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0603-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 3 Jun 12, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Patrick Berry
THEME: Myth-Labeled … each of the theme answers is something from the world of mythology:
23A. WARNING: Suspension system prone to failure : SWORD OF DAMOCLES
29A. WARNING: May contain Greeks : TROJAN HORSE
50A. WARNING: Possible heart-related side effects : CUPID’S ARROW
75A. WARNING: Cutting tool required : GORDIAN KNOT
96A. WARNING: Do not open : PANDORA’S BOX
103A. WARNING: Effects on children unknown : FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH
4D. WARNING: May cause damnation if swallowed : FORBIDDEN FRUIT
54D. WARNING: Improper use could lead to jealousy, treachery and/or war : APPLE OF DISCORD
COMPLETION TIME: 41m 41s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … SYMS (Sims), Lynde (Linde)


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
6. Moon shots? : REARS
The first recorded mooning incident took place in 66 AD, during the First Roman-Jewish War. Roman soldiers decided to moon Jewish pilgrims as they traveled to the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem.

11. Lead-ins to many YouTube videos : ADS
YouTube is a video-sharing website, launched in 2005 by three ex-PayPal employees. Google bought YouTube in 2006 for $1.65 billion. Yep, $1.65 billion ... less than two years after it was founded ...

19. Maker of Reynolds Wrap : ALCOA
The Aluminum Corporation of America (ALCOA) is the largest producer of aluminum in the United States. The company was founded in 1888 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where its headquarters is to this day.

20. Film composer Morricone : ENNIO
Ennio Morricone is an Italian composer, best known for writing music for films and television shows. It was Morricone who wrote the fabulous scores for the Spaghetti Westerns of Sergio Leone, including “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly”.

21. A fire sign : LEO
Each of the twelve astrological signs is associated with one of the classical elements:
- Fire signs: Aries, Leo, Sagittarius
- Earth signs: Taurus, Capricorn, Virgo
- Air signs: Libra, Aquarius, Gemini
- Water signs: Cancer, Scorpio, Pisces

22. Saint Clare of Assisi's sister : AGNES
Saint Agnes of Assisi was the younger sister of Saint Clare of Assisi. Both Clare and Agnes took to the contemplative life as followers of Saint Francis of Assisi.

23. WARNING: Suspension system prone to failure : SWORD OF DAMOCLES
In the legend of “The Sword of Damocles”, Damocles was a member of the court of Dionysius II of Syracuse. Damocles was a bit of a smarmy type and weaseled his way into sitting on the throne of his king so that he could taste the power and privilege that came with the position. However, as a price, Damocles had to sit on the throne under a sword that was suspended by a single hair of a horse’s tail. Such was the tension felt by Damocles that he begged to be allowed give up the privileges of the throne.

26. Company that owns Lands' End : SEARS
Richard Sears was a station agent on the railroad. In the late 1800s he bought up a shipment of unwanted watches that was left at his depot, and sold the watches to other agents up and down the line. He was so successful that he ordered more watches, and then came up with the idea of using a catalog to promote more sales. The catalog idea caught on, and by the mid 1900s Sears was the biggest retailer in the whole country.

28. Gershwin title character : BESS
“Porgy and Bess” is an opera with music by George Gershwin, lyrics by his brother, Ira Gershwin, and libretto by DuBose Heyward. The storyline of the opera is based on the novel “Porgy” written by DuBose Heyward and and wife Dorothy Heyward. “Porgy and Bess” was first performed in 1935, in New York City, but really wasn’t accepted as legitimate opera until 1976 after a landmark production by the Houston Grand Opera. The most famous song from the piece is of course the wonderful “Summertime”.

29. WARNING: May contain Greeks : TROJAN HORSE
The story of the Wooden Horse of Troy is told in Virgil’s poem “The Aeneid”. According to the tale, the city of Troy finally fell to the Greeks after a siege that had lasted for ten years. In a ruse, the Greeks sailed away in apparent defeat, leaving behind a large wooden horse. Inside the horse were hidden 30 crack soldiers and, when the horse was dragged into the city as a victory trophy, the soldiers sneaked out and opened the city’s gates. The Greeks returned under cover of night and entered the open city.

37. John : LAV
Our word “lavatory” originally referred to a washbasin, and comes from the Latin “lavatorium”, a place for washing. In the 1600s a "lavatory" became a washroom, and in the 1920s a toilet.

