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0115-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 15 Jan 12, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications


CROSSWORD SETTER: Finn Vigeland
THEME: Weather Report … the circled letters in the grid spell out breeds of cats and dogs “raining” down the grid in vertical lines:
66A. Weather comment represented visually by this puzzle's circled letters : IT’S RAINING CATS AND DOGS
13D. It's lowered to hear music : PHONOGRAPH NEEDLE (Poodle)
29D. You probably raise your arm for this : ANTIPERSPIRANT (Persian)
31D. It's north of the South : MASON-DIXON LINE (Manx)
34D. Big Apple team : BRONX BOMBERS (boxer)
39D. Shows that can be racier than their network counterparts : CABLE SITCOMS (calico)
41D. Cheating : BREAKING THE RULES (beagles)
COMPLETION TIME: 27m 25s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
13. "Star Trek" weapon : PHASER
A MASER is a device that was around long before LASERs came into the public consciousness. A MASER (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) is similar to a LASER, but microwaves are emitted rather than light waves. When the storyline for "Star Trek" was being developed, the writers introduced a weapon called a "phaser", with the name "phaser" derived from PHoton mASER. So, now we know …

20. What will the French think of next? : IDEE
Idée is the French word for "idea".

21. Troop group : PHALANX
In ancient warfare, a phalanx was a group of soldiers that stood or marched together as a unit using their shields as an outer barrier around the formation. "Phalanx" (plural "phalanges") is the Greek word for "finger". "Phalanx" was used for the military formation probably because of the finger-like movements that such formations made on the field of battle.

22. Dream setting : CASTLE IN SPAIN
“Castle in Spain” is a term used for day-dreaming absentmindedly.

24. After-dinner choices : SORBETS
“Sorbet” can mean different things around the world. Here in the US, sorbet is a non-fat frozen dessert that is made without any dairy content.

26. Some online communications, for short : IMS
Those would be Instant Messages (IMs).

27. QB Tebow : TIM
Tim Tebow is a quarterback playing for the Denver Broncos. He was the first college sophomore to win the Heisman Trophy.

28. Thérèse de Lisieux, for one : SAINTE
Saint Thérèse de Lisieux is also known as Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus and the Holy Face. Back in Ireland we call her “The Little Flower of Jesus”.

30. :D, e.g. : EMOTICON
An emoticon is a glyph created using text characters, usually to represent facial features and usually oriented sideways. The emoticon is designed to indicate emotion or attitude. The classic example is the smiley face :-)

37. Grp. that coordinates E.T.A. and E.T.D. : ATC
Air traffic control (ATC).

42. Basis of a lawsuit : TORT
The word "tort" is a French word meaning "mischief, injury or wrong". Tort law is generally about negligence, when the action of one party causes injury to another but that action falls outside of the scope of criminal law.

43. "By ___!" : GEORGE
“By George” is, as one might expect, a euphemism for “by God”.

44. Slip-on : LOAFER
The type of slip-on shoe called a "loafer" dates back to 1939. "Loafer" was originally a brand name introduced by the store Fortnum and Mason's in London.

50. Organ repair sites, briefly : ORS
Operating room (OR).

52. ___ B. Driftwood ("A Night at the Opera" role) : OTIS
"A Night at the Opera" is the 1935 Mark Brothers film that was the first movie in which Chico, Harpo and Groucho appeared without their brother Zeppo. It's really great entertainment!

The five Marx Brothers were born to "Minnie" and "Frenchy" Marx in New York City. The more famous older boys were Chico, Harpo and Groucho. Zeppo was the youngest brother, an he appeared in the early Marx Brothers movies. The fifth son was called Gummo, and he went off to pursue his own career off the stage.

53. Org. that may assess violence levels : MPAA
The Motion Picture Association of America's (MPAA) film-rating system is purely voluntary and is not backed by any law. Movie theaters agree to abide by the rules that come with the MPAA ratings, in exchange for access to new movies.

54. PBS flagship station : WNET
WNET is a television station located in Newark, New Jersey. It is PBS's station that covers New York City, as well as the rest of the tri-state area.

The Public Broadcasting System (PBS) was founded in 1970, and is my favorite of the broadcast networks. I love PBS's drama and science shows in particular, and always watch the election results with the NewsHour team.

55. Part of a pinochle round : MELD
Pinochle is a card game developed from the 19th-century French game called bezique.

56. Former U.N. secretary general Kofi ___ : ANNAN
Kofi Annan is the diplomat from Ghana who served as General Secretary of the UN for ten years until the beginning of 2007. Annan attended the MIT Sloan School of Management from 1971-72, and graduated with a Master of Science degree.

