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0212-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 12 Feb 12, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications


CROSSWORD SETTER: Kurt Mueller
THEME: Additional Reading … this is a rebus puzzle, with the word BOOK in some squares (represented by a square symbol in the my grid above):
21A. Send over some Bibles? : DELIVER THE GOOD (BOOK)S
33A. Dolt's football game plans? : PLAY(BOOK) FOR A FOOL
54A. The truth about a popular Internet community? : FACE(BOOK) REALITY
80A. Egotistical author's request to a reader? : (BOOK)MARK MY WORDS
89A. ___ T. (big name in 1960s music) : (BOOK)ER
98A. Avid reader : (BOOK)WORM
100A. Annual publications for burros? : DONKEYS YEAR(BOOK)S
117A. Dust cover made of 100% aluminum, perhaps? : FULL METAL (BOOK) JACKET
10D. Engage again for a gig : RE(BOOK)
13D. Aid for record-keeping at Mrs. Smith's? : APPLE PIE ORDER (BOOK)
17D. Like some flights : OVER(BOOK)ED
47D. Get together with your bet taker? : MEET ONE’S (BOOK)MAKER
57D. Sign the register : (BOOK) IN
61D. Ship's record : LOG(BOOK)
103D. Volume holder : (BOOK)SHELF
119D. Fill completely, in a way : (BOOK) UP
COMPLETION TIME: 55m 06s!!
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
1. Handsome, as Henri : BEL
Henri is “bel” (handsome) and Marie is “belle” (beautiful).

4. Lucky end? : ASH
Lucky Strike is an R.J. Reynolds brand of cigarette. It was the single most successful brand during the thirties in terms of sales. A marketing campaign in the twenties promoted Lucky Strikes to women, touting it as a cigarette that could help keep the weight down, an alternative to eating candy. Oh boy have times changed, thank goodness ...

7. Hyundai sedan : AZERA
The Hyundai Azera was the name used worldwide for the model known as the Hyundai Grandeur in its homeland of South Korea. It was produced from 1986 to 1992.

12. Mata ___ (spy) : HARI
Mata Hari was the stage name used by Margaretha Geertuida Zella, born in the Netherlands in 1876. After an unsuccessful and somewhat tragic marriage, Zella moved to Paris in 1903 where she struggled to make a living. By 1905 she was working as an exotic dancer and using the name Mata Hari. She was a successful courtesan, notably moving in various circles of high-ranking military officers. She apparently worked as a double agent, both for the French and the Germans. When she was accused by the French of passing information to the enemy, she was tried, found guilty and executed by firing squad in 1917 at the height of WW1.

16. G.P.'s group : AMA
The American Medical Association (AMA) was founded in 1847 at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. The first female member was allowed to join in 1868 but the first African American members weren't admitted until one hundred years later, in 1968.

19. They're all the same : CLONES
Dolly is the most famous sheep in the world. She was a clone, and she was born in 1996 near Edinburgh in Scotland, grown from a cell taken from the mammary gland of a healthy donor sheep. When asked why she was called Dolly, the scientist responsible said, and I quote:
"Dolly is derived from a mammary gland cell and we couldn't think of a more impressive pair of glands than Dolly Parton's".
Like I said, I am simply quoting. I don't judge …

24. Tour org. : LPGA
The Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) was founded in 1950 by a group of 13 lady golfers, and today it is the oldest ongoing women’s sports professional organization in the US.

29. Mark Messier, for 12 years : OILER
Mark Messier is a former professional hockey player from Canada. He won the Stanley Cup five times with the Edmonton Oilers and once with the New York Rangers.

30. Actress Gilpin of "Frasier" : PERI
Roz Doyle is a character in the wonderful sitcom “Frasier”. Roz is played, very ably, by the actress Peri Gilpin.

38. Bar, legally : ESTOP
The legal term "estop" means to block or stop by using some legal device. The word "estop" comes from Old French, in which "estopper" means "to stop up" or "to impede".

