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I am currently on vacation in Ireland, returning on October 9th. I am hoping to complete a blog post each evening, even if it is only the basics (solved grid and clues, plus explanation of theme). I apologize in advance if I am late in posting.

Bill

0219-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 19 Feb 12, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications


CROSSWORD SETTER: James F. C. Burns
THEME: Core O’Nations … there is a country name hidden within each of the theme answers:
21A. Show of affection : A H(UG AND A) KISS
102A. Place for produce stands : GAR(DEN MARK)ET
15D. Unofficial discussions : INFOR(MAL TA)LKS
26D. Trip up, perhaps : CAT(CHIN A) LIE
30D. Makes an extra effort : TAKE(S PAIN)S
44D. Sea salvager's quest, maybe : SUN(KEN YA)CHT
46D. Like always : AS (PER U)SUAL
50D. On the level : FA(IR AN)D SQUARE
COMPLETION TIME: 37m 27s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
10. College town SW of Cleveland : OBERLIN
Oberlin, Ohio is a city southwest of Cleveland. The city is home to Oberlin College, the biggest employer in town. Oberlin was named after Jean-Frédéric Oberlin, a pastor from Alsace.

18. Donnybrook : MELEE
A “donnybrook” is a free-for-all, named after a famous historic fair in Donnybrook, a district in Dublin, Ireland. Donnybrook Fair had the reputation as a place where there was lots of drinking and fighting.

19. Island group that includes Guam : MARIANAS
Guam is a US territory in the western Pacific Ocean, the largest of the Mariana Islands. Guam is also the first territory in the United States to see the sun rise on any particular day. As such, it has adopted the motto, "Where America's day begins". During WWII, the US territory of Guam was occupied by the Japanese for 31 months until it was liberated in the Battle of Guam in July 1944. Of the 18,000 Japanese men holding the island, only 485 surrendered, so almost all perished in the invasion. One Japanese sergeant hid out on the island for an incredible 28 years, finally surrendering in 1972!

21. Show of affection : A H(UG AND A) KISS
Uganda is a landlocked county in East Africa lying just to the west of Kenya. Uganda was ruled by the British as a protectorate from 1894 and gained independence in 1962. Uganda is very much associated with the tyrannical rule of Idi Amin in the 1970s.

27. The first letter of "tsar," in Cyrillic : TSE
The Cyrillic alphabet is a writing system that dates back to the First Bulgarian Empire in the 10th century AD. Cyrillic is the alphabet used in Slavic languages, including Russian. When Bulgaria was admitted to the European Union in 2007, Cyrillic became the third official language of the EU, alongside the Latin and Greek alphabets.

28. Sweet ending? : -OSE
The sugar we consume as "table sugar" is mainly sucrose that is extracted from sugar cane and sugar beet. We also consume lactose, naturally occurring in milk, and fructose, naturally occurring in fruit. But most of the sugar we eat or drink tends to be prepared commercially, the most famous being high-fructose corn syrup that is glucose that is industrially processed into a glucose/fructose mix. Don't get me started on the politics of food ...

30. Long-migration seabirds : TERNS
Terns are seabirds that are found all over the world. The Arctic Tern makes a very long-distance migration. One Arctic Tern that was tagged as a chick in Great Britain in the summer of 1982, was spotted in Melbourne, Australia just three months later. The bird had traveled over 14,000 miles in that time, an average of about 150 miles a day. Remarkable …

31. Deep Western lake : TAHOE
Lake Tahoe is up in the Sierra Nevada mountains right on the border between California and Nevada. Lake Tahoe is the largest alpine lake in the country. It's also the second deepest lake, with only the beautiful Crater Lake in Oregon being deeper. Given its location, there are tall casinos that sit right on the shore on the Nevada side of the state line where gambling is legal.

34. Back to front? : -IER
“-ier” is the suffix in the word “frontier”.

35. Kind of rock : ACID
Acid rock is a musical genre, a subset of psychedelic rock. The term comes from the influence of the drug LSD (acid) on some compositions in the early days.

36. Eucharist plate : PATEN
The paten and chalice hold a special place in many Christian services. The paten is the plate that holds the bread and the chalice the wine that are used to represent the body and blood of Christ.