The use of "john" as a slang term for a toilet is peculiar to North America. It probably comes from the older slang term of "jack" or "jakes" that had been around since the 16th century. In Ireland, in cruder moments, we still refer to a toilet as "the jacks".

40. They get punched out : CHADS
We are all familiar with "hanging chads" after the famous Florida election recounts of 2000. A chad is any piece of paper punched out from a larger sheet. So, those round bits of paper we've all dropped over the floor when emptying a hole punch, they're chads.

43. "The Ballad of ___," 1967 comedy/western : JOSIE
“The Ballad of Josie” is a comedy film from 1967, a Western spoof with a good cast that includes Doris Day, Peter Graves and George Kennedy.

45. Part of L.A.P.D. : LOS
The Los Angles Police Department (LAPD) is the third largest local law enforcement agency in the country, after New York PD and Chicago PD. Among other things, LAPD is famous for creating the first Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team in the US, in 1965.

54. 1966 Florentine flooder : ARNO
The Arno is the principal river in the Tuscany region of Italy, and passes through the cities of Florence and Pisa. Famously, the Arno flooded in 1966, the worst flood in the region for centuries. There were numerous deaths and extensive destruction of priceless art treasures, particularly in Florence.

55. Musandam Peninsula nation : OMAN
Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the OAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. The capital city of Muscat has a strategic location on the Gulf of Oman and has a history of invasion and unrest. Centuries of occupation by the Persians ended in 1507 when the Portuguese took the city in a bloody attack. The Portuguese held Muscat for much of the next one hundred years until finally ousted by local Omani forces in 1648. A Yemeni tribe invaded the area in 1741 and set up a monarchy that has been in place ever since.

56. Big-box store : IKEA
Did you know that IKEA was founded by Ingvar Kamprad in 1943 when he was just 17-years-old??!! IKEA is an acronym that stands for Ingvar Kamprad Elmtaryd Agunnaryd (don't forget now!). Elmtaryd was the name of the farm where Ingvar Kamprad grew up, and Agunnaryd is his home parish in Sweden.

57. Single-masted boat : SLOOP
Sloops and cutters are sailboats, and each has just one mast. One major difference between the two types of vessel is that the mast on a cutter is set much further aft than the mast on a sloop.

63. Avoided bogey : PARRED
The term "Bogey" originated at the Great Yarmouth Golf Club in England in 1890, and was used to indicate a total round that was one over par (and not one over par on a particular hole, as it is today). The name Bogey came from a music hall song of the time "Here Comes the Bogey Man". In the following years it became popular for players trying to stay at par to be "playing against Colonel Bogey". Then, during WWI, the marching tune "Colonel Bogey" was written and named after the golfing term. If you don't recognize the name of the tune, it's the one that's whistled by the soldiers marching in the great movie "The Bridge on the River Kwai".

65. Bordeaux grape : MERLOT
Merlot is one of the main grapes used to make Bordeaux wines, along with Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot.

Bordeaux is perhaps the wine producing capital of the world. Wine has been produced in the area since the eighth century. Bordeaux has an administrative history too. During WWII, the French government relocated from Paris to the port city of Bordeaux when it became clear that Paris was soon to fall to the Germans. After the German's too France, the capital was famously moved to Vichy.

70. Newswoman Roberts : COKIE
Cokie Roberts is a great journalist and author, best known for her work with National Public Radio.

71. Source of the word "bandanna" : HINDI
A bandanna is a large kerchief that is usually worn on the head or around the neck. The term “bandanna” comes from the Hindi word meaning “to tie”.

72. Saloon singer Sylvia : SYMS
Sylvia Syms was a jazz singer from New York. Frank Sinatra called Syms the “world’s greatest saloon singer”. Syms actually died on stage, suffering a heart attack at the age of 74.

75. WARNING: Cutting tool required : GORDIAN KNOT
In the legend of the Gordian Knot, a poor peasant called Gordian was made king and in gratitude dedicated his ox and cart to the god Zeus. He tied up the cart with a very intricate knot, and it was predicted that the person who untied the knot would rule all of Asia. Many tried and failed to release the knot, including Alexander the Great. Alexander eventually worked around the problem and sliced the knot in a half with his sword. Apparently the gods were pleased, and Alexander went onto great military success.

