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0401-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Apr 12, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications


CROSSWORD SETTER: Patrick Merrell
THEME: Of Course! … all of the theme clues are “punny” golfing references:
22A. Golf club repositioning? : CHANGE OF ADDRESS
40A. Hole in one? : STROKE OF LUCK
49A. Comment after hitting a tee shot out of bounds? : BYE BYE BIRDIE
69A. Wedge shot from a worn-out practice range platform? : A CHIP OFF THE OLD BLOCK
90A. Use one club for all 18 holes? : PUTTER A ROUND (from “putter around”)
101A. Course not listed in the guidebooks? : MISSING LINKS
122A. Woods stowed in the rear of a golf cart? : BACKSEAT DRIVERS
14D. Duffer's shots? : FORE PLAY (from “foreplay”)
88D. Club thrown in disgust? : CAST IRON
COMPLETION TIME: 22m 12s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
9. Crosswise, when 18-Across : ABEAM
(18. See 9-Across : ASEA)
The beam is the widest part of a nautical vessel. Something pointed out as lying "abeam" is something that it is 90 degrees from a line through the bow and the stern, in other words off to the right or the left.

19. Augusta National Golf Club, for the Masters : HOME
Golf's Masters Tournament is the first of the four major championships in the annual calendar, taking place in the first week of April each year. It is played at Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia, and has a number of traditions. One is that the winner is awarded the famous "green jacket", but he only gets to keep it for a year and must return it to the club after twelve months.

20. Class, abroad : CASTE
Many creatures organize themselves into a social structure, a phenomenon known as "eusociality". Examples of such creatures would be ants, bees and wasps, where there are queens, workers and soldiers. The groups within such a hierarchical structure are known as castes. The word "caste" was borrowed from the class divisions in Indian society (although the word "caste" and hierarchical concept was actually introduced by the Portuguese).

21. SST component : SONIC
The most famous Supersonic Transport (SST) was the Concorde, a plane that's no longer flying. Concorde had that famous "droop nose". The nose was moved to the horizontal position during flight to create the optimum aerodynamic shape to reduce drag. It was lowered during taxi, takeoff and landing, so that the pilot had better visibility. The need for the droop nose was driven largely by the delta-shaped wings. A delta wing necessitates a higher angle of attack at takeoff and landing than conventional wing designs, so the pilot needed the nose lowered so that he or she could see the ground.

27. Stock price movement : TICK
That would be an uptick or a downtick.

34. Three-time Best Director in the 1930s : CAPRA
I can’t tell you how many of Frank Capra’s movies are on my list of all-time favorites. He directed such classics as “It Happened One Night”, “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town”, “Lost Horizon”, “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”, “Meet John Doe”, “Arsenic and Old Lace” and the holiday favorite “It’s a Wonderful Life”. Capra also did his bit during WWII, enlisting just a few days after Pearl Harbor was attacked. Given his great talent, and the fact that he enlisted at the relatively advanced age of 44, the US Army put him to work directing 11 documentary war films in the “Why We Fight” series, for which he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal.

37. Jennifer of tennis : CAPRIATI
Jennifer Capriati is a retired American tennis player, and former World Number One. She had all sorts of success playing tennis as a child, and turned professional when she was just 13 years old ...

48. Shoot two under : EAGLE
The use of the word "eagle" to signify a 2-under-par score on a hole in golf, simply builds on the established use of "birdie" for 1-under-par. An eagle is just a "bigger" bird, and 2-under par is "bigger" and better than 1-under.

49. Comment after hitting a tee shot out of bounds? : BYE BYE BIRDIE
Apparently the term "birdie" originated in 1899 at the Atlantic City Country Club in Northfield, New Jersey. A golfer hit his second shot on a par four that stopped inches from the cup after hitting a bird in flight. The golfer tapped the ball in for one-under-par, and his golfing buddies labeled the second shot a "bird". The golfers started to call one-under-par a birdie, and the term spread through the club, and from there around the world ...

53. Insect named for the Virgin Mary : LADYBUG
The seven spots commonly found on the wing covers of beetles called coccinellidae gave rise to the common name "ladybug", as in the Middle Ages the insect was called the "beetle of Our Lady". The spots were said to symbolize the Seven Joys and Seven Sorrows, events in the life of the Blessed Virgin Mary called out in the Roman Catholic tradition.