37. Half of a 1960s pop group : MAMAS
A folk group called the Magic Circle renamed itself to the Mamas and the Papas in the early sixties. Sadly, the Mamas and the Papas weren't a happy bunch, always fighting over who was getting credit for songs and whose voice was getting mixed out of recordings, so they split up, twice. While they were together though, they wrote and recorded some great songs, songs which really do epitomize the sound of the sixties. "Monday, Monday" was written by John Phillips, one of "the Papas", and it was to become the only number one hit for the group. Here's a shocker ... when it hit number one in 1966, it was the first time that a group made up of both sexes topped the American charts!

38. O. Henry bad guy who became a Hollywood/TV hero : CISCO KID
The Cisco Kid is a character who was first introduced in an O. Henry short story called "The Caballero's Way". The original O. Henry character was a cruel outlaw, but the character depicted in subsequent movies and television shows is more heroic.

45. Aussie "girl" famous for 55-Downing : MATILDA
(55. See 45-Across : WALTZ)
“Waltzing Matilda” is a country folk song from Australia, a bush ballad. The term “waltzing matilda” is slang. “Waltzing” means travelling by foot, and a “matilda” is a bag slung over the back. The song is often called the unofficial national anthem of Australia.

51. Tax-free bond, briefly : MUNI
A municipal bond (Muni) is one that is issued by a city or local government, or some similar agency. Munis have an advantage over other investments in that any interest earned on the bond is usually exempt from state and federal income taxes.

52. Like leprechauns : IRISH
A leprechaun is a mischievous fairy in Irish folklore. Traditionally, leprechauns spend their days making shoes and hide all their money in a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow. Our word “leprechaun” comes from the Irish name for such a sprite, “leipreachán”.

57. Opposite of spring : NEAP
Tides of course are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon's effect. At spring tides, the sun and the moon's gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

58. Ryder fleet : VANS
The Ryder company was founded in 1933 in Miami, Florida by James Ryder. It started out as a concrete hauling company, but changed its focus a few years later to the leasing of trucks.

60. Some payments: Abbr. : CKS
Checks (cks.)

61. Roseanne's husband on "Roseanne" : DAN
Actor John Goodman will forever be remembered as Dan Barr, the on-screen husband of Roseanne Barr in the sitcom "Roseanne". Goodman went to Missouri State University where he studied drama and was a compatriot of Kathleen Turner.

62. And others : ET ALIA
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact "et al." can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

65. "Dies ___" : IRAE
"Dies Irae" is Latin for "Day of Wrath". It is the name of a famous melody in Gregorian Chant, one that is often used as part of the Roman Catholic Requiem Mass.

68. Lime ___ : RICKEY
A rickey is a class of mixed drink made from a base spirit, half a squeezed lime and carbonated water.

69. Not yet decided: Abbr. : TBA
To be advised (TBA).

71. Middle parts of Japan? : OBIS
The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied in what is called a butterfly knot.

72. Home of the N.C.A.A.'s Minutemen : UMASS
The University of Massachusetts Amherst (UMass) is the largest public university in New England. UMass was founded back in 1863, although it took a while to get the school into service. Construction work was delayed and the college went through two presidents before William S. Clark took charge. He cracked the whip, completed the construction and enrolled the first students in the same year he took over the reins, in 1867. As a result, although Clark was the third President of UMass, he is regarded by most as the school’s founding father.

75. "Fiddler on the Roof" matchmaker : YENTE
Yenta (Yente) is actually a female Yiddish name. In Yiddish theater it came to mean a busybody.

77. One of two deliveries? : SON
I think the idea is that a birth delivery could be a son or a daughter.

78. Rap's Dr. ___ : DRE
Dr. Dre is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. He is perhaps as well known for his own singing career as he is for producing records and starting the careers of others such as Snoop Dog, Eminem and 50 Cent.

79. Bonaventures, e.g. : MASTS
A bonaventure mizzen is a fourth mast on large, sixteenth century galleon.

85. Pesto ingredient : BASIL
Pesto gets its name from the Latin word for "crush". The word "pestle", as in mortar and pestle, is derived from the same Latin root.

87. The House of ___ : GUCCI
Gucci was founded in Rome in 1921, by Guccio Gucci. Guccio's son, Aldo Gucci, took over the company after his father's death in 1953. It was Aldo that established the international presence for the brand, opening the company's first overseas store, in New York City.

