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1030-11: New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Oct 11, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications


CROSSWORD SETTER: Andrea Carla Michaels & Patrick Blindauer
THEME: Hollywood from Right to Left … each of the theme answers is a Hollywood movie title, but with an R (for right) changed to an L (for left):
23A. One of St. Peter's heavenly duties? : ANGEL MANAGEMENT (“Anger Management”)
42A. "Snakes on a Plane," e.g.? : SCALY MOVIE (“Scary Movie”)
52A. What a lazy mover prefers to carry? : THE LIGHT STUFF (“The Right Stuff”)
67A. Workout class on a pleasure cruise? : PILATES OF THE CARIBBEAN (“Pirates of the Caribbean”)
88A. Unbelievable court infraction? : FANTASTIC FOUL (“Fantastic Four”)
96A. Cabby's nonstop patter? : TAXI DRIVEL (“Taxi Driver”)
119A. Guests at a Hatfield/McCoy marriage ceremony? : WEDDING CLASHERS (“Wedding Crashers”)
COMPLETION TIME: 29m 22s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … NATTI (NATTI), ALIOTO (ALAOTO)


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
20. Took one step too many, maybe : TRAVELED
“Traveling” is a basketball term, describing an illegal move of the the feet while holding the ball.

21. She was beheaded by Perseus : MEDUSA
In Greek mythology, Medusa was one of the monstrous female creatures known as Gorgons. Anyone who gazed directly at her would turn into stone. She was eventually killed by the hero Perseus, who beheaded her. He carried her head and used its powers as a weapon, before giving it to the goddess Athena to place on her shield.

22. "Dallas" Miss : ELLIE
Miss Ellie was the matriarch of the famed Ewing family, around which the TV series "Dallas" was written. For most of the series, Miss Ellie was played by Barbara Bel Geddes, and once in a TV movie of Dallas by Molly Hagan. Barbara Bel Geddes left the show in 1984, and was replaced by the much more celebrated actress, Donna Reed. When Bel Geddes decided to return to the show the following year Reed was fired, much to her chagrin, and a law suit ensued.

23. One of St. Peter's heavenly duties? : ANGEL MANAGEMENT (“Anger Management”)
"Anger Management" is a 2003 comedy starring the great Jack Nicholson, and Adam Sandler. I love Jack Nicholson in movies, but Adam Sandler ... not so much. So, I haven't seen this one.

25. "The Untouchables" villain : NITTI
Frank Nitti was one of the top henchmen working for Al Capone. Unlike Capone, who was born in Brooklyn, New York Nitti was actually born in Italy, near the city of Salerno. When Capone was eventually put away for 11 years for tax evasion, Netti was convicted of the same crime. Nitti was only imprisoned for 18 months, and when released he was labelled as the new head of Capone's Chicago Outfit. However the truth seems to be that he was just a front man, with others making the decisions.

29. Mujeres con esposos : SENORAS
“Mujeres con esposos” … “women with husbands” in Spanish.

31. Place for un béret : TETE
"Tête" is the French word for "head".

36. Kitty, in Segovia : GATO
“Gato” is the Spanish for “cat”.

Segovia is a city and province in Spain, not too far north of Madrid in the center of the country.

37. Singer Cassidy : SHAUN
Shaun Cassidy is a singer and actor. He played the role of Joe Hardy in “The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries” on television in the late seventies. He is the son of actress and singer Shirley Jones, and the half-brother of actor/singer David Cassidy, both of whom appeared in “The Partridge Family”.

42. "Snakes on a Plane," e.g.? : SCALY MOVIE (“Scary Movie”)
“Scary Movie” is one of those parody movies, a film released in 2000 that pokes fun at famous horror films. It was advertised with the tagline “No mercy. No shame. No sequel”. The “no sequel” reference was a parody in itself, making fun of the fact that slasher movies in particular were made into strings of sequels. But there was in fact to be a sequel to “Scary Movie”, in fact three of them with one more on the way. “Scary Movie 2” came out in 2001, with the tagline “We lied”.

46. Brand of tea : SALADA
When we moved house as kids, everything would be packed in "tea chests". We drank so much tea in that part of the world that the wooden boxes used to transport loose tea across the ocean were readily available. Everyone had a few up in their attic. Salada Tea was founded in 1892 to provide tea packaged in foil to the consumer, as opposed to smaller wooden tea chests. This kept the tea fresher and more consistent in flavor.