61. Ousted from the ring, for short : TKOD
In boxing, a knockout (KO) is when one of the fighters can't get up from the canvas within a specified time, usually 10 seconds. This can be due to fatigue, injury, or the participant may be truly "knocked out". A referee, fighter or doctor may also decide to stop a fight without a physical knockout, especially if there is concern about a fighter's safety. In this case the bout is said to end with a technical knockout (TKO).

66. Weather comment represented visually by this puzzle's circled letters : IT’S RAINING CATS AND DOGS
It has been “raining cats and dogs” at least since the 1700s, but no one seems to know the origin of the expression.

72. Major artery through San Antonio : I-TEN
I-10 is the most southerly of the interstate routes that crosses from the Atlantic to the Pacific. It stretches from Santa Monica, California to Jacksonville, Florida.

San Antonio, Texas was named by a Spanish expedition that stopped in the area in 1691, honoring the Portuguese saint, Anthony of Padua.

73. Plant tissue : XYLEM
Xylem is a vascular tissue in many plants, the function of which is to transport water and some nutrients. It is xylem tissue that makes up what we know as wood.

75. TV tavern keeper : MOE
Moe Szyslak is the surly bartender in "The Simpson" animated TV show. I don't really care for "The Simpsons", but Hank Azaria who supplies the voice for the character ... him I like.

80. The Mediterranean has a warm one : CLIME
Clime is just another word for climate, as in the expression "in search of warmer climes".

82. Shade of a swan's bill in a Keats poem : EBON
Ebony is another word for the color black (often shortened to "ebon" in poetry). Ebony is a dark black wood that is very dense, one of the few types of wood that sinks in water. Ebony has been in high demand so the species of trees yielding the wood are now considered threatened. It is in such short supply that unscrupulous vendors have been known to darken lighter woods with shoe polish to look like ebony, so be warned ...

The phrase “By a swan’s ebon bill” comes from the 1816 poem by John Keats called “Sleep and Poetry”.

86. Many wonks : DWEEBS
Dweeb is relatively recent American slang that came out of college life in the late sixties. Dweeb, squarepants, nerd, they're all not-nice terms that mean the same thing: someone excessively studious and socially inept.

A "wonk" is an overly-studious person. It is an American slang term that has been around at least since 1954.

88. Scat syllable : DOO
Scat singing is a vocal improvisation found in the world of jazz. There aren't any words as such in scat singing, just random nonsense syllables made up on the spot.

89. One of the Everly Brothers : PHIL
The Everly Brothers are noted for their steel guitar sound, and their great use of harmony. Their harmony onstage wasn’t reflected off the stage though. In 1973 the brothers decided to pursue separate careers and scheduled a farewell performance attended by many fans, family and stalwarts from the music industry. Don Everly came on stage too drunk to perform, and eventually brother Phil just stormed off into the wings, smashing his guitar as he left. The boys didn’t talk to each other for ten years after that incident.

90. Fate : KARMA
Karma is religious concept with its basis in Indian faiths. Karma embraces the notion of cause and effect. Good deeds have good consequences at some later point in one's life, future life, or afterlife, and vice versa.

91. Fictional Simon : LEGREE
Simon Legree is the cruel slave owner in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”.

96. Kaput : ENDED
Kaput comes to us from French (via German). "Capot" means "not having won a single trick" in the French card game called Piquet.

98. Overseas Mr. : SRI
“Sri” is a title of respect for a male in India.

99. Austrian physician who lent his name to an English word ending in "-ize" : MESMER
Franz Mesmer was a German physician, the person who first coined the phrase “animal magnetism”. Back then the term described a purported magnetic field that resided in the bodies of animate beings. Mesmer also lent his name to our term “mesmerize”.

102. "True Colors" singer, 1986 : LAUPER
If you’ve ever heard Cyndi Lauper speaking, you’d know that she was from Queens, New York. She is the daughter of divorced parents, strongly influenced by a supportive mother. She was always a free spirit, and even as young teen in the mid-sixties she dyed her hair different colors and wore outlandish fashions. She was a young woman who wanted to “find herself”, and to that end she once spent two weeks alone in the woods up in Canada, well, just with her dog.

104. Roam : GAD
"To gad about" is to move around with little purpose. The word comes from the Middle English "gadden" meaning "to hurry".

