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0722-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 22 Jul 12, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Brendan Emmett Quigley
THEME: A.A. Meetings … each of the theme answers is a well-known expression, with two letters A added to one of the words in the expression:
23A. Like the winner of the Miss Influenza pageant? : SICK AND TIARAED (sick and tired)
36A. "I can see Mexico's southernmost state from this ship!"? : CHIAPAS AHOY (Chips Ahoy)
105A. Funding for a Spanish seafood dish? : PAELLA GRANT (Pell Grant)
123A. Far Easterners signed to a St. Louis ball team? : CARDINAL ASIANS (cardinal sins)
14D. Steam bath enjoyed just before bedtime? : MIDNIGHT SAUNA (Midnight Sun)
17D. Dos Equis-filled item at a birthday party? : PINATA OF BEER (pint of beer)
46D. Pork-on-a-stick? : PIG SATAY (pigsty)
52D. Scent coming from a Netflix envelope? : DVD AROMA (DVD-ROM)
56D. Answer to "Did you see which Greek goddess walked by?"? : THAT WAS ATHENA (that was then)
63D. Filthy kid's laconic question? : BATHTUB AGAIN (bathtub gin)
COMPLETION TIME: 34m 05s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. Unlike terra incognita, say : MAPPED
“Terra incognita” is a Latin term meaning “unknown land”, something one might see on an old map. One might also see “mare ingognitum”, meaning “unknown sea”.

20. Olive oil alternative : CANOLA
Canola is a type of rapeseed, and Canola oil is made from the seeds. The particular cultivar used in oil production was developed in Canada, and the name "Canola" in fact comes from "CANadian Oil, Low Acid".

26. Tiki bar order : MAI TAI
The Mai Tai cocktail is strongly associated with the Polynesian islands, but it was supposedly invented in 1944 in Trader Vic's restaurant in Oakland, California. One recipe is 6 parts white rum, 3 parts orange curaçao, 3 parts Orgeat syrup, 1 part rock candy syrup, 2 parts fresh lime juice, all mixed with ice and then a float added of 6 parts dark rum.

The world's first tiki bar was called "Don the Beachcomber", and was opened in L.A. in 1933 by Ernest Gantt (also known as "Donn Beach"). The bar became famous for its exotic rum cocktails. Gantt was called to serve in WWII, and the business expanded dramatically under his ex-wife's management so that there was a 160-restaurant chain waiting for Gantt when he returned stateside.

Tiki culture is a modern invention, dating from the 20th century, and is the experience created in Polynesian-style restaurants. The word "Tiki" is borrowed from Polynesia.

29. Indulged in some capers? : ATE
The seasoning we know as “capers” are the edible flower buds of the caper bush, also known as Flinders rose. By the time we get them in a jar, the buds have been pickled and salted.

30. Hovering falcon : KESTREL
The name kestrel applies to several different types of falcon. What distinguishes kestrels from other falcons is their behavior. Kestrels hover when hunting, at 50-60 feet above the ground, and then swoop down when they spot their prey.

36. "I can see Mexico's southernmost state from this ship!"? : CHIAPAS AHOY! (Chips Ahoy!)
Chiapas is the most southern of the 31 states of Mexico, and its capital city is Tuxtla Gutierrez. As a border state, Chiapas neighbors the country of Guatemala.

Chips Ahoy! is a Nabisco brand of chocolate chip cookies.

41. Tapas bar order : SANGRIA
Sangria is red wine punch, usually associated with Portugal and Spain. Recipes for sangria vary, but almost all include a robust red wine, sliced fruit, something sweet (e.g. orange juice, sugar), a spirit (e.g. brandy, triple sec), carbonated water or perhaps7up, and ice. The drink is named for its color, as “sangre” is the Spanish for blood.

"Tapa" is the Spanish word for "lid", and there is no clear rationale for why this word came to be used for an appetizer. There are lots of explanations cited, all of which seem to involve the temporary covering of one's glass of wine with a plate or item of food to either preserve the wine or give one extra space at the table.

43. Quixote's pal : PANZA
The full name of Cervantes' novel is "The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha". In the story, Don Quixote is a retired country gentleman who heads out as a knight-errant and who renames himself Don Quixote of la Mancha. Sancho Panza is Don Quixote's squire who spouts out humorous comments called "sanchismos".