39. Cinco follower : SEIS
“Cinco, seis” is "five, six" in Sanish.

49. Comet rival : BON AMI
Bon Ami cleanser was introduced just a few years after Bon Ami soap went to market in 1886. The cleanser was marketed by emphasising its “non-scratch” properties. The label showed a chick coming out of an egg, the idea being that a newly hatched chick hasn’t yet scratched the ground looking for worms and insects.

52. Curved molding : OGEE
An ogee is like an s-curve. Specifically it is a figure consisting of two arcs that curve in opposite directions (like an S) but both ends of the curve end up parallel to each other (which is not necessarily true for an S).

54. The truth about a popular Internet community? : FACE(BOOK) REALITY
Everything I know about Facebook I learned from the very entertaining movie called “The Social Network”, released in 2010.

62. "C'est ___" : LA VIE
“C’est la vie” is French for “that’s life”.

63. Sea of ___ (arm of the Black Sea) : AZOV
The Sea of Azov lies east of the Crimean Peninsula and is linked to the larger Black Sea via the narrow Strait of Kerch. The Sea of Azov is the shallowest sea in the world, with the depth never going above forty-six feet.

64. Stimpy's pal : REN
“The Ren and Stimpy Show” ran on Nickelodeon from 1991 to 1996. Not my cup of tea ...

67. Jack's inferior : TEN
In most card games, a ten is inferior to a jack.

68. Albanian money : LEK
The official currency of Albania is called the lek. The first lek was introduced in 1926, and was apparently named after Alexander the Great.

72. Singer/actress with a simultaneous #1 album and #1 film, familiarly : J.LO
J.Lo is the nickname of singer and actress Jennifer Lopez. "J.Lo" is also the title of her second studio album, released in 2001.

75. Fracas : MELEE
“Melee” comes from the French word (“mêlée”), and in both languages it means a "confused fight".

“Fracas” is a French word that we absorbed into English. In turn, the French usage evolved from the Italian “fracasso” meaning “uproar, crash”.

77. Rathskeller vessel : STEIN
A city hall in Germany is called a Rathaus. In days gone by there was often a restaurant located in the basement or cellar of a Rathaus, and this restaurant was given the name Rathskellar. Now any bar located below street level in any building is called a Rathskellar.

84. Tiny bits of pasta : ORZO
Orzo is pasta that has been formed into granular shapes, much like barley. And indeed, "orzo" is the Italian word for "barley".

87. Ike's W.W. II command : ETO
Dwight D. Eisenhower was in command of the European Theater of Operations during WWII. If you're a WWII buff like me, then I recommend you take a look at a great made-for-TV movie, starring Tom Selleck as Eisenhower, called "Ike: Countdown to D-Day" which came out in 2004.

89. ___ T. (big name in 1960s music) : (BOOK)ER
Booker T. & the M.G.'s were in effect the house band at Stax Records, and so appeared on loads of famous recordings including some by Wilson Pickett and Otis Redding. As such, they became synonymous with what became known as the Stax Sound. One of the unique things about the band was that it was racially integrated, with two white guys making a name for themselves in soul music, which at the time was very much part of black culture. And of course they produced the fabulous 1962 hit “Green Onions”.

108. Whence Zeno : ELEA
Zeno of Elea was a Greek philosopher who lived in Elea, a Greek colony in Southern Italy. He is famous for his “paradoxes”, a set of problems that really make you think! In the problem known as Achilles and the Tortoise, Zeno tells us that Achilles races a tortoise, giving the tortoise a head start (of say 100 meters). By the time Achilles reaches the starting point of the tortoise, the tortoise will have moved on, albeit only a small distance. Achilles then sets his sight on the tortoise’s new position and runs to it. Again the tortoise has moved ahead a little. Achilles keeps on moving to the tortoise’s new position but can never actually catch his slower rival, or can he …?