55. Multiuse W.W. II vessel : LST
LST stands for Landing Ship, Tank. LSTs were the large vessels used mainly in WWII that had doors at either ends through which tanks and other vehicles could roll off and onto beaches. The design concept persists to this day in the huge fleet of commercial roll-on/roll-off car ferries, all inspired by the LST.

57. Brightest star in Orion : RIGEL
Rigel is the sixth brightest star in the night sky, and the brightest star in the constellation of Orion. If you can imagine the stars in Orion laid out, Rigel is at his left foot. The name “Rigel” is an abbreviated version of the Arabic term for “Left Foot of the Central One”.

61. Ex-Jet Boomer : ESIASON
Boomer Esiason is a retired NFL quarterback, now working as a sports commentator. Esiason has had the nickname “Boomer” since before he was born. His mother called him “Boomer” because he was constantly kicking away in her womb.

77. Disappearance of 7/2/1937 : EARHART
Amelia Earhart is as famous today as she was during her lifetime. When she became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic, she was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross by Congress and the Cross of Knight of the Legion of Honor by the French government. She made two attempts to circumnavigate the globe by air (not solo). Her first attempt in March 1937 had to be abandoned when her aircraft was damaged during takeoff. The second attempt in June/July of the same year ended when Earhart and her navigator disappeared flying from Lae, New Guinea to Howland Island in the Central Pacific. There is an expedition planned for mid-2012 that has the goal of finding Earhart’s plane in a reef near Gardner Island (now Nikamaror). Remains have been found on the island that may be Earhart’s, and a photograph taken in 1937 is believed to show part of a plane’s undercarriage sticking out of the water.

82. 100 kopecks : RUBLE
The ruble (also “rouble”) is the unit of currency in Russia, as well as several other countries of the former Soviet Union.

95. "That's ___!" : A WRAP
When shooting of a film is concluded the movie is said to “wrap”, and everyone heads to the wrap party. There is one story that “wrap” is actually an acronym for “wind, reel and print”, a reference to the transition of the filming process into post-production. But, this explanation is disputed.

99. Old-time actress Talbot or Naldi : NITA
Nita Talbot is an American actress, whose most famous roles were the "White Russian spy" in "Hogans Heroes" and Sheila Fine on the sitcom "Soap".

Nita Naldi was an American silent film actress, who usually played a "femme fatale" type of role.

100. Words to the left of the White House flag on a $20 bill : IN GOD
From 1776, "e pluribus unum" was the unofficial motto of the United States. It was pushed aside in 1956 when an Act of Congress designated "In God We Trust" as the country's official motto.

101. Course not listed in the guidebooks? : MISSING LINKS
The oldest type of golf course is a links course. The name “links” comes from the Old English word “hlinc” meaning “rising ground”. "Hlinc" was used to describe areas with coastal sand dunes or open parkland. As a result, we use the term “links course” to mean a golf course that is located at or on the coast, often amid sand dunes. The British Open is always played on a links course.

The scientific community doesn't really embrace the concept of a "missing link" anymore. The idea that the there is or was an "ape man" that links the human species with "lower animals" has fallen by the wayside.

108. Robert Frost's middle name : LEE
The wonderful poet Robert Frost was a native of San Francisco. He was well recognized for his work during his lifetime, and received four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry.

109. "Now We Are Six" author : A A MILNE
Alan Alexander (A.A.) Milne was an English author, best known for his delightful "Winnie-the-Pooh" series of books. He had only one son, Christopher Robin Milne, born in 1920, and he was the inspiration for the Christopher Robin character in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Winnie-the-Pooh was named after Christopher Robin's real teddy bear, one he called Winnie, who in turn was named after a Canadian black bear called Winnie that the Milnes would visit in London Zoo. The original Winnie teddy bear is on display at the Main Branch of the New York Public Library in New York.

"Now We Are Six" is a collection of children's verses by A. A. Milne, the creator of Winnie-the-Pooh and his friends. It was published in 1927, and illustrated by E. H. Shephard, the man behind the illustrations for the Winnie-the-Pooh stories as well as Kenneth Graham's equally famous story "The Wind in the Willows". Indeed, eleven of the verses in "Now We Are Six" are illustrated with images of Winnie the Pooh. Sounds like one for the grand-kids ...

111. Like some columns : IONIC
An Ionic column is relatively ornate. It usually has grooves running up and down its length and at the top there is a "scroll" design called a "volute". The scroll design makes it a popular inclusion in academic buildings.

