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0318-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 18 Mar 12, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications


CROSSWORD SETTER: Mike Nothnagel & Byron Walden
THEME: Rear-End Collisions … This is a rebus puzzle, with theme answers comprised of two words. The first word is a synonym of "compress", and the last/rear word is written pairs of letters “colliding” together in the same square:
15A. Burro, e.g. : PACK ANIMAL
26A. When the pressure's on : CRUNCH TIME
45A. Big media event : PRESS CONFERENCE
53A. Widely popular shows, say : CROWD PLEASERS
55A. Bunting is part of it : SQUEEZE PLAY
71A. Some morning fund-raisers : PANCAKE BREAKFASTS
86A. Late rallies : CLUTCH PERFORMANCES
99A. Car safety feature : CRUMPLE ZONE
101A. Data storage device : COMPACT DISC
111A. Mexican cooking ingredients called "flores de calabaza" in Spanish : SQUASH BLOSSOMS
135A. Diamond substitute : PINCH RUNNER
142A. Occasions to try out riffs : JAM SESSIONS
COMPLETION TIME: 67m 12s! (pretty slow for me, but it is St. Paddy’s Day evening, if you know what I mean!)
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
7. Label for unmentionables? : ET CETERA
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact "et al." can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

25. Hero of an old Scottish ballad : TAM LIN
Tam Lin features in a ballad that originated in the Scottish border areas. It tells of the rescue of Tam Lin by his true love from the Queen of the Fairies.

32. Godzilla, e.g. : MONSTER
Godzilla is a Japanese invention. The first in a very long series of Godzilla films was released way back in 1954. The original name in Japanese was "Gojira", but this was changed to Godzilla for audiences outside of Japan. "Gojira" is a combination of "gorira" and "kujira", the Japanese words for gorilla and whale, apt because Godzilla is a big ape-like creature that came out of the deep.

36. One of the "Desperate Housewives" : BREE
The character Bree is played by Marcia Cross on "Desperate Housewives" (I haven't even seen one episode!). During pre-production, the show was called "Wisteria Lane" and then "The Secret Lives of Housewives".

41. Daredevil Knievel : EVEL
Daredevil Evel Knievel contracted Hepatitis C from the many blood transfusions that he needed after injuries incurred during stunts. He had to have a liver transplant as a result, but his health declined after that. He eventually passed away in 2007.

59. Old French coin : ECU
The ecu was an Old French coin. When introduced in 1640 it was worth three livres (an older coin, called a "pound" in English). The word "ecu" comes from the Latin "scutum" meaning "shield". The original ecu had a coat of arms on it, a shield.

61. Roy of country music : ACUFF
Roy Acuff was a country music singer and fiddle player. He founded the group known as the Smoky Mountain Boys.

64. Sources of pollen grains : STAMENS
The stamen is the male reproductive organ of a flower. The part of the stamen known as the anther carries the pollen, which is picked up by the bee and transferred from flower to flower. The pistil is the female reproductive organ, and it accepts the pollen.

69. Diaper wearer : INFANT
Here's another word that I had to learn when I moved to America: "diaper". What are called "diapers" over here we call "nappies" back in Ireland. The term "diaper" is actually the original term that was used in England for the garment, where "diaper" referred to the cloth that was used. The term diaper was brought to the New World where it stuck. Back in Britain, diaper was displaced by the word "nappy", a diminutive of "napkin".

73. "The Closer" airer : TNT
"The Closer" is a crime drama airing on TNT, with Kyra Sedgwick in the lead role. Sedgwick is married to actor Kevin Bacon.

79. Jumbo combatants : SUMOS
Sumo is a sport that is practiced professionally only in the country of its origin, Japan. There is an international federation of sumo wrestling now, and one of its aims is to have the sport accepted as an Olympic event.