44. Art philanthropist Broad : ELI
Eli Broad made his fortune in real estate and was one of the founders of Kaufman and Broad, that we know these days as KB Homes. Broad's net worth was recently reported at just over $5 billion.

47. Day during the dog days : HOT ONE
“Dog Days” is the term given to the warmest and most humid days of summer. The term derives from the ancient belief that hot weather was caused when Sirius (the Dog Star) was in close proximity to the sun.

54. Rate setter, informally : THE FED
The Federal Reserve System is more usually known simply as "the Fed", and is the central banking system of the US. The Fed was introduced in 1913 in response to a number of financial panics at the beginning of the 20th century. The original role of the Fed was to act as a lender of last resort in case there was a run on a bank. This can happen as most of the money that is deposited by customers in a bank is reinvested by that bank, so it has very little liquid cash available. If too many customers look for their money at one time, then the bank can be short of cash and this can start a "run". The Fed's responsibilities have broadened since those early days ...

57. Place to get a learner's permit, for short : DMV
In most states, the government agency responsible for vehicle registration and the issuing of drivers licenses is called the DMV, which usually stands for the Department of Motor Vehicles, but there are "variations on the theme". For example, in Arizona the responsible agency is called the Motor Vehicle Division (MVD), and in Colorado the familiar acronym DMV stands for "Division" of Motor Vehicles.

58. Fall guys : GOATS
A fall guy is a scapegoat, or simply “goat”.

60. Some Kellogg grads : MBAS
The business school at Northwestern University is called the John L. Kellogg School of Management. John L. Kellogg was the son of Will Keith Kellogg of breakfast cereal fame, and his foundation made a generous donation in 1979, hence the current name for the business school.

61. Literally, "fire bowl" : HIBACHI
The traditional hibachi in Japan is a heating device, often a ceramic bowl or box that holds burning charcoal. This native type of hibachi isn't used for cooking, but as a space heater (a brazier). Here in the US we use the term hibachi to refer to a charcoal grill used as a small cooking stove, which in Japanese would be called a "shichirin".

70. Article in Hoy : UNA
“Hoy” is a Spanish-language newspaper published here in the US. “Hoy” is Spanish for “today”.

71. With 41-Down, Ford part : HAN
41D. See 71-Across : SOLO
Han Solo was the space smuggler in "Star Wars" played by Harrison Ford. Ford was originally hired by George Lucas just to read lines for actors during auditions for "Star Wars", but over time Lucas became convinced that Ford was right for the pivotal role of Han Solo.

72. Like the Battle of Trafalgar : NAVAL
The Battle of Trafalgar was fought between the British Navy led by Admiral Lord Nelson, and the combined navies of France and Spain led by French Admiral Pierre-Charles Villeneuve. The engagement took place off the southwest coast of Spain near Cape Trafalgar, hence the battle’s name. At the end of the day Admiral Lord Nelson was dead, but twenty-two Franco-Spanish ships were lost without one sinking of a British vessel.

75. Kabayaki base : EEL
"Kabayaki" is a specific way of preparing fish in Japanese cuisine, and in particular refers to the preparation of eel.

76. Entertainer with a Mandinka warrior haircut : MR T
Mr. T's real name is Laurence Tureaud. Mr. T is famous for many things, including the wearing of excessive amounts of jewelry. He started this habit when he was working as a bouncer, wearing jewelry items that had been left behind by customers at a night club so that the items might be recognized and claimed. It was also as a bouncer that he adopted the name Mr. T. His catchphrase comes from the movie "Rocky III". Before he goes up against Rocky Balboa, Mr. T says, "No, I don't hate Balboa, but I pity the fool". He parlayed the line into quite a bit of success. He had a reality TV show called "I Pity the Fool", and produced a motivational video called "Be Somebody ... or Be Somebody's Fool!".

77. French verb with a circumflex : ETRE
The French for “to be” is “être”.

79. Pro accompanier? : RATA
"Pro rata" is a Latin phrase meaning "in proportion".

82. Danish Nobelist : BOHR
Niels Bohr was a Danish physicist who won his 1922 Nobel Prize for his work on quantum mechanics and atomic structure. Later in his life Bohr was part of the team working on the Manhattan Project, developing the first atomic bomb.