80. ___ United (English football club) : LEEDS
Leeds United is one of the most successful clubs playing professional soccer in England, and is a team with a passionate fan base.

87. Japanese kana character : CHI
Kana are syllabic characters in simplified kanji. Kana are often used to show the pronunciation of foreign words.

88. Big name in suits : SPEEDO
Speedo brand swim-wear was first produced in Australia in 1928, by a hosiery company that wanted to diversify. The brand name was chosen after a slogan competition among employees was won by "Speed on in your Speedos". It was a long time ago, I guess ...

91. ___ Creed (statement of religious beliefs) : NICENE
What is known today in the Christian tradition as the Nicene Creed, was originally adopted by the first ecumenical council when it met in 325 AD. The meeting took place in the city of Nicaea, which gave its name to this particular profession of faith. Nicaea is the Greek name of the city that is now called Iznik, and it lies in the northwest of Turkey.

96. WARNING: Do not open : PANDORA’S BOX
In Greek mythology, Pandora was the first woman. Pandora is famous for the story of "Pandora's Box". In actual fact, the story should be about Pandora's "Jar", as a 16th-century error in translation created a "box" out of the "jar". In the story of Pandora’s Box, curiosity got the better of her and she opened up a box she was meant to leave alone. As a result she released all the evils of mankind, just closing it in time to trap hope inside.

102. "The Addams Family" actor John : ASTIN
John Astin is best known for playing Gomez, the head of the household on "The Addams Family" TV series.

103. WARNING: Effects on children unknown : FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH
The Fountain of Youth is supposedly a spring that restores the youth of anyone who drinks from it. There have been stories of such fountains all over the world, including the Caribbean where the magical waters were believed to be in the mythical land of Bimini (although there is also a "real" Bimini in the Bahamas).

109. "Rubber Duckie" singer : ERNIE
“Rubber Duckie” is a song by the Muppet character Ernie.

I've always believed that the "Sesame Street" characters Bert and Ernie were named after two roles played in the Christmas classic "It's a Wonderful Life". In the movie, the policeman's name is Bert and his taxi-driving buddy is named Ernie. However, the "Sesame Street" folks have stated that the use of the same names is just a coincidence.

110. Thomas of stage and screen : MARLO
Marlo Thomas’s most famous role was playing the title character in the television sitcom “That Girl”. Thomas is also well known as a spokesperson for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

111. Mens ___ : REA
"Mens rea" is Latin for "guilty mind" and is a central concept in criminal law. The concept is expanded to "actus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea" meaning "the act does not make a person guilty unless the mind be also guilty". In other words, a man should not be deemed guilty of an act, unless he had a "guilty mind", that he intended to do wrong.

Down
2. Actor Cary : ELWES
Cary Elwes is an English actor, more noted for appearing in the 1987 film “The Princess Drive”. Cary is the son of a celebrated English portrait painter, Dominick Elwes.

3. Symbol used to mark England's National Trails : ACORN
The National Trails of England and Wales are long distance footpaths that traverse the country crossing significant areas. Examples are the Hadrian’s Wall Path, the Offa’s Dyke Path, the Thames Path and the Pennine Way.

8. 1956 Ingrid Bergman/Yul Brynner film : ANASTASIA
“Anastasia” is a 1956 historical drama that tells the story of a young French woman who in the 1920s is convinced to pass herself off as the daughter of the murdered Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. The leads in the movie are Ingrid Bergman and Yul Brynner.

The last ruler of Imperial Russia was Tsar Nicholas II (of the House of Romanov). Famously, the Tsar and his family were murdered in 1918 in the basement of a house in Yekaterinburg, Russia by members of the Bolshevik secret police. The Tsar's youngest daughter was 16-year-old Anastasia and rumors of her escape have persisted for years. The rumors grew with the help of numerous women who claimed to be Anastasia, but DNA testing has proven that all claims were false. In 2009, DNA testing finally proved that the remains of all of the Tsar's immediate family, including Anastasia, have been found and identified.

12. Entertain a party, in a way : DEEJAY
The world's first radio disk jockey was one Ray Newby of Stockton, California who made his first broadcast in 1909, would you believe? When he was 16 years old and a student, he started to play his records on a primitive radio located in the Herrold College of Engineering and Wireless in San Jose. The records played back then were mostly recordings of Enrico Caruso.

