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0422-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 22 Apr 12, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications


CROSSWORD SETTER: Paula Gamache & Ed Stein
THEME: Letting Go Of … each of the themed answers is a common expression with the word “of” left out:
23A. Diet? : BATTLE (of) THE BULGE
31A. Be very successful at fishing? : LAND (of) PLENTY
37A. Do a clerk's work at a morgue? : BOOK (of) THE DEAD
50A. Throw large bank notes around? : CAST (of) THOUSANDS
67A. Take advantage of good Samaritans? : MILK (of) HUMAN KINDNESS
86A. Forge some personal notes? : DOCTOR (of) LETTERS
94A. Outdo one's buddies? : BEST (of) FRIENDS
103A. Be a sadistic masseuse? : POUND (of) FLESH
118A. Send for a special bridal accessory? : ORDER (of) THE GARTER
COMPLETION TIME: 20m 15s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
1. Spiderwoman? : ARACHNE
In Greek and Roman mythology, Arachne was a mortal woman who was a great weaver. Arachne boasted that her weaving was greater than that of the goddess Pallas Athena (or Minerva in Roman myth), and this was proven true in a contest. As a result, Arachne was turned into a spider. “Arachne” is the Greek word for spider.

21. Natural gas component : ETHANE
The “smaller” alkanes are gases and are quite combustible. Methane (CH4) is the main component of natural gas with ethane (C2H6) being the second largest component. Propane (C3H8) is also found in natural gas and is heavy enough to be readily turned into a liquid, by compression, for ease of transportation and storage. Butane (C4H10) is also easily liquefied under pressure and is used as fuel in cigarette lighters and as a propellant in aerosol sprays. The heavier alkanes are liquids and solids at room temperature.

22. Wife of Alexander the Great : ROXANA
Roxana was the wife of Alexander the Great. Soon after Alexander died, Roxana bore him a son, Alexander IV Aegus. Alexander had two other wives, and after he died Roxana murdered both of them. Both Roxana and her son suffered a similar fate, however, as they were themselves assassinated during the struggle to take control of the Alexandrian Empire.

23. Diet? : BATTLE (of) THE BULGE
The Ardennes Offensive of WWII is better known as the Battle of the Bulge. The “Bulge” name was coined by the American press, citing the “bulge” in the Allied front lines where the battle took place. US forces suffered more casualties in this engagement than in they did any other battle in the whole war.

26. Plains Indian : OTOE
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

27. Part of the Dept. of Justice : DEA
The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) was set up in 1973 while President Nixon was in office.

28. Wee creature : AMOEBA
An ameba (or "amoeba" as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek "amoibe", meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

36. Actor Paul of "American Graffiti" : LE MAT
The actor Paul Le Mat is most noted for an early role in his career, playing John Milner in “American Graffiti”. Milner is the character who spends most of the film dealing with an annoying young teenybopper called Carol.

37. Do a clerk's work at a morgue? : BOOK (of) THE DEAD
The “Book of the Dead” is an ancient Egyptian text that contained magic spells thought to be needed by a dead person in order to move into the afterlife. The “Book of the Dead” was placed in the coffin or burial chamber with the deceased.

42. Unborn, after "in" : UTERO
"In utero" is a Latin term meaning "in the uterus". The Latin "uterus" translates as both "womb" and "belly". The Latin word was derived from the Greek "hystera" also meaning womb, which gives us the words "hysterectomy", and "hysterical".

46. Cardinal from New York : EGAN
Edward Egan served as Roman Catholic Archbishop of New York from 2000 to 2009. Egan was made a cardinal in 2001.

49. Something further? : ADO
The reference is to the phrase “without further ado …”

55. O : OMICRON
Omega is the last letter of the Greek alphabet, and is the one that looks like a horseshoe. The word "omega" literally means "great O" (O-mega). Compare this with the Greek letter Omicron meaning "little O" (O-micron).

58. It begins "Forasmuch as many have taken in hand ..." : LUKE
The Gospel According to Luke is the longest of the four Gospels in the Bible. Some well-known stories are unique to Luke, and do not appear in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark nor John. A couple of examples would be “The Prodigal Son” and “The Good Samaritan”. It is believed that the author of the Gospel of Luke was the same person who wrote “Acts of the Apostles”.

64. How albums may be stored : ON CD
The Compact Disc (CD) is an optical storage device that was developed for the storage and playback of music. Derivative products were later developed such as the CD-ROM for data storage, and the PhotoCd for storage of images.