84. Cousin to "Roger that" : WILCO
In the world of radio telephony, “wilco” is short for “I understand and will comply”.

The term “roger”, meaning “yes” or “acknowledged”, comes from the world of radio-telephony. The British military used a phonetic alphabet in the fifties that included Roger to represent the letter “R”. As such, it became customary to say “Roger” when acknowledging a message, with R (Roger) standing for “received”.

89. Vanidades magazine reader : LATINA
“Vanidades” is a Sapnish-language women’s magazine. “Vanidades” was first published in Cuba back in 1931, but the headquarters of the magazine moved to Miami, Florida when Fidel Castro took power.

99. "___ like a Maelstrom, with a notch" (Emily Dickinson poem) : ‘TWAS
On a recent trip around the country, my wife and I had a very disappointing stop in Amherst, Massachusetts intending to visit the old home of Emily Dickinson. We hadn't done our homework and failed to note that the home was only open for tours on certain days of the week, and not the day we were there (so be warned!). Emily Dickinson wrote nearly 1800 poems in her lifetime, with less than a dozen published before she died in 1886. Emily's younger sister discovered the enormous collection, and it was published in batches over the coming decades.

101. Old Polly Holliday sitcom : FLO
Florence Jean "Flo" Castleberry was a waitress in the sitcom "Alice" which aired on CBS in the 70s and 80s. Flo got her own sitcom (called “Flo”) which had a brief run in the early 80s. I saw a few episodes of “Alice”, but that's about it. Oh, and Flo was played by Polly Holiday.

102. Company with the slogan "At the heart of the image" : NIKON
Nikon was founded in 1917, a merger of three companies making various optical devices. After the merger, the company's main output was lenses (including the first lenses for Canon cameras, before Canon made its own). During the war, Nikon sales grew rapidly as the company focused on (pun unintended!) equipment for the military including periscopes and bomb sights.

105. Funding for a Spanish seafood dish? : PAELLA GRANT (Pell Grant)
Pell Grants are awarded by the federal government to students with financial need so that they can attend college. The grant is named for Senator Claiborne Pell, who sponsored the bill that introduced aid for students.

110. "Babette's Feast" author : DINESEN
Isak Dinesen was the pen name of the Danish author Baroness Karen Blixen. Blixen's most famous title by far is “Out of Africa”, her account of the time she spent living in Kenya.

120. Game whose lowest card is the 7 : ECARTE
Écarté is a card game that comes to us from France, with a name that translates into 'discarded".  Écarté  is a game like whist but is played with a stripped-down deck.

123. Far Easterners signed to a St. Louis ball team? : CARDINAL ASIANS (cardinal sins)
The St. Louis Cardinals were originally called the "Brown Stockings", changing their name to the "Perfectos" in 1899. The new name obviously didn't go down well with the locals, as the owners changed it one year later to the Cardinals.

128. Top to bottom, say : ANTONYM
An antonym is an “anti-synonym”. A synonym is word having the same sense as another, and an antonym the opposite.

130. Philosopher forced by Nero to commit suicide : SENECA
Seneca the Younger was a tutor and advisor to the Emperor Nero of Ancient Rome. Although maybe innocent, Seneca was forced to commit suicide by Nero as it was alleged that Seneca participated in a plot to kill the emperor. To kill himself, Seneca cut into a number of veins in order to bleed to death.

Down
1. Wee rooms, for short? : WCS
When I was growing up in Ireland, a "bathroom" was a room that had a bath and no toilet. The separate room with the commode was called "the toilet" or sometimes the W.C. (the water closet). Apparently the term closet was used because in the 1800s when homeowners started installing toilets indoors they often displaced clothes in a "closet", as a closet was the right size to take the commode. It has been suggested that the British term "loo" comes from Waterloo (water-closet ... water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure.

2. Onetime teen idol Corey : HAIM
Corey Haim was a Canadian actor and teen idol. Haim found success in Hollywood at a very early age, and he also discovered drugs at a very early age, using by the time he was fifteen years old. Haim died when he was 41, in 2010.

3. Their empire was the Land of the Four Quarters : INCA
The Inca Empire was known as the Tawantinsuyu, which translates as “land of the four quarters”. The Inca Empire was a federal organization having a central government that sat above four “suyu” or “quarters”, four administrative regions.

4. "The Avengers" villain : LOKI
“The Avengers” is a 2012 movie that features a whole load of superheroes battling a supervillain called Loki.