115. Russian retreat : DACHA
Dachas are usually second homes, located outside the city limits in rural areas. Residents/tenants of dachas are often called dachniks.

116. "The Mikado" baritone : KO-KO
"The Mikado" is a wonderful comic opera by Gilbert and Sullivan, set in the exotic location of Japan. "Mikado" is a former term for the "Emperor of Japan". In the opera, Ko-Ko is the name of the Lord High Executioner of Titipu.

117. Dust cover made of 100% aluminum, perhaps? : FULL METAL (BOOK) JACKET
Stanley Kubrick’s 1987 classic war film “Full Metal Jacket” takes its name from the “full metal jacket” bullet that is used by infantry riflemen. The film is set largely in Vietnam and, somewhat bizarrely I think, all those jungle scenes were shot on a disused building site in London!

121. As previously mentioned, in bibliographies : IDEM
Idem is usually abbreviated as "id." and is the Latin word for "the same". In research papers idem is used in a list of references, in place of citations "already mentioned above".

123. Room in Clue : STUDY
Clue is another board game that we knew under a different name growing up in Ireland, as outside of North America Clue is marketed as "Cluedo". Cluedo was the original name of the game introduced in 1949 by the famous British board game manufacturer, Waddingtons. There are cute differences between the US and UK versions. For example, the man who is murdered is called Dr. Black (Mr. Boddy in the US), one of the suspects is the Reverend Green (Mr. Green in the US), and the suspect weapons include a dagger (a knife in the US), a lead pipe (lead piping in the US) and a spanner (a wrench in the US). I think it's a fabulous game, a must during the holidays ...

124. Diminutive suffix : -ULA
The suffix -ula indicates "small". For example, the word "formula" is from the Latin for "little form".

125. Gobi-like : SERE
The large desert in Asia called the Gobi lies in northern China and southern Mongolia. The Gobi desert is growing at an alarming rate, particularly towards the south. This “desertification” is caused by increased human activity, and the Chinese government is trying to halt the desert’s progress by planting great swaths of new forest, the so called "Green Wall of China".

127. Black ___ (some military activities) : OPS
"Black ops" is the name given to covert operations, activities that are usually outside of standard military protocol and may even be against the law. Funding for black ops is usually provided by a secret "black budget".

128. Platoon V.I.P. : SFC
Sergeant First Class (SFC).

Down
2. "There's a Chef in My Soup!" writer : EMERIL
Emeril Lagasse is an American chef, born in Massachusetts. Lagasse first achieved notoriety as executive chef in Commander's Palace in New Orleans. Now famous for his television shows, his cuisine still showcases New Orleans ingredients and influences. Lagasse started using his famous, "Bam!" catchphrase in order to keep his crew awake during repeated tapings of his show.

7. Shampoo ingredient : ALOE
Aloe vera has a number of alternate names that are descriptive of its efficacy as a medicine. These include the First Aid plant, Wand of Heaven, Silent Healer and Miracle Plant.

11. Father-and-son rulers of Syria : ASSADS
Dr. Bashar al-Assad is the current President of the Syrian Arab Republic, and is the son of the former President, Hafez al-Assad, whom he replaced in 2001. President Assad is a medical doctor, speaks fluent English and conversational French. Assad was studying ophthalmology in London when he met his wife, an Englishwoman.

12. One-named fashion designer : HALSTON
Roy Halston Frowick was a fashion designer who was most successful during the seventies. He was also known simply as Halston. He was famous for creating those colorful long dresses that women wore to discos back then.

13. Aid for record-keeping at Mrs. Smith's? : APPLE PIE ORDER (BOOK)
The company known as Mrs. Smith’s Pies was founded by Amanda Smith and her son in the 1920s. The Smiths started the company to take advantage of increasing demand for her own fruit pies that she sold at a local YMCA lunch counter in Pottstown, Pennsylvania.

