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Greetings from Mammoth Lakes, California

My wife and I are on vacation until Friday, July 25th; a road trip through the backroads of the states east of California. I anticipate late-night solving and posting, with acknowledgement of comments and emails suffering. Please, don't be offended at my silence as I prioritize the writing of posts! Today's hike was in Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest where we passed a tree over 4,750 years old. Getting close to home ...

Bill

0819-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 19 Aug 12, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Freddie Cheng
THEME: Oh, Really? … all of the theme answers are well-known expressions or terms that have a word with an “el” sound replaced by a similar word with an “oh” sound:
23A. Ultranationalism? : JINGO ALL THE WAY (“jingle all the way”)
39A. "Thriller" Grammy sweep? : THE DAY OF THE JACKO (“The Day of the Jackal”)
48A. Speed at which the apocalypse is coming? : TEMPO OF DOOM (“... Temple of Doom”)
64A. Obsessive-compulsive soap purger? : RINSE PSYCHO (rinse cycle)
74A. Big gambling loss in the Biggest Little City in the World? : RENO FAILURE (renal failure)
91A. Bad precept for U.S. foreign policy? : AMERICAN EGO (American Eagle)
99A. Not a happy ending on the yellow brick road? : TOTO ANNIHILATION (total annihilation)
121A. TV detective with his unbalanced suspect? : HAMMER AND SICKO (hammer and sickle)

122D. New element in each of this puzzle's theme answers : AN O
COMPLETION TIME: 32m 10s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … RONZONI (Ronzini), LETO (Leti)


Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Polo need : MALLET
The game of polo originated in Iran, possibly before the 5th century BC. Polo was used back them primarily as a training exercise for cavalry units.

7. Some ballroom dances : CHA-CHAS
I believe the dance is called a “cha-cha-cha”, and not just “cha-cha” ...

The cha-cha-cha is a Latin dance with origins in Cuba, where it was introduced by composer Enrique Jorrin in 1953.

20. Figures in TV's "V" : ALIENS
“V” is a franchise of science fiction television shows. The “V” in the titles of the various productions stands for “visitors”, aliens disguised as human beings who want to take over the Earth.

21. Acid, e.g. : ETCHANT
“Etchant” is a noun, a word for any corrosive material used to etch a surface.

22. One-two wager : EXACTA
To win the bet called an exacta, the person betting must name the horses that finish first and second and in the exact order. The related bet called the trifecta requires naming of the first, second and third-place finishers in the right order.

23. Ultranationalism? : JINGO ALL THE WAY (“jingle all the way”)
Jingoism is an extreme form of nationalism, exhibited by a country that uses threats or force internationally in order to advance its national interests. The term originated in England and comes from the expression “by Jingo”, a euphemism for “by Jesus” that was used as an oath.

The traditional Christmas song “Jingle Bells” was first published in 1857, penned by James Lord Pierpoint. We associate the song with Christmas, although in fact Pierpoint wrote it as a celebration of Thanksgiving.
Oh, jingle bells, jingle bells
Jingle all the way
Oh, what fun it is to ride
In a one horse open sleigh

31. Gray shades : TAUPES
Taupe is a dark, gray-brown color. The name "taupe" comes from the Latin name of the European Mole, which has skin with the same color.

35. Mil. stat : MIAS
Missing in action (MIA).

36. Dame ___ Everage : EDNA
Dame Edna Everage is the outrageous character created and played by Australian comedian Barry Humphries. I saw him/her perform live in a San Francisco theater, and what a great show it was.

39. "Thriller" Grammy sweep? : THE DAY OF THE JACKO (“The Day of the Jackal”)
Michael Jackson was such a sad figure I always think. Jackson's apparently unconstrained lifestyle made him an easy target for the tabloids. The less than charitable representatives of the media gave him the nickname "Wacko Jacko".

Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” is the best-selling album of all time.

“The Day of the Jackal” is an excellent thriller novel by Frederick Forsyth. It’s all about an assassination attempt on President Charles de Gaulle. The best film adaptation I’ve seen of the story is the 1973 release that starred Edward Fox as the assassin known as the Jackal.

48. Speed at which the apocalypse is coming? : TEMPO OF DOOM (“... Temple of Doom”)
“Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” is the second in the series of “Indiana Jones” movies, although the story is written as a prequel to the first film, “Raiders of the Lost Ark”.