80. Meyerbeer output : ARIAS
Giacomo Meyerbeer was a German composer, mainly of operatic works. He is recognized as the first composer to use the “grand opera” style, yet his works are rarely performed today. Meyerbeer largely fell out of favor after his death, largely due to a personal campaign against his reputation by Richard Wagner. That campaign was known to be racially driven, as Mayerbeer was of Jewish heritage.

85. Gen ___ : XER
The term Generation X originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful 1991 publication "Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture". By the latest accepted definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

88. It involves a trip to the underworld : AENEID
"The Aeneid" is Virgil's epic poem that tells of the journey of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy to become the ancestor of all Romans.

92. Al dente, say : FIRM
The Italian expression "al dente" literally means "to the tooth" or "to the bite" and is used to describe not only pasta, but also vegetables that are cooked so that they are tender yet still crisp.

101. Data storage device : COMPACT DISC
The Compact Disc (CD) is an optical storage device that was developed for the storage and playback of music. Derivative products were later developed such as the CD-ROM for data storage, and the PhotoCd for storage of images.

109. Decalogue possessive : THY
“Decalogue” is another name for the Ten Commandments.

110. Boxer Ali : LAILA
Laila Ali is the daughter of the great Muhammad Ali and is a very capable boxer in her own right. She's not a bad dancer either, coming in third place in the fourth season of "Dancing with the Stars".

115. Barely gets : EKES OUT
To "eke out" means to "make something go further or last longer". So, you can eke out your income by cutting back on expenses. I always have a problem with the commonly cited definition of “eke out” as “barely get by”. Close but no cigar, I say ...

120. Arles affirmatives : OUIS
A few years ago I had the privilege of living just a short car ride from the beautiful city of Arles in the South of France. Although it has a long and colorful history, the Romans had a prevailing influence over the city's design. It has a spectacular Roman amphitheater, arch, circus as well as old walls that surround the center of the city. In more modern times, it was a place Vincent van Gogh often visited, and where he painted his famous "Cafe Terrace at Night", as well as "Bedroom in Arles".

121. Murder, ___ : INC
Murder, Inc was the name for organized crime groups in the twenties through the forties.

122. Special delivery : PREEMIE
A “preemie” is a preterm or premature birth.

124. Half brother of Athena : ARES
In Greek mythology the god Ares was the half-brother of the goddess Athena, although the two were regarded as enemies. Both deities are associated with war, with Athena representing strategic warfare whereas Ares is linked to momentary, passionate violence.

125. 1950 film in which Frank Bigelow investigates his own murder : DOA
Both the original 1950 film "D.O.A." starring Edmond O'Brien, and its 1988 remake starring Dennis Quaid and Meg Ryan, are excellent movies in my opinion. The basic storyline is that the lead character discovers he has been poisoned, and uses the limited time he has to live in order to discover who "murdered" him.

130. Kofi of the U.N. : ANNAN
Kofi Annan is the diplomat from Ghana who served as General Secretary of the UN for ten years until the beginning of 2007. Annan attended the MIT Sloan School of Management from 1971-72, and graduated with a Master of Science degree.

137. First estate : CLERGY
In the Middle Ages, society was organized into “the Estates of the realm”, a hierarchical structure largely ordained by the church. The three estates of the realm, in order of influence, were:
- the clergy
- the nobility
- the commoners

142. Occasions to try out riffs : JAM SESSIONS
A riff is a short rhythmic phrase in music, especially one improvised on a guitar.

The use of "jam", to mean an improvised passage performed by a whole jazz band, dates back to the late twenties. This gave rise to "jam session", a term used a few years later. The use of "jam" in this context probably stems from the meaning of "jam" as something sweet, something excellent.

143. Peeping Tom's home : COVENTRY
In the legend of Lady Godiva, a noblewoman rode naked through the streets of Coventry in England, basically as a dare from her husband in return for relieving the taxes of his tenants. Lady Godiva issued instructions that all the town’s inhabitants should stay indoors while she made her journey. However, a tailor in the town named Tom disobeyed the instructions by boring holes in the shutters on his windows, and “peeped”. As a result, Peeping Tom was struck blind, and the term “peeping Tom” has been in our language ever since.

