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0701-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Jul 12, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Schoenholz
THEME: Yankee Doodle Dandies … each of the theme answers is a celebrity who was BORN ON THE FOURTH OF JULY:
28A. President who was 65-Across (1872) : CALVIN COOLIDGE
39A. Presidential daughter who was 65-Across (1998) : MALIA OBAMA
45A. Novelist who was 65-Across (1804) : NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE
65A. See 28-, 39-, 45-, 83-, 95- and 107-Across : BORN ON THE FOURTH OF JULY
83A. Team owner who was 65-Across (1930) : GEORGE STEINBRENNER
95A. Columnist who was 65-Across (1918) : ANN LANDERS
107A. Literary critic who was 65-Across (1905) : LIONEL TRILLING
COMPLETION TIME: 36m 06s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Plays a siren : TEMPTS
In Greek mythology, the Sirens were seductive bird-women who lured men to their deaths with their song. When Odysseus sailed closed to the island home of the Sirens he wanted to hear their voices, but in safety. He had his men plug their ears with beeswax and then ordered them to tie him to the mast and not to free him until they were safe. On hearing their song he begged to be let loose, but the sailors just tightened his bonds and sailed away unharmed.

7. Gold Coast, today : GHANA
The name "Ghana" means "warrior king" in the local language. The British established a colony they called Gold Coast in 1874, later to become Ghana, as part of the scramble by Europeans to settle as much of Africa as they could. One of Ghana's most famous sons is Kofi Annan, the diplomat that served as General Secretary of the UN for ten years until the beginning of 2007.

19. Noted landing site : ARARAT
Mount Ararat is in Turkey. Ararat is a snow-capped dormant volcano with two peaks. The higher of the two, Greater Ararat, is the tallest peak in the country. Ararat takes its name from a legendary Armenian hero called Ara the Beautiful (or Ara the Handsome).

20. Player of the younger Cunningham on "Happy Days" : MORAN
Erin Moran is the lovely actress most famous for playing Joanie Cunningham on "Happy Days" and the resulting (short-lived) spin-off sitcom called "Joanie Loves Chachi". Long before she got her big break in "Happy Days", Moran played Jenny Jones on the children's drama "Daktari" from the late sixties.

21. Mach3 predecessor : ATRA
Fortunately for crossword setters, the Atra razor was introduced by Gillette in 1977. It was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

22. "Yes, I'm a Witch" singer, 1992 : ONO
Yoko Ono was born into a prosperous Japanese family, and is actually a descendant of one of the emperors of Japan. Yoko's father moved around the world for work and she lived the first few years of her life in San Francisco. The family returned to Japan before moving on to New York, Hanoi and back to Japan just before WWII, in time to live through the great fire-bombing of Tokyo in 1945. Immediately after the war the Ono family was far from prosperous. While Yoko's father was being held in a prison camp in Vietnam, her mother had to resort to begging and bartering to feed her children. When her father was repatriated, life started to return to normal and Yoko was able to attend university. She was the first woman to be accepted into the philosophy program of Gakushuin University.

23. ___ Bay, 1898 battle site : MANILA
The Battle of Manila Bay was an engagement during the Spanish-American War that took place on May 1, 1898. The US forces were led by Commodore George Dewey who was aboard his flagship, the USS Olympia. The USS Olympia is on display at the Independence Seaport Museum in Philadelphia, but she is destined to be scuttled or scrapped unless the museum can find a new owner for her.

28. President who was 65-Across (1872) : CALVIN COOLIDGE
President Calvin Coolidge, the only US President to have been born on July 4th, was known as a man of few words. It was while he was serving as Vice-President to in the administration of Warren G. Harding, that Coolidge earned the nickname “Silent Cal”. There is a famous story told about Coolidge’s reticence that I would love to think is true, attributed to the poet Dorothy Parker. Sitting beside him at dinner, she remarked to him, "Mr. Coolidge, I've made a bet against a fellow who said it was impossible to get more than two words out of you." His famous reply: "You lose."