13. 1998 home run race participant : SOSA
Sammy Sosa was right in the public eye in 1998 when he and Mark McGwire were vying to be the first to surpass the home run record held by Roger Maris. McGwire fell out of public favor due to stories of steroid abuse (stories which he later admitted were true) while Sosa fell of out favor when he was found to be using a corked bat in a 2003 game.

14. Approach clubs : MASHIES
Most of the irons in a golf bag had non-numerical names in days gone by:
- 2 Iron ... Cleek
- 3 Iron ... Mid Mashie
- 4 Iron ... Mashie Iron
- 5 Iron ... Mashie
- 6 Iron ... Spade Mashie
- 7 Iron ... Mashie Niblick
- 8 Iron ... Pitching Niblick
- 9 Iron ... Niblick

15. Antediluvian : AGE OLD
Something “antediluvian” is very old. The term comes from “ante” meaning “before” and “diluvium” meaning “flood”. The idea is that something really old took place before Noah’s Flood.

18. City that hosts the world's biggest annual game fair : ESSEN
The Internationale Spieltage SPIEL is a four-day game fair that is held every year in Essen in Germany. SPIEL is the largest game fair in the world.

32. ___ de deux : PAS
The the world of ballet, a pas de deux is duet in which the dancers dance together. A classic pas de deux has a particular structure. It starts with a short entree, then an adagio followed by two variations, one for each dancer, and ends with a short coda. The term "pas de deux" is French for "step for two", or I suppose "dance for two".

34. "Ars Amatoria" writer : OVID
The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso is today known simply as Ovid. Ovid is usually listed alongside the two other great Roman poets, Horace and Virgil.

42. Oscar winner for "Little Miss Sunshine" : ALAN ARKIN
The actor Alan Arkin won his only Oscar (Best Supporting Actor) for his role in "Little Miss Sunshine" from 2006, a movie I just did not understand ...

43. Made a misleading move, in football : JUKED
“To juke” is to dodge or feint, a variant of “to jook”, a Scottish term with the same meaning.

46. Like Spam : PRECOOKED
Spam is a brand of pre-cooked meat product that has been made by Hormel since 1937. The ingredients in Spam include chopped pork shoulder, modified potato starch as a binder, and sodium nitrite as a preservative. Apparently 3.8 cans of Spam are consumed in the US every second. I find that hard to believe though …

51. "It's the stupidest tea-party I ever was at in all my life!" speaker : ALICE
“Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” is often cited as as the origin of the expression "mad as a March hare", perhaps because of confusion between the March Hare and the Mad Hatter who appear together at the famous "tea party" in the story. The expression predates the Lewis Carroll tale, and arose as hares were said to behave quite “madly” in the March breeding season.

54. WARNING: Improper use could lead to jealousy, treachery and/or war : APPLE OF DISCORD
According to Greek myth, the goddess Eris tossed the Apple of Discord into the midst of the festivities at a royal wedding. The resulting dispute was said to have led to the Trojan War.

61. Fictional friend of Peter the goatherd : HEIDI
“Heidi” is a Swiss children’s book written and published in two parts. “Heidi” tells the story of a young girl in the care of her grandfather in the Swiss Alps.

66. Certain missile : SCUD
Scud missiles were developed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War. The Soviets called them R-11 missiles at first, with later versions known as R-17 and R-300 Elbrus. The name "Scud" was actually the name NATO used for the missile, a name created by Western intelligence officers. Ballistic missiles haven't been used much in actual warfare, with the most ballistic missile launches happening in WWII, the German V-2 rocket attacks on England. The second most used ballistic missile is the Scud, which featured in a number of conflicts:
- used by Egypt against Israel in the Yom Kippur War of 1973
- used by the USSR in Afghanistan
- used by Libya against a US Coast Guard station in 1986
- used by Iranians and Iraqis in the Iran-Iraq War of 1980-88
- used by Iraq in the Gulf War of 1990-91

68. "Bewitched" regular Paul : LYNDE
Paul Lynde was a character actor noted for playing Uncle Arthur on the TV sitcom “Bewitched”. He was also noted as the longtime “center square” on “Hollywood Squares”, for thirteen years.