6. Tomoyuki ___, creator of Godzilla : TANAKA
Tomoyuki Tanaka was a Japanese film producer, famous as the father of the “Godzilla” series of movies.

Godzilla is a Japanese invention. The first in a very long series of Godzilla films was released back in 1954. The original name in Japanese was "Gojira", but this was changed to Godzilla for audiences outside of Japan. "Gojira" is a combination of "gorira" and "kujira", the Japanese words for gorilla and whale, apt because Godzilla is a big ape-like creature that came out of the deep.

7. Mel who was portrayed in "Field of Dreams" : OTT
At 5' 9", Mel Ott weighed just 170 lb (I don't think he took steroids!) and yet he was the first National League player to hit over 500 home runs. Sadly, Ott died in a car accident in New Orleans in 1958 when he was only 49 years old.

“Field of Dreams” is a fantasy drama about baseball, released in 1989 and starring Kevin Costner. “Field of Dreams” was also the last film in which Burt Lancaster made an appearance. The baseball stadium that was built for the movie can be visited in Dubuque County, Iowa.

9. Venice's La Fenice, for one : TEATRO
“Teatro” is the Italian word for “theater”.

Teatro La Fenice is a famous opera house in Venice, Italy. The current building was opened in 2003, replacing a prior structure destroyed by arson in 1996. The older building was itself a replacement of another theater building destroyed by fire in 1836. Perhaps quite fittingly, "fenice" is the Italian for "phoenix".

10. Fringed carriages : SURREYS
A surrey is a type of horse-drawn carriage, one with two seats and four wheels. The first surreys were built in the county of Surrey in southern England, hence the name.

12. Double curve : OGEE
An ogee is like an s-curve. Specifically it is a figure consisting of two arcs that curve in opposite directions (like an S) but both ends of the curve end up parallel to each other (which is not necessarily true for an S).

13. Some M&M's : REDS
Forrest Mars, Sr. was the founder of the Mars Company. Forrest invented the Mars Bar while living over in England and then developed M&M's when he returned to the US. Mars came up with the idea for M&M's when he saw soldiers in the Spanish Civil War eating chocolate pellets. Those pellets had a hard shell of tempered chocolate on the outside to prevent them from melting. Mars got some of the funding to develop the M&M from William Murrie, the son of the president of Hershey's Chocolate. It is the "M" and "M" from "Mars" and "Murrie" that gives the name to the candy.

14. Steam bath enjoyed just before bedtime? : MIDNIGHT SAUNA (midnight sun)
The summer phenomenon of “midnight sun” occurs north of the Arctic Circle and south of the Antarctic Circle. At those locations, and at those times of the year, the sun is visible at midnight, and indeed for the full 24 hours.

15. Nabokov novel : ADA
"Ada" is a 1969 novel by Vladimir Nabokov. The story takes place in the 1800s on Antiterra, an Earth-like planet that has a history similar to ours but with interesting differences. For example, there is a United States, but the country covers all of North and South America. What we call eastern Canada is a French-speaking province called "Canady", and western Canada is a Russian-speaking province called "Estody". The storyline is about a man called Van Veen who, when 14 years old, meets for the first time his cousin, 11-year-old Ada. The two cousins eventually have an affair, only to discover later that they are in fact brother and sister.

16. ___ ejemplo : POR
“Por ejemplo” is Spanish for “for example”.

17. Dos Equis-filled item at a birthday party? : PINATA OF BEER (pint of beer)
Piñatas originated in Mexico, probably among the Aztecs or Mayans. Today piñatas are usually made from cardboard that is brightly decorated with papier-mâché. Traditionally a piñata was made out of a clay pot, adorned with feathers and ribbons and filled with small treasures. During religious ceremonies the clay pots would be suspended and broken open so that the contents would spill out onto the ground at the feet of a god as an offering.

Dos Equis lager was originally brewed in 1897, and back then was called "Siglo XX" (20th century) to celebrate the arrival of the new century. The name was changed later to simply "Dos Equis" (two exes).

18. Poet Sitwell : EDITH
Dame Edith Sitwell was a British poet, elder sister to Osbert and Sacherevell Sitwell who were also noted writers.

28. Wine: Prefix : OEN-
In Greek mythology Oeno was the goddess of wine, giving us "oen-" as a prefix meaning "wine". Oenology, for example, is the study of wine.