65. Beige : ECRU
The shade called ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word "ecru" comes from French and means "raw, unbleached". "Ecru" has the same roots as our word "crude".

66. Conditional construct in programming : IF-THEN
Computer programmers use the construct “if-then” in writing some code. The program checks for a certain condition (“if”) and when that condition is encountered (“then”) it carries out a specific action.

67. Take advantage of good Samaritans? : MILK (of) HUMAN KINDNESS
The phrase “milk of human kindness” comes from William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”. The actual quotation is:
Yet doe I feare thy Nature, It is too full o' th' Milke of humane kindnesse.

72. Desert homes : ADOBES
The building material known as adobe has been around a long time, and has been used in dry climates all over the world. The original form of the word "adobe" dates back to Middle Egyptian times, about 2000 BC. The original "spelling" is dj-b-t, and translates as mud (sun-dried) brick.

76. Bunny man, for short : HEF
Hugh Hefner is from Chicago. His first publishing job was in the military, where he worked as a writer for a US Army newspaper from 1944-46. He went to college after his military service and then worked as a copywriter for "Esquire" magazine. He left "Esquire" to found his own publication that he called "Playboy", which first hit the newsstands in 1953. "Playboy" has been around ever since.

79. Bathroom fixture : BIDET
"Bidet" is of course a French word that we imported into English. In French, the word "bidet" originally described a small horse or a pony. What we know as a bidet was so called because one can straddle it like a horse in order to use it.

80. Abbr. in many a party invitation : BYOB
Bring Your Own Beer/Bottle/Booze (BYOB).

81. It may be broken on a ranch : BRONC
A "bronco" (also "bronc") is a horse that is untamed. In Mexican Spanish "bronco" is a word for "horse", and in the original Spanish "bronco" means "rough, rude".

83. Kind of bean : SOYA
What are known as soybeans here in the US are called soya beans in most other English-speaking countries. So, I drink soy milk here in America, but when I am over in Ireland I drink "soya milk".

86. Forge some personal notes? : DOCTOR (of) LETTERS
In many countries, including the US, the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. D.) is the highest academic degree awarded by universities. However, in Ireland and the UK "doctorates" can also be awarded, a higher recognition. For example, there is a Doctor of Sciences (DSc) and a Doctor of Letters (DLitt).

89. Director Lee : ANG
Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as "Sense & Sensibility" (my personal favorite), "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon", "Hulk", and "Brokeback Mountain".

90. Edwards or Andrews: Abbr. : AFB
Edwards Air Force Base is in a desert area in Southern California. Edwards is a flight test center for the Air Force, and it was here that Chuck Yeager famously broke the sound barrier for the first time. And of course, Edwards was used for many landings of the Space Shuttle.

Joint Base Andrews is located just outside Washington, D.C. It is noted as the home base for the two Boeing VC-25A (Air Force One) aircraft that serve the US President. Joint Base Andrews is so called as it resulted from the merger of Andrews Air Force Base and the US Navy Naval Air Facility Washington.

103. Be a sadistic masseuse? : POUND (of) FLESH
Famously, at the climax of William Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice", Antonio goes on trial because he cannot repay a loan to Shylock of 3,000 ducats. Faced with non-payment, Shylock demands his legal right to "a pound of flesh".

111. Coca-Cola brand : SPRITE
Sprite is Coca-Cola’s answer to the very successful soft drink called 7 Up. Sprite was introduced in 1961, and Coca-Cola used its muscle to topple 7 Up from its dominant position in the market. Sprite has been the number-one selling lemon soda since 1978.

114. Wee, to a Scot : SMA'
The Scots dialect word sma' means "small". It famously appears in the Robert Burns poem, "To a Mouse". The lines read:
A daimen icker in a thrave
’S a sma’ request;
I’ll get a blessin wi’ the lave,
An’ never miss’t!
which "translates" to:
An occasional ear of corn out of twenty-four sheaves
Is a small request;
I'll be blest with the rest of the corn,
And never miss the ear you took!

115. Anent : AS TO
“Anent” is a preposition meaning “regarding, concerning”.

116. Dr. Seuss title character : HORTON
Horton the elephant turns up in two books by Dr. Seuss, "Horton Hatches the Egg" and "Horton Hears a Who!"