33. Capital of Denmark? : DEE
Dee is the first letter in the word “Denmark”.

35. Fermented honey drink : MEAD
Mead is a lovely drink, made from fermented honey and water.

36. Where kips are cash : LAOS
The kip has been the unit of currency in Laos since 1952.

The official name for the country of Laos is the Lao People's Democratic Republic. In the Lao language, the name is "Meuang Lao". The French ruled the country as part of French Indochina, having united three separate Lao kingdoms. As there was a plural of "Lao" entities united into one, the French added the "S" and so today we tend to use "Laos" instead of "Lao".

39. Presidential daughter who was 65-Across (1998) : MALIA OBAMA
By tradition, the Secret Service code names used for the US President and family all start with the same letter. For the current First Family, that letter is R:
- Barack Obama: Renegade
- Michelle Obama: Renaissance
- Malia Obama: Radiance
- Sasha Obama: Rosebud

41. First National Leaguer with 500 home runs : OTT
At 5' 9", Mel Ott weighed just 170 lb (I don't think he took steroids!) and yet he was the first National League player to hit over 500 home runs. Sadly, Ott died in a car accident in New Orleans in 1958 when he was only 49 years old.

45. Novelist who was 65-Across (1804) : NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE
Nathaniel Hawthorne was a novelist from Salem, Massachusetts. Supposedly, Hawthorne changed the spelling of his family name from Hathorne in an attempt to dissociate himself from one of his ancestors. Nathaniel’s great-great-grandfather was John Hathorne, one of the judges in the Salem Witch Trials.

52. Early computer : ENIAC
The acronym ENIAC stands for Electronic Numerical Integrator and Calculator (although many folks insist that the C was for "Computer"). ENIAC was the first general-purpose electronic computer. It was designed to calculate artillery firing tables, but it ended up being used early on to make calculations necessary for the development of the hydrogen bomb. Given its uses, it's not surprising to hear that development of ENIAC was funded by the US Army during WWII.

53. Yevtushenko's "Babi ___" : YAR
Yevgeny Yevtushenko is a Russian poet, among other things. His most famous work is probably his poem "Babi Yar" which tells of the Nazi massacre of Jews in Kiev in 1941. Babi Yar is a ravine outside of Kiev, where over 33,000 Jews were slaughtered by the Nazis, a massacre carried out over just two days.

54. Red Cross supply : SERA
Back in 1859, a Swiss businessman called Henry Dunant went to meet French emperor Napoleon III, to discuss making it easier to conduct commerce in French-occupied Algeria. The Emperor was billeted at Solferino, where France and Austria were engaged in a major battle. In one day, Dunant witnessed 40,000 soldiers die in battle, and countless wounded suffering on the battlefield without any organized medical care. Dunant abandoned his business agenda and instead spent a week caring for the sick and wounded. Within a few years he had founded the precursor to the Red Cross, and in 1901 was awarded the first ever Nobel Peace Prize.

58. "The Haj" author : URIS
Leon Uris as an American writer. His most famous books are "Exodus" and "Trinity", two excellent stories, in my humble opinion …

61. Long way to go? : LIMO
The word "limousine" actually derives from the French city of Limoges. The area around Limoges is called the Limousin, and it gave its name to a cloak hood worn by local shepherds. In early motor cars, a driver would sit outside in the weather while the passengers would sit in the covered compartment. The driver would often wear a limousin-style protective hood, giving rise to that type of transportation being called a "limousine". Well, that's how the story goes anyway ...

64. ___ Valley, 2002 Winter Olympics venue : DEER
Deer Valley is a ski resort in Park City, Utah, one of the sites used in the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics held in 2002. Deer Valley is one of the very few ski resorts in the US that still prohibits snowboarding.

72. Sri Lankan export : TEA
The name Sri Lanka translates from Sanskrit into English as "venerable island". Before 1970, Sri Lanka was known as Ceylon, a name given to the country during British rule. The lion on the country’s national flag symbolizes the fight against British colonialism.

