAT
14A. Title figure in an Aesop fable : GRASS/HOPPER
58A. Work on at a desk, say : HUNCH/OVER
77A. Bracket shape : RIGHT/ANGLE
35D. Ernest and Julio Gallo product : MERLOT/WINE
57D. Usual amount to pay : GOING/RATE
95D. Part of a boxer's training : JUMPING/ROPE
107D. It's pitched for a large audience : CIRCUS/TENT
117D. Common secret : PASS/WORD
COMPLETION TIME: 31m 01s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … UNITARD (UNATARD), MERIDIA (MERADIA)


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
14. Title figure in an Aesop fable : GRASS/HOPPER
“The Ant and the Grasshopper” is one of Aesop’s fables.

Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. He was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

19. Royal African capital : RABAT
Rabat is the capital city of the Kingdom of Morocco. After WWII, the United States maintained a major Air Force Base in Rabat, part of Strategic Air Command (SAC). Responding to pressure by the Moroccan government of King Mohammed V, the USAF pulled out in 1963.

20. Something plighted : TROTH
There's a phrase used in some traditional wedding vows that goes "... and thereto I plight thee my troth". "I plight" is an obsolete way of saying "I pledge". "Troth" is an old variant of the word truth, and meant "truth" but also "loyalty". So, "I plight thee my troth" means, "I promise to be loyal to you". I am sure all of us who uttered those words knew what we were saying ...

Howard Hughes: His Life and Madness21. Co. once owned by Howard Hughes : TWA
Trans World Airlines (TWA) was a big carrier in the US, but was perhaps even more recognized for its extensive presence in Europe and the Middle East. For many years, especially after the collapse of Pan-Am, TWA was considered the unofficial flag carrier for the US. The company started in 1930, the product of a forced merger of Transcontinental Air Transport and Western Air Express. The Transcontinental and Western Air that resulted (the original meaning of the acronym TWA) was what the Postmaster General wanted, a bigger airline to which the Postal Service could award airmail contracts.

22. "L'shanah ___!" (Rosh Hashana greeting) : TOVAH
“L'shanah tovah” is a traditional Jewish greeting meaning, “to a good year”.

Rosh Hashanah is loosely referred to as "Jewish New Year". The literal translation from Hebrew is "head of the year".

The Launch of the Acela Express: An Inside Look at America's First High-Speed Train23. Amtrak train : ACELA
The Acela Express is the fastest train routinely running in the US, getting up to 150 mph at times. The service runs between Boston and Washington D.C. via Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York. The brand name "Acela" was created to evoke "acceleration" and "excellence".

24. Emulated the phoenix : ROSE AGAIN
The phoenix is a fabulous bird of Greek mythology, which can also be found in the mythologies of Persia, Egypt and China. The phoenix is a fire spirit, which lives from 500 to 1000 years. At the end of its lifespan is builds a nest for itself (a pyre) and self-ignites, burning itself and the nest, creating a pile of ashes. A young phoenix arises from the ashes and the cycle starts all over again.

26. New Mexico county : OTERO
Otero County, New Mexico is home to a large part of the White Sands National Monument.

Trademark Poker Craps Layout 36-Inch x 72-Inch31. Losing casino roll : CRAP
“To crap out” is to make a losing roll on the first throw in a game of craps.

If one considers earlier versions of craps, then the game has been around for a very long time and probably dates back to the Crusades. It may have been derived from an old English game called "hazard" also played with two dice, which was mentioned in Geoffrey Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" from the 1300s. The American version of the game came here courtesy of the French and first set root in New Orleans where it was given the name "crapaud", a French word meaning "toad".

Forever More (Love Songs, Hits & Duets)34. James ___, duettist on the 1982 #1 hit "Baby, Come to Me" : INGRAM
James Ingram is a soul vocalist, and an accomplished, self-taught musician known for playing piano, guitar, drums and keyboard.

37. Insipid writing : PAP
One meaning of "pap" is soft or semi-liquid food for babies and small children. "Pap" comes into English via French, from the Latin word used by children for "food". In the 1500s, "pap" also came to mean "an over-simplified" idea. This gives us a usage that's common today, describing literature or perhaps TV programming that lacks real value or substance. Hands up those who think there's a lot of pap out there, especially on television ...

42. Fight (off) : STAVE
The word "stave" was originally the plural of "staff", a wooden rod. To "stave off" originated with the concept of holding off with a staff.