51. Having allegorical meanings : AESOPIC
Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly Aesop was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. He was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. Aesop was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

61. Gold-compound salt : AURATE
Salts of gold hydroxide (aka auric acid) are known as aurates.

62. Balkan native : SERB
Serbs are an ethnic group native to the Balkans in southeastern Europe. Although Serbs exist as minority groups in many countries in the region, they are the majority ethnic group in Serbia, in Montenegro and in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

66. Source of indigo : ANIL
Anil is another name for the indigo plant, as well as the name for the blue indigo dye that is obtained from it. The color of anil is relatively close to "navy" blue.

70. Kate who married a prince : MIDDLETON
Prince William, Duke of Cambridge married Catherine "Kate" Middleton in 2011 at Westminster Abbey in London. Middleton is what one might call a commoner, born to parents who were flight attendants. However, as is so often the case in Britain, Kate’s ancestry can be traced back far enough to show that she and William do have common ancestors, dating back to the 1500s on her mother’s side and to the 1400s on her father’s side.

73. Classic Jags : XKES
Jaguar started out as a manufacturer of sidecars for motorcycles back in 1922, when the company was known as the Swallow Sidecar Company (SS for short). The company changed its name to Jaguar after WWII, because of the unfortunate connotations of the letters "SS" at that time.

74. Big gambling loss in the Biggest Little City in the World? : RENO FAILURE (renal failure)
Reno, Nevada was named in honor of Major General Jesse Lee Reno, a Union officer killed in the Civil War. The city has a famous "Reno Arch", a structure that stands over the main street. It was erected in 1926 to promote an exposition planned for the following year. After the expo, the city council decided to keep the arch and held a competition to decide what wording should be displayed, and the winner was "The Biggest Little City in the World".

77. Venetian strip : SLAT
A blind in a window is often composed of slats.

80. Louis Armstrong played one : CORNET
Louis Armstrong was born in New Orleans in 1900. Armstrong had a poor upbringing, and only stayed in school till he was 11 years old. The exact origin of Louis’s nickname “Satchmo” seems to be a little unclear. One story is that he used to dance for pennies in New Orleans as a youngster and would hide those pennies in his mouth away from the other kids. For this he earned the nickname “satchel mouth”, which was shortened to “Satchmo”.

81. More gung-ho : KEENER
"Kung ho" is a Chinese expression meaning "work together, cooperate". The anglicized version "gung ho" was adopted by a Major Evans Carlson as an expression of combined spirit for his 2nd Marine Raider Battalion during WWII. From there the term spread throughout the Marine Corps and back to America where it persists to this day.

89. Former Treasury secretary Paul and former Yankee Paul : O’NEILLS
Paul O’Neill was a Secretary of the Treasury appointed by President George W. Bush. However, he and the President had major disagreements with O'Neill not supporting the Bush tax cuts nor the invasion of Iraq and so O’Neill was fired after less than two years in the office.

91. Bad precept for U.S. foreign policy? : AMERICAN EGO (American eagle)
The Bald Eagle is sometimes referred to as the American eagle.

The bald eagle was near to extinction in the lower 48 states in recent decades, with most of the blame being laid at the feet of the controversial pesticide DDT. The chemical wasn't dangerous to the fully-grown bird, but ingestion caused the females to lay eggs which had thin and brittle shells. The eggs became too fragile to survive life in the nest. The DDT ban in 1972 seemed to make the difference, and the recovery in the population was so robust that the species was removed from the Endangered List in 2007. Let's hear it for environmental regulations ...

93. Spa item : LOOFAH
The loofah (also loofa, lufah and luffa, all Arabic words) is a vine, with fruit that's very popular in Asia and Africa. If the fruit is allowed to mature, it can be processed to remove everything but the more rigid xylem structure (remember your high school botany class?) leaving a soft, sponge-like mass that is used as a skin polisher.

98. Non compos mentis : ADDLED
"Compos mentis" is Latin, and translates literally as "in command of one's mind", and is a term used in law.

99. Not a happy ending on the yellow brick road? : TOTO ANNIHILATION (total annihilation)
In the movie "The Wizard of Oz" Toto is played by a terrier, but in the books by L. Frank Baum, Toto was just described as "a little black dog, with long, silky hair and small black eyes that twinkled merrily on either side of his funny, wee nose".

107. Do a hula, e.g. : GYRATE
Hula is the name of the Polynesian dance. The chant or song that the dance illustrates, that's known as the mele.

121. TV detective with his unbalanced suspect? : HAMMER AND SICKO (hammer and sickle)
Mike Hammer is the protagonist in a series of private detective novels by Mickey Spillane. The novels have been adapted for radio, television and the big screen. The actor most associated with Mike Hammer is Stacy Keach, who played the role in the TV series “Mickey Spillane’s Mike Hammer” from 1984 to 1987.