88. Baba ___ (Gilda Radner character) : WAWA
Barbara Walters was originally quite upset at the caricature of her performed by Saturday Night Live star, Gilda Radner. She took offense at Radner exaggerating her speech impediment, which of course led to the name "Baba Wawa" being used for "Barbara Walters". However, when she saw that her own daughter found the skit to be hilarious, Barbara realized she needed to lighten up.

89. Writer Umberto : ECO
Umberto Eco is an Italian writer, probably best known for his novel "The Name of the Rose" published in 1980. "The Name of the Rose" was adapted in 1986 into a movie with the same title, starring Sean Connery.

90. Titles for attys. : ESQS
The title "esquire" is of British origin and is used differently today depending on whether one is in the US or the UK. Here in America the term is usually reserved for those practicing the law (both male and female). In the UK it is a term of gentle respect reserved for a male who has no other title that one can use. So a mere commoner like me might receive a letter from the bank say, addressed to W. E. Butler Esq.

91. Ottoman officer : PASHA
A pasha was a high-ranking official in the Ottoman Empire, roughly equivalent to the English rank of “lord”.

92. Noted tower locale : BABEL
We use the word "babel" now to describe a scene of confusion, lifting the term from the biblical story of the Tower of Babel. The Tower was built in the city of Babylon, and the construction was cursed with a confusion of languages due to the varied origins of all the builders.

94. Pac-12 team, for short : ASU
Arizona State University has a long history, founded as the Tempe Normal School for the Arizona Territory in 1885.

95. Shelley's fairy queen : MAB
In Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”, Mercutio refers to the fairy known as Queen Mab. It seems that Queen Mab was Shakespeare’s creation, although she became popular in subsequent works of literature. For example, she is referred to in Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick”, in Jane Austen’s “Sense and Sensibility”, and Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote a large poetic work called “Queen Mab: A Philosophical Poem”.

99. Start for someone seeking advice : DEAR ABBY
The advice column "Dear Abby" first appeared in 1956. Pauline Phillips was Abby back then, but now the column is written by Jeanne Phillips, her daughter. The full name of the "Abby" pen name is Abigail Van Buren, which Pauline Philips came up with by combining "Abigail" from the biblical Book of Samuel, and "Van Buren" after the former US president.

102. Place for produce stands : GAR(DEN MARK)ET
The constitutional monarchy of Denmark consists of not only the country of Denmark, but also the autonomous constituent countries of the Faroe Islands and Greenland.

108. N.J. and Pa. each have a famous one : TPKE
Back in the 15th century a “turnpike” was a defensive barrier across a road. By the 17th century the term was used for a barrier that stopped travellers until a toll was paid. By the 18th century a turnpike was the name given to a road with a toll.

109. Hall of fame : MONTY
Monty Hall is the stage name of Canadian-born television personality Monte Halperin. Hall is perhaps best known as the longtime host of the game show “Let’s Make a Deal”.

Down
3. Drink with foam on top : LAGER
Lager is so called because of the tradition of cold storing the beer during fermentation. "Lager" is the German word for "storage".

4. "Jumpin' Jack Flash, it's ___" : A GAS
“Jumpin’ Jack Flash” is a song released in 1968 by the Rolling Stones. The song was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards at Richards’ country house. Apparently Jagger awoke one morning to the sound of a gardener doing his work. Richards told him that the gardener was Jumpin’ Jack Dyer, and the song evolved from there.

7. Stews : OLIOS
Olio is a term meaning a hodgepodge or a mixture, coming from the mixed stew of the same name. The stew in turn takes its name from the Spanish "olla", the name of the clay pot used when cooking the stew.

10. Text-speak gasp : OMG
OMG is text-speak for Oh My Gosh! Oh My Goodness! Or any other G words you think of …

11. Red Cross founder Clara : BARTON
Clara Barton was deeply disturbed by her experiences caring for the wounded during the Civil War. She dedicated herself after the war towards American recognition of the International Committee of the Red Cross. The American Red Cross was inevitably formed, in 1881, and Barton was installed as its first president.

14. New Guinea port : LAE
Lae is the second largest city in Papua New-Guinea (after the capital, Port Moresby). It was from the airport at Lae that Amelia Earhart departed in 1937, never to be seen again.