118. Send for a special bridal accessory? : ORDER (of) THE GARTER
"Honi soit qui mal y pense" is the motto of the English chivalric Order of the Garter. The motto translates (loosely) as "Evil be to him who evil thinks". Apparently these words date back to King Edward III, who one day was dancing with Joan of Kent. Poor Jane suffered the humiliation of having her garter slip down her leg to her ankle, creating some laughter from onlookers. The kin, made light of the incident, and placed the garter on his own leg saying, "Honi soit qui mal y pense". The incident led to the naming of the Order, and the Order's motto.

122. Swank do : SOIREE
"Soir" is the French word for "evening" and a "soirée" is an "evening party". The French word "soirée" has an acute accent over the first "e", but we tend to drop this when using the word in English.

Down
1. Chile de ___ (hot pepper) : ARBOL
The Chile de árbol is a small, very hot Mexican chili pepper. The mature peppers are a lovely bright red in color.

3. ___ Martin, British sports car : ASTON
Aston Martin is a British car manufacturer, founded in 1913 by Lionel Martin. The Aston part of the company name comes from Aston Hill, a famous site for hill-climbing cars that is nearby the original factory. Aston Martin cars are much loved by the British entertainment industry. Of course James Bond was given one in “Goldfinger”, and Michael Caine drove one in the 1969 version of “The Italian Job”. Roger Moore’s character drove a yellow Aston Martin in the seventies television show “The Persuaders!”.

5. "Good" cholesterol, for short : HDL
HDL (high-density lipoprotein) is a compound that is used to transport fats around the body. When HDL is combined with (i.e. is transporting) cholesterol, it is often called "good cholesterol". This is because HDL seems to remove cholesterol from where it should not be, say on the walls of arteries, and transports it to the liver for re-use or disposal. Important stuff ...

LDL (low-density lipoprotein) is one of the compounds responsible for transporting fats around the body. When LDL is combined with cholesterol it can be referred to as “bad cholesterol” as it can build up on the inner walls of blood vessels leading to atherosclerosis.

6. Razz : NEEDLE
The verb "razz" is a shortened form of "raspberry".

Not so much here in America, but over in the British Isles "blowing a raspberry" is a way of insulting someone (I think it's called "a Bronx cheer" here in the US).

10. Baba au ___ : RHUM
Rum baba (also “baba au rhum” in French) is a small yeast cake saturated in rum, and sometimes filled with whipped cream. Rum baba is derived from the recipe for the tall "babka" yeast cake that was introduced to the world by the Polish communities. The Polish words "baba" and "babka" mean "old woman" or "grandmother" in English. I guess someone must have thought that all grandmothers were saturated in rum!

12. Ali trainer Dundee : ANGELO
Angelo Dundee was the man in the corner of the ring for Muhammad Ali throughout his career. Dundee also trained actor Russell Crowe for his role in the 2005 movie “Cinderella Man”, and even made a cameo appearance in the film. Angelo passed away in February 2012, at 90 years of age.

13. Some sports footwear : REEBOKS
The brand name Reebok was adopted as the new company name for Foster Shoes of the UK in 1960. The name Reebok (more commonly “Rhebok”) is an Afrikaans word for an antelope, and comes from the term "roe buck".

14. Word in the MGM logo : ARS
It seems that the phrase "art for art's sake" has its origins in France in the nineteenth century, where the slogan is expressed as "l'art pour l'art". The Latin version "Ars gratia artis" came much later, in 1924 when MGM's publicist chose it for the studio's logo, sitting under Leo the lion. I would have thought this a much older expression!

15. Owner of YouTube : GOOGLE
YouTube is a video-sharing website, launched in 2005 by three ex-PayPal employees. Google bought YouTube in 2006 for $1.65 billion. Yep, $1.65 billion ... less than two years after it was founded ...

18. Cadaver study: Abbr. : ANAT
“Cadaver” is the Latin word for a dead body, and a word we’ve been using in English since about 1500.

24. Tennis champ Mandlikova : HANA
Hana Mandlikova is a former professional tennis star from Czechoslovakia. Mandlikova won four Grand Slam titles and then retired in 1990, at the ripe old age of 28.

33. Statistics method for checking means : T-TEST
A “t-test” in the world of statistics is one that makes use of a “Student’s t distribution”. The t-statistic was introduced by a chemist working in the Guinness Brewery in Dublin, back in 1908. “Student” was the chemist’s pen name.

39. Faddish 1970s footwear : EARTH SHOES
Earth shoes were developed in the seventies in Scandinavia. What made an earth shoe unique was the thick sole with a thinner heel, a so-called “negative heel”. That must have been quite the shoe to walk in.