73. Film canine : ASTA
Asta was the wonderful little dog in the superb movie "The Thin Man" starring William Powell and Myrna Loy (as Nick and Nora Charles). In the original story by Dashiell Hammett, Asta was a female Schnauzer, but on screen Asta was played by a wire-haired fox terrier called "Skippy". Skippy was also the dog in "Bringing up Baby" with Cary Grant and Katherine Hepburn, the one who kept stealing the dinosaur bone. Skippy retired in 1939, so Asta was played by other dogs in the remainder of "The Thin Man" films.

74. "This is dedicated to the ___ love" : ONE I
“Dedicated to the One I Love” is a song that is most associated with the Mamas and the Papas as they had a hit with it in 1967. Back in 1961, the same song was a big hit for The Shirelles.

75. Wordsworth's "solitary Tree" : YEW
Here are some lines from the poem “Yew Trees” by William Wordsworth:
This solitary Tree! a living thing 10
Produced too slowly ever to decay;
Of form and aspect too magnificent
To be destroyed.

The great English poet William Wordsworth lived in the Lake District in the north of England, a beautiful part of the country. I’ve been fortunate enough to visit Dove Cottage in Grasmere a couple of times, where Wordsworth lived with his wife, Dorothy.

78. Article in Der Spiegel : EIN
"Der Spiegel" is a very successful German magazine found on news-stands all over Europe. The name "Der Spiegel" translates from German into "the Mirror".

83. Team owner who was 65-Across (1930) : GEORGE STEINBRENNER
George Steinbrenner was the owner of the New York Yankees baseball team for 37 years, right up until his passing in 2010.

93. Sierra Nevada, e.g. : BEER
The Sierra Nevada Brewing Company is powered almost exclusively by solar energy, and even has a charging station for electric vehicles at its brewery. The company also uses the cooking oil from its restaurant as biodiesel for its delivery trucks. Discarded yeast is used to make ethanol fuel, and spent grain is used as food for livestock. For its efforts to preserve the environment, Sierra Nevada won the EPA's “Green Business of the Year” award for 2010.

95. Columnist who was 65-Across (1918) : ANN LANDERS
"Ask Ann Landers" was an advice column written by Eppie Lederer from 1995 to 2002. Eppie was the twin sister to Pauline Phillips, the person behind "Dear Abby". Eppie took over the "Ask Ann Landers" column from Ruth Crowley who started it in 1943.

(It was Eppie Lederer who was born on the 4th of July).

101. Attire usually worn with slippers : TUTU
The word "tutu", used for a ballet dancer's skirt, is actually a somewhat "naughty" term. It came into English from French in the early 20th century. The French "tutu" is an alteration of the word "cucu", a childish word for "cul" meaning the "bottom, backside".

102. "Unfaithful" co-star, 2002 : GERE
Richard Gere has played such great roles on the screen, and I find him to be a very interesting character off the screen. Gere has been studying Buddhism since 1978 and is a very visible supporter of the Dalai Lama and the people of Tibet.

103. The final Mrs. Chaplin : OONA
Oona O'Neill dated J. D. Salinger and Orson Welles in her teens, but ended up marrying Charlie Chaplin. Oona was still pretty young when she married Chaplin, much to the dismay of her famous father, the playwright Eugene O'Neill. After the marriage Eugene disowned Oona as he was pretty upset about 54-year-old Chaplin marrying his 18-year-old daughter.

104. Economic stat. : CPI
The Consumer Price Index (CPI) measures changes in the price of services and goods purchased by households. The United States CPI fell in 2009, for the first time since 1955. That’s how bad the 2009 recession was …

107. Literary critic who was 65-Across (1905) : LIONEL TRILLING
New Yorker Lionel Trilling ranks as one of the great American literary critics of the twentieth century. He wrote in the celebrated journal "Partisan Review" along with his wife and fellow critic, Diana Trilling. He and Diana were listed among the influential group of writers and critics of the mid-1900s known as the New York Intellectuals, along with the likes of Saul Bellow and Susan Sontag.