144. Raga instruments : SITARS
The sitar has been around since the Middle Ages. It is a stringed instrument that is played by plucking, and is used most often in Hindustani classical music. In the West we have been exposed to the sitar largely through the performances of Ravi Shankar and some music by George Harrison of the Beatles, a one-time student of Shankar.

Raga isn't really a type of music, but has been described as the "tonal framework" in which Indian classical music is composed. Ravi Shankar is perhaps the most famous raga virtuoso (to us Westerners).

Down
1. OK setting in the summer : CDT
Central daylight saving time is in operation in Oklahoma during the summer.

4. Clambake dish : COLESLAW
The term "coleslaw" is an Anglicized version of the Dutch name "koolsla", which in itself is a shortened form of "Koolsalade" meaning "cabbage salad".

9. Orts : CRUMBS
Orts are small scraps of food left after a meal. The word comes from Middle English, and originally described scraps left by animals.

12. Letter after delta : ECHO
The NATO phonetic alphabet is also called the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) phonetic alphabet. It goes Alfa, Bravo, Charlie etc.

13. Tangent, e.g. : RATIO
The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine, cosine and tangent. Each of these is a ratio, a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The inverses to these three functions are arcsine, arccosine and arctangent. The inverse functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine, cosine and tangent.

14. French weapon : ARME
"Arme" is the French for "weapon", as in "armes de destruction massive" (weapons of mass destruction).

19. Manchester's St. ___ Church : ANN’S
I think the reference is to St. Ann’s church in Manchester, England, a church that was consecrated in 1712.

21. Choir voice : ALTO
In choral music, an alto is the second-highest voice in a four-part chorus made up of soprano, contr(alto), tenor and bass. The word "alto" describes the vocal range, that of the deepest female singing-voice, whereas the term "contralto" describes more than just the alto range, but also its quality and timbre. An adult male's voice (not a boy's) with the same range as an alto is called a "countertenor".

31. E.T.S. offering : GRE
The Educational Testing Service (ETS) was founded in 1947 and produces standardized tests for students from kindergarten through college. Perhaps most famously, ETS operates the SAT testing process.

32. Former Ford offering, for short : MERC
The Mercury brand of car was made by Ford from 1938 until 2011.

36. Aberdeen hillside : BRAE
"Brae" is a lowland Scots word for the slope or brow of a hill.

38. Storytelling Studs : TERKEL
Studs Terkel was an author, historian and broadcaster. Terkel won a Pulitzer in 1985 for his book “The Good War”, an oral history of WWII consisting of interviews he conducted with many ordinary people about their experiences during the conflict.

39. New York lake : SENECA
When I first moved to the US I came to Upstate New York and was lucky enough to live near the beautiful Finger Lakes. The largest of the eleven lakes is Seneca Lake, one of the deepest bodies of water in the United States. My wife and I visited the Finger Lakes region in 2010 and stopped at one of the best wineries in the area and frankly were blown away by the quality of the wines available. Coming from California it’s very refreshing to taste great wines that are made without the benefit of artificial irrigation.

44. Members of a Connecticut tribe : PEQUOTS
The Pequot people are Native Americans that inhabited, in the 1600s and earlier, most of what today is the State of Connecticut.

48. Pharmaceutical company that developed Metamucil and Dramamine : G D SEARLE
Metamucil is a laxative and fiber supplement that has been around since 1934. The main ingredient of Metamucil is psyllium seed husks.

Dramamine is a brand name for dimenhydrinate, a drug used to counteract motion sickness.

56. Remedy for acid reflux : ZANTAC
Zantac is a brand name for the drug called ranitidine, which is used to inhibit the production of stomach acid. Ranitidine was introduced in 1981, and by 1988 was the biggest-selling, prescription drug in the world.

