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Greetings from Blackrock in Dublin, Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland until October 9th. I plan on doing the puzzle each day (with a pint, no doubt), although I may be a little late due to time zone differences. I am sure that you understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

1106-11: New York Times Crossword Answers 6 Nov 11, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications


CROSSWORD SETTER: Elizabeth C. Gorski
THEME: Baker’s Dozen … a dozen of the “down” answers are types of cakes, and each of them is written in reverse order, bottom to top, “UPSIDE DOWN”:
1D. Not having quite enough money : SHORT
3D. Schokolade : GERMAN CHOCOLATE
5D. Manna, according to the Bible : ANGEL FOOD
12D. The "mode" of "à la mode"? : ICE CREAM
15D. Canine shelter : POUND
40D. Wooded area near the Rhine Valley : BLACK FOREST
47D. Pastry chef creations ... and a hint to 12 other answers in this puzzle : UPSIDE DOWN CAKES
50D. Squishy dish cleaner : SPONGE
61D. Word before republic or seat : BANANA
84D. Girl's holiday party dress fabric : RED VELVET
87D. Cause for bringing out candles : BIRTHDAY
103D. Coat of paint : LAYER
110D. Bed cover : SHEET
COMPLETION TIME: 31m 28s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 3 … GAGE (WADE), BRAGE (BRAWA), ONEGA (ONEDA)


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Number of coins in la Fontana di Trevi? : TRE
“Tre” is Italian for “three”.

Three Coins in the Fountain” is a 1954 film about three young American women in Rome looking for romance. In the story, each of the girls throws a coin into the city’s famous Trevi fountain making a wish. The title song is probably the most famous composition by songwriter Sammy Cahn.

The Trevi Fountain is a huge fountain in Rome, the largest constructed in the Baroque style. The tradition is that if one throws a coin in the fountain, one is guaranteed a return visit to the city one day. Tourists throw in an amazing 3,000 euros (over $4,000) every day. The money is collected and is used to stock a supermarket for the needy of the city.

4. Singer Bryan : ADAMS
Bryan Adams is a Canadian singer-songwriter. Adams is also a very accomplished photographer and his images have been widely published.

19. Invader of 1066 : NORMAN
King Harold II of England was the last Anglo-Saxon king of the country. He died in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings, vainly attempting to fight off the invasion led by William, Duke of Normandy. William, also known as “the Conqueror”, became the first Norman King of England and ruled from 1066 until his death in 1087 as William I.

21. Logan of "60 Minutes" : LARA
Lara Logan is a South African newswoman, currently the Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent for CBS News.

22. ___ fide : BONA
Bona fide(s), translates from the Latin as "in good faith", and is used to indicate honest intentions. It can also mean that something is authentic, like a piece of art that is represented in good faith as being genuine.

23. Muscat's land : OMAN
Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula, neighbored by the OAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. The capital city of Muscat has a strategic location on the Gulf of Oman, and has a history of invasion and unrest. Centuries of occupation by the Persians ended in 1507 when the Portuguese took the city in a bloody attack. The Portuguese held Muscat for much of the next century until finally ousted by local Omani forces in 1648. A Yemeni tribe invaded the area in 1741 and set up a monarchy that has been in place ever since.

24. Focus of Gandhi's philosophy : NONVIOLENCE
Mohandas Gandhi was a political and spiritual leader in India in the first part of the 20th century, as the country sought independence from Britain. He was also referred to as "Mahatma", meaning "great soul". His remarkable philosophy of nonviolence and living a modest lifestyle was a great inspiration to the Indian people. India (and Pakistan) was granted independence in 1947. Sadly, Gandhi was assassinated the very next year, by a Hindu nationalist.

27. Radioactivity figure : HALF-LIFE
The half-life of a radioactive substance is the time it takes for half of the substance to “disappear” due to radioactive decay. So, if a radioactive element has a half-life of say 100 years, then in 100 years 50% of the element will have disappeared, but 50% still remains. In 500 years there will still be over 3% of the material left lying around. That’s one of the terrifying things about nuclear weapons and nuclear energy. The fallout and waste just doesn’t seem to go away ...

32. Uppity sort : SNOOT
"Snoot" is a variant of "snout" and is a word that originated in Scotland. The derivative "snooty", an adjective to describe a "high-hat", someone very haughty, started out as "snouty" back in the 1850s. The idea is that someone who is snooty, or snouty, tends to look down his or her nose at the rest of the world.