48. Term on a tide table : NEAP
Tides of course are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon's effect. At spring tides, the sun and the moon's gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

50. Subject of a Magritte painting : PIPE
“The Treachery of Images” is a painting by René Magritte. It is a very simple image of a pipe that one might smoke, with the words below (in French), “This is not a pipe”. Magritte’s point was that that the painting wasn’t a pipe, but rather an image of a pipe.

Belgian artist René Magritte was a surrealist. His most recognized work maybe is "The Son of Man", a painting he created as a self-portrait. It is the work that shows a man in a bowler hat with his face covered by an apple. The image features prominently in the great movie, the 1999 remake of "The Thomas Crown Affair".

51. Doc workers' org.? : AMA
The American Medical Association (AMA) was founded in 1847, at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. The first female member was allowed to join in 1868, but the first African American members weren't admitted until one hundred years later, in 1968.

52. What a lazy mover prefers to carry? : THE LIGHT STUFF (“The Right Stuff”)
The 1983 movie “The Right Stuff” was adapted from a 1979 book of the same name by Tom Wolfe. It tells the story of the group of test pilots who were selected as the first astronauts, those who flew in space in the Project Mercury program.

57. Your, in Tours : TES
Tours is the largest city in the Centre region of France. It is said that the people of Tours speak the "purest" form of French in the whole country, and when spoken by a local it is also said to be free of any accent.

58. Blues instrument : SAX
The saxophone was invented by the Belgian, Adolphe Sax. Sax developed lip cancer at one point in his life, and one has to wonder if that was related to his saxophone playing (I am sure not!). I had the privilege of visiting Sax's grave in the Cemetery of Montmartre in Paris a few years ago.

59. Harsh cry : CAW
A caw is the harsh cry of a crow.

63. Poet Mark : DOTY
Mark Doty is a poet. In 1995 he became the first American to win the T.S. Eliot prize for Poetry.

64. "___ Fan Tutte" : COSI
Mozart's comic opera "Così fan tutte" is also known in English as "The School for Lovers". A more literal translation is "Thus do all (women)", or "Women are like that".

65. Bob, for one : HAIRDO
A "bob cut" is a short hairstyle in which the hair is cut straight around the head, at about the line of the jaw. Back in the 1570s a "bob" was the name given to a horse's tail that was cut short, and about a century later it was being used to describe short hair on humans. The style became very popular with women in the early 1900s (as worn by actress Clara Bow, for example), with the fashion dying out in the thirties. The style reemerged in the sixties around the time the Beatles introduced their "mop tops", with Vidal Sassoon leading the way in styling women's hair in a bob cut. Personally, I like it ...

67. Workout class on a pleasure cruise? : PILATES OF THE CARIBBEAN (“Pirates of the Caribbean”)
Pilates is a physical exercise system developed by, and named for, Joseph Pilates. Pilates introduced his system of exercises in 1883 in Germany.

The "Pirates of the Caribbean" series of films is of course based on the wonderful ride at the Disney theme parks. The first title in the series is "The Curse of the Black Pearl", released in 2003. The film is remarkable in many ways, including the fact that it was the first Disney movie to be given a PG-13 rating.

74. William Morris workers : AGENTS
William Morris was a German immigrant who started out in business in New York City as a Vaudeville Agent. He grew his business by encouraging his clients to branch into the up-and-coming media of silent movies and radio. The William Morris Agency represented many of the great stars of the day, including Al Jolson, the Marx Brothers, Mae West and Charlie Chaplin.

77. Egg foo ___ : YUNG
Egg foo yung is a dish served in Chinese restaurants, and is basically an omelet. It probably takes its name from a flower called the Fu Yung.

78. Makeshift Frisbee : PIE DISH
The Frisbee concept started back in 1938 with a couple who had an upturned cake pan that they were tossing between each other on Santa Monica Beach in California. They were offered 25 cents for the pan on the spot, and as pans could be bought for 5 cents, the pair figured there was a living to be earned.

81. Film special effects, briefly : CGI
Computer-generated imagery.

82. Rangers' venue, for short : MSG
Madison Square Garden is an arena in New York City used for a variety of events. In the world of sports it is home to the New York Rangers of the NHL, as well as the New York Knicks of the NBA. It is also the third busiest music venue in the world in terms of ticket sales.