41. Film director Stanley : DONEN
Along with Gene Kelly, Stanley Donen was the co-director of the 1952 musical "Singin' in the Rain". Donen also directed another great dance classic, 1951's "Royal Wedding", where famously he had Fred Astaire dancing on the ceiling. Decades later in 1986, when Lionel Richie released his song "Dancing on the Ceiling", Richie asked Stanley Donen to direct the music video.

42. Where Bertrand Russell taught philosophy, for short : UCLA
Bertrand Russel was a British philosopher, a noted liberal and outspoken pacifist.

43. Some crosses : TAUS
Tau is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet, the letter which gave rise to our Roman "T". Both the letters tau (T) and chi (X) were symbolically associated with the cross.

44. They're mushed : ESKIMO DOGS
“Mushing” is the use of one of more dogs to pull a sled. “Mush” is thought to come from the French “marche” meaning “go, run”.

51. Oscar winner Tom : HANKS
Tom Hanks is a such a great actor, I think. He has played so many iconic roles in a relatively short career. Hanks is from California, and studied theater for a couple of years in Hayward, California not far from here. Hanks is married to the talented actress Rita Wilson.

54. Gandhi garment : SARI
The item of clothing called a sari (also saree) is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that is unstitched along the whole of its length. It can range from four to nine meters long (that's a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

Indira Gandhi's father was Jawaharlai Nehru, Prime Minister of India (and the Nehru of the Nehru Jacket). Indira herself became Prime Minister in 1966. She was assassinated in 1984 by two of her own bodyguards, as she was walking to meet Peter Ustinov who was about to interview her for Irish television.

64. Adams with the 1991 hit "Get Here" : OLETA
Oleta Adams is an American soul singer from Seattle, Washington. Adams has had most of her success over in the UK, rather than here in the US.

71. Frontiersman Boone, informally : DAN’L
Daniel Boone was a pioneer and folk hero. For Boone the frontier was what we now call the state of Kentucky. He led the building of the Wilderness Road through the famous Cumberland Gap in the Appalachians, a route subsequently taken by hundreds of thousands of migrants into Kentucky. Boone fought in the Revolutionary War with distinction, and after the war returned to Kentucky and got himself into land speculation. He became mired in debt, forcing him to emigrate to Missouri to settle down on land that was at that time owned by the French. It was there that he spent the last decades of his life.

72. Award-winning British sitcom, to fans : AB FAB
“Absolutely Fabulous” (sometimes called "Ab Fab") is a cult-classic sitcom produced by the BBC. The two stars of the show are Jennifer Saunders and Joanna Lumley.

73. Moon of Saturn : DIONE
Dione is a moon of Saturn, discovered in 1684 by Cassini. Originally Cassini named the four satellites of Saturn that he discovered "Sidera Lodoicea" (the stars of Louis). In so doing he was honoring King Louis XIV of France. These "stars of Louis" were individually named after Greek gods in 1847.

77. Brontë heroine : EYRE
"Jane Eyre" is of course the novel written by Charlotte Brontë under the pen name Currer Bell. Over the years, I've shared here on the blog that the "Jane Eyre" storyline is a little too dark and Gothic for my taste, but a very persuasive blog reader convinced me to look more at the romantic side of the story and give it a second chance. I watched a wonderful 4-hour television adaptation of the novel made by the BBC a while back, and I have to say that because I was focused on the relationship between Jane and Rochester, I was able to push past the Gothic influences (that depress me) so I really enjoyed the performance. I thoroughly recommend this 2006 BBC adaptation to fans of the novel.

81. HVAC measure : BTU
In the world of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), the power of a heating or cooling unit can be measured in British Thermal Units (BTUs). This dated unit is the amount of energy required to heat a pound of water so that the water's temperature increases by one degree Fahrenheit.

82. Veg-O-Matic maker : RONCO
Ronco is a company the builds and sells products mainly for the kitchen. Over the years Ronco has been closely associated with the “-O-Matic” suffix, especially the "Veg-O-Matic” vegetable slicer.

83. 500 initials : STP
STP motor oil takes its name from "Scientifically Treated Petroleum".

The first Indy 500 race was held on Memorial Day in 1911. The winner that day was one Ray Harroun. Harroun had seen someone using a rear view mirror on a horse-drawn vehicle, and decided to fit one on his Marmon "Wasp" motor car. Supposedly that was the first ever use of a rear view mirror on a motor vehicle.