105. Letters on some N.Y.C. luggage : LGA
The accepted three big airports serving New York City are John F. Kennedy (JFK), La Guardia (LGA) and Newark (EWR).

Fierello La Guardia was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945, racking up three full terms in office. The famous airport that bears his name was built at his urging, stemming from an incident that took place while he was in office. He was taking a TWA flight to "New York" and was outraged when the plane landed at Newark Airport, in the state of New Jersey. He demanded that the flight take off again and land at a small airport in Brooklyn. A gaggle of press reporters joined him on the short hop and he gave them a story, urging New Yorkers to support the construction of a new commercial airport within the city's limits. The new airport, in Queens, opened in 1939 as New York Municipal, often called "La Guardia" as a nickname. It was officially relabeled as "La Guardia" in 1947.

108. Actress Tyler : LIV
Actress and model Liv Tyler is the daughter of Steven Tyler, lead singer with Aerosmith, and Bebe Buell, a celebrated model and singer.

114. Artificial plot device : DEUS EX MACHINA
“Deus ex machina” is a Latin phrase that translates as “god out of the machine”. “Deus ex machina” is a plot device used in some works whereby some apparently inextricable problem is suddenly resolved by an unexpected intervention. The term was first used in Horace’s “Ars Poetica”.

118. "The Conqueror," e.g. : EPITHET
The epithet “the Conqueror” was most famously applied to William I of England.

Harold II of England was the last Anglo-Saxon king of the country. He died in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings, vainly attempting to fight off an invasion led by William, Duke of Normandy. William, also known as “the Conqueror”, became the first Norman King of England and ruled as William I from 1066 until his death in 1087.

120. Some bills have them : EARMARKS
Political earmarks are provisions on bills that are inserted by an interested party to funnel funds towards a particular project or district. The idea is that the earmark takes away from the Executive Branch the ability to manage certain funds associated with the bill that were originally meant to support the bill’s intent.

Down
1. Chewed stimulant : COCA
The coca plant is native to South America, and is similar in appearance to a blackthorn bush. Coca leaves have been chewed for centuries, perhaps even as far back as 3,000 years ago. Chewing the leaves apparently produces a pleasurable numb sensation in the mouth and a pleasant taste. The most famous alkaloid in the leaf is cocaine, but this wasn't extracted in its pure form until the mid-1800s. The cocaine was used in a medicines and tonics and other beverages, including the original version of Coca-Cola! Before 1903, a glass of Coke would contain about 9mg of cocaine. Coca-Cola still uses coca leaves, as the flavor is prized, but the cocaine is extracted before it arrives at the bottling plant.

4. 2000 title role for Richard Gere : DR T
The 2000 movie "Dr. T & the Women" is a pretty good film, staring Richard Gere in the title role. There can't be many romantic comedies about gynecologists ...

5. LL Cool J's "Going Back to ___" : CALI
Rap star LL Cool J was born James Todd Smith. His stage name stands for "Ladies Love Cool James".

10. Nudists : ADAMITES
“Adamite” is another word for a human being, or more specifically a nudist belonging to a Christian sect who sought to emulate Adam.

11. Nascar Hall of Fame architect : PEI
I. M. Pei (full name: Ieoh Ming Pei) is an exceptional American architect, born in China. Of his many wonderful works, my favorite is the renovation of the Louvre in Paris, especially the Glass Pyramid in the courtyard.

The NASCAR Hall of Fame opened its doors relatively recently, in 2010. It is located in Charlotte, North Carolina.

13. It's lowered to hear music : PHONOGRAPH NEEDLE (Poodle)
The standard Poodle breed of dog is considered to be the second most intelligent breed, after the Border Collie. The name “poodle” comes from a Low German word meaning “to splash about”, reflecting the original use of the breed as a water retriever.

14. Taft's partner in a 1947 act : HARTLEY
The 1947 Taft-Hartley Act takes its name from the original bill’s sponsors, Senator Robert Taft and Representative Fred A. Hartley, Jr. The act is still in force and deals with monitoring of the activities of labor unions. The bill came into effect after Congress managed to override the veto of President Harry S. Truman.

15. Light reflection ratio : ALBEDO
Albedo is the reflective power of a surface. The term “albedo” is Latin for “whiteness”.

16. R.S.V.P. facilitator: Abbr. : SAE
Self-addressed envelope (SAE).

RSVP stands for "Répondez s'il vous plaît", which is French for "please, answer".

