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Greetings from Louisburgh, County Mayo in Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland, and have extended my stay until October 24th. I am focused on getting the puzzle solved and at least a basic post up each day. It's proving to be difficult to do much more than that due to pressure of time, which I am sure you can understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

0311-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 11 Mar 12, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications


CROSSWORD SETTER: Vic Fleming & John Dunn
THEME: 100 Years Ago … all of the theme answers relate to the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912:
63A. Theme of this puzzle : TITANIC
27A. American millionaire lost with the 63-Across : JOHN JACOB ASTOR
33A. With 88-Across, 1960 musical partly about the 63-Across, with "The" : UNSINKABLE
88A. See 33-Across : MOLLY BROWN
96A. What the 63-Across crossed to begin her 88-/13-Down : ENGLISH CHANNEL
3D. 2003 James Cameron documentary about the 63-Across : GHOSTS OF THE ABYSS
5D. 63-Across's destination on her 88-/13-Down : NEW YORK CITY
38D. 1955 Walter Lord book about the 63-Across : A NIGHT TO REMEMBER
65D. Where the 63-Across's 88-/13-Down began : SOUTHAMPTON
88D. With 13-Down, disastrous event for the 63-Across : MAIDEN
13D. See 88-Down : VOYAGE
COMPLETION TIME: 20m 50s!!
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
1. "Hansel and Gretel" figure : HAG
"Hansel and Gretel" is a Germanic fairy tale found in the collection of the Brothers Grimm. It tells of two siblings, Hansel and Gretel, the children of a woodcutter. The youngsters are abandoned in a forest at the behest of an evil stepmother. Clever Hansel hears of the plan and leaves a trail of pebbles so that he and his sister can find their way home, which they do. But the children are abandoned again, and this time leave a trail of breadcrumbs. Unfortunately, the crumbs are eaten by birds and so the children do indeed become lost. But eventually they do all live happily ever after ...

4. Collection of sketches, for short : SNL
NBC first aired a form of "Saturday Night Live" (SNL) in 1975 under the title "NBC's Saturday Night". The show was actually created to give Johnny Carson some time off from "The Tonight Show". Back then "The Tonight Show" had a weekend episode, and Carson convinced NBC to pull the Saturday or Sunday recordings off the air and hold them for subsequent weeknights in which Carson needed a break. NBC turned to Lorne Michaels and asked him to pull together a variety show to fill the vacant slot, and he came up with what we now call "Saturday Night Live".

7. Kind of port : USB
Universal Serial Bus (USB) is an industry standard dealing with how computers and electronic devices connect and communicate, and deal with electrical power, through those connections.

10. Like most of the Swiss flag : RED
The flag of Switzerland is the very distinctive white cross on a red background. Unlike most national flags, the Swiss flag is a square, although the version used as the Swiss naval ensign is rectangular.

13. Kind of trail : VAPOR
We talk so often about global warming these days but there is another fascinating phenomenon that is related, known as global dimming. Global dimming is the reduction in the amount of heat that irradiates daily from the planet due to the insulating effect of pollution, and vapor trails from aircraft, that are present in the atmosphere. The effect has been touted as a theory for decades but dramatic empirical data became available in the wake of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Planes were grounded and the skies over America were clear for three days. There was a stark change in the temperature range measured across the US for these three days, demonstrating the impact that air travel has on our climate.

23. Northern bird : SNOW OWL
The snowy owl (also “snow owl”) is such a beautiful-looking creature, I think. The snowy owl has plumage that is thick and white making it well-adapted for life north of the Arctic Circle.

24. ___ nerve : SCIATIC
The sciatic nerve is the longest and widest nerve in the human body. It runs from the lower back down through the leg to the foot.

25. Quidnunc : YENTA
Yenta (Yente) is actually a female Yiddish name. In Yiddish theater it came to mean a busybody.

A "quidnunc" is a nosy person. The term comes from the Latin "quid nunc?" which means "what now?"

26. Saunter with style : SASHAY
To sashay is to strut along in a showy manner. “Sashay” is an Anglicized form of the French word “chassé”, a sliding step in square dancing.