32. Dashiell Hammett's last novel, with "The" : THIN MAN
“The Thin Man” was the last novel published by Dashiell Hammett. The book of course was the basis of an absolutely fabulous series of “The Thin Man” Hollywood movies starring William Powell and Myrna Loy as Nick and Nora Charles.

34. "Rhoda" co-star David : GROH
David Groh played Joe Gerard on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and on "Rhoda". Joe is the character married to Rhoda.

38. Gridiron stat. : INT
We never used the word "gridiron" when I was growing up in Ireland (meaning a grill used for cooking food over an open fire). So, maybe I am excused for finding out relatively recently that a football field gridiron is so called because the layout of yard lines over the field looks like a gridiron used in cooking!

39. Hyundai model : AZERA
The Hyundai Azera was the name used worldwide for the model known as the Hyundai Grandeur in its homeland of South Korea. The Azera was produced from 1986 to 1992.

40. Style : PANACHE
Someone exhibiting panache is showing dash and verve, and perhaps has a swagger. “Panache” is a French word used for a plume of feathers, especially one in a hat.

42. World ___ : ATLAS
We call a book of maps an “atlas” after a collection of maps published by the famous Flemish geographer Gerhadus Mercator. Mercator's collection contained a frontispiece with an image of Atlas the Titan from Greek mythology holding up the world on his shoulders, giving us our term "atlas".

46. Pork-on-a-stick? : PIG SATAY (pigsty)
The dish known as “satay” originated in Java, Indonesia and is marinated pieces of meat served on a skewer in a sauce, often a spicy peanut sauce.

49. Line in the 1950s : EDSELS
It was Henry Ford's son Edsel, who gave his name to the Edsel brand of automobile, a name that has become synonymous with "failure".

52. Scent coming from a Netflix envelope? : DVD AROMA (DVD-ROM)
The acronym DVD doesn’t actually stand for anything these days, although it originally was short for Digital Video Disk. The use of the word "video" was dropped as DVDs are no longer limited to storing video content.

Netflix was founded in Los Gatos, California in 1997. The company delivered it's billionth DVD in 2007. I presume the renter wasn't charged for that movie ...

56. Answer to "Did you see which Greek goddess walked by?"? : THAT WAS ATHENA (that was then)
The Greek goddess Athena is often associated with wisdom (among other attributes). In many representations Athena is depicted with an owl sitting on her head. It is this linkage of the owl with the goddess of wisdom that led to today's perception of the owl as being "wise".

64. Calvary initials : INRI
The letters written on the cross on which Jesus died were “INRI”. INRI is an acronym for the Latin "Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum", which translates into English as Jesus the Nazarene, King of the Jews.

66. Actress ___ Marie Saint : EVA
Eva Marie Saint is an American actor, who won the Best Supporting Actress Oscar for playing Edie Doyle in the 1954 movie "On the Waterfront". My favorite of Saint's movies is the 1959 Hitchcock classic, "North by Northwest", in which she starred opposite Cary Grant. She ratcheted back her career at its height, right after her success in "North by Northwest". Saint opted instead to spend more time with her husband and children, taking very few acting roles. That marriage is still going strong, and she has two children and three grandchildren.

73. Visa charge : LATE FEE
Did you know that Visa doesn't issue any credit cards? Visa just sells the electronic systems and infrastructure to banks who then put the Visa logo on their own cards so that both the customer and merchant know to use the VISA system when making a transaction.

90. Soda with a Blue Cream flavor : NEHI
"Nehi Corporation" was the nickname for the Chero-Cola/Union Bottle Works that introduced the Nehi drink in 1924. Years later the company developed a new brand, Royal Crown Cola (also known as RC Cola). By 1955, RC Cola was the company's flagship product, so the "Nehi Corporation" became the "Royal Crown Company". In 1954, RC Cola became the first company to sell soft drinks in cans.

93. Sun, on the Riviera : SOLEIL
“Soleil” is French for “sun”.

“Riviera” is an Italian term meaning “bank” or “shore”. We usually use it in the sense of the Italian Riviera, the coastal part of Italy east of the Italy-France border, and the French Riviera, a strip of the French coast west of the same border.

95. Jamaican music : SKA
Ska originated in Jamaica in the late fifties and was the precursor to reggae music. No one has a really definitive etymology of the term "ska", but it is likely to be imitative of some sound.