125. Action Man : U.K. :: ___ : U.S. : GI JOE
G.I. Joe was the original "action figure", the first toy to carry that description. G.I. Joe first hit the shelves in 1964. I had a “GI Joe” growing up, although over in the British Isles we played with “Action Man”, the brand name used under license from Hasbro in the US.

126. Long Island airport site : ISLIP
The town of Islip is on the south shore of Long Island. It is home to Islip Airport, now known as Long Island MacArthur Airport, used by many as a viable alternative to JFK and LaGuardia.

127. Legislative excess : PORK
Pork barrel politics have been around for a long time. The term originated in 1863 in a story by Edward Everett Hale called "The Children of the Public". Hale used "pork barrel" in a positive way, describing any public spending by government for the benefit of citizens. By the 1870s the term "pork" had negative connotations, with references in the press to "pork barrel bills" in Congress. Nowadays "pork" really applies to any government project designed to benefit a relatively small group of citizens (usually potential voters for a particular politician) with the bill being paid by the citizenry as a whole.

129. Revenuer : T-MAN
A T-man is a law-enforcement agent of the US Treasury.

132. Reagan and others : RONS
Ron Reagan's views couldn't be any further from his father's, I think. Before Air America went bust, he had a daily 3-hour spot, and these days he makes frequent appearances on MSNBC. Reagan is also a good dancer, and for a while was a member of the Joffrey Ballet.

Down
1. There are 336 dimples on a typical golf ball, for instance : FACT
The first golf balls had smooth surfaces. The idea of adding dimples grew out of the empirical observation that used balls flew further. These older balls were beaten up and had nicks in the surface. The nicks, and the dimples in a modern ball, create a turbulent layer of air that “sticks” to the surface of the ball, and this sticky layer of turbulent air has less drag as it slices though the rest of the air between the golfer and the ball’s destination.

2. 1970s Wimbledon victor over Connors : ASHE
Arthur Ashe was a professional tennis player from Richmond, Virginia. In his youth, Ashe found himself having to travel great distances to play against Caucasian opponents due to the segregation that still existed in his home state. He was rewarded for his dedication by being selected for the 1963 US Davis Cup team, the first African America player to be so honored. He continued to run into trouble because of his ethnicity though, and in 1968 was denied entry into South Africa to play in the South African Open. In 1979 Ashe suffered a heart attack and had bypass surgery, with follow-up surgery four years later during which he contracted HIV from blood transfusions. Ashe passed away in 1993 due to complications from AIDS. Shortly afterwards, Ashe was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton.

Jimmy Connors is one of the greats of the sport of tennis, playing during what I regard as the “golden era”, the days of Bjorn Bog, Ilie Nastase, Rod Laver, John Newcombe and John McEnroe. Tennis was such a fun and entertaining sport back then. Well, that’s my humble opinion …

5. Aussie chick : SHEILA
“Sheila” is a slang term used in Australia for a young woman.

7. Inits. in bowling lanes : AMF
AMF Bowling Centers, Inc. is an operator of bowling allies, the largest such company in the world in fact.

9. Operating in either of two ways : AC/DC
If you have a laptop with an external power supply, then that big “block” is an AC/DC converter. It converts the AC current you get from a wall socket into the DC current that is used by the laptop.

10. Carnival worker : BARKER
A barker is someone who works to attract attention for an entertainment event, trying to get patrons to buy a ticker. Barkers are often seen at circuses and funfairs. Apparently the term “barker” isn’t appreciated by those in the trade, and they prefer to be called “talkers”.

11. Suffix with Milan : -ESE
Milan is Italy's second largest city, second only to Rome. Milan is a European fashion capital, the headquarters for the big Italian fashion houses of Valentino, Gucci, Versace, Armani, Prada and others. Mario Prada was even born in Milan, and helped establish the city's reputation in the world of fashion.

14. Duffer's shots? : FORE PLAY (from “foreplay”)
No one seems to know for sure where the golfing term "fore!" comes from. It has been used at least as far back as 1881, and has always been called out to warn other golfers that a wayward ball might be heading their way. My favorite possibility for its origin is that it is a contraction of the Gaelic warning cry "Faugh a Ballach!" (clear the way!) which is still called out in the sport of road bowling. Road bowling is an Irish game where players bowl balls along roads between villages, trying to reach the end of the course in as few bowls as possible, just like in golf!