111. Michigan college : ALMA
Alma College in Alma, Michigan was founded by Michigan Presbyterians in 1886. The school has a Scottish heritage of which it is very proud. Alma has its own Scottish marching band, a Scottish dance troupe and even its own design of tartan.

112. When sung five times, an Abba hit : I DO
"I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do" was the second of ABBA's long, long string of smash hits. It was particularly successful in Australia, where there is a huge Abba fan base to this day. The song was featured in a really great Australian film called "Muriel's Wedding" from 1994. This was the movie that launched the career of the wonderful actress Toni Collette.

113. Electrical impulse conductor in the body : MOTONEURON
Motoneuron is another term for “motor neuron”, a nerve cell the carries impulses from the central nervous system to muscles, for example.

117. D.C. player : NAT
The Washington Nationals baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005, becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series; one is the Mariners, and the other the Nats.

119. Maytag acquisition of 2001 : AMANA
The Amana Corporation takes its name from the location of its original headquarters, in Middle Amana, Iowa.

Down
1. Tufted topper : TAM
A tam o'shanter is a man's cap traditionally worn by Scotsmen. "Tams" were originally all blue (and called "blue bonnets") but as more dyes became readily available, they became more colorful. The name of the cap comes from the title character of Robert Burns poem "Tam O'Shanter".

3. Some large tubes : MANICOTTI
Cannelloni differs from manicotti, even though both are essentially tubes of pasta. Manicotti (Italian for "sleeves") are pre-shaped tubes. Cannelloni (Italian for "large reeds") are rectangular sheets of pasta that are rolled into tubes after having been stuffed with some filling.

5. Part of Tennyson's "crooked hands" : TALON
Alfred Lord Tennyson wrote a poem called “The Eagle”:
He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
Close to the sun in lonely lands,
Ringed with the azure world, he stands.
The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;
He watches from his mountain walls,
And like a thunderbolt he falls.

7. Former financing inits. : GMAC
GMAC is short for General Motors Acceptance Corporation. GM has only a small stake in GMAC now, and indeed the name has been officially changed to Ally Bank. You and me, we are the biggest shareholders in GMAC/Ally today, since the US government gave the bank $12.5 billion to bail it out in 2008-2009.

8. Wannabe surfers : HODADS
“Hodad” is a slang term that dates from the fifties. It’s used to describe someone who hangs out at the beach, but someone who isn’t a surfer. Hodads were mainly into cars and music.

13. 10th-century Holy Roman emperor : OTTO II
Otto II was also called Otto the Red. He was the son of the Otto the Great and ruled the Saxon or Ottonian dynasty, becoming Holy Roman Emperor in 967 AD.

14. Iris part : AREOLA
The word areola comes from Latin, meaning "small open space", and is a diminutive of the Latin word "area", meaning "open space".

15. Clayey deposit : MARL
Marl is a mud that is rich in calcium carbonate. Marl, or marlstone, is often used as a fertilizer for lime-deficient soil.

29. Infuse : IMBUE
To imbue is to pervade, to soak in. “Imbue” has the same etymological roots as our word “imbibe”.

30. "Home ___" : ALONE
“Home Alone” is a 1990 film starring Macaulay Culkin that has become a Christmas classic. Culkin was nominated for a Best Actor Golden Globe for his performance, the youngest actor ever to be so honored.

31. Lord of the Flies : SATAN
“Lord of the Flies” is the translation for “Beelzebub”, an alternative name for Satan.

39. Wide-open mouth : MAW
"Maw" is a term used to describe the mouth or stomach of a carnivorous animal. "Maw" is also used as slang for the mouth or stomach of a greedy person.

40. Every, in an Rx : OMN
On a prescription, “omn.” is an abbreviation for the Latin “omnia”, the word for “all”.

43. New World monkeys : MARMOSETS
A marmoset is a small New World monkey. Marmosets are unusual in that they carry two sets of DNA. Marmosets almost always bear fraternal twins, and the reproductive cells of each twin includes DNA from the other twin.