27. American millionaire lost with the 63-Across : JOHN JACOB ASTOR
John Jacob Astor IV was a member of the famous and wealthy Astor family of New York. Astor was a passenger on the RMS Titanic when it made its fateful journey in 1912. Astor did not survive the tragedy, and was the wealthiest person to go down with the ship.

29. Two-time All-Star Martinez : TINO
Tino Martinez has retired from Major League Baseball. He played first base for a number of teams including the Mariners, Yankees, Cardinals and Devil Rays. Martinez was born and raised in Tampa, Florida, and as a boy he worked in his father's cigar factory.

32. Medical pioneer Sir William : OSLER
Sir William Osler was a Canadian physician, one of the principal founders of Johns Hopkins Hospital.

33. With 88-Across, 1960 musical partly about the 63-Across, with "The" : UNSINKABLE
(88. See 33-Across : MOLLY BROWN)
“The Unsinkable Molly Brown” is a musical film released in 1964 and is a fictional account of the life of Molly Brown, one of the survivors of the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912. The title role in the film was played by Debbie Reynolds.

38. ___ blood-typing : ABO
The most important grouping of blood types is the ABO system. Blood is classified as either A, B, AB or O, depending on the type of antigens on the surface of the red blood cells. A secondary designation of blood is the Rh factor, in which other antigens are labelled as either positive or negative. When a patient receives a blood transfusion, ideally the donor blood should be the same type as that of the recipient as incompatible blood cells can be rejected. However, blood type O-Neg can be accepted by recipients with all blood types, AB or O, positive or negative. Hence someone with O-neg blood type is called a "universal donor".

41. Fraternal org. : BPOE
The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (BPOE) was founded in 1868 and is a social club that has about a million members today. It started out as a group of men getting together in a "club" in order to get around the legal opening hours of taverns in New York City. The club took on a new role as it started to look out for poor families of members who passed away. The club now accepts African Americans as members (since the seventies) and women (since the nineties), but atheists still aren't welcome.

44. Land in Central America : TIERRA
“Tierra” is Spanish for “earth, land”.

47. Big name in lawn products : SCOTT’S
Scott's Miracle-Gro Company was founded in 1868 by one Orlando Scott, initially selling seed to the agricultural industry. In the early 1900s it started to sell to homeowners, mainly supplying lawn seed. The company merged with the gardening company Miracle-Gro in 1955.

50. Singer Winans : CECE
CeCe Winans (real name Priscilla) is a Gospel music singer. She is part of a duo with her brother, BeBe Winans (real name Benjamin).

52. Old PC screen : CRT
Cathode Ray Tube (CRT). There aren't may of them around in the stores these days ...

55. Cager Baylor : ELGIN
Elgin Baylor is a retired NBA player and a former NBA general manager. Baylor spent 22 years as GM for the LA Clippers.

58. Generation ___ : XER
The term Generation X originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful 1991 publication "Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture". By the latest accepted definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

61. Science fiction author Frederik : POHL
Frederik Pohl is an American science-fiction writer, a winner of three Hugo awards. He started off his career as a literary agent, and was the only agent ever hired by Isaac Asimov.

62. Start of a children's rhyme : EENY
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

63. Theme of this puzzle : TITANIC
The RMS Titanic set off on her tragic maiden voyage in 1912, sailing from Southampton, England bound for New York City. Regulations only required that the ship have lifeboat capacity for 1,178 people, even though a full complement of passengers and crew was 3,547. When the order was given to abandon ship, the captain adhered to the traditional protocol of "women and children first". As a result, only 20% of male passengers survived the disaster, compared to 75% of the female passengers. Perhaps more telling is that 61% of those in first class survived, and only 25% of those in third class. The crew fared even worse though, with only 24% making it.

65. Transmitted, as an S O S : SENT
The Carpathia was the boat that answered the SOS signal sent out by the Titanic.

The combination of three dots - three dashes - three dots is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots - pause - three dashes - pause - three dots), although in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so SOS is in effect only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases "Save Our Souls" and "Save Our Ship" are simply mnemonics, introduced after the "SOS" signal was adopted.