54. Term of address in Dixie : Y’ALL
“Dixie” is a nickname sometimes used for the American South, and often specifically for the original 11 states that seceded from the Union just prior to the Civil War. It’s apparently not certain how the name “Dixie” came about. One theory is that it comes from the term “dixie” which was used for currency issued by banks in Louisiana. The 10-dollar bills had the word “dix” on the reverse side, the French for “ten”. From the banknote, the French speaking area around New Orleans came to be known as Dixieland, and from there “Dixie” came to apply to the South in general.

Talk: npr's susan stamberg considers all things55. Susan of NPR : STAMBERG
Susan Stamberg is a news correspondent for National Public Radio, and occasional host of the program “Weekend Edition Saturday”. Back in 1972 Stamberg was made co-host of the news magazine show “All Things Considered”, making her the first female host of a national news broadcast.

64. Death, in Dresden : TOD
“Tod” is the German word for “death”.

The historic German city of Dresden was almost completely destroyed during WWII, especially as a result of the famous firebombing of the city in 1945. Restoration work in the inner city in recent decades led to it being designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, however, in 2006 when the city built a highway bridge close to the city center, UNESCO took Dresden off the list. This was the only time a European location lost World Heritage status.

Slide Rule74. Author Shute of "On the Beach" : NEVIL
"On the Beach" is a wonderful novel by Nevil Shute, first published in 1957. The famous story is about the ending of the human race as nuclear fallout spreads south from the northern hemisphere after WWIII. The novel was adapted into a great 1959 movie starring Gregory Peck, Ava Gardner and even Fred Astaire.

81. Barrio babies : NENES
"Nenes" is the Spanish for "little kids".

"Barrio" is the name given to an urban district in Spanish speaking countries.

83. Eavesdrop, maybe : PRY
To "eavesdrop" is to listen in on someone else's conversation without being invited to do so. The term comes from the practice of spies loitering in the area just outside the walls of a house, particularly in the "eavesdrip", the ground close to a house that catches the drips of rainwater falling from the eaves of the roof.

Chesapeake Bay Retrievers (Barron's Complete Pet Owner's Manuals)88. What Chesapeake dogs are trained to do : RETRIEVE
The Chesapeake Bay Retriever is a breed of dog. It is similar to a Labrador Retriever, but the Chesapeake has a curly coat, rather than the Lab’s smooth coat.

90. Golden rule word : UNTO
The Golden Rule is also known as the ethic of reciprocity, and is a basis for the concept of human rights. A version of the rule used in the Christian tradition is attributed to Jesus: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”.

92. Leader of Abraham? : ALEPH
The Hebrew letter, aleph, has the same root as the Greek "alpha", and hence the same root as our Latin "A".

Abraham is a prominent figure in the Jewish, Christian and Muslim religions. He was descended from Noah, and was the “father” of many tribes including the Israelites and Ishmaelites. In the Christian tradition then, Jesus was a descendant of Abraham through the Israelite tribe, and in the Muslim tradition, Muhammad was also a descendant of Abraham, through the Ishmaelite tribe.

The Passion of Ayn Rand95. Ayn Rand protagonist : JOHN GALT
John Galt is a character in the Ayn Rand novel “Atlas Shrugged”.

Ayn Rand was a Russian-American novelist born Alisa Rosenbaum. Her two best known works are her novels "The Fountainhead" published in 1943 and "Atlas Shrugged" from 1957. Back in 1951, Rand moved from Los Angeles to New York City. Soon after, she gathered a group of admirers around her with whom she discussed philosophy and shared drafts of her magnum opus, "Atlas Shrugged". This group called itself "The Collective", and one of the founding members was none other than future Federal Reserve chairman, Alan Greenspan.

The Last Journey of John Keats99. "I have been half in love with ___ Death": "Ode to a Nightingale" : EASEFUL
John Keats is famous for a writing a whole series of beautiful odes. The most famous are the so-called “1819 Odes”, a collection from the year 1819 that includes famous poems such as “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, "Ode to a Nightingale” and “Ode to Psyche”.

103. "Il était ___ fois ..." (French fairy-tale starter) : UNE
“Il était une fois …” is the French for “once upon a time …”

104. Ancient kingdom in Asia Minor : LYDIA
Lydia and Ionia were ancient territories in land now covered by modern-day Turkey. Both territories eventually fell under Greek and then Roman rule.