88. Unbelievable court infraction? : FANTASTIC FOUL (“Fantastic Four”)
“Fantastic Four” is a 2005 movie about the band of comic heroes made famous in Marvel Comics. The Fantastic Four are:
- Mr. Fantastic
- The Invisible Woman
- The Human Torch
- Thing

91. Game with 108 cards : UNO
In my youth I remember being taught a great card game, by a German acquaintance of mine, called Mau Mau. Years later I discovered that Uno is basically the same game, but played with a purpose-printed deck instead of the regular deck of playing cards that's used for Mau Mau.

92. Mouselike animal : VOLE
Vole populations can really increase rapidly. Mama vole is pregnant for just three weeks before giving birth to litters of 5-10 baby voles. Then the young voles become sexually mature in just one month! If you have one pregnant vole in your yard, within a year you could have over a hundred of the little critters.

94. Fictional Jane : EYRE
"Jane Eyre" is of course the title of a novel written by Charlotte Bronte under the pen name Currer Bell. Over the years, I've shared here on the blog that the storyline is a little too dark and Gothic for my taste, but a very persuasive blog reader convinced me to look more at the romantic side of the story and give it a second chance. I watched a wonderful 4-hour television adaptation of the novel made by the BBC very recently, and I have to say that because I was focused on the relationship between Jane and Rochester, I was able to push past the Gothic influences (that depress me) so I really enjoyed the performance. I thoroughly recommend this 2006 BBC adaptation to fans of the novel.

95. Biblical dancer : SALOME
In the New Testament, Salome was a dancer and a seductress. She was the step daughter of Herod and, when she danced for him on his birthday, her mother demanded as a reward the execution of John the Baptist. Salome is not actually named in the account in the gospels, and historians rely on other sources to determine that she was indeed “Salome”.

96. Cabby's nonstop patter? : TAXI DRIVEL (“Taxi Driver”)
"Taxi Driver" is a remarkable 1976 movie directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Robert De Niro. The film is remarkable for some great performances, but also for sparking an attempt on the life of President Ronald Reagan. Would-be assassin John Hinkley, Jr. tried to kill the President in order to impress Jodie Foster, with whom he had been obsessed since seeing her performance in the film as child prostitute Iris Steensma.

103. "Family Guy" wife : LOIS
“Family Guy” is a very successful animated show on television. It was created by Seth MacFarlane, the same guy who came up with “American Dad!”. My kids love them both. Me, I can’t stand ‘em.

104. Melodic passages : ARIOSI
An arioso (plural “ariosi”) is a style of opera singing lying somewhere between a full blown aria and speech-like recitative.

106. Provide a gun for, maybe : ABET
The word "abet" comes into English from the Old French "abeter" meaning "to bait" or "to harass with dogs" (it literally means "to make bite"). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of "abet" to mean aid or encourage someone in a crime.

108. "Shakespeare in Love" star : FIENNES
I found the 1998 movie "Shakespeare in Love" to be an entertaining romantic comedy, a fictional account of Shakespeare having a love affair while in the middle of writing his famous "Romeo and Juliet". The great cast includes Gwyneth Paltrow, Colin Firth and Judi Dench, with Joseph Fiennes in the title role.

111. Anthem contraction : O’ER
"The Star Spangled Banner" was written by Francis Scott Key. The lyrics were originally a poem by Key, inspired by his witnessing of the bombarding by the British of the American forces at Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore in September 1814. The words were then set to the tune of a popular British drinking song written by John Stafford Smith called "The Anacreontic Song", with the Anacreontic Society being a men's club in London.

112. Crystal on the dinner table? : NACL
Sodium chloride (NaCl) is an ionic compound, a crystal lattice made up of large chloride (Cl) ions in a cubic structure, with smaller sodium (Na) ions in between the chlorides.

118. Dickens's Drood : EDWIN
“The Mystery of Edwin Drood” is an unfinished novel by Charles Dickens. The story itself is centered not on the title character, but on Edwin Drood’s uncle, a choirmaster named John Jasper.

119. Guests at a Hatfield/McCoy marriage ceremony? : WEDDING CLASHERS (“Wedding Crashers”)
Not only does the 2005 romantic comedy "Wedding Crashers" star Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughan, but if you rent it you'll see cameos from Democratic pundit James Carville, and Republican Senator John McCain.

125. Classic Freudian diagnosis : HYSTERIA
The term “hysteria” is no longer really used in medical circles, but some attribute the first use of the term to the ancient Greek physician Hippocrates. Hysteria was supposed to be a condition suffered by women and was attributed to disturbances of the uterus. “Hystera” is the Greek word for “uterus”.