16. Enthusiasm : VIM
“Vim” and “punch” are words that both mean "energy" and "power".

21. Attacked from the air : STRAFED
We’ve been using “strafe” since WWII to mean an attack on a ground position from low-flying aircraft. Prior to that, the word was used by British soldiers to mean any form of attack. "Strafe" was picked up from the German word for “punish” as it appears in the expression “Gott strafe England” meaning, “May God punish England”.

35. Sport named for a British boarding school : RUGBY
Rugby football is a sport that developed out of football (soccer) at Rugby School, a private boarding school in England.

38. Milano of "Charmed" : ALYSSA
Alyssa Milano is an actress who started her career at a very young age. Milano played Samantha Micelli on “Who’s the Boss”, the daughter of the character played by Tony Danza.

39. Like works of Kipling and Browning : POETIC
Rudyard Kipling was a British poet and writer who was famous for his tales of the British Raj, the rule of the British Empire in India. Kipling was actually born in Bombay, but returned with his family to England when he was very young. After being educated in England, he returned to India and from there travelled the world. Kipling’s most famous works were the stories “The Jungle Book”, “Just So Stories”, “The Man Who Would Be King”, and the poems “Mandalay”, “Gunga Din” and “If-”.

Robert Browning met Elizabeth Barrett in 1845. Elizabeth was a sickly woman, confined to her parents' house in Wimpole Street in London, largely due to the conservative and protective nature of her father. Robert and Elizabeth eventually eloped in 1846, and lived in self-inflicted exile in Italy. Away from the country of his birth, Browning was moved to write his now famous "Home Thoughts, From Abroad", the first line of which is "Oh, to be in England ..."

42. Director ___ C. Kenton : ERLE
Erle Kenton was a film director from Norbro, Montana. Kenton directed 131 films between 1916 and 1957, including “The Ghost of Frankenstein”, “House of Frankenstein” and “House of Dracula”.

51. Pro ___ : BONO
The Latin term “pro bono publico” means “for the public good”, and is usually shorted to “pro bono”. The term applies to professional work that is done for free or at a reduced fee as a service to the public.

52. Iroquois foes : ERIES
The Erie people were Native Americans who lived on the south shore of Lake Erie. The Erie lost out in wars with the Iroquois in the 1700s. The remnants of the Erie people were absorbed into neighboring tribes.

54. Cassim's brother in a classic tale : ALI BABA
There is some controversy about the story "Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves" in that it has been suggested it was not part of the original collection of Arabic tales called "One Thousand and One Nights". The suggestion is that it was added by one of its European translators.

58. Investors' news, briefly : IPO
An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words it marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually). Anyone owning stock in the company prior to the IPO can find that after the public offering, that stock is now worth something on the market (as opposed to just on paper), and can become quite wealthy overnight.

67. Certain 35mm camera : SLR
SLR stands for "single lens reflex". Usually cameras with changeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

73. ___ Lake (one of New York's Finger Lakes) : CAYUGA
Cayuga Lake is one of the beautiful Finger Lakes in central New York, the longest in fact. The city of Ithaca sits right at the southern tip of Cayuga Lake.

74. Swedish coins : KRONOR
"Krona" translates in English as "crown", and is the currency of Sweden. As a member of the European Union, Sweden is required to adopt the euro as its official currency. Such a move isn’t really popular in Sweden and so the Swedish government has been using a legal loophole to allow the country to retain the krona.

78. Lincoln in-laws : TODDS
Mary Todd moved in the best of the social circles in Springfield, Illinois and there met the successful lawyer, Abraham Lincoln. The path to their marriage wasn’t exactly smooth, as the engagement was broken once but reinstated, with the couple marrying in 1842.

79. Often-filtered material : SPAM
Spam is a brand of pre-cooked meat product that has been made by Hormel since 1937. The ingredients in Spam include chopped pork shoulder, modified potato starch as a binder, and sodium nitrite as a preservative. Apparently 3.8 cans of Spam are consumed in the US every second. I find that hard to believe though …

80. Shaw who wrote "Rich Man, Poor Man" : IRWIN
Irvin Shaw's novel "Rich Man, Poor Man" was adapted into a television miniseries that was originally shown in 1976. The production was the first of its kind, a television miniseries based on a major work of fiction. Ed Asner won an Emmy for playing the lead role of Axel Jordache, one of four Emmy Awards won by the miniseries.

81. Location of many organs : TORSO
"Torso" is an Italian word meaning the "trunk of a statue", which we imported into English.

83. Org. with boats : USCG
The US Coast Guard (USCG) has the distinction of being the country’s oldest continuous seagoing service. The USGC was founded as the “Revenue Cutter Service” by Alexander Hamilton in 1790.