15. Unofficial discussions : INFOR(MAL TA)LKS
The island state of Malta is relatively small, but its large number of inhabitants makes it one of the most densely populated countries in Europe. Malta's strategic location has made it a prized possession for the conquering empires of the world. Most recently it was part of the British Empire and was an important fleet headquarters. Malta played a crucial role for the Allies during WWII as it was located very close to the Axis shipping lanes in the Mediterranean. The Siege of Malta lasted from 1940 to 1942, a prolonged attack by the Italians and Germans on the RAF and Royal Navy, and the people of Malta. When the siege was lifted, King George VI awarded the George Cross to the people of Malta collectively in recognition of their heroism and devotion to the Allied cause. The George Cross can still be seen on the Maltese flag, even though Britain granted Malta independence in 1964.

18. Real ___ : MADRID
Real Madrid is the professional soccer team based in Madrid, Spain. The team name translates as “Royal Madrid”. Real Madrid is the world’s second most valuable soccer team, after Manchester United in England.

22. X, in Roma : DIECI
“Dieci” is Italian for “ten”.

26. Trip up, perhaps : CAT(CHIN A) LIE
The world’s most populous country is The People’s Republic of China (PRC). The Republic of China (ROC) is the official name of the sovereign state we usually call Taiwan.

30. Makes an extra effort : TAKE(S PAIN)S
The Kingdom of Spain is the second largest country in the European Union (after France).

33. "Swans Reflecting Elephants," e.g. : DALI
“Swans Reflecting Elephants” is a painting that Salvador Dali completed in 1937. The title is somewhat self-explanatory. The scene features some swans on a lake, along with their reflections. In the reflection the swans take on the appearance of elephants, with the swans’ necks becoming elephant trunks and wings becoming ears.

44. Sea salvager's quest, maybe : SUN(KEN YA)CHT
Kenya lies on the east coast of Africa, right on the equator. The country takes her name from Mount Kenya, the second highest peak on the continent (after Kilimanjaro).

45. One-named rapper with the 2008 hit "Paper Planes" : MIA
M.I.A. is a British rap singer. The stage name she chose is a play on the abbreviation for Missing in Action, and her real name Mathangi Arulpragasam.

46. Like always : AS (PER U)SUAL
Peru's name comes from the word "Biru". Back in the early 1500s, Biru was a ruler living near the Bay of San Miguel in Panama. The territory over which Biru ruled was the furthest land south in the Americas known to Europeans at that time. The Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro was the first European to move south of Biru's empire and the land that he found was designated "Peru", a derivative of "Biru".

50. On the level : FA(IR AN)D SQUARE
Before 1935, the country we know today as Iran was called Persia by the Western world. The official name of the country since the Iranian Revolution of 1979 is the “Islamic Republic of Iran”.

61. Lord's Prayer word : DEBTS
The Lord's Prayer is a central prayer in Christian religions, and is found in two places in the New Testament. In the version in the Gospel of Matthew the last line of the prayer is "deliver from evil". In the Gospel of Luke the last line is "lead us not into temptation". The last words of the prayer as it most often said today are:
For thine is the kingdom,
The power, and the glory,
For ever and ever,
Amen

63. The 82-Down in "The Lion King" : TIMON
Timon and Pumbaa are a pair of characters in Disney’s “The Lion King”, a meerkat and warthog.

67. Film producer Carlo : PONTI
The Italian film producer Carlo Ponti was not quite as famous as his celebrity wife, Sophia Loren. Ponti met Loren as a contestant in a beauty contest he was judging in 1950. Back then she was a budding young actress still using her real name, Sofia Lazzaro. The two married in 1957 even though divorce was illegal at the time in Italy, so Ponti was still married to his first wife.

76. Pricey hors d'oeuvre : ESCARGOT
In order to eat snails, apparently they have to be “purged” before killing them. That means starving them or feeding them on something “wholesome” for several days before cooking them up. Ugh ...

79. Juilliard subj. : MUS
The Juilliard School is located in the Lincoln Center in New York City. The immense popularity of the school is perhaps illustrated by its acceptance rate. In 2007 the school had 2,138 applications, and only 162 students were admitted. That's an acceptance rate of well under 10%.

80. Pricey furs : SABLES
Sables are small mammals about two feet long, found right across northern Europe and northern Asia. The sable’s pelt is highly prized in the fur trade. It is unique among furs in that it feels smooth no matter which direction it is stroked.