126. Stinger : TASER
Victor Appleton wrote a novel for young adults called "Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle". The company that developed the TASER electroshock weapon named their product as a homage to the novel, as TASER stands for Thomas A. Swift's Electric Rifle. Interesting, eh?

Down
1. Single partygoer : STAG
Back where I come from, bachelor parties are called stag parties, and bachelorette parties are hen parties. And in Ireland the fairer sex usually isn't welcome at a stag party, not even for entertainment purposes. We tend to focus on the drink ...

2. Classical Italian typeface : ARNO
Arno is a typeface created relatively recently, by Robert Slimbach at Adobe. He chose the name “Arno”, the river that runs through Florence, as the design was inspired by typefaces used in classical Italian works from the 15th and 16th centuries.

3. Christmas party : MAGI
"Magi" is the plural of the Latin word "magus", a term applied to someone who was able to read the stars. Hence, magi is commonly used with reference to the "wise men from the East" who followed the star and visited Jesus soon after he was born.

5. Daughter of Loki : HEL
Hel is a being from Norse Mythology who presides over a realm also called Hel. The underworld of Hel receives many of the dead, and the term “go to Hel” is used in Norse accounts to mean “to die”.

6. Horror film locale: Abbr. : ELM ST
“A Nightmare on Elm Street” is a Wes Craven slasher-horror film, released in 1984. As I don’t do “slasher” nor “horror” I only learned recently that Johnny Depp was in the movie, making his feature film debut.

8. "The Simpsons" teacher Krabappel : EDNA
Edna Krabappel is a 4th grade teacher in the TV show “The Simpsons”.

9. Letters of surprise, in text messages : OMG
Oh My Gosh! Oh My Goodness! Or any other G words you think of …

12. City that was the site of three battles in the Seven Years' War : QUEBEC
What the British call the Seven Years' War is usually called the French and Indian War over here in the US. In the broader context, the war was fought between alliances led by Britain and France, and in the American theater was fought between British and French forces alongside their Native American allies.

15. Mark Twain and George Sand, e.g. : PEN NAMES
Samuel Langhorne Clemens was the real name of the author Mark Twain. Twain wasn’t the only pen name used by Clemens. Early in his career he signed some sketches as “Josh”, and signed some humorous letters that he wrote under the name “Thomas Jefferson Snodgrass”. The name of Mark Twain came from the days when Clemens was working on riverboats on the Mississippi. A riverboatman would call out “by the mark twain” when measuring the depth of water. This meant that on the sounding line, according to the “mark” on the line, the depth was two (“twain”) fathoms, and so it was safe for the riverboat to proceed.

George Sand was the pseudonym of the very colorful French novelist Baroness Dudevant. Her novel "Isidora" was first published in 1861.

16. 1960s-'70s San Francisco mayor : ALIOTO
Joseph Alioto was the 36th mayor of San Francisco, serving from 1968 to 1976.

17. Opera whose second act is called "The Gypsy" : IL TROVATORE
Giuseppe Verdi's opera "Il Trovatore" is known in English as "The Troubadour". It is one of the few operas with more than one version written by the same composer. Verdi wrote a French translation, with some revisions to the score, which goes by the name "Le trouvère".

18. Singer Ford : LITA
Lita Ford was the lead singer for The Runaways, later becoming famous for her solo work (never heard of her!).

30. "Raiders of the Lost Ark" locale : EGYPT
"Raiders of the Lost Ark" is, in my humble opinion, the best of the Indiana Jones franchise of movies. This first Indiana Jones film was released in 1981, produced by George Lucas and directed by Steven Spielberg. Harrison Ford was Spielberg's first choice to play the lead, but Lucas resisted as he was concerned that he would be too closely associated with the actor (as Ford played Han Solo in "Star Wars", and also appeared in Lucas's "American Graffiti"). Tom Selleck was offered the role but couldn't get out of his commitments to "Magnum, P.I." Eventually Spielberg got his way, a good thing I say ...

32. College in Beverly, Mass. : ENDICOTT
Endicott College in Beverly, Massachusetts was founded in 1939 as a two-year women’s college. The school became co-educational in 1994.