104. Eustacia ___, "The Return of the Native" woman : VYE
“The Return of the Native” is a novel by English author Thomas Hardy. The storyline deals with illicit sexual relations and created quite a stir when it was published in Victorian England.

109. Café additive : LECHE
“Leche” is Spanish for “milk”.

114. Funny Carvey : DANA
Dana Carvey, along with the likes of Phil Hartman and Kevin Nealon, was part of the new breed of "Saturday Night Live" comedians accredited with resurrecting the show in the late eighties. One of Carvey's most popular characters was the Church Lady, and he became so associated with her that among fellow cast members Carvey was often referred to simply as "the Lady". Carvey had open-heart surgery in 1997 to clear a blocked artery, but the surgical team operated on the wrong artery. To recover, he had to have five more procedures, so ended up suing for medical malpractice, and donating the $7.5 million compensation payment to charity.

117. Copter's forerunner : GIRO
“Giro” is a reference to the autogyro, an aircraft that uses an unpowered rotor to create lift, and a powered propeller to provide thrust. The first autogyro was flown in 1923 in Spain, where it was invented.

121. A U.P.S. driver may have one: Abbr. : RTE
United Parcel Service (UPS) is based in Sandy Springs, Georgia and has its own airline that operates out of Louisville, Kentucky.

124. N.L. East team, on scoreboards : NYM
The New York Mets baseball team was founded in 1962, a replacement for two teams that the city had lost, namely the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants. For several years the Mets played very poorly, finishing no better than second to last in their division. Then of course along came the “Miracle Mets” in 1969, who beat the Baltimore Orioles to claim the World Series in a huge upset.

125. Stage item : AMP
An electric guitar, for example, needs an amplifier to take the weak signal created by the vibration of the strings and turn it into a signal powerful enough for a loudspeaker.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. During which : WHILST
7. Chooses : OPTS FOR
14. Unlike terra incognita, say : MAPPED
20. Olive oil alternative : CANOLA
21. Sexual drive : THE URGE
22. "Me! Me!" : I DO, I DO
23. Like the winner of the Miss Influenza pageant? : SICK AND TIARAED (sick and tired)
25. "Blast!" : DARN IT
26. Tiki bar order : MAI TAI
27. Dons for the first time : TRIES ON
29. Indulged in some capers? : ATE
30. Hovering falcon : KESTREL
33. Some cake slices : EIGHTHS
36. "I can see Mexico's southernmost state from this ship!"? : CHIAPAS AHOY (Chips Ahoy)
41. Tapas bar order : SANGRIA
43. Quixote's pal : PANZA
44. Art philanthropist Broad : ELI
45. Lend for a short while : SPOT
47. Day during the dog days : HOT ONE
50. When some coffee breaks begin : AT TEN
51. Bring in, as a big client : LAND
53. Like one who has gone green? : ILL
54. Rate setter, informally : THE FED
55. Scoundrel : RAT
57. Place to get a learner's permit, for short : DMV
58. Fall guys : GOATS
60. Some Kellogg grads : MBAS
61. Literally, "fire bowl" : HIBACHI
65. Stand sales : ADES
67. ___ dish : SOAP
69. Before, to a poet : ERE
70. Article in Hoy : UNA
71. With 41-Down, Ford part : HAN
72. Like the Battle of Trafalgar : NAVAL
74. Kick oneself over : RUE
75. Kabayaki base : EEL
76. Entertainer with a Mandinka warrior haircut : MR T
77. French verb with a circumflex : ETRE
79. Pro accompanier? : RATA
80. Guts : INNARDS
82. Danish Nobelist : BOHR
84. Cousin to "Roger that" : WILCO
86. Target of thieves who do card skimming : ATM
88. Some trailers : ADS
89. Vanidades magazine reader : LATINA
91. Words before and after "what" : I AM
92. They vote first : YEAS
94. "Look who's back!" : IT’S ME
98. Brings out : EDUCES
99. "___ like a Maelstrom, with a notch" (Emily Dickinson poem) : ‘TWAS
101. Old Polly Holliday sitcom : FLO
102. Company with the slogan "At the heart of the image" : NIKON
103. Is mannerly : BEHAVES
105. Funding for a Spanish seafood dish? : PAELLA GRANT (Pell Grant)
108. Lucidness : CLARITY
110. "Babette's Feast" author : DINESEN
111. Gas pump abbr. : REG
112. North by northwest, e.g. : HEADING
115. For years on end : IN AGES
120. Game whose lowest card is the 7 : ECARTE
123. Far Easterners signed to a St. Louis ball team? : CARDINAL ASIANS (cardinal sins)
127. Bleach : WHITEN
128. Top to bottom, say : ANTONYM
129. Lick but good : LARRUP
130. Philosopher forced by Nero to commit suicide : SENECA
131. Kids' summer activity center : DAY CAMP
132. Like mushroom heads : SPONGY