33. Degs. from Yale and Harvard : LLDS
The honorary degree of Legum Doctor (LL.D.) translates from the Latin as Doctor of Laws, a plural. This practice of using the plural originated in Cambridge University in England, as one was awarded an LL.D. after having been taught both Canon Law and Civil Law.

35. TMC competitor : SHO
Showtime is a competitor of The Movie Channel.

37. "Odyssey" temptress : CIRCE
Circe is a minor goddess in Greek mythology, the goddess of magic. She was fond of transforming those who did not please her into animals by using magical potions.

45. Mediterranean isl. : SAR
Sardinia is an autonomous region of Italy, an island in the Mediterranean off the west coast of the country. It lies to the south of the French island of Corsica. Sardinia is the second largest island in the Mediterranean (Sicily is the largest).

49. "Humbug!" : BAH
The classic 1843 novella "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens has left us with a few famous phrases and words. Firstly, it led to the popular use of "Merry Christmas", and secondly it gave us the word "scrooge" meaning a miserly person. And thirdly, everyone knows that Scrooge uttered the famous line "Bah! Humbug!".

51. And others : ET ALII
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact "et al." can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (applies to neuter nouns, but can be used for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

53. Credit card bill nos. : APRS
Annual Percentage Rates.

55. Wearing a wig and shades, say : INCOG
“Incog” is short for “incognito”, the Italian for “unknown”.

60. Baseball's Bando : SAL
Sal Bando is a former Major League Baseball player and baseball executive.

61. "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" storyteller : AESOP
Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. He was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

62. Classic jetliner : DC-NINE
The McDonnell Douglas DC-9 made its maiden flight in 1965, and was produced until 2006. It was designed for landing and takeoff in smaller airports. With that in mind, the aircraft’s two engines were mounted on the rear of the fuselage so that the wings were left “clean”, with flaps running the full length creating more lift and so helping to lower takeoff and approach speeds.

64. Old hi-fi records : MONOS
Monophonic sound ("mono") is sound reproduced using just one audio channel, which is usually played out of just one speaker. Stereophonic sound is reproduced using two audio channels, with the sound from those channels played out of two speakers. The pair of stereo speakers are usually positioned apart from each other so that sound appears to come from between the two. Quadraphonic sound (4.0 surround sound) uses four audio channels with the sound played back through four speakers often positioned at the corners of the room in which one is listening.

68. Big grocery store chain : IGA
IGA stands for Independent Grocers Alliance, a chain of supermarkets that extends right around the world. IGA's headquarters is in Chicago.

72. "Pinwheel and Flow" artist : CALDER
Alexander Calder was an American sculptor and artist. He is famous for having invented the mobile sculpture, a work made up of several pieces hanging on a string in equilibrium. In effect they are what we might known as “mobiles”, operating on the same principle as mobiles that sit over cribs in a nursery.

74. "Fee, fi, fo, ___" : FUM
The line "fee-fi-fo-fum" (with various spellings) comes from the famous English fairy tale "Jack and the Beanstalk". Within the story, the giant at the top of the beanstalk utters a little poem when he detects the presence of Jack:
Fee-fi-fo-fum,
I smell the blood of an Englishman,
Be he alive, or be he dead
I'll grind his bones to make my bread.

75. Ratchet bar : PAWL
In a ratchet, there’s a rotating gear over which runs a spring-loaded finger, the piece of metal that makes the clicks as the gear rotates. That finger is called a “pawl”.

77. "Cheers!" : SKOAL
Skoal is a Swedish toast, with its roots in the old Norse word "skaal", meaning "cup".

79. Perfumery rootstock : ORRIS
Orris root is a base ingredient in many perfumes, providing a so-called “base note”. It is also an ingredient in some brands of gin.

81. PJ-clad mansion owner : HEF
Hugh Hefner is from Chicago. His first publishing job was in the military, where he worked as a writer for an Army newspaper (from 1944-46). He went to college after his military service, and then worked as a copywriter for "Esquire" magazine. He left "Esquire" to found his own publication that he called "Playboy", which first hit the newsstands in 1953. It has been around ever since.

83. Henry ___ Lodge : CABOT
Henry Cabot Lodge was a Republican Senator from Massachusetts. He famously went up against President Woodrow Wilson demanding congressional control over the declaration of war. As a result, the US never ratified the Treaty of Versailles that ended WWI, and never joined the League of Nations.