34. Fine fiddle : AMATI
The first of the Amati family to make violins was Andrea Amati, who lived in the 14th century. He was succeeded by his sons, Antonio and Girolama. In turn, they were succeeded by Girolama's son, Nicolo. Nicolo had a few students who achieved fame making musical instruments as well. One was his own son, Girolamo, and another, the famed Antonio Stradivari.

37. Orly birds, once : SSTS
The most famous supersonic transport (SST) was the Concorde, a plane that's no longer flying. Concorde had that famous "droop nose". The nose was moved to the horizontal position during flight to create the optimum aerodynamic shape thereby reducing drag, and was lowered during taxi, takeoff and landing so that the pilot had better visibility. The need for the droop nose was driven largely by the delta-shaped wings. A delta wing necessitates a higher angle of attack at takeoff and landing than conventional wing designs, so the pilot needed the nose lowered so that he or she could see the ground.

Orly is on the outskirts of Paris, to the south of the city. It is home of course to the Paris-Orly Airport, the second busiest international airport for the city, after the more recently built Charles de Gaulle Airport. Orly is still home to more domestic flights though.

39. "Family Ties" son : ALEX
"Family Ties" was one of the first TV shows that I enjoyed when I arrived in the US back in 1983. I found the situation very appealing, with two ex-hippie parents facing off against an ultra-conservative son. The main characters in the show were Michael J. Fox as Alex, Meredith Baxter-Birney as Alex's mom, Elyse, and Michael Gross as Alex's Dad, Steven. But some future stars had recurring roles as well, including Courtney Cox as one of Alex's girlfriends and Tom Hanks as Elyse's young brother.

43. "You put the ___ in the coconut ..." : LIME
“You put the lime in the coconut” is a line from the 1972 song “Coconut” by Harry Nilsson.

44. Marcos of the Philippines : IMELDA
Many moons ago I spent a couple of very happy years living in Manila in the Philippines. I had an apartment there, and residing in the apartment building next door was Imelda Marcos, along with all of her shoes I assume ...

45. "Morning Train" singer, 1981 : EASTON
Sheena Easton is a Scottish singer. She was big in the eighties with songs like “9 to 5” (released as “Morning Train” in the US) and “For Your Eyes Only”, the theme song for the James Bond film of the same name.

47. Ancient May birthstones : AGATES
In early civilizations particular gemstones were associated particular signs of the zodiac. Agate was the Gemini birthstone.

Here is the "official" list of birthstones by month, that we tend to use today:
January: Garnet
February: Amethyst
March: Bloodstone or Aquamarine
April: Diamond
May: Emerald
June: Pearl or Moonstone
July: Ruby
August: Sardonyx or Peridot
September: Sapphire or Lapis Lazuli
October: Opal or Pink Tourmaline
November: Topaz or Citrine
December: Turquoise or Zircon (also now, Tanzanite)

54. Polar hazard : FLOE
An ice floe is a sheet of ice that has separated from an ice field, and is floating freely on the ocean.

61. Automaker since 1974 : KIA
Kia Motors is the second largest manufacturer of cars in South Korea, behind Hyundai (and Hyundai is a part owner in Kia now). In recent years, Kia has focused on sales into Europe, and has been remarkably successful.

62. Triangular sails : JIBS
A jib is a triangular sail that is set at the bow of a sailboat.

65. 1997 winner of Wimbledon and the U.S. Open : HINGIS
Martina Hingis is a retired Swiss tennis player and former World No. 1 professional. She retired in 2007 after testing positive for cocaine during Wimbledon, although she denied using the drug.

68. Creature whose tail makes up half its body's length : IGUANA
An iguana is a lizard, and is cold-blooded. As such, there are times when pet iguanas needs heat from a UV lamp to maintain its body temperature.

69. World heavyweight champion who was once an Olympic boxing gold medalist : LENNOX LEWIS
The boxer Lennox Lewis was born in London, England but moved with his family to Ontario, Canada when he was 12-years-old. He won a gold medal for Canada in the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, and soon after moved back to his native England. In 1993 he was declared WBC heavyweight champion for the first time. In his spare time, Lewis is an avid chess player, and funded an after-school chess program for disadvantaged youths.

71. Feudal estate : FIEF
In the days of feudalism, a "fief" was basically a "fee" (the words "fee" and "fief" have the same origins) paid by a lord in exchange for some benefit to him, perhaps loyalty or military service. The fief itself was often land granted by the Lord.

72. "Et voilà!" : TA-DA
“Et voilà” is French for, “and there it is!”