MARY TYLER MOORE TED KNIGHT 11X14 PHOTO108. Newsman Baxter on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" : TED
Ted Baxter was the pompous and shallow TV newsman on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”, played by the actor Ted Knight. Baxter was always concerned that he was going to lose his job, so in a nice twist in the storyline Baxter was the only character not to be laid off from the newsroom in the final episode of the show.

110. Fishermen with pots : EELERS
An eeler is someone who fishes for eels. Eeling is also known as "sniggling".

112. Onetime weight-loss drug : MERIDIA
Meridia was a trade name for the drug sibutramine, an appetite suppressant that was withdrawn from the market as it was shown to cause strokes and other cardiovascular events.

116. Convertible : RAGTOP
“Ragtop” is slang for a convertible automobile.

118. The dot on the "i" in the Culligan logo : WATER DROP
Culligan is a water purification company with head offices in Rosemont, Illinois. The company was founded in 1936 by Emmet Culligan after he discovered that his homemade water filter was also acting as a water softener. That first water filter was made from a coffee can with perforations in the bottom and filled with greensand, a marine sediment.

122. ___ acid : IODIC
Iodic acid is the simplest acid containing the element iodine, hence its name.

124. Alabama speedway locale : TALLADEGA
The Talladega Superspeedway is the longest oval on the NASCAR circuit with a length of 2.66 miles. It also has seating for a whopping 175,000 spectators. The track opened in 1969, built on an abandoned airfield north of the city of Talladega, Alabama. The circuit is renowned for its supposed Talladega Jinx, which is said to have caused a number of accidents and incidents over the years. There have been a relatively high number of fatalities and crashes, including the death of driver Larry Smith in what was apparently a minor wreck, and the death of driver Davey Allison in a helicopter crash in the raceway's infield. In another strange occurrence, driver Bobby Isaac left his car on the 90th lap of a race as he claims he heard voices that told him to park and get out of his vehicle.

126. 2011 revolution locale : CAIRO
It seems that the whole world these days has eyes on the city of Cairo, the capital of Egypt. It is the largest city on the continent of Africa, and is nicknamed "The City of a Thousand Minarets" because of its impressive skyline replete with Islamic architecture. The name Cairo is a European corruption of the city's original name in Arabic, "Al-Qahira".

Spears, Britney - Girls Are Always Right Unauthorized128. Britney Spears's "___ Slave 4 U" : I’M A
Britney Spears was the best-selling female artist of the first decade of the 21st century. And I didn’t buy even one song …

133. Stellate : star :: xiphoid : ___ : SWORD
“Stellate” means “star-shaped” and “xiphoid” means “sword-shaped”. “Xiphoid” comes from the Greek word for a swordfish, “xiphias”, which in turn comes from “xiphos” meaning "sword".

134. Artery opener : STENT
In the world of medicine and surgery, a stent is an artificial tube inserted inside a vessel in the body, say an artery, so that it reduces the effects of a local restriction in the body's conduit.

Down
1. Some intimates : BRAS
The word "brassière" is of course French in origin, but it isn't the word the French use for a "bra". In France what we call a bra is a "soutien-gorge", translating to "held under the neck". The word "brassière" is indeed used in France but there it describes a baby's undershirt, a lifebelt or a harness. "Brassière" comes from the Old French word for an "arm protector" in a military uniform ("bras" is the French for "arm"). Later "brassière" came to mean "breast plate" and from there was used for a type of woman's corset. The word jumped into English around 1900.

Trademark NHL Chicago Blackhawks Billiard Ball Triangle Rack2. Billiards need : RACK
What are known as “billiard sports” are also called “cue sports”, with billiard being the French name for the cue. It’s thought that “billiard” is derived from an Old French word for a “stick”.

6. Poetic stanza : STROPHE
In general terms, in poetry a “strophe” is a pair of stanzas with alternating form. So, a poem might be made up from a number of strophes, and twice that number of stanzas.

7. Many a vaudevillian : TROUPER
The Vire is a river that flows through Normandy in France. The poets of the Vire valley were known as the "Vau de Vire", a term that some say gave rise to our word "Vaudeville".

Gto: Best of Ronny & The Daytonas14. The "it" in the lyric "turn it on, wind it up, blow it out" : GTO
The words “turn it on, wind it up, blow it out” appear in the song “G.T.O”, the debut recording for the surf rock group of the sixties known as Ronny & the Daytonas.