17. Tolkien creature : ENT
Ents are those tree-like creatures that live in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth, in his series of books "The Lord of the Rings". “Ent” is an Old English word for “giant”.

18. Pharmacies fill them, in brief : RXS
There seems to some uncertainty about the origin of the symbol "Rx", used for a medical prescription. One explanation is that it comes from the astrological sign for Jupiter, which was a symbol put on prescriptions in days of old to invoke Jupiter's blessing to help the patient recover.

21. Fourth letter after 49-Down : PSI
The Greek letter psi is the one that looks a bit like a trident or a pitchfork.

23. Leaf pores : STOMATA
Stomata (plural of stoma) are pores found under almost every leaf, clearly visible under a simple microscope. The stomata take in air rich in carbon dioxide. Through the process of photosynthesis, the plants generate oxygen, which is released back into the air though the same stomata.

29. You probably raise your arm for this : ANTIPERSPIRANT (Persian)
The Persian is that long-haired cat with the squashed in muzzle. The breed takes its name from its place of origin, namely Persia (Iran).

31. It's north of the South : MASON-DIXON LINE (Manx)
The original Mason-Dixon line was surveyed by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in the 1760s. The line was used to resolve a border dispute between some of the original British colonies. The Mason-Dixon now forms part of the state lines of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware and West Virginia. The line has come to symbolize the cultural boundary between the Northern and Southern United States.

I've seen Manx cats by the dozen. They're found all over the Isle of Man (hence the name "Manx"), which is located in the middle of the Irish Sea. Manx cats have no tails, they really don't.

32. Stock page listings: Abbr. : COS
Companies (Cos.) are listed on the stock exchanges.

34. Big Apple team : BRONX BOMBERS (Boxer)
The Bronx Bombers (i.e. the Yankees) I just found out are so called because they are from the Bronx (duh!) and because they are a big hitting team (it says here ...). You'll have to excuse me, as I grew up playing rugby …

The Boxer breed of dog (one of my favorites!) originated in Germany. My first dog was a Boxer/Labrador mix, a beautiful animal. Our current family dog is a Boxer/Pug mix, another gorgeous creature.

36. Heroic deeds : GESTS
Our word "gest" meaning a great deed or an exploit has been around since about 1300, and comes from the Old French word "geste" meaning the same thing. These days "geste" can also mean "gesture".

37. ___ Hall (site on many a campus) : ALUMNI
An "alumnus" (plural ... alumni) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is "alumna" (plural ... alumnae). The word comes into English from Latin, in which alumnus means foster-son or pupil.

39. Shows that can be racier than their network counterparts : CABLE SITCOMS (calico)
Domestic cats with a white coat and patches of brown and black are called calico cats in this country. In Ireland, and the rest of the world I think, such cats are called tortoiseshell-and-white. "Calico" is not a breed of cat, simply a coloring.

41. Cheating : BREAKING THE RULES (Beagles)
The Beagle breed of dog is a scent hound, developed for tracking small game. Because of this characteristic, Beagles are often used as detection dogs in customs halls around the world. The world’s most famous Beagle is supposed to be Snoopy from the comic strip “Peanuts”.

45. Angry Birds, e.g. : FAD
Angry Birds is a video game that was developed for smartphones. It the third most downloaded game after Tetris and Pac-Man.

49. Fourth letter before 21-Down : TAU
Tau is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet, the letter which gave rise to our Roman "T". Both the letters tau (T) and chi (X) were symbolically associated with the cross.

57. Security Council veto : NON
“Non” is French for “no”.

The United Nations Security Council has 15 members, 5 of whom are permanent and who have veto power over any resolution. The 10 non-permanent members are elected into place and hold their seats for two years. The UN charter requires that authorized representatives of the member nations are always present at UN headquarters so that the Security council can meet at any time. The permanent members are:
- China
- France
- Russia
- United Kingdom
- United States

61. ___ kwon do : TAE
Taekwondo is the national sport of Korea. The translation is rather "comrehensive". Tae means "to strike or break with foot"; kwon means "to strike or break with fist"; do means "way" or "art". Along with judo, it is one of only two martial arts that are included in the Olympic Games.

63. Put away : ICE
“Ice” is a slang term for “kill, put away”

65. Big name in frozen desserts : EDY
Dreyers' ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyers in the Western United States, and Edy's in the Eastern states. The company's founders were William Dryer and Joseph Edy.