85. "Paper Moon" girl : ADDIE
Tatum O'Neal was the youngest actress to win a "competitive" Oscar. She won the Best Supporting Actress Award in 1974 when she was just 10, for her role as Addie in "Paper Moon". The youngest person to win an Academy Award was Shirley Temple, who was only 5 years old when she was given an honorary Oscar in 1934.

87. Musician who won a 2011 Presidential Medal of Freedom : YO-YO MA
Yo-Yo Ma is a marvelous American cellist, born in Paris to Chinese parents. He started studying the violin when he was very young, working his way up (in size) to the viola and finally to the cello. Ma has said that he wanted to play the double bass, but it was just too big for his relatively small frame.

92. Brightly colored lizards : AGAMAS
An agama is a genus of lizards that are native to Africa.

95. It has banks in St. Petersburg : NEVA
The Neva is a very large river that spills into the Gulf of Finland at the beautiful city of St. Petersburg. The river forms an expansive delta as it reaches the Baltic Sea, and the delta gives rise to numerous islands, with the number of islands further increased by a network of canals. The historic part of the city is built on these islands, giving St. Petersburg a very Venetian feel. I had the privilege of visiting the city some years ago, and I can attest that it is indeed spectacular ...

96. Bugs, e.g. : VWS
VW stands for Volkswagen, which translates from German into "people's car". The original "Volkswagen" was built under a directive from Adolf Hitler, who wanted a cheap car built that ordinary people could afford to purchase. He awarded the contract to engineer Ferdinand Porsche, whose name (paradoxically) would forever be associated with high performance, expensive cars.

100. Certain antibody : LYSIN
Lysin is an antibody that can destroy red blood cells and bacteria.

108. "Be silent," in music : TACET
“Tacet” is a musical direction meaning “be silent”. It is typically given on a score to instruct a particular voice or instrument to remain silent for a whole movement. “Tacet” is Latin for “it is silent”.

111. Cheesemaker's supply : RENNET
Rennet is an enzyme complex that is produced in the stomach of mammals. It is used by children to digest a mother’s milk. Rennet is also used to coagulate milk in cheese production.

120. Dust Bowl witness : OKIE
The Dust Bowl was the name given to a period in which severe dust storms ravaged the American and Canadian Prairies in the thirties. A major factor in the storms was the loss of the deep-rooted grasses native to the land that had been displaced by intensive farming. Without the grasses the topsoil was blown away in a period of drought.

121. English general in the American Revolution : GAGE
Thomas Gage was a British general who fought in the early days of the American War of Independence. It was General Gage who was in charge of the victorious forces in the Battle of Bunker Hill. However, the "victory" resulted in such huge losses for the British that Gage was recalled and dismissed from office.

124. Dangerous speed : METH
“Speed” is a street name used for the drug methamphetamine, also called “meth” and “crystal meth”.

125. Bygone spray : ALAR
The chemical name for Alar, a plant growth regulator and color enhancer, is daminozide. It was primarily used on apples but was withdrawn from the market when it was linked to cancer.

Down
2. Circus Maximus patron : ROMAN
The Circus Maximus was an ancient stadium used for chariot racing in Rome. It was the first such stadium built by the Romans, and was the largest ever to be built in the whole of the Roman Empire. It was over 2,000 feet long and just under 400 feet wide, and could house about 15,000 spectators. There is very little of the original structure remaining and the site is now used as a major park in the city.

3. Schokolade : GERMAN CHOCOLATE
“Scholokolade” is the German word for “chocolate”.

4. Years, to Tiberius : ANNI
Tiberius was the second Emperor of Rome, succeeding Augustus. In his latter life Tiberius became very reclusive, not really wanting the responsibilities of Emperor but refusing to give up his power. Instead he exiled himself from Rome leaving administrative control of the Empire to unscrupulous aides. Tiberius himself led a quiet life on the island of Capri, although his death at the age of 77 was apparently hastened by a pillow placed over his face, an act ordered by his successor Caligula.

5. Manna, according to the Bible : ANGEL FOOD
According to the Book of Exodus, manna was a food eaten by the Israelites as they traveled out of Egypt. It "fell" to Earth during the night six days a week, and was gathered in the morning before it had time to melt.

6. Synthetic fiber brand : ARNEL
Arnel is a brand name used for an acetate textile.

7. Year of Super Bowl XXXIX : MMV
Super Bowl XXXIV was played at the end of the 2004 season. The New England Patriots defeated the Philadelphia Eagles. It was the third straight Super Bowl win for the Patriots.