15. Campus drillers : ROTC
The Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program for officers based in colleges all around the US. The ROTC program was established in 1862 when, as a condition of receiving a land-grant to create colleges, the federal government required that military tactics be a part of a new school's curriculum.

17. Frozen food brand : SARA LEE
In 1935, businessman Charles Lubin bought a chain of three bakeries in Chicago called Community Bake Shops, and soon expanded the operation into seven stores. Lubin introduced a cream cheesecake that he named after his daughter who was only 8-years-old at the time, Sara Lee Lubin. The cheesecake was a hit, and he renamed the bakeries to Kitchen of Sara Lee. The business was bought out by Consolidated foods in 1956, but the brand name Sara Lee persists to this day, as does Ms. Sara Lee herself, now known as Sara Lee Schupf.

Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Graphic - Macro Shot of Red Mobile Phone - 36"W x 24"H25. 4 on a phone : GHI
The 4-key on a phone is used to insert the letters GHI in a text message for example.

28. Cool sorts : HIPSTERS
Back in the early 40s, hipsters were just folks who were "hip". Nowadays hipsters are also trousers cut so that they hug the hips (although I think they may be more commonly called "hip-huggers" in the US).

20th Century Masters: The Millennium Collection: Best Of Dinah Washington33. Singer Washington : DINAH
Dinah Washington was the stage name of the blues and jazz singer Ruth Lee Jones. Apparently when she was once performing at the famed London Palladium, she announced (with Queen Elizabeth sitting in the Royal Box), “There is but one Heaven, one Hell, one queen, and your Elizabeth is an impostor.” That would have created a bit of a stir …

35. Ernest and Julio Gallo product : MERLOT/WINE
E J Gallo Winery was founded by Ernest and Julio Gallo in Modesto, California in 1933. Gallo is the largest exporter of wine from the whole State of California.

37. Regulars on VH1 : POP STARS
The music network on cable television known as VH1 is also called “Video Hits 1”. VH1 was launched in 1985 to build on the success of MTV by screening music videos aimed at a slightly older audience and featuring lighter pop music.

38. Asia Minor : ANATOLIA
Asia Minor is also known as Anatolia, and is the geographic part of Asia that protrudes out into the west, towards Europe. It is roughly equivalent to modern-day Turkey.

39. Model : PARADIGM
We tend to use “paradigm” to mean the set of assumptions and practices that define some aspect of life. It can also simply mean something that serves as a model, pattern or example. “Paradigm” ultimately comes from the Greek word for “show side by side”.

41. The Whale constellation : CETUS
Cetus is a constellation named after a sea monster from Greek mythology. Today, Cetus is often called “the Whale”.

45. Pro ___ : TEM
Pro tempore can be abbreviated to "pro tem" or "p.t." It is a Latin phrase which best translates as "for the time being". It is used to describe a person who is acting for another, usually a superior.

47. Enzyme regulating blood fluid and pressure : RENIN
Renin is the enzyme in the body that regulates arterial blood pressure. It is also known as angiotensinogenase.

49. Cabbage dishes : SLAWS
The term "coleslaw" is an Anglicized version of the Dutch name "koolsla", which in itself is a shortened form of "Koolsalade" meaning "cabbage salad".

WAGON TRAIN: The Television Series (Revised Edition)51. Original "Wagon Train" network : NBC
“Wagon Train” was a Western series that ran on NBC and ABC in the late fifties and early sixties. The series was a spin-off from a John Ford Western movie called “Wagon Master” released in 1950. The show featured outstanding guest actors in various episodes including, Lou Costello, Angie Dickenson, Leonard Nimoy, Ronald Reagan, Peter Lorre and Mickey Rooney. There was even a brief appearance by John Wayne, billed under the pseudonym Michael Morris, a throwback to Wayne’s real name of Marion Michael Morrison.

1/400 DC-10-30 'American Airlines'53. Classic McDonnell Douglas aircraft : DC TEN
The McDonnell Douglas DC-10 is a very recognizable passenger aircraft, with one engine under either wing and a third incorporated into the base of the vertical stabilizer at the rear of the plane.

62. Sap : ENERVATE
“To enervate” is to have someone feel drained of energy. “Enervare” is the Latin for “to weaken”.

Keira Knightley66. Actress Knightley : KEIRA
Keira Knightly is an English actress whose first starring role was in the hit Indy film “Bend it Like Beckham”.