68. Monopoly token : HAT
The commercial game of Monopoly is supposedly a remake of "The Landlord's Game" created in 1903 by a Quaker woman called Lizzie Phillips. She used her game as a tool to explain the single tax theory of American economist Henry George. The Landlord's Game was first produced commercially in 1924. The incredibly successful derivative game called Monopoly was introduced in 1933 by Charles Darrow, who became a very rich man when Parker Brothers bought the rights to the game just two years later in 1935.

69. Like tsunami-affected areas : COASTAL
“Tsunami” is the Japanese word for “harbor wave”.

72. Nobelist poet Neruda : PABLO
Pablo Neruda was the pen name, and eventually the legal name, used by Chilean writer Neftali Ricardo Reyes Basoalto. He chose the name as a homage to Czech poet Jan Neruda.

73. Classic black-and-white film featuring gigantic irradiated ants : THEM!
“Them!” is a science fiction film about giant ants, released in 1954. It was one of the first films that used the “nuclear irradiated monster” theme, and was the first film to feature giant bugs. Acting in the film (not as leads) were James Arness, and a young Leonard Nimoy.

81. Cartoon canine : REN
“The Ren and Stimpy Show” ran on Nickelodeon from 1991 to 1996. Not my cup of tea ...

87. Radical '60s org. : SDS
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) was an activist group in the sixties. The SDS organized the largest student strike in the history of the United States on 26 April 1968, with about a million students staying away from class that day.

91. Some reuniongoers : ALUMS
An "alumnus" (plural ... alumni) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is "alumna" (plural ... alumnae). The word comes into English from Latin, in which alumnus means foster-son or pupil.

94. "___ Walked Into My Life" ("Mame" song) : IF HE
The musical "Mame" opened on Broadway in 1966, with Angela Lansbury in the title role. The musical is based on the 1955 novel "Auntie Mame" written by Patrick Dennis.

95. Moon feature : MARE
A “mare” is a large dark area on the moon. “Mare” is the Latin for “sea.

96. What the 63-Across crossed to begin her 88-/13-Down : ENGLISH CHANNEL
The English Channel is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean, the narrow part that separates the south of England from northern France. At its narrowest point the Channel is just over 20 miles wide, and it indeed possible to see France from England and vice versa. Nowadays of course there is a tunnel under the channel making travel extremely convenient. When I was living and working in Europe, with the help of the Channel Tunnel, one day I had a breakfast meeting in Brussels, a lunch meeting in London, and a dinner meeting in Paris. It’s more fun sitting here doing the crossword though …

106. Toast in Toledo : SALUD
“Salud” is Spanish for “health”.

Toledo is a city in central Spain.

107. College voter : ELECTOR
The United States is unique in that it elects the head of state using an electoral college, as opposed to a direct popular election. It has been argued that the original intent by the Framers of the Constitution was for the Electoral College to nominate candidates for the positions of President and Vice President based on popular vote, and then Congress would decide on which candidates would take office. This intent would have been more in line with elections for head of state in other countries. But, it doesn't work that way, as we well know ...

111. Clinks : COOLERS
The Clink (also "the Clynke") was a celebrated prison in Southwark, England owned by the Bishop of Winchester. The prison was given the name "the clink", probably from the sound made by metal keys in metal locks and metal chains around ankles. The prison was closed down in 1780, and around the same time "clink" entered the English language as a slang term for "jail".

114. École ___ arts : DES
“École des arts” is French for “art school”.

115. "Piers Morgan Tonight" airer : CNN
Piers Morgan made a name for himself over in the UK as a journalist and then editor of some pretty trashy tabloid newspapers. He had a reputation for being very forceful in investigating the lives of celebrities and is now very much embroiled in the phone-hacking scandals that have rocked British society. He broke into television in the US as a judge on “America’s Got Talent”, and was (surprisingly, I’d say!) chosen to replace Larry King on CNN.

Down
2. Title girl on "Introducing ... The Beatles" : ANNA
“Introducing... the Beatles” was the first Beatles album produced for the US market, released in 1964. One of the tracks was “Anna (Go to Him)”.