Down
1. Wee rooms, for short? : WCS
2. Onetime teen idol Corey : HAIM
3. Their empire was the Land of the Four Quarters : INCA
4. "The Avengers" villain : LOKI
5. Furniture piece : SLAT
6. Tomoyuki ___, creator of Godzilla : TANAKA
7. Mel who was portrayed in "Field of Dreams" : OTT
8. N.L. East team, on scoreboards : PHI
9. Venice's La Fenice, for one : TEATRO
10. Fringed carriages : SURREYS
11. Easily injured : FRAIL
12. Double curve : OGEE
13. Some M&M's : REDS
14. Steam bath enjoyed just before bedtime? : MIDNIGHT SAUNA (Midnight Sun)
15. Nabokov novel : ADA
16. ___ ejemplo : POR
17. Dos Equis-filled item at a birthday party? : PINATA OF BEER (pint of beer)
18. Poet Sitwell : EDITH
19. Is grandmotherly, in a way : DOTES
24. Pump choice : DIESEL
28. Wine: Prefix : OEN-
31. McDonald's offering since 1985 : SALAD
32. Dashiell Hammett's last novel, with "The" : THIN MAN
34. "Rhoda" co-star David : GROH
35. "___ where it hurts" : HIT ‘EM
36. Estate-planning pro : CPA
37. Place for a band : HAT
38. Gridiron stat. : INT
39. Hyundai model : AZERA
40. Style : PANACHE
41. See 71-Across : SOLO
42. World ___ : ATLAS
46. Pork-on-a-stick? : PIG SATAY (pigsty)
48. Came close to : NEARED
49. Line in the 1950s : EDSELS
52. Scent coming from a Netflix envelope? : DVD AROMA (DVD-ROM)
56. Answer to "Did you see which Greek goddess walked by?"? : THAT WAS ATHENA (that was then)
59. Doughnuts, mathematically : TORI
61. Kind of pie : HUMBLE
62. Foray : INROAD
63. Filthy kid's laconic question? : BATHTUB AGAIN (bathtub gin)
64. Calvary initials : INRI
66. Actress ___ Marie Saint : EVA
68. Like some Facebook friend requests : PENDING
73. Visa charge : LATE FEE
78. 1% group : ELITE
81. Moving : ASTIR
83. Baby food preparation device : RICER
85. Ravens' cries : CAWS
87. Store keepers? : MALLS
90. Soda with a Blue Cream flavor : NEHI
93. Sun, on the Riviera : SOLEIL
95. Jamaican music : SKA
96. Jamaican fellow : MON
97. Adenoidectomy specialist, for short : ENT
100. P.R. pro : SPIN DOC
104. Eustacia ___, "The Return of the Native" woman : VYE
106. Chest pain : ANGINA
107. Historical records : ANNALS
108. Rappers' posses : CREWS
109. Café additive : LECHE
110. Like some tricks : DIRTY
113. Many a prep sch. : ACAD
114. Funny Carvey : DANA
116. "This is a priority!" : ASAP
117. Copter's forerunner : GIRO
118. Make : EARN
119. Tight : SNUG
121. A U.P.S. driver may have one: Abbr. : RTE
122. Private eye : TEC
124. N.L. East team, on scoreboards : NYM
125. Stage item : AMP
126. Dangerous job : SPY


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3 comments :

Anonymous said...

LOKI'D!

Bill Butler said...

"Loki'd" ... nice verb! :)

Anonymous said...

It is, isn't it? I can't believe even the NY Times has been Loki'd. That morning I was drinking my coffee and enjoying my crossword, glad to have something I could fill in with ease. Only later, when I was so sleepy, unable to stay awake, and looking like such an ass, did I realize...

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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