68. "The ___ Tailors," Dorothy L. Sayers mystery : NINE
Dorothy L Sayers is a mystery writer, best known for her “Lord Peter Wimsey” series of novels. She is known as one of the four original "Queens of Crime", namely: Dorothy L. Sayers, Margery Allingham, Agatha Christie, and Dame Ngaio Marsh.

71. N.Y.C. landmark : THE UN
The United Nations building is located on “international territory” in New York City in Manhattan, overlooking the East River. The building is sometimes referred to as “Turtle Bay”, as it is located in the Turtle Bay neighborhood.

82. Monterrey Mrs. : SRA
Monterrey is a Mexican city, the capital of the state of Neovo Leon in the northeast of the country. Monterrey is the second largest city in Mexico, after Mexico City, in terms of area (but third in terms of population, losing out to Guadalajara).

Members Mark Epsom Salt 10lb87. With 4-Down, MgSO4.7H2O : EPSOM
(4. See 87-Down : SALTS)
The Surrey town of Epsom in England is most famous for its racecourse, at which is run the Epsom Derby every year, one of the three races that make up the English Triple Crown. You might also have heard of Epsom salt. Epsom salt is magnesium sulfate, originally prepared by boiling down mineral waters (Epsom was indeed a spa town at one time).

97. Scrupulously followed, as the party line : HEWED TO
“To hew to” is to conform to a rule or principle.

Tank Unitard by Eurotard - White/Medium101. One-piece garment : UNITARD
A unitard is like a leotard, except that it has long legs and sometime long sleeves. It wouldn’t be a good look for me ...

111. Fifth of eight : SOL
The solfa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti. The solfa scale was developed from a six-note ascending scale created by Guido of Arezzo in the 11th century. He used the first verse of a Latin hymn to name the syllables of the scale:
Ut queant laxis resonāre fibris
Mira gestorum famuli tuorum,
Solve polluti labii reatum,
Sancte Iohannes.
The "ut" in this scale was later changed to "do", as "do" is a more "open ended" sound, and "si" was added (the initials of "Sancte Iohannes") to complete the seven-note scale. Later again, "si" was changed to "ti" so that each syllable began with a unique letter.

120. Israeli conductor Daniel : OREN
Daniel Oren is a conductor born in Israel. He is the artistic director of the Verdi Opera House in Salerno, Italy.

121. After-dinner drink : PORT
The city of Oporto in Portugal gave its name to port wine in the late 1600s, as it was the seaport through which most of the region's fortified wine was exported.

123. Iowa college : COE
Coe College is a private school in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

125. Margery of rhyme : DAW
“See Saw Margery Daw” is a nursery rhyme that goes:
See Saw Margery Daw,
Jacky shall have a new master;
Jacky shall earn but a penny a day,
Because he can't work any faster.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Nitty-gritty, as of negotiations : BRASS/TACKS
6. Boater : STRAW/HAT
11. Sponge (up) : SOP
14. Title figure in an Aesop fable : GRASS/HOPPER
19. Royal African capital : RABAT
20. Something plighted : TROTH
21. Co. once owned by Howard Hughes : TWA
22. "L'shanah ___!" (Rosh Hashana greeting) : TOVAH
23. Amtrak train : ACELA
24. Emulated the phoenix : ROSE AGAIN
26. New Mexico county : OTERO
27. Roughly plan : SKETCH OUT
29. Effects : THINGS
31. Losing casino roll : CRAP
32. Not included : SKIPPED
34. James ___, duettist on the 1982 #1 hit "Baby, Come to Me" : INGRAM
36. It might be French, Swiss or Italian : ALP
37. Insipid writing : PAP
40. Globular : SPHERIC
42. Fight (off) : STAVE
43. "Well, that's odd" : GEE
44. Go ___ great length : ON AT
46. More placid : SERENER
48. Boss : OVERSEER
50. Corporate owner : PARENT
52. Passé : DATED
54. Term of address in Dixie : Y’ALL
55. Susan of NPR : STAMBERG
58. Work on at a desk, say : HUNCH/OVER
60. Shot up : SOARED
64. Death, in Dresden : TOD
65. Thief : CROOK
67. Take no action regarding : SIT ON
69. Bale binder : TWINE
70. Settled down : ALIT
72. Grunts may come out of them : STIES
74. Author Shute of "On the Beach" : NEVIL
76. Throw out : SPEW
77. Bracket shape : RIGHT/ANGLE
79. Mini-tantrums : SNITS
81. Barrio babies : NENES
83. Eavesdrop, maybe : PRY
84. Exactly like : SAME AS
86. Log holder : GRATE
88. What Chesapeake dogs are trained to do : RETRIEVE
90. Golden rule word : UNTO
92. Leader of Abraham? : ALEPH
94. Time of lament : SAD DAY
95. Ayn Rand protagonist : JOHN GALT
99. "I have been half in love with ___ Death": "Ode to a Nightingale" : EASEFUL
102. Locus : SITE
103. "Il était ___ fois ..." (French fairy-tale starter) : UNE
104. Ancient kingdom in Asia Minor : LYDIA
106. Incredibly stupid : MORONIC
108. Newsman Baxter on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" : TED
109. Kitten's cry : MEW
110. Fishermen with pots : EELERS
112. Onetime weight-loss drug : MERIDIA
114. Exclamation after a workout : PHEW
116. Convertible : RAGTOP
118. The dot on the "i" in the Culligan logo : WATER DROP
122. ___ acid : IODIC
124. Alabama speedway locale : TALLADEGA
126. 2011 revolution locale : CAIRO
127. Crazy : NUTSO
128. Britney Spears's "___ Slave 4 U" : I’M A
129. More judicious : SAGER
130. Stimulant : UPPER
131. Really feel for? : GROPE
132. Ia. neighbor : NEB
133. Stellate : star :: xiphoid : ___ : SWORD
134. Artery opener : STENT