3. 2003 James Cameron documentary about the 63-Across : GHOSTS OF THE ABYSS
"Ghosts of the Abyss" is a documentary film directed by James Cameron and released in 2003. The film deals with the undersea exploration of the wreck of the Titanic, a fitting project for Cameron who directed the 1997 blockbuster "Titanic". The film was released by Walt Disney Pictures and was the studio's first 3-D movie.

4. Ferris's girlfriend in "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" : SLOANE
The character Sloane Peterson in "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" is played by the very beautiful actress Mia Sara. Sloane is the girlfriend of the title character.

“Ferris Bueller's Day Off” is one of my favorite movies of all time, and was written and directed by John Hughes and released in 1986. There are so many classic scenes in the film, including two wonderful musical interludes. The more sedate of these is vignette shot in the Art Institute of Chicago that is beautifully filmed. The more upbeat musical scene is a rendition of “Twist and Shout” during a Von Steuben Day parade.

6. "Bad" cholesterol, for short : LDL
LDL (low-density lipoprotein) is one of the compounds responsible for transporting fats around the body. When LDL is combined with cholesterol it can be referred to as “bad cholesterol” as it can build up on the inner walls of blood vessels leading to atherosclerosis.

HDL (high-density lipoprotein) is a compound that is used to transport fats around the body. When HDL is combined with (is transporting) cholesterol, it is often called "good cholesterol". This is because HDL seems to remove cholesterol from where it should not be, say on the walls of arteries, and transports it to the liver for re-use or disposal. Important stuff ...

10. Actress Lee of "Funny Face" : RUTA
Ruta Lee is a Canadian actress and dancer, best known for playing one of the brides in the 1954 movie “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers”.

11. Novelist Ambler : ERIC
Eric Ambler was a British author of spy novels, an author that I read voraciously for relaxation as I worked my way through college. One of his books was “The Light of Day”, which provided inspiration for the comic movie adaption called “The Pink Panther”. Ambler also wrote the screenplay for the excellent film “A Night to Remember” which told the story of the fateful maiden voyage of the RMS Titanic.

12. 1920s-'30s style, informally : DECO
Art Deco is the name given to a style of design and architecture of the 1920s that actually had its roots in Belgium and then spread throughout Europe before arriving in North America. Celebrated examples of art deco architecture are the magnificent Chrysler Building in New York City completed in 1930, and the GE Building that sits in the middle of Rockefeller Center also in New York City, with the address of "30 Rock".

16. Hall-of-Fame QB Graham : OTTO
Otto Graham was not only a professional football player, but he also played professional basketball.

21. Atlantic City casino, with "the" : TAJ
Donald Trump's Taj Mahal Casino Resort opened up for business in Atlantic City in 1990.

28. Banjoist Fleck : BELA
Béla Fleck is a banjo player who performed with the bands New Grass Revival and Béla Fleck and the Flecktones. Fleck was born in New York City and was given the name Béla Anton Leoš Fleck. He was named after Hungarian composer Béla Bartók, Austrian composer Anton Webern, and Czech composer Leoš Janáček. That’s quite a name to live up to, but by all accounts Fleck is one of the most technically proficient banjo players the world has ever known.

32. Some modern museum designs : OP ART
Op art is also known as optical art, and puts optical illusions to great effect.

34. One-named singer/actress associated with Warhol : NICO
Nico was the stage name of the German singer born Christa Päffgen. Nico was one of Andy Warhol’s superstars, a group of personalities that gathered around him and whom he promoted in the sixties and seventies.

37. Seaport in western France : BREST
Brest is a port city in northwest France, the second largest military port in the country. Brest was an important base for German U-boats during WWII when France was occupied by the Nazis.

38. 1955 Walter Lord book about the 63-Across : A NIGHT TO REMEMBER
“A Night to Remember” is a 1955 book written by Walter Lord that describes the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912. The film was adapted into an excellent film released in 1958 that used the same title.