69. Home to many John Constable works, with "the" : TATE
The museum known as "the Tate" is actually made up of four separate galleries in England. The original Tate gallery was founded by Sir Henry Tate as the National Gallery of British Art. It is located on Millbank in London, on the site of the old Millbank Prison, and is now called Tate Britain. There is also the Tate Liverpool in the north of England located in an old warehouse, and the Tate St. Ives in the west country located in an old gas works. My favorite of the Tate galleries is the Tate Modern which lies on the banks of the Thames in London. It's a beautiful building, a converted power station that you have to see to believe.

John Constable is the most English of painters, although during his lifetime his work was more popular in France than it was in his native country. His most famous painting is “The Hay Wain” from 1821, which you can see in the National Gallery in London.

75. Gainesville athlete : GATOR
The Florida Gators are the sports teams of the University of Florida, located in Gainesville. Sometimes the female teams are called the "Lady Gators", and all of the fans make up the "Gator Nation".

76. Attention-getting sign : NEON
The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube the neon gas “glows”, giving off the familiar light.

79. ___ Beach (California surfing mecca) : REDONDO
Redondo Beach is one of the three so-called Beach Cities in L.A. County, California (along with Manhattan Beach and Hermosa Beach). Among Redondo Beach's famous residents were the Smothers Brothers who grew up there and graduated from the local high school.

84. Part of a calf : FIBULA
The fibula is the calf bone, and lies beside the tibia, with both bones sitting under the femur.

95. Grammy-winning Weird Al Yankovic song : EAT IT
"Eat It" was a big hit for Weird Al Yankovic, and is a parody of the bigger Michael Jackson hit, "Beat It". For reasons of copyright, Yankovic had to present the lyrics of the parody to Michael Jackson, and was pleasantly surprised to see that Jackson found it amusing and gave permission for the project to proceed. In Australia, "Eat It" actually got to number one in the charts, while "Beat It" only made it to number three!

99. "Young Frankenstein" role : INGA
I am not really a big fan of movies by Mel Brooks, but “Young Frankenstein” is the exception. I think the cast has a lot to do with me liking the film, as it includes Gene Wilder, Teri Garr, Marty Feldman and Gene Hackman.

The lovely Teri Garr had a whole host of minor roles in her youth, including appearances in nine Elvis movies. Her big break came with the role of Inga in "Young Frankenstein", and her supporting role in "Tootsie" earned her an Academy Award nomination. Sadly, Teri Garr suffers from multiple sclerosis and is a National Ambassador for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

101. Kojak's first name : THEO
I think we all remember Telly Savalas playing the title role in the detective drama "Kojak", but do we recall his performance in the 1962 "Birdman of Alcatraz"? Savalas played a supporting role opposite Burt Lancaster in that movie, earning himself an Oscar nomination. Another of his more significant roles was Pontius Pilate in the 1965 epic "The Greatest Story Ever Told". Savalas had to shave his head to play Pilate, and he liked the look so much that he remained bald for the rest of his life.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Pages (through) : LEAFS
6. Moon shots? : REARS
11. Lead-ins to many YouTube videos : ADS
14. Sunset color : MAUVE
19. Maker of Reynolds Wrap : ALCOA
20. Film composer Morricone : ENNIO
21. A fire sign : LEO
22. Saint Clare of Assisi's sister : AGNES
23. WARNING: Suspension system prone to failure : SWORD OF DAMOCLES
26. Company that owns Lands' End : SEARS
27. Tea flavoring : HERB
28. Gershwin title character : BESS
29. WARNING: May contain Greeks : TROJAN HORSE
31. High-precision rifle user : SNIPER
33. Its first car was the Model AA : TOYOTA
35. Well-connected industrialists? : OIL MEN
36. Generally preferred work shift : DAY
37. John : LAV
38. Raring to go : PSYCHED
40. They get punched out : CHADS
43. "The Ballad of ___," 1967 comedy/western : JOSIE
45. Part of L.A.P.D. : LOS
46. Litter member : PUP
49. Function : ROLE
50. WARNING: Possible heart-related side effects : CUPID’S ARROW
54. 1966 Florentine flooder : ARNO
55. Musandam Peninsula nation : OMAN
56. Big-box store : IKEA
57. Single-masted boat : SLOOP
58. Uncorks : OPENS
59. Proves false : CONFUTES
61. Crime film centerpiece : HEIST
62. Very tame tom : LAP CAT
63. Avoided bogey : PARRED
64. Picket line? : FENCE
65. Bordeaux grape : MERLOT
66. Silently says "So what?" : SHRUGS
67. Furniture purchase : SUITE
68. Rent : LEASE OUT
70. Newswoman Roberts : COKIE
71. Source of the word "bandanna" : HINDI
72. Saloon singer Sylvia : SYMS
73. Pods often pickled : OKRA
74. Foot, e.g. : UNIT
75. WARNING: Cutting tool required : GORDIAN KNOT
77. Tour de force : FEAT
78. Entertainment center location : DEN
79. Unrefined : RAW
80. ___ United (English football club) : LEEDS
81. Perplex : ADDLE
82. Company whose ads have "Peanuts" characters : METLIFE
86. Not be entirely independent : OWE
87. Japanese kana character : CHI
88. Big name in suits : SPEEDO
91. ___ Creed (statement of religious beliefs) : NICENE
93. Gliding dance step : CHASSE
96. WARNING: Do not open : PANDORA’S BOX
98. Nettle : RILE
100. Completely cover : COAT
102. "The Addams Family" actor John : ASTIN
103. WARNING: Effects on children unknown : FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH
106. Ending with farm or home : -STEAD
107. Nothing but : ALL
108. Olympic group? : RINGS
109. "Rubber Duckie" singer : ERNIE
110. Thomas of stage and screen : MARLO
111. Mens ___ : REA
112. Biofuel source : ALGAE
113. Supplement : ADD TO