82. Othello, for one : MOOR
One of the most famous Moors in literature is Othello, the title character in William Shakespeare's tragedy "Othello, the Moor of Venice". The word "Moor" describes various peoples of North Africa, usually of the Muslim faith. At the height of their geographic influence the Moors occupied much of the Iberian peninsula, calling it Al Andalus (from which modern Andalusia gets its name).

90. Arrow maker : FLETCHER
A fletcher is an arrow maker, coming from the French word for an arrow, “fleche”.

93. Mendes of "Hitch" : EVA
Eva Mendes play the female lead in the movie "Hitch" opposite Will Smith.

101. Co-star of Kate and Farrah, in 1970s TV : JACLYN
Jaclyn Smith played Kelly Garrett on the hit television show “Charlie’s Angels”. She was in fact the only one of the original title characters to stay with the show for its whole run from 1976 to 1981.

105. Belted one : ORION
A “subset” of three particularly bright stars in the constellation of Orion is named “Orion’s Belt”. The three bright stars sit almost in a straight line and are about equidistant. They’re usually the easiest way to spot the constellation of Orion in the night sky.

107. Ho-hum : BLASE
“Blasé”, meaning “nonchalant, bored from overindulgence” comes from the French verb “blaser”, meaning "to satiate".

113. Cries in Cologne : ACHS
The exclamation "ach!" is usually translated from German into English as "oh!"

Cologne is the fourth largest city in Germany, and is called “Koln” in German.

117. Challenge for jrs. : PSAT
I think the acronym PSAT stands for Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test.

120. Ballpark fig. : ERA
The pitching stat, earned run average (ERA), measures how many runs a pitcher tends to give up per nine innings.

122. Jeanne d'Arc, for one: Abbr. : STE
Joan of Arc (also Jeanne d’Arc) led the French Army successfully into battle a number of times during the Hundred Years War with England. When she was eventually captured she was tried in Rouen, the seat of the occupying English government in France at that time. There she was burned at the stake having been found guilty of heresy. Joan of Arc was canonized some 600 years later, in 1920, and is now one of the patron saints of France.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "Right back at cha!" : SAME HERE
9. Unclear : OPAQUE
15. Sandcastle engineering equipment : PAILS
20. Took one step too many, maybe : TRAVELED
21. She was beheaded by Perseus : MEDUSA
22. "Dallas" Miss : ELLIE
23. One of St. Peter's heavenly duties? : ANGEL MANAGEMENT (“Anger Management”)
25. "The Untouchables" villain : NITTI
26. "How's it ___?" : GOIN’
27. Ship part : SPAR
28. Roast slightly : RIB
29. Mujeres con esposos : SENORAS
31. Place for un béret : TETE
33. Conquer : MASTER
36. Kitty, in Segovia : GATO
37. Singer Cassidy : SHAUN
40. One side of a quad, maybe : DORM
42. "Snakes on a Plane," e.g.? : SCALY MOVIE (“Scary Movie”)
46. Brand of tea : SALADA
48. Term on a tide table : NEAP
50. Subject of a Magritte painting : PIPE
51. Doc workers' org.? : AMA
52. What a lazy mover prefers to carry? : THE LIGHT STUFF (“The Right Stuff”)
56. Projections on some globes: Abbr. : MTS
57. Your, in Tours : TES
58. Blues instrument : SAX
59. Harsh cry : CAW
60. Cheap and flimsy, as metal : TINLIKE
62. Big bump : JOLT
63. Poet Mark : DOTY
64. "___ Fan Tutte" : COSI
65. Bob, for one : HAIRDO
67. Workout class on a pleasure cruise? : PILATES OF THE CARIBBEAN (“Pirates of the Caribbean”)
74. William Morris workers : AGENTS
75. Cousin of an ampule : VIAL
76. Things rings lack : ENDS
77. Egg foo ___ : YUNG
78. Makeshift Frisbee : PIE DISH
81. Film special effects, briefly : CGI
82. Rangers' venue, for short : MSG
85. Ax : CAN
86. Number of X's in this puzzle's answer : TWO
88. Unbelievable court infraction? : FANTASTIC FOUL (“Fantastic Four”)
91. Game with 108 cards : UNO
92. Mouselike animal : VOLE
94. Fictional Jane : EYRE
95. Biblical dancer : SALOME
96. Cabby's nonstop patter? : TAXI DRIVEL (“Taxi Driver”)
100. Key with four sharps: Abbr. : E MAJ
102. Curt : TERSE
103. "Family Guy" wife : LOIS
104. Melodic passages : ARIOSI
106. Provide a gun for, maybe : ABET
108. "Shakespeare in Love" star : FIENNES
111. Anthem contraction : O’ER
112. Crystal on the dinner table? : NACL
114. Bloke : CHAP
118. Dickens's Drood : EDWIN
119. Guests at a Hatfield/McCoy marriage ceremony? : WEDDING CLASHERS (“Wedding Crashers”)
123. Appropriate : SEIZE
124. Playground retort : ARE TOO
125. Classic Freudian diagnosis : HYSTERIA
126. Stinger : TASER
127. Stonewallers? : MASONS
128. Looks down on : SNEERS AT