14. "Copy that" : ROGER
The term “Roger”, meaning “yes” or “acknowledged”, comes from the world of radio-telephony. The British military used a phonetic alphabet in the fifties that included Roger to represent the letter “R”. As such, it became customary to say “Roger” when acknowledging a message, with R (Roger) standing for “received”.

18. Sarkozy's predecessor : CHIRAC
Jacques Chirac served as French President from 1995 to 2007. He also served twice as Prime Minister of France, and as the Mayor of Paris. However, at the end of 2011 he was found guilty of embezzling public funds and was given a 2-year suspended sentence.

Nicolas Sarkozy is the current President of France and has been in office since 2007. Sarkozy’s wife is perhaps as famous as the President himself. He married the singer songwriter Carla Bruni at the Élysée Palace in 2008.

19. Film special effects, briefly : CGI
Computer-generated imagery (CGI).

23. Enlighten : EDIFY
“To edify” is to provide instruction in order to improve spiritually, morally or intellectually. The intent is to “build up” someone's faith or morality and so “edify” comes from the Latin “aedificare” meaning “to build, construct”. This Latin root also gives us our word “edifice”.

32. 1987 Broadway sensation, colloquially : LES MIZ
The 1980 musical "Les Miserables" is an adaptation of the 1862 novel of the same name by Victor Hugo. The show opened in London in 1985, and is the longest running musical in the history of London's West End. My wife and I saw "Les Miz" in the Queen's Theatre in London quite a few years ago, but were only able to get tickets for seats in the very back row. The theater seating is very steep, so the back row of the balcony is extremely high over the stage. One of the big events in the storyline is the building of a street barricade over which the rebels fight. At the height we were seated we could see the stagehands behind the barricade, sitting around drinking Coke, one even having a cigarette. On cue they would get up and catch a dropped rifle, or an actor that had been shot. It was pretty comical. I didn't really enjoy the show that much, to be honest. Some great songs, but the storyline just didn't seem to hang together for me.

34. Landed estate : FIEF
In the days of feudalism, a "fief" was basically a "fee" (the words "fee" and "fief" have the same origins) paid by a lord in exchange for some benefit to him, perhaps loyalty or military service. The fief itself was often land granted by the Lord.

35. Old Spanish card game : OMBRE
Ombre is a card game, with the name derived from the Spanish word for "man" ("hombre"). Ombre is a trick-taking game, very popular in the 16th century and of significant importance in the history of cards. Ombre was the first game in which trumps were determined by rounds of bidding rather than just by luck of the draw. This of course is an important feature in other games today, most notably bridge.

36. The duck in Prokofiev's "Peter and the Wolf" : OBOE
As is the case for many I am sure, Prokofiev's "Peter and the Wolf" was my introduction to the world of classical music, as it was played for us at school many, many moons ago. Prokofiev wrote the piece as a commissioned work for the Central Children's Theater in Moscow, in 1936. He loved the idea of the project, and wrote the story and music in just four days!

The oboe is perhaps my favorite of the reed instruments. The name "oboe" comes from the French "hautbois" which means "high wood". When you hear an orchestra tuning before a performance you'll note (pun intended!) that the oboe starts off the process by playing an "A". The rest of the musicians in turn tune to that oboe's "A". Oh, and if you want to read a fun book (almost an "exposé") about life playing the oboe, you might try "Mozart in the Jungle" by oboist Blair Tindall. I heard recently that HBO are working towards a pilot based on the book and I can’t wait to see it!

37. Superboy's sweetie : LANA
Smallville, Kansas is the town on Earth in which Superman grew up (as Clark Kent). One of Clark's best friends in Smallville, and romantic interest of his youth, was Lana Lang.

41. Magic, once : LA LAKER
Magic Johnson’s real name is Earvin Johnson. He was born and grew up in Lansing, Michigan. He earned the nickname “Magic” when playing basketball in high school after a particularly great performance on the court.