66. Part of a.m. : ANTE
The 12-hour clock has been around a long time and was even used in sundial format in Ancient Egypt. Our use of AM and PM dates back to Roman times, with AM standing for Ante Meridiem (before noon) and PM standing for Post Meridiem (after noon). Today we use the concept of AM and PM differently than it was intended. In Ancient Rome, 2 AM say, was 2 hours Ante Meridiem, two hours before noon, which makes sense grammatically anyway. We call that same time 10 AM.

67. Scottish inventor and road builder John Loudon ___ : MCADAM
Tarmac is of course short for "tarmacadam". In the 1800s, Scotsman John Loudon McAdam developed a system for constructing roads that became very popular and that became known as macadam. Macadam was a top-layer of crushed stone and gravel laid over larger stones, with the surface built with a convex cross-section so that water tended to drain to the sides. In 1901, a significant improvement was made by English engineer Edgar Purnell Hooley who introduced tar in the macadam, improving the resistance to water damage and practically eliminating dust. The "tar-penetration macadam" is the basis of what we now call Tarmac.

72. Habitual teeth grinding : BRUXISM
“Bruxism” is the term for grinding of the teeth and clenching of the jaw. Bruxism usually manifests itself during sleep.

77. Newsworthy 1950s trial, informally : H-TEST
There are two classes of nuclear weapons, both of which get the energy for the explosion from nuclear reactions. The first nuclear bombs developed, called atomic bombs (A-bombs), use fission reactions. Uranium nuclei are split into smaller nuclei with the release of an awful lot of energy in the process. The second class of nuclear weapons are fusion bombs. These devices are called thermonuclear weapons or hydrogen bombs (H-bombs). In a fusion reaction, the nuclei of hydrogen isotopes are fused together to form bigger nuclei, with the release of even greater amounts of energy than a fission reaction.

81. Climb, as a rope : SHIMMY UP
A kind blog reader pointed out to me that the use of "shimmy up" has an interesting history. One can also say "shinny up" a rope or pole, meaning to climb using one's shins. This was the original term for the maneuver, but then it was mixed up with the word "shimmy", a term from dancing meaning to shake from side to side. Now it seems that about half of us use "shimmy up" and half "shinny up". I guess we are watching our language evolve!

86. Italian turnover : CALZONE
A calzone is like a pizza but with the dough base folded in half, forming a semi-circle.

89. Water in the Oise : EAU
The River Oise rises in Belgium and joins up with the River Seine just outside Paris.

96. Poetry contests : SLAMS
A poetry slam is a competition in which poets read their own work (usually), with winners being chosen by members of audience. Apparently the first poetry slam took place in Chicago in 1984. Now there is a Nation Poetry Slam that takes place each year, with representatives from the US, Canada and France.

97. Area near Little Italy : SOHO
The Manhattan neighborhood known today as SoHo was very fashionable in the early 1900s, but as the well-heeled started to move uptown the area became very run down and poorly maintained. Noted for the number of fires that erupted in derelict buildings, it earned the nickname "Hell's Hundred Acres". The area was then zoned for manufacturing and became home to many sweatshops. In the mid-1900s artists started to move into open loft spaces and renovating old buildings as the lofts were ideal locations in which an artist could both live and work. In 1968, artists and others organized themselves so that they could legalize their residential use of an area zoned for manufacturing. The group they formed took its name from the name given to the area by the city's Planning Commission i.e "South of Houston". This was shortened from So-uth of Ho-uston to SoHo as in the SoHo Artists Association, and the name stuck.

99. Bank offerings, in brief : CDS
A certificate of deposit is like a less-flexible and higher-paying savings account. Instead of depositing money into a savings account and earning interest periodically, one can open a CD. With a CD one deposits a minimum amount of money but must leave it there for a specified length of time. In return for committing the funds for a fixed period one is given a higher interest rate than a savings account, and can redeem that interest and the initial deposit when the term has expired. CDs are relatively low-risk investments as they are FDIC insured, just like savings accounts.