68. "Cagney & Lacey" org. : NYPD
The New York Police Department (NYPD) is the largest municipal police force in the country. The department's roots go back as far at 1625 when there was an eight-man night watch in the days when New York was still known as New Amsterdam. Several disparate forces with policing responsibility were amalgamated in 1844 to form the New York City Police Department, signalling the end of the night watch force that had existed for over 200 years.

71. Martial arts master : SENSEI
“Sensei” is a Japanese form of address used for figures of authority, from lawyers to a martial arts instructors.

82. Doc's reading : EEG
An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a record of electrical activity caused by the firing of neurons within the brain. The EEG might be used to diagnose epilepsy, or perhaps to determine if a patient is "brain dead".

93. White Rabbit's cry : I’M LATE
The White Rabbit is the first character who Alice meets from Wonderland in the famous children’s tale by Lewis Carroll. When Alice sees the White Rabbit, he is running by and saying “Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!”. Then she follows him down the rabbit hole and out story begins ...

97. California beach town with a racetrack : DEL MAR
Del Mar translates into English as "of the sea" aptly enough. Also aptly enough, this upscale beach town started out as a purpose-built resort developed for the rich and famous, back in 1885. Desi Arnaz and Lucille Ball had a house there for many years, as did Burt Bacharach. Skate boarder Tony Hawks grew up in Del Mar.

106. Player of golf : GARY
Gary Player is a professional golfer from South Africa. To me, Player has always come across as a real gentleman with a great personality. Living in South Africa, and playing mainly in the US, he has logged over 15 million air miles, and that's believed to be a record for any athlete.

111. "I can't get excited about it" : MEH
“Meh!” is one of those terms unfamiliar to me, a modern colloquialism meaning, “I’m not great, but not bad”.

112. Bit of investors' news, for short : IPO
An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words it marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually). Anyone owning stock in the company prior to the IPO can find that after the IPO that stock is now worth something on the market (as opposed to just on paper), and can become quite wealthy overnight.

113. ___ Tin Tin : RIN
The original Rin Tin Tin was an actual dog, a puppy discovered by a GI in a bombed-out kennel in France during WWI. The soldier named the pup Rin Tin Tin, the same name as a puppet given to American soldiers for luck. On returning to the US, "Rinty", was trained by his owner and was spotted doing tricks by a film producer. Rinty featured in some films, eventually getting his first starring role in 1923 in the silent movie "Where the North Begins". Legend has it that this first Rin Tin Tin died in the arms of actress Jean Harlow. Not a bad way to go ...

115. I, to Tiberius : EGO
“Ego” is the Latin word for “I”.

Tiberius was the second Emperor of Rome, succeeding Augustus. In his latter life Tiberius became very reclusive, not really wanting the responsibilities of Emperor but refusing to give up his power. Instead he exiled himself from Rome leaving administrative control of the Empire to unscrupulous aides. Tiberius himself led a quiet life on the island of Capri. Having said that, his death at the age of 77 was apparently hastened by a pillow placed over his face, an act ordered by his successor Caligula.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. DNA testing might reopen one : COLD CASE
9. Uses a 13-Across on : ZAPS
13. "Star Trek" weapon : PHASER
19. Person who's a zero? : OPERATOR
20. What will the French think of next? : IDEE
21. Troop group : PHALANX
22. Dream setting : CASTLE IN SPAIN
24. After-dinner choices : SORBETS
25. PC key : ALT
26. Some online communications, for short : IMS
27. QB Tebow : TIM
28. Thérèse de Lisieux, for one : SAINTE
30. :D, e.g. : EMOTICON
33. Battle-ax : OLD BAG
37. Grp. that coordinates E.T.A. and E.T.D. : ATC
40. Letter-shaped girder : H-BEAM
42. Basis of a lawsuit : TORT
43. "By ___!" : GEORGE
44. Slip-on : LOAFER
46. Places for rings, maybe : SAFES
48. Humble response to praise : I TRY
50. Organ repair sites, briefly : ORS
51. Polished : URBANE
52. ___ B. Driftwood ("A Night at the Opera" role) : OTIS
53. Org. that may assess violence levels : MPAA
54. PBS flagship station : WNET
55. Part of a pinochle round : MELD
56. Former U.N. secretary general Kofi ___ : ANNAN
58. Get ready to drive : TEE UP
59. x, y and z : AXES
60. Scot's "not" : NAE
61. Ousted from the ring, for short : TKOD
62. TV station, e.g. : AIRER
64. Cicely or tarragon : HERB
66. Weather comment represented visually by this puzzle's circled letters : IT’S RAINING CATS AND DOGS
72. Major artery through San Antonio : I-TEN
73. Plant tissue : XYLEM
74. Hunted : PREY
75. TV tavern keeper : MOE
76. Bud : MATE
78. Feel (for) : GROPE
80. The Mediterranean has a warm one : CLIME
82. Shade of a swan's bill in a Keats poem : EBON
83. Kindergarten stuff : ABCS
84. Gravitate : TEND
85. Not cheating : FAIR
86. Many wonks : DWEEBS
88. Scat syllable : DOO
89. One of the Everly Brothers : PHIL
90. Fate : KARMA
91. Fictional Simon : LEGREE
92. Esteem : ADMIRE
94. Rolling ___ (rich) : IN IT
96. Kaput : ENDED
98. Overseas Mr. : SRI
99. Austrian physician who lent his name to an English word ending in "-ize" : MESMER
100. Propose : NOMINATE
102. "True Colors" singer, 1986 : LAUPER
104. Roam : GAD
105. Letters on some N.Y.C. luggage : LGA
108. Actress Tyler : LIV
111. Subject of a Vatican investigation : MIRACLE
114. Artificial plot device : DEUS EX MACHINA
118. "The Conqueror," e.g. : EPITHET
119. "___ it" ("Understood") : I GET
120. Some bills have them : EARMARKS
121. Dolls : HONEYS
122. Brit's teapot cover : COSY
123. Like some boards : DRY-ERASE