41. It's about 20 miles north of Lauderdale : BOCA
The name of the city of Boca Raton in Florida translates from Spanish as “Mouse Mouth”. There doesn’t seem to be a definitive etymology of the name but one plausible explanation is a nautical one. “Boca”, as well as meaning “mouth” can mean “inlet”. “Ratón”, as well as meaning “mouse” was also used to describe rocks that chewed away at a ship’s cable. So possibly Boca Raton was named for a rocky inlet.

43. Actress Skye : IONE
Ione Skye is an American actress, born in Hertfordshire in England. She is best known for portraying the character Diane Court in the 1989 high school romance movie "Say Anything ...", starring opposite John Cusack. Skye is the daughter of the Scottish folk singer Donovan.

45. Permanent sites? : SALONS
A perm is the name given to a permanent wave, a chemical or thermal treatment of hair to produce waves, curls or even to straighten hair. I don't worry about such things ... No.1 all over ...

47. "Benson" actress : SWENSON
Inga Swenson is an American actress. Her best known role was "Gretchen Kraus", the German cook and later housekeeper on the TV show "Benson". Swenson also appeared in a couple of episodes of "Bonanza" playing the second wife of Ben Cartwright (Lorne Greene), and mother of Hoss Cartwright (Dan Blocker). This was despite the fact that in real life she was actually 4 years younger than Blocker!

48. Work in wildlife preservation? : TAXIDERMY
The word "taxidermy" originates in Greek. "Taxis" means arrangement (the same root as "tactics") and "derma" meaning "skin". A gruesome practice, if you ask me, but you didn't ...

49. Put back, in a way : STET
"Stet" is the Latin word meaning "let it stand". In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word "stet" beside the change and then underscoring the change with a line of dots (or dashes).

57. Comic actor Nielsen : LESLIE
Leslie Nielsen was a Canadian actor, famous for playing the zany Sergeant Frank Drebin in "The Naked Gun". Nielsen’s big break in films came in the innovative comedy “Airplane!”

67. "60 Minutes" correspondent : STAHL
Lesley Stahl has worked on "60 Minutes" since 1991. She is married to author "Aaron Latham". As a journalist, it was Latham who wrote the article that inspired the movie "Urban Cowboy".

69. Mrs. Dithers of "Blondie" : CORA
"Blondie" was created as a comic strip by Chic Young. It was first published in 1930 and is still being created today (although the strip is now controlled by Chic's son, Dean). The strip spawned a series of radio programs (1939-1950) and a series of Blondie films (1938-1950). Blondie is married to Dagwood Bumstead. Dagwood slaves away at a construction company run by Julius Dithers, whose wife is called Cora.

71. Director Fritz : LANG
Fritz Lang was an Austrian-born American filmmaker. His masterpiece "Metropolis" was produced in Germany in 1927, a work of science-fiction that explored the struggle between workers and owners in a capitalist society. "Metropolis" was the most expensive silent movie ever made.

74. Biblical kingdom where Moses died : MOAB
In the Bible, Moab was the first son of Lot, and the founder of the Kingdom of Moab.

92. "The Far Side" cartoonist : LARSON
"The Far Side" is a cartoon series drawn by Gary Larson. It ran from 1980 to 1995, and continues today in reruns in many papers. A lot of "The Far Side" cartoons feature animals, often in outrageous human-like situations. Larson was so popular with people working with animals, that in 1989 an newly discovered insect species was names Strigiphilus garylarsoni. How cool is that?

96. Canadian station : ESSO
The brand name Esso has its roots in the old Standard Oil company, as it uses the initial letters of "Standard" and "Oil" (ESS-O). The Esso brand was replaced by Exxon in the US but ESSO is still used in many other countries.

99. Queen of myth : HERA
In Greek mythology, Hera was the wife of Zeus and was noted for her jealousy and vengeful nature, particularly against those who vied for the affections of her husband. The equivalent character in Roman mythology was Juno. Hera was the daughter of Cronus and Rhea.

102. Frequently injured knee part: Abbr. : ACL
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of four major ligaments that support the knee.