101. It can help you get inside someone's head : CT SCANNER
A CT (or "CAT") scan produces (via computer manipulation) a three dimensional image of the inside of an object, usually the human body. It does so by taking a series of two dimensional x-ray images while rotating the camera around the patient. The issue with CT scans is that they use x-rays, and high doses of radiation can be harmful causing damage that is cumulative over time. An MRI, on the other hand (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), uses powerful magnetic fields to generate its images so there is no exposure to ionizing radiation (such as X-rays). We used MRI equipment in our chemistry labs at school, way back in the days when the technology was still called Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI). Apparently the marketing folks didn't like the term "nuclear" because of its association with atomic bombs, so now it's just called MRI.

103. Jamaican coffee liqueur : TIA MARIA
Tia Maria is a coffee liqueur, invented just after WWII in Jamaica, using Jamaica coffee beans. The name of course translates to "Aunt Maria".

104. Bonnie and Clyde contemporary : DILLINGER
John Dillinger was a notorious bank robber during the Depression Era. Famously he was killed by federal agents in an ambush at the Biograph Theater in Chicago, in 1934.

112. Hamlet confidant : HORATIO
Horatio is a character in Shakespeare's "Hamlet", a friend of the play's hero and a relatively uninterested party in the intrigue that makes up the storyline. As a trusted friend, Horatio serves as a sounding board for Hamlet, allowing us in the audience to gain more insight into Hamlet's thinking and character as we listen to the two in conversation.

113. Many Bics : BLUE PENS
Société Bic is a French company, based in Clichy in France. The first product the company produced, more than fifty years ago, was the Bic Cristal ballpoint pen that is still produced today. Bic also makes other disposable products such as lighters and razors.

123. Zhou ___ : ENLAI
Zhou Enlai (also Chou En-Lai) was the first government leader of the People's Republic of China and held the office of Premier from 1949 until he died in 1976. He ran the government for Communist Party Leader Mao Zedong, often striking a more conciliatory tone with the West than that of his boss. He was instrumental, for example, in setting up President Nixon's famous visit to China in 1972. Zhou Enlai died just a few months before Mao Zedong, leading to unrest and a dramatic change in political direction for the country.

125. Cartoon character voiced by Mel Blanc : DINO
In the Hanna-Barbera cartoon "The Flintstones", Dino the pet dinosaur was voiced by the famous Mel Blanc, until Blanc passed away in 1989.

Mel Blanc is known as "The Man of a Thousand Voices". We've all heard Mel Blanc at one time or another, I am sure. His was the voice behind such cartoon characters as Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, Woody Woodpecker and Barney Rubble. And the words on Blanc's tombstone are ... "That's All Folks".

131. Rule that ended in 1947 : RAJ
The period of colonial rule by the British in South Asia from 1858 to 1947 is referred to as the British Raj. Prior to 1858, the area was ruled by a private enterprise, the British East India Company. “Raj” is the Hindi word for “reign”.

132. South American tuber : OCA
The plant called an oca is also known as the New Zealand Yam. The tubers of the oca are used as a root vegetable.

134. Italian actress Eleonora : DUSE
Eleanora Duse was an Italian actress, known professionally simply as “Duse”.

136. Barbarian : HUN
The Huns were a nomadic people who originated in Eastern Europe in the 4th century. Under the command of Attila the Hun they developed a unified empire that stretched from modern-day Germany across to the steppes of Central Asia. The whole of the Hunnic Empire collapsed within a year of Attila's death in 453 AD.

138. Gridiron figs. : YDS
We never used the word "gridiron" when I was growing up (meaning a grill used for cooking food over an open fire). So, maybe I am excused for finding out fairly recently that a football field gridiron is so called because the layout of yard lines over the field looks like a gridiron used in cooking!