47. Singer Lovett : LYLE
As well as being famous in his own right as a successful country singer, Lyle Lovett is known for his marriage to the actress Julia Roberts in 1993. The pair had a whirlwind romance lasting just three weeks before they eloped and were wed. The marriage was also relatively whirlwind, lasting less than two years.

48. City on the slopes of Mount Carmel : HAIFA
Haifa is the third-largest city in Israel and the largest city in the north of the country. Haifa is built on the slopes of Mount Carmel, and is a Mediterranean seaport.

51. One of the Estevez brothers : RAMON
Ramon Estevez is one of the children born to actor Martin Sheen. Ramon actually bears the name of his father as “Martin Sheen” is the stage name of Ramón Estévez.

55. French game : JEU
“Jeu” is the French word for “game”.

64. Magic lamp figure : DJINN
The "genie" in the bottle takes his or her name from "djinn". "Djinns" were various spirits considered lesser than angels, with people exhibiting unsavory characteristics said to be possessed by djinn. When the book "The Thousand and One Nights" was translated into French, the word "djinn" was transformed into the existing word "génie", because of the similarity in sound and the related spiritual meaning. This "génie" from the Arabian tale became confused with the Latin-derived "genius", a guardian spirit thought to be assigned to each person at birth. Purely as a result of that mistranslation the word genie has come to mean the "djinn" that pops out of the bottle. A little hard to follow, I know, but still quite interesting …

65. Seabiscuit, for one : BAY
Bay is a common coloring for many species of horse. A bay has a dark brown coat over most of its body, with a black tail, mane, lower legs and ears.

68. Den ___, Nederland : HAAG
Den Haag is the Dutch name for the city in the Netherlands that we know in English as The Hague. Even though The Hague is the seat of the Dutch parliament and is where Queen Beatrix resides, it is not the country's capital city. That honor goes to Amsterdam.

69. Eastern royal : RANI
A ranee (also spelled rani) is the female equivalent of a raja in India.

82. Sausage topper : KRAUT
"Sauerkraut" translates from German as "sour herb" or "sour cabbage". During WWI, American sauerkraut producers changed its name in order to distance their product from "the enemy". They called it "Liberty cabbage".

83. Ancient Greek anatomist : GALEN
Galen of Pergamum was a physician of Ancient Rome (of Greek ethnicity). He mainly worked on monkeys, dissecting their bodies to learn about physiology as it was not permitted to dissect human bodies in his day.

84. Seventh chapter : ETA
I think this clue and answers have something to do with college fraternities.

85. "I'll send an ___ to the world" (Police lyric) : SOS
“I’ll send an SOS to the world” is a lyric from the Police song, “Message in a Bottle”.

The Police was a trio formed in London in 1977, with Sting being the most famous member and lead singer. The band released "Message in a Bottle" in 1979, a song telling of a castaway "sending out an SOS" by sending off a "message in a bottle".

86. Bird's org. : NBA
Larry Bird played basketball for the Boston Celtics from 1978 to 1992. Bird has a lot of very loyal fans, and some might even be described as fanatical. In 2005 an Oklahoma City man was convicted of a crime involving a shooting. On being sentenced to 30 years imprisonment, the guilty man requested that the sentence be changed to 33 years so that it matched the number on Larry Bird's jersey. The judge obliged ...

87. Kind of test : BETA
In the world of software development, the first tested issue of a new program is usually called the "alpha" version. Expected to have a lot of bugs that need to be fixed, the alpha release is usually distributed to a small number of testers. After reported bugs have been eliminated, the refined version is called a "beta" and is released to a wider audience, but with the program clearly labeled as "beta". The users generally check functionality and report further bugs that are encountered. The beta version feeds into a release candidate, the version that is tested just prior to the software being sold into the market, bug-free. Yeah, right ...

89. "Good night, and good luck," e.g. : TAG LINE
“Good night, and good luck” was a tag line used by journalist Edward R. Murrow. The tag line was used as the title of an excellent 2005 film that tells of Murrow’s conflict with US Senator Joseph McCarthy.