9. Huge amounts : PLETHORAS
Plethora is such a lovely word I think, meaning "a lot of", and usually in the sense of "too much". This usage dates back to about 1700, and before that "plethora" was a word used in the medical field to describe an "excess of bodily fluid".

11. "The Lord of the Rings" menace : ORC
According to Tolkien, Orcs are small humanoids that live in his fantasy world of Middle-earth. They are very ugly and dirty, and are fond of eating human flesh.

12. The "mode" of "à la mode"? : ICE CREAM
In French, "à la mode" simply means "fashionable". In America it has come to describe a way of serving pie, usually with ice cream, or as I recall from when I lived in Upstate New York, with cheese.

13. Math coordinates : ABSCISSAE
When something is plotted on a graph with x- and y-coordinates, the x-coordinate is called the abscissa, and the y-coordinate is the ordinate.

16. Certain huckster : CARNY
"Carny" is American slang, and is short for "carnival worker".

18. How Hershey's Kisses are wrapped : IN FOIL
The Hershey Company produces over 80 million Kisses each day, and has been making them since 1907.

25. Anne Rice vampire : LESTAT
Anne Rice is an American author of erotic and Gothic novels. She was born Howard Allen O'Brien (no wonder she changed her name!). Her famous series of novels, "The Vampire Chronicles", centers on her character Lestat de Lioncourt, a French nobleman who was turned into a vampire in the 18th century. One of the stories, "Interview with the Vampire", was adapted for the big screen in 1994 and features Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt and others in a star-studded cast. Not my kind of movie though, as I don't do vampires …

31. In the past, once : ERST
Erstwhile means "in the past" or "once upon a time".

34. Corp. alias abbr. : DBA
Doing business as (DBA).

40. Wooded area near the Rhine Valley : BLACK FOREST
The Black Forest is a wooded and mountainous area in southwestern Germany. The Romans called the area “Silva Negra”, or “Black Forest”, because the conifers grew so densely that they blocked out much of the light in the forest. “Black Forest” is “Schwarzwald” in German.

41. One of the Alis : LAILA
Laila Ali is the daughter of the great Muhammad Ali, and is a very capable boxer in her own right. She's not a bad dancer either, coming in third place in the fourth season of "Dancing with the Stars".

42. Area known to the Chinese as Dongbei : MANCHURIA
Manchuria is a region in Northeast China, home to the Manchu people after whom the area gets its name.

44. ___ Building, New York landmark north of Grand Central : HELMSLEY
The 35-story building in Park Avenue known as the Helmsley Building was built in the twenties. Previously known as the New York Central Building and New York General Building, it was given its current name in 1978 by Harry Helmsley not long after he purchased the structure.

59. Córdoba cordial : ANIS
Anis is a Spanish liqueur,  equivalent to what's called anisette in other countries (in France, for example). It has a licorice taste as it is produced by distilling the seeds of the anis plant. Like all anis-type drinks, it is usually mixed with water and turns a milky white color when the water is added.

Córdoba is a city in Andalusia in southern Spain.

61. Word before republic or seat : BANANA
The term “Banana Republic” is used to describe a politically unstable country.

A banana seat is a long saddle on bicycle, often seen on what are called wheelie bikes.

63. ___ Beach, Hawaii : ‘EWA
‘Ewa Beach is on the coast of Oahu in Hawai’i.

65. Spartan walkway : STOA
A stoa was a covered walkway in Ancient Greek architecture. It usually consisted of columns lining the side of a building or buildings, with another row of columns defining the other side of the walkway. The columns supported a roof. Often stoae would surround marketplaces in large cities.

67. Former call letters? : MCI
MCI was a giant telecom company that suffered a similar fate to Enron, and around about the same time. MCI's stock price fell in 2000 and in maneuvers designed to protect the price, the company committed illegal acts. The larger-than-life CEO back then, Bernie Ebbers, is now serving a 25-year sentence in Louisiana.

73. Inc., abroad : LTD
In Britain and Ireland the most common type of business (my perception anyway) is one which has private shareholders whose liability is limited to the value of their investment. Such a company is known as a private limited company, and has the letters "Ltd" after the name. If the shares are publicly traded, then the company is a public limited company, and has the letters "plc" after the name.

76. "___ loves believes the impossible": Elizabeth Barrett Browning : WHO SO
Elizabeth Barrett was a very popular poet in England in the mid-1800s. The successful poet and playwright Robert Browning was an admirer of her work, and wrote to her saying so. The two met, and and began a famous courtship that led to a secret marriage which they had to hide from Elizabeth’s father.