Down
1. Chewed stimulant : COCA
2. Precious girl's name? : OPAL
3. In the event that : LEST
4. 2000 title role for Richard Gere : DR T
5. LL Cool J's "Going Back to ___" : CALI
6. "Lemme ___!" : AT ‘EM
7. "That is quite clear" : SO I SEE
8. Directional suffix : -ERN
9. "Shut your trap!" : ZIP IT
10. Nudists : ADAMITES
11. Nascar Hall of Fame architect : PEI
12. Part of a security system : SENSOR
13. It's lowered to hear music : PHONOGRAPH NEEDLE
14. Taft's partner in a 1947 act : HARTLEY
15. Light reflection ratio : ALBEDO
16. R.S.V.P. facilitator: Abbr. : SAE
17. Tolkien creature : ENT
18. Pharmacies fill them, in brief : RXS
21. Fourth letter after 49-Down : PSI
23. Leaf pores : STOMATA
29. You probably raise your arm for this : ANTIPERSPIRANT
31. It's north of the South : MASON-DIXON LINE
32. Stock page listings: Abbr. : COS
34. Big Apple team : BRONX BOMBERS
35. Side (with) : AGREE
36. Heroic deeds : GESTS
37. ___ Hall (site on many a campus) : ALUMNI
38. Attacked : TOREAT
39. Shows that can be racier than their network counterparts : CABLE SITCOMS
40. Nest maker : HEN
41. Cheating : BREAKING THE RULES
45. Angry Birds, e.g. : FAD
47. Manipulate to one's advantage : FINAGLE
49. Fourth letter before 21-Down : TAU
53. Track ___ : MEET
54. Prison unit : WARD
57. Security Council veto : NON
58. Mine transport : TRAMCAR
61. ___ kwon do : TAE
63. Put away : ICE
65. Big name in frozen desserts : EDY
67. 72-Across and others: Abbr. : RTES
68. "Cagney & Lacey" org. : NYPD
69. Bazooka, e.g. : ARM
70. Yokel : GOOBER
71. Martial arts master : SENSEI
76. Lady : MADAM
77. Villa, e.g. : ABODE
79. Portuguese king : REI
81. Tart drink : LIMEADE
82. Doc's reading : EEG
85. Battle wear : FATIGUES
87. Bond : WED
89. Tediously didactic : PREACHY
90. North Korean leader or his father : KIM
93. White Rabbit's cry : I’M LATE
95. Certain skiing competition : NORDIC
97. California beach town with a racetrack : DEL MAR
101. Vicious : NASTY
103. Doll : PET
106. Player of golf : GARY
107. Climax : ACME
108. The euro replaced it : LIRA
109. Signs : INKS
110. One with a neck and a lip : VASE
111. "I can't get excited about it" : MEH
112. Bit of investors' news, for short : IPO
113. ___ Tin Tin : RIN
115. I, to Tiberius : EGO
116. Struck : XED
117. Laugh syllable : HAR

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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