85. Needlefish : GARS
The fish known as a gar is very unusual in that it is often found in very brackish water. What is interesting about gar is that their swim bladders are vascularized so that they can actually function as lungs. So many species of gar can be seen coming to the surface and taking a gulp of air. This adaptation makes it possible for them to live in conditions highly unsuitable for other fish that must rely on their gills to get oxygen. Indeed, quite interesting …

87. Abbr. in trig : COS
As we all remember from geometry class, when we have any right-angled triangle, if you divide the length of its adjacent side by the length of the hypotenuse, the resulting ratio is called the cosine. We all do remember that, don't we?

96. Camera settings : F-STOPS
Varying the f-stop in a lens varies how big the lens opening (the aperture) is when a photograph is taken. Smaller apertures (higher f-stop values) admit less light, but result in sharper photographs.

99. Sot : LUSH
"Lush" is a slang term for a heavy drinker.

Our word "sot" comes from the Old English "sott", meaning a fool. The word "sot" started to be associated with alcohol, and not just foolery, in the late 1500s.

101. Slowly : ADAGIO
An adagio is a piece of music with a slow tempo. The "adagio" marking on the score is an instruction to play the piece slowly and in a stately manner. The word adagio is Latin for "at ease".

103. Georges who wrote "Life: A User's Manual" : PEREC
Georges Perec was a French novelist. Perec’s most famous work is “La vie mode d’emploi”, or “Life: A User’s Manual”.

104. Slowly : LARGO
Largo is a instruction to play a piece of music with a very slow tempo. “Largo” is the Italian word for “broadly”.

105. Animal or vegetable fat, e.g. : ESTER
Esters are very common chemicals. The smaller, low-molecular weight esters are usually pleasant smelling and are often found in perfumes. At the other end of the scale, the higher-molecular weight nitroglycerin is a nitrate ester and is very explosive, and polyester is a huge molecule and is a type of plastic.

106. Volume unit : STERE
"Stere" is a metric measure, although it is not part of the modern metric system. Nowadays the stere is used as a measure for firewood, and is equal to one cubic meter.

108. Steve Perry hit "___ Mine" : SHE’S
Steve Perry was the lead singer of the band Journey for much of the eighties and nineties.

110. Ocean menace : ORCA
The taxonomic name for the killer whale is Orcinus orca. The use of the name "orca", rather than "killer whale", is becoming more and more common. The Latin word "Orcinus" means "belonging to Orcus", with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

117. Born as : NEE
"Née" is the French word for "born", when referring to a female. The male equivalent is "né".

119. Vietnamese holiday : TET
The full name for the New Year holiday in Vietnam is Tet Nguyen Dan, meaning "Feast of the First Morning". Tet usually falls on the same day as Chinese New Year.

120. Mrs. Romney : ANN
Ann Davies knew Mitt Romney way back in elementary school, and the pair started dating when Ann was 16 and were married in 1968 when she was 19 years old. Ann Romney was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1998, and she has been very active with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Spiderwoman? : ARACHNE
8. Phony laugh : HAR-HAR
14. Possible barrier to romance : AGE GAP
20. Dwells : RESIDES
21. Natural gas component : ETHANE
22. Wife of Alexander the Great : ROXANA
23. Diet? : BATTLE (of) THE BULGE
25. Tea, e.g. : SOCIAL
26. Plains Indian : OTOE
27. Part of the Dept. of Justice : DEA
28. Wee creature : AMOEBA
30. Sign on a British restroom door : GENTS
31. Be very successful at fishing? : LAND (of) PLENTY
34. Site : LOCALE
36. Actor Paul of "American Graffiti" : LE MAT
37. Do a clerk's work at a morgue? : BOOK (of) THE DEAD
42. Unborn, after "in" : UTERO
46. Cardinal from New York : EGAN
48. Prussian pronoun : SIE
49. Something further? : ADO
50. Throw large bank notes around? : CAST (of) THOUSANDS
55. O : OMICRON
58. It begins "Forasmuch as many have taken in hand ..." : LUKE
59. What sisters often are : AUNTS
60. Net : EARN
62. ___ Dame : NOTRE
63. "___ mentioned ..." : AS I
64. How albums may be stored : ON CD
65. Beige : ECRU
66. Conditional construct in programming : IF-THEN
67. Take advantage of good Samaritans? : MILK (of) HUMAN KINDNESS
72. Desert homes : ADOBES
74. Amount in the back of a pickup, e.g. : LOAD
75. Cloudless : FAIR
76. Bunny man, for short : HEF
79. Bathroom fixture : BIDET
80. Abbr. in many a party invitation : BYOB
81. It may be broken on a ranch : BRONC
83. Kind of bean : SOYA
84. It may be raw : FOOTAGE
86. Forge some personal notes? : DOCTOR (of) LETTERS
89. Director Lee : ANG
90. Edwards or Andrews: Abbr. : AFB
92. Whatchamacallit? : NOUN
93. Breaking sports news, maybe : UPSET
94. Outdo one's buddies? : BEST (of) FRIENDS
98. Cloudless : CLEAR
102. #2 in a prosecutor's off. : ASST DA
103. Be a sadistic masseuse? : POUND (of) FLESH
108. Without enough money : SHORT
111. Coca-Cola brand : SPRITE
114. Wee, to a Scot : SMA'
115. Anent : AS TO
116. Dr. Seuss title character : HORTON
118. Send for a special bridal accessory? : ORDER (of) THE GARTER
121. Breakout : ESCAPE
122. Swank do : SOIREE
123. Chorus, e.g. : SINGERS
124. Thin in supply : SPARSE
125. Like many a Broadway play : TWO-ACT
126. One getting roasted or toasted : HONOREE