88. Constriction of pupils : MIOSIS
An unnatural constriction of the pupil of an eye is called miosis. Unnatural dilation is known as mydriasis.

95. Atomic energy oversight agcy. : NRC
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission oversees most aspects of the safety of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel in the US.

96. MTV's owner : VIACOM
Media giant Viacom takes it's name from the phrase vi-deo & a-udio com-unications.

98. Gambol : CAVORT
“Gambol” is a such a lovely word, meaning to frolic and leap about.

102. "Moon Over Parador" actress : BRAGA
Sonia Braga achieved fame in her native Brazil playing the title role in the movie "Gabriela". There followed roles in American films such as "Kiss of the Spider Woman" and "The Milagro Beanfield War". She has also played in the Portuguese version of "Desperate Housewives".

Moon Over Parador” is a romantic comedy released in 1988, starring Richard Dreyfuss and Sonia Braga.

104. Russia's ___ Bay, arm of the White Sea : ONEGA
The Onega Bay is in Northwestern Russia, a bay of the White Sea.

107. "The Planets" composer : HOLST
Despite the Scandinavian-sounding name, Gustav Holst was the most English of classical composers. His most famous work is the the orchestral suite known as ‘The Planets”. The suite has seven movements, one for each of the planets known at the time (1914-1916) except Earth. Pluto was discovered during Holst’s lifetime, but decades after he had completed his masterpiece.

113. FedEx rival : DHL
Back in the sixties Larry Hillblom was making pocket money as a Berkeley law student by doing courier runs between San Francisco and Los Angeles. After law school he decided to parlay his experience into his own business and set up a courier service flying bills of lading ahead of freight from San Francisco to Honolulu. Hillblom brought in two buddies, Adrian Dalsey and Robert Lynn, as partners and the three were soon hopping on and off commercial flights and gradually making more and more money. And DHL was born ... D (for Dalsey) H (for Hillblom) L (for Lynn).

FedEx began operations in 1973 as Federal Express, but now operates very successfully under it's more catchy, abbreviated name. Headquartered in Memphis, with its "SuperHub" at Memphis International Airport, FedEx is the world's largest airline in terms of tons of freight flown. And, due to the presence of FedEx, Memphis Airport has the largest-volume cargo operation of any airport worldwide.

115. Former U.S. gas brand : ESSO
The brand name Esso has its roots in the old Standard Oil company, as it uses the initial letters of "Standard" and "Oil" (ESS-O). The Esso brand was replaced by Exxon in the US but it is still used in many other countries.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Number of coins in la Fontana di Trevi? : TRE
4. Singer Bryan : ADAMS
9. Formal occasion : PROM
13. Power option : AC/DC
17. Roasted: Fr. : ROTI
19. Invader of 1066 : NORMAN
21. Logan of "60 Minutes" : LARA
22. ___ fide : BONA
23. Muscat's land : OMAN
24. Focus of Gandhi's philosophy : NONVIOLENCE
26. Sweet's partner : SOUR
27. Radioactivity figure : HALF-LIFE
29. Plans to lose : DIETS
30. S'pose : RECKON
32. Uppity sort : SNOOT
33. Degs. from Yale and Harvard : LLDS
35. TMC competitor : SHO
36. Fried chicken choice : CRISPY
37. "Odyssey" temptress : CIRCE
39. Infinite : BOTTOMLESS
42. Chem. unit : MOL
43. Turkish title : AGHA
45. Mediterranean isl. : SAR
46. Makes a scene : ACTS UP
49. "Humbug!" : BAH
50. Feminine suffix : -ENNE
51. And others : ET ALII
53. Credit card bill nos. : APRS
55. Wearing a wig and shades, say : INCOG
57. Marriage site : ALTAR
60. Baseball's Bando : SAL
61. "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" storyteller : AESOP
62. Classic jetliner : DC-NINE
64. Old hi-fi records : MONOS
66. Accurse : DAMN
68. Big grocery store chain : IGA
69. Tagalong : SHADOW
70. On the double : SWIFTLY
72. "Pinwheel and Flow" artist : CALDER
74. "Fee, fi, fo, ___" : FUM
75. Ratchet bar : PAWL
77. "Cheers!" : SKOAL
78. How you might get change for a twenty : IN TENS
79. Perfumery rootstock : ORRIS
81. PJ-clad mansion owner : HEF
83. Henry ___ Lodge : CABOT
85. "Paper Moon" girl : ADDIE
86. It means nothing to the French : RIEN
87. Musician who won a 2011 Presidential Medal of Freedom : YO-YO MA
89. Shake, rattle or roll : VERB
91. Poetic preposition : O’ER
92. Brightly colored lizards : AGAMAS
94. Museum hanging : OIL
95. It has banks in St. Petersburg : NEVA
96. Bugs, e.g. : VWS
97. Peak leaf-peeping time in Pennsylvania : MID-OCTOBER
100. Certain antibody : LYSIN
102. Raise, as a topic : BROACH
105. Part of a Q&A: Abbr. : ANS
106. Hurt : ACHE
108. "Be silent," in music : TACET
111. Cheesemaker's supply : RENNET
112. Empty spaces : VOIDS
114. Subdued : OVERCAME
116. Have ___ for (desire) : A YEN
117. Police protection : RIOT SHIELDS
120. Dust Bowl witness : OKIE
121. English general in the American Revolution : GAGE
122. About : IN RE
123. Personal contacts? : LENSES
124. Dangerous speed : METH
125. Bygone spray : ALAR
126. Gets in the pool, say : BETS
127. Like bell-bottoms or go-go pants : RETRO
128. Barbecue sound : SSS