81. Many a Justin Bieber fan : TWEEN
I saw Justin Bieber on television not too long ago for the first time, and boy do I feel old. This heartthrob from Canada was born in 1994(!), and he is recording hit after hit. Me, I'll stick with the Beatles ...

82. African mongoose : MEERKAT
The meerkat (also called a suricate) is a mongoose-like mammal that is native to parts of Africa.

83. It's much thanked once a year : ACADEMY
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is the organization that gives the annual Academy Awards also known as the "Oscars". The root of the name "Oscar" is hotly debated, but what is agreed is that the award was officially named "Oscar" in 1939.

91. San ___, suburb of San Francisco : PABLO
San Pablo, California is a city close to where I am right now. San Pablo is almost completely surrounded by the city of Richmond in the San Francisco Bay Area.

92. Israel's Ehud : BARAK
Ehud Barak served as Prime Minister of Israel from 1999 to 2001. He left office after he called a special election for Prime Minister and lost the vote to Ariel Sharon. He resigned from the Knesset and took an advisory job with the US company Electronic Data Systems (EDS), and did some security related work with a private equity company. In 2007, Barak took over leadership of Israel's Labor Party, and is now the country's Minister of Defense.

93. Wife of 67-Down : LOREN
(67. Film producer Carlo : PONTI)
Sophia Loren certainly has her place in the world of movies. In 1962 she won an Oscar for Best Actress for her role in the Italian film "Two Women", the first actress to win an Academy Award for a non-English speaking performance. Loren received a second nomination for Best Actress for her role in "Marriage Italian-Style", another Italian-language movie, released in 1964.

97. O.K. Corral hero : EARP
The famous Earp brothers of the Wild West were Wyatt, Virgil and Morgan. All three brothers participated in what has to be the most celebrated gunfight in the history of the Old West, the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona. Strangely enough, the fight didn't happen at the O.K. Corral, but took place six doors down the street in a vacant lot next to a photography studio.

100. Mythical bird : ROC
The mythical roc is a huge bird of prey, reputedly able to carry off and eat elephants.

103. 1991 book subtitled "When the Lion Roars" : MGM
There has been a lion in the logo of the MGM studio since 1924. The original was an Irishman (!), a lion name Slats who was born in Dublin Zoo in 1919. However, it wasn't until Jackie took over from Slats in 1928 that the roar was heard, as the era of silent movies was coming to an end. The current lion is called Leo, and he has been around since 1957.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. How a bug might go on a windshield : SPLAT
6. Opposite of neither : BOTH
10. College town SW of Cleveland : OBERLIN
17. Hunt : FORAGE
18. Donnybrook : MELEE
19. Island group that includes Guam : MARIANAS
21. Show of affection : A H(UG AND A) KISS
23. Balletic : GRACEFUL
24. Misery causes : BANES
25. Ridiculous : IDIOTIC
27. The first letter of "tsar," in Cyrillic : TSE
28. Sweet ending? : -OSE
29. Mobile camper, informally : RVER
30. Long-migration seabirds : TERNS
31. Deep Western lake : TAHOE
33. Tied : DREW
34. Back to front? : -IER
35. Kind of rock : ACID
36. Eucharist plate : PATEN
37. Half of a 1960s pop group : MAMAS
38. O. Henry bad guy who became a Hollywood/TV hero : CISCO KID
41. Appropriate, in slang : PINCH
42. Part of the Confederacy: Abbr. : ALA
43. The gold in them thar hills, say : ORE
44. Like "vav" in the Hebrew alphabet : SIXTH
45. Aussie "girl" famous for 55-Downing : MATILDA
49. Frizzy dos : AFROS
51. Tax-free bond, briefly : MUNI
52. Like leprechauns : IRISH
54. Your, to Yves : TES
55. Summarize : WRAP UP
56. Pot builder : ANTE
57. Opposite of spring : NEAP
58. Ryder fleet : VANS
59. Record label for Cee Lo and Whitney Houston : ARISTA
60. Some payments: Abbr. : CKS
61. Roseanne's husband on "Roseanne" : DAN
62. And others : ET ALIA
64. Former European money : LIRE
65. "Dies ___" : IRAE
67. Attack with snowballs : PELT
68. Lime ___ : RICKEY
69. Not yet decided: Abbr. : TBA
70. Public : KNOWN
71. Middle parts of Japan? : OBIS
72. Home of the N.C.A.A.'s Minutemen : UMASS
73. Maximally wacky : ZANIEST
75. "Fiddler on the Roof" matchmaker : YENTE
77. One of two deliveries? : SON
78. Rap's Dr. ___ : DRE
79. Bonaventures, e.g. : MASTS
80. Double, maybe : STUNTMAN
85. Pesto ingredient : BASIL
87. The House of ___ : GUCCI
88. Baba ___ (Gilda Radner character) : WAWA
89. Writer Umberto : ECO
90. Titles for attys. : ESQS
91. Ottoman officer : PASHA
92. Noted tower locale : BABEL
93. Spring : LEAP
94. Pac-12 team, for short : ASU
95. Shelley's fairy queen : MAB
96. Crafter's pedal : TREADLE
98. Throng : HORDE
99. Start for someone seeking advice : DEAR ABBY
102. Place for produce stands : GAR(DEN MARK)ET
104. It's pushed in a park : STROLLER
105. Some exams : ORALS
106. Sparkles : GLEAMS
107. Areas : SECTORS
108. N.J. and Pa. each have a famous one : TPKE
109. Hall of fame : MONTY