45. Rimsky-Korsakov's "Le ___ d'Or" : COQ
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov was one of the great Russian composers from the Romantic Era. His most famous works are probably “Capriccio Espagnol” and “Scheherazade”. While he was composing, Rimsky-Korsakov spent much of his working life as an officer in the Imperial Russian Navy.

46. Christina of pop : AGUILERA
Christina Aguilera is a singer who got her start on television’s “Star Search”. From there she took a role on Disney’s “The Mickey Mouse Club”.

50. "Believe ___ Not!" : IT OR
"Ripley's Believe It of Not!" is a huge franchise on television, affiliated to a worldwide chain of museums. It started out as cartoon feature appearing in newspapers in 1918.

53. Some trains : ELS
The Chicago "L" is the second largest rapid transit system in the US, with the New York City Subway being the largest. The "L" is also the second oldest, again with the New York Subway system having the honor of being around the longest. Note that the official nickname for the system is the "L" (originally short for "elevated railroad"), although the term "El" is also in common use (especially in crosswords as "ELS"). The L is managed by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA).

56. Cain raiser : EVE
The story of Cain and Abel not only appears in the Bible, it also features in the Qur'an. In the Muslim account the brothers are named Kabil and Habil.

58. Part of Y.S.L. : YVES
Yves Saint-Laurent was a French fashion designer, actually born in Algeria. He started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint-Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from prison, managed to pull his life back together, and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story ...

61. Ship's record : LOG(BOOK)
The word "logbook" dates back to the days when the captain of a ship kept a daily record of the vessel's speed, progress etc. using a "log". A log was a wooden float on a knotted line that was dropped overboard to measure speed through the water.

66. Film whale : NAMU
“Namu, the Killer Whale” is a movie that was released in 1966. It was re-released as “Namu, My Best Friend”.

68. Writer Wallace : LEW
Lew Wallace was a general for the Union Army during the Civil War, and also an author. He wrote a very successful and celebrated book, namely “Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ”, first published in 1880.

69. Jeff Lynne's band, for short : ELO
ELO of course stands for the Electric Light Orchestra, a symphonic rock group from the north of England. The band's manager was Don Arden, father of Sharon Osbourne (wife of Ozzy).

72. ___ Kennedy Smith (sister of J.F.K.) : JEAN
We all know Jean Kennedy Smith back in Ireland, as she was the US Ambassador there during the days of the Clinton administration. She is the sister of President John F. Kennedy.

74. They come from Mars : M AND MS
Forrest Mars, Sr. was the founder of the Mars Company. He invented the Mars Bar while living over in England, and then developed M&M's when he returned to the US. He came up with the idea for M&M's when he saw soldiers in the Spanish Civil War eating chocolate pellets. Those pellets had a hard shell of tempered chocolate on the outside to prevent them from melting. Mars got some of the funding to develop the M&M from William Murrie, the son of the president of Hershey's Chocolate. It is the "M" and "M" from "Mars" and "Murrie" which gives the name to the candy.

75. Classic fragrance sold in France as Mon Péché : MY SIN
The fragrance called My Sin was created by a Russian perfumer named Madame Zed. My Sin was marketed in France as Mon Péché.

76. Macedonian city with Greek and Roman ruins : EDESSA
Ancient Macedonia was in the northeast part of the Greek peninsula. For a while, the capital city was named Edessa.

94. Shooting match : SKEET
There are three types of competitive shotgun target shooting sports:
- Skeet shooting
- Trap shooting
- Sporting clays

95. Homer's home : HELLAS
Hellas is a historical name for Greece.

Homer was a famous poet of Ancient Greece, believed to be the author of the two classic epic poems, the "Iliad" and the "Odyssey". However, some scholars believe that Homer did not actually exist, but rather he is the personification of oral tradition that was passed down through the ages.

97. Supply at a French smoke shop : TABAC
“Tabac” is the French word for “tobacco”.

102. Brouhaha : RUCKUS
"Brouhaha" was a French word that back in the 1550s meant "the cry of the devil disguised as clergy" . Wow ...