Down
1. Not having quite enough money : SHORT
2. Circus Maximus patron : ROMAN
3. Schokolade : GERMAN CHOCOLATE
4. Years, to Tiberius : ANNI
5. Manna, according to the Bible : ANGEL FOOD
6. Synthetic fiber brand : ARNEL
7. Year of Super Bowl XXXIX : MMV
8. Declared : SAID SO
9. Huge amounts : PLETHORAS
10. Pirate's demand : RANSOM
11. "The Lord of the Rings" menace : ORC
12. The "mode" of "à la mode"? : ICE CREAM
13. Math coordinates : ABSCISSAE
14. Bakers, e.g. : COOKS
15. Canine shelter : POUND
16. Certain huckster : CARNY
18. How Hershey's Kisses are wrapped : IN FOIL
20. "There is ___ in team" : NO I
25. Anne Rice vampire : LESTAT
28. P.O. box item : LTR
31. In the past, once : ERST
34. Corp. alias abbr. : DBA
38. No-___-do : CAN
40. Wooded area near the Rhine Valley : BLACK FOREST
41. One of the Alis : LAILA
42. Area known to the Chinese as Dongbei : MANCHURIA
44. ___ Building, New York landmark north of Grand Central : HELMSLEY
47. Pastry chef creations ... and a hint to 12 other answers in this puzzle : UPSIDE DOWN CAKES
48. Children and more children : PROGENIES
49. Tries to get at auction : BIDS FOR
50. Squishy dish cleaner : SPONGE
52. Woman of one's heart : LADYLOVE
54. Less abundant : SPARSER
56. Suffix with human : -OID
58. Drag : TOW
59. Córdoba cordial : ANIS
61. Word before republic or seat : BANANA
63. ___ Beach, Hawaii : ‘EWA
65. Spartan walkway : STOA
67. Former call letters? : MCI
71. Photo developer : LAB
73. Inc., abroad : LTD
76. "___ loves believes the impossible": Elizabeth Barrett Browning : WHO SO
80. So to speak : IN A MANNER
82. Followers of some asterisks : FOOTNOTES
84. Girl's holiday party dress fabric : RED VELVET
87. Cause for bringing out candles : BIRTHDAY
88. Constriction of pupils : MIOSIS
90. High beam? : RAY
93. Cheese fanciers : MICE
95. Atomic energy oversight agcy. : NRC
96. MTV's owner : VIACOM
98. Gambol : CAVORT
99. Not so tough : EASIER
101. Orchestra section: Abbr. : STR
102. "Moon Over Parador" actress : BRAGA
103. Coat of paint : LAYER
104. Russia's ___ Bay, arm of the White Sea : ONEGA
107. "The Planets" composer : HOLST
109. Sends forth : EMITS
110. Bed cover : SHEET
113. FedEx rival : DHL
115. Former U.S. gas brand : ESSO
118. Follower of Ernest or Benedict? : -INE
119. Austin-to-N.Y.C. path : ENE

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2 comments :

Unknown said...

There are 12 upside down cakes. One down is SHORT ie shortcake.

Bill Butler said...

Oops!

Thank you for pointing out my error. All fixed now!

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Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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