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Spanish girls : CHICAS
7. Label for unmentionables? : ET CETERA
15. Burro, e.g. : PACK ANIMAL
22. Lower : DEMOTE
23. Like some collisions : THREE-CAR
24. "For real!" : I MEAN IT
25. Hero of an old Scottish ballad : TAM LIN
26. When the pressure's on : CRUNCH TIME
27. Avails oneself of : TURNS TO
28. Face-offs : DUELS
29. Bottom line? : HEM
30. Yoo follower : HOO
31. Heart : GIST
32. Godzilla, e.g. : MONSTER
34. Epitome of simplicity : ABC
36. One of the "Desperate Housewives" : BREE
37. Formal/informal reply to "Who's there?" : IT’S I
41. Daredevil Knievel : EVEL
42. Lampoons : SENDS UP
45. Big media event : PRESS CONFERENCE
47. Hike the price of, perhaps : RETAG
49. Cultivate, in a way : HOE
50. Four front? : TETRA-
52. Snoops (around) : POKES
53. Widely popular shows, say : CROWD PLEASERS
55. Bunting is part of it : SQUEEZE PLAY
59. Old French coin : ECU
60. Beknighted souls? : SIRS
61. Roy of country music : ACUFF
62. Draft pick? : ALE
63. An affront : SLAP
64. Sources of pollen grains : STAMENS
68. Letter-shaped opening in some pistons : T-SLOT
69. Diaper wearer : INFANT
71. Some morning fund-raisers : PANCAKE BREAKFASTS
73. "The Closer" airer : TNT
74. "___ me!" : SEARCH
78. Last place you'll see a bachelor : ALTAR
79. Jumbo combatants : SUMOS
80. Meyerbeer output : ARIAS
82. Suffered a financial setback, slangily : ATE IT
83. Irk : NEEDLE
85. Gen ___ : XER
86. Late rallies : CLUTCH PERFORMANCES
88. It involves a trip to the underworld : AENEID
90. Stares slack-jawed : GAPES
91. Stuck : IN A SPOT
92. Al dente, say : FIRM
95. It's not liquid : GAS
96. It's not liquid : SOLID
97. Blue material : SMUT
98. Dander : IRE
99. Car safety feature : CRUMPLE ZONE
101. Data storage device : COMPACT DISC
106. Was manic : RAVED
108. Pulls down : EARNS
109. Decalogue possessive : THY
110. Boxer Ali : LAILA
111. Mexican cooking ingredients called "flores de calabaza" in Spanish : SQUASH BLOSSOMS
115. Barely gets : EKES OUT
118. ___ rat : MALL
119. Echelon : TIER
120. Arles affirmatives : OUIS
121. Murder, ___ : INC
122. Special delivery : PREEMIE
124. Half brother of Athena : ARES
125. 1950 film in which Frank Bigelow investigates his own murder : DOA
128. Hawaiian souvenir? : TAN
130. Kofi of the U.N. : ANNAN
131. Driver's aid : ROAD MAP
135. Diamond substitute : PINCH RUNNER
137. First estate : CLERGY
139. Put into motion : ACTUATE
140. Rah-rah : ENTHUSED
141. Crossed the tarmac : TAXIED
142. Occasions to try out riffs : JAM SESSIONS
143. Peeping Tom's home : COVENTRY
144. Raga instruments : SITARS