92. Herbal tea : TISANE
“Tisane” is another word for herbal tea. “Tisane” comes into English via French from the Greek “ptisane”, the word for crushed barley.

93. Early Wagner opera : RIENZI
“Rienzi” is an early opera by Richard Wagner, first performed when he was about 30 years old. The version of “Rienzi” that premiered in the Dresden Opera House ran for over six hours!

102. Oui's opposite : NON
“Oui” and “non” are French for “yes” and “no”.

112. University of Miami mascot : IBIS
Sebastian the Ibis is the mascot of the Miami Hurricanes, the athletics teams of the University of Miami. “The Ibis” was chosen as the name of the school’s yearbook in 1926, and was adopted as the mascot decades later in the eighties. The ibis was selected by the Hurricanes as the bird is known for its bravery when a hurricane approaches.

114. Egyptian menaces : ASPS
The asp is a venomous snake found in the Nile region of Africa. The asp is so venomous that it was used in ancient Egypt and ancient Greece as a means of execution. Cleopatra observed such executions noting that the venom brought on sleepiness without any painful spasms. Therefore, when the great queen opted to commit suicide, the asp was her chosen method.

116. Nephew of Caligula : NERO
The emperor Nero had quite the family life. When Nero was just 16-years-old he married his stepsister, Claudia Octavia. He also had his mother and stepbrother executed.

Caligula was emperor of Rome after Tiberius, and before Claudius. “Caligula” was actually a nickname for Gaius Germanicus. Gaius’s father was a successful general in the Roman army and his soldiers called young Gaius "Caligula", meaning “little soldier’s boot”.

117. Country in a Thomas Moore poem : ERIN
Thomas Moore was an Irish poet and songwriter, best known for writing the lyrics of “The Minstrel Boy” and “The Last Rose of Summer”. He also wrote a poem called “Erin, Oh Erin”.

118. Mil. awards : DSCS
The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest honor awarded to members of the US Army. The DSC is equivalent to the Navy Cross and the Air Force Cross.

119. ___ Pepper : SGT
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Heart Club Band was the alter-ego of the Beatles and was used in the studio album of the same name released in 1967.

121. Hit Steely Dan album : AJA
Steely Dan's heyday was in the seventies when they toured for a couple of years, although the group mainly focused on studio work. The band was formed in 1972 and broke up in 1981. The core of the band reunited in 1993 and they are still going strong today.

123. The Indians, on sports tickers : CLE
The Cleveland baseball franchise started out in 1869 as the Forest Citys named after Forest city, the nickname for Cleveland. After a number of transitions, in 1914 the team took on the name "Indians". The media came up with name "Indians" after being asked for suggestions by the team owners. "Indians" was inspired by the successful Boston team of the day, the Boston Braves.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Drop : FALL
5. Diagnostic test, of a sort : SCAN
9. Crosswise, when 18-Across : ABEAM
14. ___ bean : FAVA
18. See 9-Across : ASEA
19. Augusta National Golf Club, for the Masters : HOME
20. Class, abroad : CASTE
21. SST component : SONIC
22. Golf club repositioning? : CHANGE OF ADDRESS
25. "I bet I'll know it" : TRY ME
26. Botanical holder : TENDRIL
27. Stock price movement : TICK
28. Yonder : THERE
30. Cloths with repeating patterns : CALICOS
32. When to get in, briefly : ETA
34. Three-time Best Director in the 1930s : CAPRA
37. Jennifer of tennis : CAPRIATI
40. Hole in one? : STROKE OF LUCK
44. Take out ___ (get some assistance at the bank) : A LOAN
45. Stance : VIEW
47. According to : PER
48. Shoot two under : EAGLE
49. Comment after hitting a tee shot out of bounds? : BYE BYE BIRDIE
53. Insect named for the Virgin Mary : LADYBUG
55. Multiuse W.W. II vessel : LST
56. Where tumblers can be found : LOCK
57. Brightest star in Orion : RIGEL
60. "I do" : YES
61. Ex-Jet Boomer : ESIASON
64. Pilfer : SWIPE
66. Uniform: Prefix : ISO-
69. Wedge shot from a worn-out practice range platform? : A CHIP OFF THE OLD BLOCK
75. Equal : ARE
76. Continental coins : EUROS
77. Disappearance of 7/2/1937 : EARHART
79. Wait to play : SIT
82. 100 kopecks : RUBLE
84. Like 20% of Israel : ARAB
86. Start of an attention-getting call : YOO
87. Put through : PROCESS
90. Use one club for all 18 holes? : PUTTER A ROUND (from “putter around”)
95. "That's ___!" : A WRAP
96. Topper : CAP
99. Old-time actress Talbot or Naldi : NITA
100. Words to the left of the White House flag on a $20 bill : IN GOD
101. Course not listed in the guidebooks? : MISSING LINKS
104. Ones on a circuit : RACE CARS
107. Untrue : NOT SO
108. Robert Frost's middle name : LEE
109. "Now We Are Six" author : A A MILNE
111. Like some columns : IONIC
113. Spelling aid? : WAND
115. Newly districted : REZONED
119. Fragment : SHARD
122. Woods stowed in the rear of a golf cart? : BACKSEAT DRIVERS
125. Action Man : U.K. :: ___ : U.S. : GI JOE
126. Long Island airport site : ISLIP
127. Legislative excess : PORK
128. Any of seven Danish kings : ERIC
129. Revenuer : T-MAN
130. Loses : SHEDS
131. Sleighful : TOYS
132. Reagan and others : RONS