Down
1. Chile de ___ (hot pepper) : ARBOL
2. Lariat : REATA
3. ___ Martin, British sports car : ASTON
4. Given a ticket : CITED
5. "Good" cholesterol, for short : HDL
6. Razz : NEEDLE
7. Regard : ESTEEM
8. ___-haw : HEE-
9. Held off : AT BAY
10. Baba au ___ : RHUM
11. Overhead light? : HALO
12. Ali trainer Dundee : ANGELO
13. Some sports footwear : REEBOKS
14. Word in the MGM logo : ARS
15. Owner of YouTube : GOOGLE
16. Go over : EXCEED
17. Put on weight : GAIN
18. Cadaver study: Abbr. : ANAT
19. Mates : PALS
24. Tennis champ Mandlikova : HANA
29. Director's "start" : ACTION
32. Garden ___ : PLOT
33. Statistics method for checking means : T-TEST
35. "Excuse me" : AHEM
37. Heavy-handed measure : BAN
38. Next at bat : ON DECK
39. Faddish 1970s footwear : EARTH SHOES
40. Eat up, so to speak : ADORE
41. Film director Stanley : DONEN
42. Where Bertrand Russell taught philosophy, for short : UCLA
43. Some crosses : TAUS
44. They're mushed : ESKIMO DOGS
45. Itinerary abbr. : RTE
47. Many an anesthetic : GAS
51. Oscar winner Tom : HANKS
52. Response to a shot, maybe : OUCH
53. Too much : UNDULY
54. Gandhi garment : SARI
56. Figure out : INFER
57. Foldable furniture : COTS
61. Seek election to : RUN FOR
64. Adams with the 1991 hit "Get Here" : OLETA
65. Windup : END
66. One way to be trapped during winter : IN ICE
68. "Yeah, sure" : I BET
69. It may be set with candlelight : MOOD
70. Relatively safe investment : AA BOND
71. Frontiersman Boone, informally : DAN’L
72. Award-winning British sitcom, to fans : AB FAB
73. Moon of Saturn : DIONE
77. Brontë heroine : EYRE
78. Unfading : FAST
80. Is suitable for : BEFITS
81. HVAC measure : BTU
82. Veg-O-Matic maker : RONCO
83. 500 initials : STP
85. Needlefish : GARS
87. Abbr. in trig : COS
88. Gang land : TURF
91. It helps support a canopy : BEDPOST
95. ___ sauce : TARTAR
96. Camera settings : F-STOPS
97. Like some minds and margins : NARROW
99. Sot : LUSH
100. Tangle up : ENMESH
101. Slowly : ADAGIO
103. Georges who wrote "Life: A User's Manual" : PEREC
104. Slowly : LARGO
105. Animal or vegetable fat, e.g. : ESTER
106. Volume unit : STERE
107. Play (around) : HORSE
108. Steve Perry hit "___ Mine" : SHE’S
109. O.R. or E.R. site : HOSP
110. Ocean menace : ORCA
112. Peculiar: Prefix : IDIO-
113. Trillion: Prefix : TERA-
117. Born as : NEE
119. Vietnamese holiday : TET
120. Mrs. Romney : ANN

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost everyday as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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