Down
1. OK setting in the summer : CDT
2. Go (to) : HEAD OVER
3. Protected against : IMMUNE TO
4. Clambake dish : COLESLAW
5. Skewed : ATILT
6. Picks up : SENSES
7. Impress clearly : ETCH
8. Sewing machine parts : THREADERS
9. Orts : CRUMBS
10. Poetic period : E’EN
11. High-___ : TECH
12. Letter after delta : ECHO
13. Tangent, e.g. : RATIO
14. French weapon : ARME
15. Feels for : PITIES
16. Entertains : AMUSES
17. Diploma, e.g.: Abbr. : CERT
18. Neighbor of Mo. : KAN
19. Manchester's St. ___ Church : ANN’S
20. "Nobody else is coming" : I’M IT
21. Choir voice : ALTO
31. E.T.S. offering : GRE
32. Former Ford offering, for short : MERC
33. Runs through : REHEARSES
35. Doesn't get taught a lesson? : CUTS CLASS
36. Aberdeen hillside : BRAE
37. Dirt : INFO
38. Storytelling Studs : TERKEL
39. New York lake : SENECA
40. Freezes over : ICES UP
43. They might be held at a sewage plant : NOSES
44. Members of a Connecticut tribe : PEQUOTS
45. Aisle or window, e.g.: Abbr. : PREF
46. Part of a medical bill : COPAY
48. Pharmaceutical company that developed Metamucil and Dramamine : G D SEARLE
51. Clump of grass : TUFT
54. Toy piano sound : PLINK
56. Remedy for acid reflux : ZANTAC
57. Seasonal helper : ELF
58. Petitions : PLEAS
61. Request : ASK FOR
63. Unmoving machine parts : STATORS
64. Cross : SPAN
65. 88-Across, for one : TALE
66. Part of a.m. : ANTE
67. Scottish inventor and road builder John Loudon ___ : MCADAM
68. Hooked (up) : TEAMED
69. J.F.K., e.g. : INITS
70. Very serious, as an accident : NEAR FATAL
72. Habitual teeth grinding : BRUXISM
73. Aligned : TRUED
75. Change, as keyboard keys : REMAP
76. Dos + tres : CINCO
77. Newsworthy 1950s trial, informally : H-TEST
80. Item of winter sports equipment : ALPINE SKI
81. Climb, as a rope : SHIMMY UP
84. Road designer, e.g.: Abbr. : ENGR
86. Italian turnover : CALZONE
87. Confine : PEN UP
89. Water in the Oise : EAU
90. Attendee : GOER
92. Primarily : FIRST
93. Syrian's neighbor : IRAQI
94. "Side by Side by Sondheim," e.g. : REVUE
96. Poetry contests : SLAMS
97. Area near Little Italy : SOHO
99. Bank offerings, in brief : CDS
100. Change in Mexico : PESOS
101. It can help you get inside someone's head : CT SCANNER
102. Followed : CAME NEXT
103. Jamaican coffee liqueur : TIA MARIA
104. Bonnie and Clyde contemporary : DILLINGER
105. Item at a bakery : SCALE
107. Corn unit : EAR
112. Hamlet confidant : HORATIO
113. Many Bics : BLUE PENS
114. Medical suffix : -OSIS
116. Put in someone's care : ENTRUST
117. Political writings : TRACTS
123. Zhou ___ : ENLAI
124. Collect : AMASS
125. Cartoon character voiced by Mel Blanc : DINO
126. Airing : ON TV
127. Yearn (for) : ACHE
129. Unhip : NERDY
131. Rule that ended in 1947 : RAJ
132. South American tuber : OCA
133. Bills are in it: Abbr. : ATM
134. Italian actress Eleonora : DUSE
135. Bencher's target : PEC
136. Barbarian : HUN
138. Gridiron figs. : YDS

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4 comments :

Grumpier Greg said...

I didn't get this one at all, I'm humbled to admit. No St. Paddy's excuses for me. It's pretty rare anymore that I'm not able to complete a Sunday since I've been under your tutelage, so hats off to Mike and Byron, the puzzle setters, I guess. I just never caught on.

Bill Butler said...

Hi Greg,

Yes, this one was tricky. I was really slow in coming up with the theme so ended up with big gaps in the grid for the longest time. But, with the luck of the Irish, I got there in the end :)

Still, it sounds like you enjoyed it, Greg, and that's the main thing!

Anonymous said...

This is the first Times crossword that has ever stumped me. I got most of it but couldn't figure out the theme answers. I read your explanation and then was able to finish it myself, but without your help I would still be in insomnia-land.

El

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, El.

This was a tough one, for sure. I am glad the blog post helped you get some sleep :)

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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