90. Six Nations tribe : ONEIDAS
The Oneida people originally lived in the area that is now Central New York. The Oneida were one of the five founding nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, also known as the Five Nations (the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Seneca nations).

96. Like some mutual funds : NO-LOAD
Mutual fund "loads" are percentages levied as a commission. Mutual funds can be classified by the type of load levied, for example, front-end load, back-end load or even no-load.

97. West of Nashville : DOTTIE
Dottie West was a country music singer, a friend and fellow-recording artist of Patisy Cline and Loretta Lynn.

100. Actress Ryder : WINONA
The Hollywood actress Winona Ryder's real name is Winona Horowitz. Ryder was born near the town of Winona in Minnesota, from which she got her name. Her success on the screen has garnered as much media attention as her life off the screen. The papers had a field day when she was arrested in 2001 on a shoplifting charge followed by a very public court appearance. Her engagement with Johnny Depp in the early nineties was another media frenzy. Depp had "Winona Forever" tattooed on his arm, which he had changed after the breakup to "Wino Forever". A man with a sense of humor ...

101. Kettledrum : TIMBAL
Timbal is another word for a kettledrum, derived from the Old French and Old Spanish word for a small drum.

108. Anarchist Goldman : EMMA
Emma Goldman was an anarchist from present day Lithuania who emigrated to New York City. When President William McKinley was assassinated in 1901, the assassin Leon Czolgosz said that he was inspired to carry out the terrible deed after listening to a speech by Emma Goldman. This was enough for the authorities to arrest Goldman and charge her with planning the killing, although she was released after two weeks.

110. Punkie : GNAT
A punkie is biting midge, a nasty little bug similar to a gnat.

116. Literary inits. : EAP
Edgar Allan Poe lived a life of many firsts. He is considered to be the inventor of the detective-fiction genre. He was also the first notable American author to make his living through his writing, something that didn't really go too well for him as he was always financially strapped. In 1849 he was found on the streets of Baltimore, delirious from either drugs or alcohol. He died a few days later in hospital at 39 years of age.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Plays a siren : TEMPTS
7. Gold Coast, today : GHANA
12. Meander : ROAM
16. It's a plus in a bank acct. : DEP
19. Noted landing site : ARARAT
20. Player of the younger Cunningham on "Happy Days" : MORAN
21. Mach3 predecessor : ATRA
22. "Yes, I'm a Witch" singer, 1992 : ONO
23. ___ Bay, 1898 battle site : MANILA
24. Deliver : ADMINISTER
26. They push things : ADS
27. File folder, e.g. : ICON
28. President who was 65-Across (1872) : CALVIN COOLIDGE
30. Heads up : ASCENDS
33. Capital of Denmark? : DEE
34. Come to naught : FAIL
35. Fermented honey drink : MEAD
36. Where kips are cash : LAOS
37. Observe, in the Bible : SEEST
39. Presidential daughter who was 65-Across (1998) : MALIA OBAMA
41. First National Leaguer with 500 home runs : OTT
42. Act out : MIME
43. Staff : MAN
44. Some slippers : MULES
45. Novelist who was 65-Across (1804) : NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE
52. Early computer : ENIAC
53. Yevtushenko's "Babi ___" : YAR
54. Red Cross supply : SERA
55. Word with black or pack : JET
58. "The Haj" author : URIS
61. Long way to go? : LIMO
63. Bill provider : ATM
64. ___ Valley, 2002 Winter Olympics venue : DEER
65. See 28-, 39-, 45-, 83-, 95- and 107-Across : BORN ON THE FOURTH OF JULY
71. Plenty : A LOT
72. Sri Lankan export : TEA
73. Film canine : ASTA
74. "This is dedicated to the ___ love" : ONE I
75. Wordsworth's "solitary Tree" : YEW
76. Interpret : READ
78. Article in Der Spiegel : EIN
79. Sweater style : V-NECK
83. Team owner who was 65-Across (1930) : GEORGE STEINBRENNER
89. Have ___ one's words : TO EAT
92. Set-___ : TOS
93. Sierra Nevada, e.g. : BEER
94. Building block, of sorts : DNA
95. Columnist who was 65-Across (1918) : ANN LANDERS
99. Powerful blows : SWATS
101. Attire usually worn with slippers : TUTU
102. "Unfaithful" co-star, 2002 : GERE
103. The final Mrs. Chaplin : OONA
104. Economic stat. : CPI
105. Initially : AT FIRST
107. Literary critic who was 65-Across (1905) : LIONEL TRILLING
111. Michigan college : ALMA
112. When sung five times, an Abba hit : I DO
113. Electrical impulse conductor in the body : MOTONEURON
114. Riffraff : RABBLE
117. D.C. player : NAT
118. Knightwear? : MAIL
119. Maytag acquisition of 2001 : AMANA
120. And others, in a footnote : ET ALIA
121. Most of a figure eight : ESS
122. Coolers : ADES
123. Water balloon sound : SPLAT
124. Out : ASLEEP