Down
1. Single partygoer : STAG
2. Classical Italian typeface : ARNO
3. Christmas party : MAGI
4. Occurring someday : EVENTUAL
5. Daughter of Loki : HEL
6. Horror film locale: Abbr. : ELM ST
7. Garnered : REAPED
8. "The Simpsons" teacher Krabappel : EDNA
9. Letters of surprise, in text messages : OMG
10. Classmates, e.g. : PEERS
11. Lets in : ADMITS
12. City that was the site of three battles in the Seven Years' War : QUEBEC
13. Org. with a sub division : USN
14. Has a beef? : EATS
15. Mark Twain and George Sand, e.g. : PEN NAMES
16. 1960s-'70s San Francisco mayor : ALIOTO
17. Opera whose second act is called "The Gypsy" : IL TROVATORE
18. Singer Ford : LITA
19. Cinco follower : SEIS
24. Limb perch : ARMREST
30. "Raiders of the Lost Ark" locale : EGYPT
32. College in Beverly, Mass. : ENDICOTT
34. Fine fiddle : AMATI
35. Rat-a-tat : RAP
37. Orly birds, once : SSTS
38. "You're so funny," sarcastically : HA-HA
39. "Family Ties" son : ALEX
41. It's west of 12-Down: Abbr. : ONT
43. "You put the ___ in the coconut ..." : LIME
44. Marcos of the Philippines : IMELDA
45. "Morning Train" singer, 1981 : EASTON
47. Ancient May birthstones : AGATES
49. Thing that may break people up : PUNCH LINE
53. Rtes. : HWYS
54. Polar hazard : FLOE
55. Money-related: Abbr. : FISC
61. Automaker since 1974 : KIA
62. Triangular sails : JIBS
63. "Shoot!" : DANG
65. 1997 winner of Wimbledon and the U.S. Open : HINGIS
66. Step down, in a way : ABDICATE
67. Union concession : PAY CUT
68. Creature whose tail makes up half its body's length : IGUANA
69. World heavyweight champion who was once an Olympic boxing gold medalist : LENNOX LEWIS
70. Egg: Prefix : OVI-
71. Feudal estate : FIEF
72. "Et voilà!" : TA-DA
73. Geom. figure : RECT
78. ___ sci : POLI
79. Peeper problems : STYES
80. Doing injury to : HARMING
82. Othello, for one : MOOR
83. Basic arithmetic : SUMS
84. Lottery winner's feeling : GLEE
86. Easy eats : TV DINNER
87. Poorer : WORSE
89. Word with level or devil : SEA
90. Arrow maker : FLETCHER
93. Mendes of "Hitch" : EVA
97. Charge, in a way : IONIZE
98. Chips away at : ERODES
99. Given false facts : LIED TO
101. Co-star of Kate and Farrah, in 1970s TV : JACLYN
105. Belted one : ORION
107. Ho-hum : BLASE
108. Celebration : FEST
109. Theory : IDEA
110. Did laps : SWAM
113. Cries in Cologne : ACHS
115. One of a pair of towel markings : HERS
116. 17-Down piece : ARIA
117. Challenge for jrs. : PSAT
120. Ballpark fig. : ERA
121. Turndowns : NOS
122. Jeanne d'Arc, for one: Abbr. : STE

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2 comments :

suzyq said...

I don't understand the answer to 86 across, number of X's in this puzzle's answer: two?

Bill Butler said...

Hi SuzyQ,

I probably should have spelled out the answer to that one about the Xs. If you count them, there are only two Xs in the answer grid. One in SAX (58A) and one in TAXI DRIVEL (96A).

I hope that solves the mystery for you :)

Thanks for stopping by, Suzy.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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