108. 1887-1996 govt. watchdog : ICC
The Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) was set up in 1887 to regulate the railroads and later the trucking industry. The ICC was abolished in 1995 and its functions were absorbed by the Surface Transportation Board.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "Hansel and Gretel" figure : HAG
4. Collection of sketches, for short : SNL
7. Kind of port : USB
10. Like most of the Swiss flag : RED
13. Kind of trail : VAPOR
18. Gobbled down : INHALED
20. Provide for : NURTURE
22. Give out one's address? : ORATE
23. Northern bird : SNOW OWL
24. ___ nerve : SCIATIC
25. Quidnunc : YENTA
26. Saunter with style : SASHAY
27. American millionaire lost with the 63-Across : JOHN JACOB ASTOR
29. Two-time All-Star Martinez : TINO
30. Like a friendly dog's tail : AWAG
31. Kind of trip : EGO
32. Medical pioneer Sir William : OSLER
33. With 88-Across, 1960 musical partly about the 63-Across, with "The" : UNSINKABLE
38. ___ blood-typing : ABO
41. Fraternal org. : BPOE
42. Family : KIN
44. Land in Central America : TIERRA
45. [Like that!] : SNAP
46. Dolt : OAF
47. Big name in lawn products : SCOTT’S
50. Singer Winans : CECE
51. Recover, as a sunken ship : RAISE
52. Old PC screen : CRT
53. Takes the crown in : WINS AT
54. Plays, with "in" : OPTS
55. Cager Baylor : ELGIN
56. Letter earner : ATHLETE
58. Generation ___ : XER
60. Collect dust : SIT
61. Science fiction author Frederik : POHL
62. Start of a children's rhyme : EENY
63. Theme of this puzzle : TITANIC
65. Transmitted, as an S O S : SENT
66. Wise off to : SASS
67. Landscaper's buy : SOD
68. Monopoly token : HAT
69. Like tsunami-affected areas : COASTAL
72. Nobelist poet Neruda : PABLO
73. Classic black-and-white film featuring gigantic irradiated ants : THEM!
75. Peeved : PUT OUT
77. Some tubes carry them : OVA
78. Arrive by plane : FLY IN
79. Prefix with plane : AERO-
80. Gushes : SPURTS
81. Cartoon canine : REN
82. Detective's assignment : CASE
83. What scattered things are said to be all over : THE MAP
85. "Don't think so" : NAH
86. Maritime danger : BERG
87. Radical '60s org. : SDS
88. See 33-Across : MOLLY BROWN
91. Some reuniongoers : ALUMS
93. Summer cooler : FAN
94. "___ Walked Into My Life" ("Mame" song) : IF HE
95. Moon feature : MARE
96. What the 63-Across crossed to begin her 88-/13-Down : ENGLISH CHANNEL
103. Does the hair just so : PRIMPS
106. Toast in Toledo : SALUD
107. College voter : ELECTOR
108. Birth announcement : IT’S A BOY
109. Washington, but not Adams : STATE
110. Be behind schedule : RUN LATE
111. Clinks : COOLERS
112. Bygone : OLDEN
113. Bowflex target : ABS
114. École ___ arts : DES
115. "Piers Morgan Tonight" airer : CNN
116. Collecting a pension: Abbr. : RET