Down
1. Some intimates : BRAS
2. Billiards need : RACK
3. Have ___ in one's bonnet : A BEE
4. See 87-Down : SALTS
5. Library area : STACKS
6. Poetic stanza : STROPHE
7. Many a vaudevillian : TROUPER
8. Listed : ROSTERED
9. Polished off : ATE
10. Question from one in another room : WHAT?
11. Bad marks : STAINS
12. Because of : OWING TO
13. Roast go-with : PAN GRAVY
14. The "it" in the lyric "turn it on, wind it up, blow it out" : GTO
15. Campus drillers : ROTC
16. C : AVERAGE
17. Frozen food brand : SARA LEE
18. Ad-filled weekly : SHOPPER
25. 4 on a phone : GHI
28. Cool sorts : HIPSTERS
30. Computer option for a document : SAVE AS
33. Singer Washington : DINAH
35. Ernest and Julio Gallo product : MERLOT/WINE
37. Regulars on VH1 : POP STARS
38. Asia Minor : ANATOLIA
39. Model : PARADIGM
41. The Whale constellation : CETUS
45. Pro ___ : TEM
47. Enzyme regulating blood fluid and pressure : RENIN
49. Cabbage dishes : SLAWS
51. Original "Wagon Train" network : NBC
53. Classic McDonnell Douglas aircraft : DC TEN
56. Goes bad : ROTS
57. Usual amount to pay : GOING/RATE
59. Act like a protective mother : HOVER
61. Hit one out of the park, say : RIPPED IT
62. Sap : ENERVATE
63. Innocent : DEWY-EYED
66. Actress Knightley : KEIRA
68. "The ___ Tailors," Dorothy L. Sayers mystery : NINE
71. N.Y.C. landmark : THE UN
73. Trite : STALE
75. Ignore, in a way : LET SLIDE
78. Fishing line fiasco : TANGLE
80. Tick off : STEAM
82. Monterrey Mrs. : SRA
85. One with endurance : STAYER
87. With 4-Down, MgSO4.7H2O : EPSOM
89. Fingers, for short : IDS
91. Source of many English words that come to us via French : OLD LATIN
93. "Strap yourselves in, kids ..." : HERE WE GO
95. Part of a boxer's training : JUMPING/ROPE
96. Time it takes to develop a set of photos, maybe : ONE-HOUR
97. Scrupulously followed, as the party line : HEWED TO
98. No-win situation? : TIE GAME
100. One living off the land, maybe : FORAGER
101. One-piece garment : UNITARD
105. Where kids get creative in school : ART LAB
107. It's pitched for a large audience : CIRCUS/TENT
111. Fifth of eight : SOL
113. Learn to get along : ADAPT
115. Bit of smoke : WISP
117. Common secret : PASS/WORD
119. Smelly : RIPE
120. Israeli conductor Daniel : OREN
121. After-dinner drink : PORT
123. Iowa college : COE
125. Margery of rhyme : DAW

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

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Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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