104. Washington airport : SEA-TAC
Sea-Tac Airport is more fully known as Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. It is the main hub for Alaska Airlines.

105. Sushi bar servings: Var. : SAKIS
I guess “saki” is a variant of “sake”, the name we use for a Japanese alcoholic drink.

We refer to the Japanese alcoholic beverage made from rice as "sake". We've gotten things a bit mixed up in the West. "Sake" is actually the word that the Japanese use for all alcoholic drinks.

107. Like some energy : SOLAR
Solar panels make use of what's known as the photovoltaic effect. We all learned about the photoelectric effect in school, in which electrons were ejected from the surface of some materials when it was exposed to light or other forms of radiation. The photovoltaic effect is related to the photoelectric effect but is different. Instead of electrons being ejected from the surface, in the photovoltaic effect electrons move around inside the material creating a difference in voltage.

112. Bone under a watch : ULNA
The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the "thumb-side" of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the "pinkie-side".

113. Govt. gangbusters : T-MEN
A T-man is a law-enforcement agent of the US Treasury.

118. One, in Orléans : UNE
Orléans is a city in France, located less than 100 miles southwest of Paris. The city gives its name to the American city of New Orleans.

120. Law degs. : JDS
The law degree abbreviated to J.D. stands for Juris Doctor.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Handsome, as Henri : BEL
4. Lucky end? : ASH
7. Hyundai sedan : AZERA
12. Mata ___ (spy) : HARI
16. G.P.'s group : AMA
17. Some nerve : OPTIC
19. They're all the same : CLONES
20. Each : A POP
21. Send over some Bibles? : DELIVER THE GOOD (BOOK)S
24. Tour org. : LPGA
25. Really want : CRAVE
26. Largest, as a sum : TIDIEST
27. Things that may have to be cleared : AISLES
29. Mark Messier, for 12 years : OILER
30. Actress Gilpin of "Frasier" : PERI
31. Graybeards : OLDSTERS
33. Dolt's football game plans? : PLAY(BOOK) FOR A FOOL
38. Bar, legally : ESTOP
39. Cinco follower : SEIS
40. Drum set set : CYMBALS
42. Huffs : SNITS
45. Word affixed to web or handy : CAM
48. Police investigator: Abbr. : DET
49. Comet rival : BON AMI
51. Ogle : EYE
52. Curved molding : OGEE
54. The truth about a popular Internet community? : FACE(BOOK) REALITY
59. Reveal, in poetry : OPE
60. Put down : QUELL
62. "C'est ___" : LA VIE
63. Sea of ___ (arm of the Black Sea) : AZOV
64. Stimpy's pal : REN
65. "The gloves are off!" : IT’S ON
67. Jack's inferior : TEN
68. Albanian money : LEK
70. Decodes : READS
72. Singer/actress with a simultaneous #1 album and #1 film, familiarly : J.LO
73. Warden's charge : GAME
75. Fracas : MELEE
77. Rathskeller vessel : STEIN
79. Velvet finish? : -EEN
80. Egotistical author's request to a reader? : (BOOK)MARK MY WORDS
84. Tiny bits of pasta : ORZO
85. Live : ARE
86. Frees : UNTIES
87. Ike's W.W. II command : ETO
89. ___ T. (big name in 1960s music) : (BOOK)ER
90. Like certain passages : NASAL
93. Professorial : DONNISH
96. Start of some Italian church names : SANT
98. Avid reader : (BOOK)WORM
100. Annual publications for burros? : DONKEYS YEAR(BOOK)S
105. Monotony : SAMENESS
108. Whence Zeno : ELEA
109. Mistreatment : ABUSE
110. Cut down to size : ABASED
111. Best in business : OUTSELL
115. Russian retreat : DACHA
116. "The Mikado" baritone : KO-KO
117. Dust cover made of 100% aluminum, perhaps? : FULL METAL (BOOK) JACKET
121. As previously mentioned, in bibliographies : IDEM
122. Comparatively stupid : INANER
123. Room in Clue : STUDY
124. Diminutive suffix : -ULA
125. Gobi-like : SERE
126. Showed over : RERAN
127. Black ___ (some military activities) : OPS
128. Platoon V.I.P. : SFC