Down
1. "Me too" : SO HAVE I
2. Tree trimmers : PRUNERS
3. Drink with foam on top : LAGER
4. "Jumpin' Jack Flash, it's ___" : A GAS
5. X : TEN
6. Show sympathy, say : BE KIND
7. Stews : OLIOS
8. Check, as brakes : TEST
9. Halting : HESITANT
10. Text-speak gasp : OMG
11. Red Cross founder Clara : BARTON
12. Remove : ERASE
13. Wedding staple : RICE
14. New Guinea port : LAE
15. Unofficial discussions : INFOR(MAL TA)LKS
16. Something gotten at an amusement park, maybe : NAUSEA
17. Draper's supply : FABRIC
18. Real ___ : MADRID
20. Loads : SLEWS
22. X, in Roma : DIECI
26. Trip up, perhaps : CAT(CHIN A) LIE
30. Makes an extra effort : TAKE(S PAIN)S
32. Little chuckle : HEH
33. "Swans Reflecting Elephants," e.g. : DALI
36. Mischievous one : PIXIE
37. SAT section : MATH
39. Whodunit staple : CORPSE
40. "Are you in ___?" : OR OUT
41. Servings of 3-Down : PINTS
44. Sea salvager's quest, maybe : SUN(KEN YA)CHT
45. One-named rapper with the 2008 hit "Paper Planes" : MIA
46. Like always : AS (PER U)SUAL
47. Turns down : DENIES
48. Appraise : ASSAY
49. Mexican shout of elation : ARRIBA
50. On the level : FA(IR AN)D SQUARE
51. Colorful bird : MACAW
53. Lets : RENTS
55. See 45-Across : WALTZ
58. For immediate lease, say : VACANT
61. Lord's Prayer word : DEBTS
63. The 82-Down in "The Lion King" : TIMON
66. Hogwash : ROT
67. Film producer Carlo : PONTI
70. Bottom of the ocean? : KEEL
74. Bearded flower : IRIS
76. Pricey hors d'oeuvre : ESCARGOT
79. Juilliard subj. : MUS
80. Pricey furs : SABLES
81. Many a Justin Bieber fan : TWEEN
82. African mongoose : MEERKAT
83. It's much thanked once a year : ACADEMY
84. Common co-op rule : NO PETS
85. They can help worriers : BEADS
86. Strengths : ASSETS
87. Gossip : GABBER
88. Ungainly gait : WADDLE
91. San ___, suburb of San Francisco : PABLO
92. Israel's Ehud : BARAK
93. Wife of 67-Down : LOREN
95. Barley product : MALT
97. O.K. Corral hero : EARP
98. Eclipse phenomenon : HALO
100. Mythical bird : ROC
101. Earth cycles: Abbr. : YRS
103. 1991 book subtitled "When the Lion Roars" : MGM

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3 comments :

Jim said...

41A-pinch.
When is pinch used for appropriate?

Bill Butler said...

Hi Jim,

I think "appropriate" here is the verb, not the adjective. So "to appropriate" is to take possession of, usually without permission. That would be stealing, pinching.

Hope that helps.

Jim said...

Thanks!

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This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

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Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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