Down
1. Old naval punishment : LASH
2. Actor Cary : ELWES
3. Symbol used to mark England's National Trails : ACORN
4. WARNING: May cause damnation if swallowed : FORBIDDEN FRUIT
5. Unfortunate : SAD
6. Consult, with "to" : REFER
7. Wraps up : ENDS
8. 1956 Ingrid Bergman/Yul Brynner film : ANASTASIA
9. Wheel part : RIM
10. Like used fire irons : SOOTY
11. Earmarks : ALLOTS
12. Entertain a party, in a way : DEEJAY
13. 1998 home run race participant : SOSA
14. Approach clubs : MASHIES
15. Antediluvian : AGE OLD
16. Strip of weapons : UNARM
17. Minister's reading : VERSE
18. City that hosts the world's biggest annual game fair : ESSEN
24. Comply with : OBEY
25. Seasonal yield : CROP
30. At all, in dialect : NO HOW
32. ___ de deux : PAS
34. "Ars Amatoria" writer : OVID
37. Canters leisurely : LOPES
39. Sound heard at equestrian events : CLOP
40. Critter with a lot of teeth : CROC
41. Cache for cash, say : HOMOPHONE
42. Oscar winner for "Little Miss Sunshine" : ALAN ARKIN
43. Made a misleading move, in football : JUKED
44. Required : ESSENTIAL
46. Like Spam : PRECOOKED
47. Grotesque : UNNATURAL
48. Blog entry : POST
50. Names : CITES
51. "It's the stupidest tea-party I ever was at in all my life!" speaker : ALICE
52. Headed heavenward : ROSE
53. Floorboard problem : ROT
54. WARNING: Improper use could lead to jealousy, treachery and/or war : APPLE OF DISCORD
58. They're sometimes seen in banks : OARS
60. Compulsion : URGE
61. Fictional friend of Peter the goatherd : HEIDI
62. Smallest : LEAST
64. Charitable creation : FUND
65. Notes : MEMOS
66. Certain missile : SCUD
67. Officer's title : SIR
68. "Bewitched" regular Paul : LYNDE
69. Home to many John Constable works, with "the" : TATE
71. Complain loudly : HOWL
72. Really ridiculing : SKEWERING
75. Gainesville athlete : GATOR
76. Attention-getting sign : NEON
79. ___ Beach (California surfing mecca) : REDONDO
81. "I suspected as much!" : AHA
82. Near the center : MEDIAL
83. Shoe part : INSOLE
84. Part of a calf : FIBULA
85. Future C.P.A.'s study : ECON
87. Special creator? : CHEF
88. Muscle woe : SPASM
89. Food in many shapes : PASTA
90. Cross the doorsill : ENTER
92. Actor without lines : EXTRA
93. About to happen : CLOSE
94. Reliable : SOUND
95. Grammy-winning Weird Al Yankovic song : EAT IT
97. In the distance : AFAR
99. "Young Frankenstein" role : INGA
101. Kojak's first name : THEO
104. Afflict : AIL
105. Biblical "indeed" : YEA

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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