Down
1. Half of an interrogation team : BAD COP
2. "There's a Chef in My Soup!" writer : EMERIL
3. Chorus syllables : LA LA LA
4. Lug : APE
5. Orch. section : STR
6. Successful swinger : HITTER
7. Shampoo ingredient : ALOE
8. Where the wild things are? : ZOOS
9. Put an ___ : END TO
10. Engage again for a gig : RE(BOOK)
11. Father-and-son rulers of Syria : ASSADS
12. One-named fashion designer : HALSTON
13. Aid for record-keeping at Mrs. Smith's? : APPLE PIE ORDER (BOOK)
14. "Copy that" : ROGER
15. Bridge declaration : I PASS
17. Like some flights : OVER(BOOK)ED
18. Sarkozy's predecessor : CHIRAC
19. Film special effects, briefly : CGI
22. Actresses Dana and Judith : IVEYS
23. Enlighten : EDIFY
28. Believers : ISTS
30. Mail-related : POSTAL
32. 1987 Broadway sensation, colloquially : LES MIZ
34. Landed estate : FIEF
35. Old Spanish card game : OMBRE
36. The duck in Prokofiev's "Peter and the Wolf" : OBOE
37. Superboy's sweetie : LANA
41. Magic, once : LA LAKER
43. It's measured in points : TYPE SIZE
44. Spotted : SEEN
45. Rimsky-Korsakov's "Le ___ d'Or" : COQ
46. Christina of pop : AGUILERA
47. Get together with your bet taker? : MEET ONE’S (BOOK)MAKER
50. "Believe ___ Not!" : IT OR
53. Some trains : ELS
55. Pamper : CATER TO
56. Cain raiser : EVE
57. Sign the register : (BOOK) IN
58. Part of Y.S.L. : YVES
61. Ship's record : LOG(BOOK)
66. Film whale : NAMU
68. Writer Wallace : LEW
69. Jeff Lynne's band, for short : ELO
71. Start of a Vol. I heading : A TO
72. ___ Kennedy Smith (sister of J.F.K.) : JEAN
74. They come from Mars : M AND MS
75. Classic fragrance sold in France as Mon Péché : MY SIN
76. Macedonian city with Greek and Roman ruins : EDESSA
78. Opposite of "and" : NOR
81. Type : KIND
82. ___ forte (less loud, in music) : MENO
83. Judge's order : STAY
88. Dosage frequency, frequently : ONE A DAY
91. "Gnarly, man!" : AWESOME
92. Star or wolf preceder : LONE
94. Shooting match : SKEET
95. Homer's home : HELLAS
97. Supply at a French smoke shop : TABAC
99. Western evergreen : RED FIR
101. Hail in a loud voice : YELL TO
102. Brouhaha : RUCKUS
103. Volume holder : (BOOK)SHELF
104. Washington airport : SEA-TAC
105. Sushi bar servings: Var. : SAKIS
106. Dwelling : ABODE
107. Like some energy : SOLAR
112. Bone under a watch : ULNA
113. Govt. gangbusters : T-MEN
114. To be, to Benicio : SER
118. One, in Orléans : UNE
119. Fill completely, in a way : (BOOK) UP
120. Law degs. : JDS

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2 comments :

Anonymous said...

What do the grey and red squares represent?

Bill Butler said...

The grey and red squares are an artifact of the crossword application that I use to solve the puzzle. Unfortunately I can't get rid of them. They have no meaningful significance. You can read more about them in the Frequently Asked Questions section (link at the top right of the page).

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost everyday as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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