Down
1. Tufted topper : TAM
2. Chapter : ERA
3. Some large tubes : MANICOTTI
4. They might be inflated : PRICES
5. Part of Tennyson's "crooked hands" : TALON
6. Pinch-hits (for) : STANDS IN
7. Former financing inits. : GMAC
8. Wannabe surfers : HODADS
9. Cove, e.g. : ARMLET
10. Sucker-like : NAIVE
11. Years at the Vatican : ANNI
12. Wily sort : RASCAL
13. 10th-century Holy Roman emperor : OTTO II
14. Iris part : AREOLA
15. Clayey deposit : MARL
16. Conclude negotiations successfully : DO A DEAL
17. Chess closing : ENDGAME
18. Impersonated : POSED AS
25. Bundles of joy, so to speak : INFANTS
29. Infuse : IMBUE
30. "Home ___" : ALONE
31. Lord of the Flies : SATAN
32. Convoy component : SEMI
38. Wide shoe spec : EEE
39. Wide-open mouth : MAW
40. Every, in an Rx : OMN
42. Lens used for close-ups : MACRO
43. New World monkeys : MARMOSETS
46. Frequent : HAUNT
47. Singer Lovett : LYLE
48. City on the slopes of Mount Carmel : HAIFA
49. What a thermometer measures : HEAT
50. Garden chemical brand : ORTHO
51. One of the Estevez brothers : RAMON
55. French game : JEU
56. Dish that may be smoked : EEL
57. Adjudge : TRY
59. Prelim : INTRO
60. Range rover : STEER
62. Certain belly button : OUTIE
64. Magic lamp figure : DJINN
65. Seabiscuit, for one : BAY
66. Crowd shout : OLE
67. Ticket datum : ROW
68. Den ___, Nederland : HAAG
69. Eastern royal : RANI
70. What a thermometer may measure : FEVER
77. Get off at a station : DETRAIN
80. Like adversity, one hopes : ENDURABLE
81. Mint products : CENTS
82. Sausage topper : KRAUT
83. Ancient Greek anatomist : GALEN
84. Seventh chapter : ETA
85. "I'll send an ___ to the world" (Police lyric) : SOS
86. Bird's org. : NBA
87. Kind of test : BETA
88. Interstate sign : REST AREA
89. "Good night, and good luck," e.g. : TAG LINE
90. Six Nations tribe : ONEIDAS
91. Becomes established : ENROOTS
96. Like some mutual funds : NO-LOAD
97. West of Nashville : DOTTIE
98. Registers : ENROLS
99. Air show maneuver : SPIRAL
100. Actress Ryder : WINONA
101. Kettledrum : TIMBAL
104. Opposite of break apart : CLUMP
106. High-heels alternatives : FLATS
108. Anarchist Goldman : EMMA
109. Meadowlands : LEAS
110. Punkie : GNAT
115. "The dog ate my homework," probably : LIE
116. Literary inits. : EAP

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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