Down
1. Unwelcome reception : HISS
2. Title girl on "Introducing ... The Beatles" : ANNA
3. 2003 James Cameron documentary about the 63-Across : GHOSTS OF THE ABYSS
4. Ferris's girlfriend in "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" : SLOANE
5. 63-Across's destination on her 88-/13-Down : NEW YORK CITY
6. "Bad" cholesterol, for short : LDL
7. Not yet planted : UNSOWN
8. "For example ...?" : SUCH AS
9. "Give me your best shot!" : BRING IT
10. Actress Lee of "Funny Face" : RUTA
11. Novelist Ambler : ERIC
12. 1920s-'30s style, informally : DECO
13. See 88-Down : VOYAGE
14. Kindergarten comeback : ARE SO
15. Big huff? : PANT
16. Hall-of-Fame QB Graham : OTTO
17. Stern : REAR
19. For some time : AWHILE
21. Atlantic City casino, with "the" : TAJ
27. Short outings : JAUNTS
28. Banjoist Fleck : BELA
32. Some modern museum designs : OP ART
34. One-named singer/actress associated with Warhol : NICO
35. Continues : KEEPS IT UP
36. Frigid : ARCTIC
37. Seaport in western France : BREST
38. 1955 Walter Lord book about the 63-Across : A NIGHT TO REMEMBER
39. Spaghetti sauce seasoning : BASIL
40. ___ seas : OPEN
41. It's about 20 miles north of Lauderdale : BOCA
43. Actress Skye : IONE
45. Permanent sites? : SALONS
47. "Benson" actress : SWENSON
48. Work in wildlife preservation? : TAXIDERMY
49. Put back, in a way : STET
51. Second go-rounds : REPEATS
57. Comic actor Nielsen : LESLIE
59. Cry with the shake of a pompom : RAH
63. Close behind : TO HEEL
64. Spends some time out? : NAPS
65. Where the 63-Across's 88-/13-Down began : SOUTHAMPTON
66. Word with bar or fork : SALAD
67. "60 Minutes" correspondent : STAHL
69. Mrs. Dithers of "Blondie" : CORA
70. Professes : AVERS
71. Director Fritz : LANG
72. Some basic training grads : PFCS
74. Biblical kingdom where Moses died : MOAB
76. Mole's work : TUNNEL
83. A lot : TONS
84. Newspaper or magazine offering : PRINT AD
86. Early stage of a time capsule project : BURIAL
88. With 13-Down, disastrous event for the 63-Across : MAIDEN
89. Distinguished : OF NOTE
90. "___ the love?" : WHERE’S
92. "The Far Side" cartoonist : LARSON
93. Champagne holder : FLUTE
96. Canadian station : ESSO
97. Like some parks: Abbr. : NATL
98. Joyful : GLAD
99. Queen of myth : HERA
100. Wood or iron : CLUB
101. Brooding types : HENS
102. Frequently injured knee part: Abbr. : ACL
104. Go (over) : PORE
105. Method: Abbr. : SYST
108. 1887-1996 govt. watchdog : ICC

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4 comments :

Phylis Sophical said...

What does it mean when there are brackets in a clue? As in 45 across [Like that!]

Bill Butler said...

Hi Phylis,

That's a very good question!

I think the use of brackets in a clue means that the words within the brackets are a verbal representation of an action, with that action being the answer. So in this case, describing something that happens very quickly one might say "it happened just like that". Alternatively, one might say "it happened just like ..." and then SNAP one's fingers.

At least, I think that's it!

Anonymous said...

Bill,

Regarding 4 down, the parade in "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" is in fact the Von Steuben Day Parade. See . Thus the reason for singing Wayne Newton's version of "Danke Schoen". See the wikipedia page regarding the disparity in Ferris' springtime hooky day and the actual mid-September date for Von Steuben Day.

For additional trivia, most Chicago locals notice that the parade does not take place on the same streets in different immediate cut-away scenes and his father's office building (depicted as 333 W. Wacker Drive from exterior shots), where the father looks down at the parade, is almost 1/2 a mile from the parade locations. Further, the location of the step-dancing for "Twist and Shout" is now currently the plaza south of Chase Tower (10 S. Dearborn), which is about 1 and 1/2 blocks south and slightly west of the initial parade location shots. "The Blues Brothers" has some of these same continuity problems during the famous chase to the Cook County Assessor's office.

"The Fugitive" starring Harrison Ford does contain a St. Patrick's Day Parade, however. The only problem is that it seems to take place during a weekday in the afternoon and the route is on Dearborn Street. The actual parade takes place on the Saturday beforehand (or the actual March 17th like this year) at noon and starts at Columbus Drive and Roosevelt Road, which is over 1/2 a mile east and about 1.5 miles south of the depiction in "The Fugitive".

Thanks for all your contributions, though, and you are correct that "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" is a good movie.

-Cheers

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, anonymous visitor.

Thank you so much for pointing out the error. I guess I must assume that every parade that takes place in Chicago involves the Irish! You mentioned the parade scene in "The Fugitive", and I do think that's probably what confused things in my mind. And of course the rendition of "Danke Schoen" now makes perfect sense.

I'll amend what I wrote. Thanks for your help!

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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