Down
1. There are 336 dimples on a typical golf ball, for instance : FACT
2. 1970s Wimbledon victor over Connors : ASHE
3. Meager : LEAN
4. Terrestrial decapod : LAND CRAB
5. Aussie chick : SHEILA
6. "Chill!" : COOL IT
7. Inits. in bowling lanes : AMF
8. Swell : NEATO
9. Operating in either of two ways : AC/DC
10. Carnival worker : BARKER
11. Suffix with Milan : -ESE
12. On the line : AT STAKE
13. Protection from bug bites : MESH
14. Duffer's shots? : FORE PLAY (from “foreplay)
15. Whichever : ANY
16. Enthusiasm : VIM
17. Whiz : ACE
21. Attacked from the air : STRAFED
23. Not fine : GRAINY
24. Knocked : DISSED
29. Prefix with management : ECO-
31. ___ center : CIVIC
33. Shirt : TOP
35. Sport named for a British boarding school : RUGBY
36. "I haven't ___" : A CLUE
37. TV option : CABLE
38. Milano of "Charmed" : ALYSSA
39. Like works of Kipling and Browning : POETIC
41. Light start? : TWI-
42. Director ___ C. Kenton : ERLE
43. They might help produce a blowout : KEGS
46. Annoy : IRK
50. Secretive couple : ELOPERS
51. Pro ___ : BONO
52. Iroquois foes : ERIES
54. Cassim's brother in a classic tale : ALI BABA
58. Investors' news, briefly : IPO
59. Come together : GEL
62. "Caught you!" : AHA
63. Military title? : SIR
64. Pharynx affliction : STREP
65. One-word query : WHO?
67. Certain 35mm camera : SLR
68. "Lo-o-ovely!" : OOH
70. Second of 12: Abbr. : FEB
71. Suffix with ear or arm : -FUL
72. Valued : DEAR
73. ___ Lake (one of New York's Finger Lakes) : CAYUGA
74. Swedish coins : KRONOR
78. Lincoln in-laws : TODDS
79. Often-filtered material : SPAM
80. Shaw who wrote "Rich Man, Poor Man" : IRWIN
81. Location of many organs : TORSO
83. Org. with boats : USCG
84. Lawyer: Abbr. : ATT
85. Violate a peace treaty, maybe : REARM
88. Club thrown in disgust? : CAST IRON
89. Installment : EPISODE
91. Anonymous: Abbr. : UNK
92. Herbal tea : TISANE
93. Early Wagner opera : RIENZI
94. Quick survey : ONCE-OVER
97. Like a real-estate deal that doesn't involve a mortgage : ALL CASH
98. Crusty one : PIE
102. Oui's opposite : NON
103. Object of curiosity on the first day of school : NEW KID
105. Put on the line : AIR-DRY
106. Some postal workers : CLERKS
110. Novelize, e.g. : ADAPT
112. University of Miami mascot : IBIS
114. Egyptian menaces : ASPS
116. Nephew of Caligula : NERO
117. Country in a Thomas Moore poem : ERIN
118. Mil. awards : DSCS
119. ___ Pepper : SGT
120. That guy : HIM
121. Hit Steely Dan album : AJA
123. The Indians, on sports tickers : CLE
124. As well : TOO

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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