126. Like the Boston Tea Partiers : ANTI-TAX
The famous destruction of tea in Boston Harbor to protest against the Tax Act took place on December 16, 1773. The action was referred to as the “destruction of the tea” for decades, and it wasn’t until 1834 that the term “Boston Tea Party” first appeared in print.

127. Whence the phrase "Beware of Greeks bearing gifts" : AENEID
"The Aeneid" is Virgil's epic poem that tells of the journey of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy to become the ancestor of all Romans. The origin of the phrase, "Beware of Greeks bearing gifts" lies of course in the story of the Trojan Horse. When the gift of the horse turns up outside the walls of Troy, a priest declares,"Do not trust the horse, Trojans! Whatever it is, I fear the Danaans (Greeks) even if they bring gifts".

Down
3. Lead-in to type : LINO-
Linotype printing was the main technology used in the publication of newspapers and magazines for most of the 20th century, up until the 1970s when it was gradually replaced by offset printing and computer typesetting. Linotype printing was so called as a complete “line of type” was produced at one time.

5. Japanese mushroom : ENOKI
Enokitake (also known as enoki) are long and thin white mushrooms often added to soups or salads.

6. J.F.K. search party? : TSA
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was of course created in 2001, soon after the 9/11 attacks.

The Idlewild Golf Course was taken over by the city of New York in 1943, and construction started on a new airport to serve the metropolis and relieve congestion at La Guardia. The Idlewild name still persists, even though the airport was named after Major General Alexander E. Anderson from the first days of the project. When the facility started operating in 1948 it was known as New York International Airport, Anderson Field. It was renamed to John F. Kennedy International Airport in 1963, one month after the President was assassinated.

8. Link letters : HTTP
"http" are the first letters in most Internet link addresses. “http” stands for HyperText Transfer Protocol.

11. Part of a bray : HAW
Hee haw!

12. Santa ___ : ANA
Santa Ana is the county seat of Orange County, California and takes its name from the Santa Ana River that runs through the city. The Santa Ana winds are the very dry air currents that sweep offshore late in the year in Southern California. Because these air currents are so dry, they are noted for their influence over forest fires in the area, especially in the heat of the fall. The winds arise from a buildup of air pressure in the Great Basin that lies between the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada. Under the right conditions, that air spills over the peaks of the Sierra Nevada and basically "falls" down the side of the Sierra range, heading for the ocean. As the air falls it becomes drier and heats up, so that relative humidity can fall to below 10% by the time it hits the coast.

16. Article of apparel that's not made where you might think : PANAMA
Panama hats are also known as Jipijapas, named for a town in Ecuador (and not Panama) that was a major player in the hat trade.

17. Like CH3CO2H : ACETIC
Acetic acid has the formula CH3CO2H.

24. Plaster support : LATH
The words "lath" and "lattice" have the same root in Old French. Laths are thin strips of wood that are nailed across a frame forming a backing to which plaster can be applied to finish a wall.

28. 1980s New York Philharmonic maestro : MEHTA
Zubin Mehta is an Indian conductor of western classical music, from Mumbai. Mehta studied music in Vienna, where he made his conducting debut in 1958. In 1961 he was named assistant director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, creating a fuss with the music director designate of the orchestra, Georg Solti. Solti resigned as a protest, and Mehta took his job. In 1978 Mehta took over as Music Director and Principal Conductor of the New York Philharmonic, eventually becoming the longest holder of that position.

30. Peter of "The Last Emperor" : O’TOOLE
Irish actor Peter O'Toole got his big break in movies when he played the title role in the 1962 epic film "Laurence of Arabia". But my favorite of his movies is much lighter fare, "How to Steal a Million" in which he stars opposite Audrey Hepburn.

“The Last Emperor” is a 1987 biographical film about Puyi, the last Emperor of China. “The Last Emperor” was unique in that it was the first time the Chinese government allowed filming in the Forbidden City in Beijing. In fact, Queen Elizabeth II was on a state visit to China the same time that filming was taking place, and the Chinese government gave priority to filming, so the British royal party could not visit the Forbidden City.

33. Radar anomaly : UFO
In 1952, the USAF revived its studies of reported Unidentified Flying Objects (UFO) sightings in a program called Project Blue Book. There were two prior USAF studies of the UFO phenomenon, namely Project Sign and Project Grudge. Project Blue Book ran from 1952 until it was shut down in 1969 with the conclusion that there was no threat to national security, and that there were no sightings that could not be explained within the bounds of modern scientific knowledge.

34. Class action grp.? : PTA
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA).

38. "Little" comics boy : NEMO
Little Nemo was the hero in a comic strip drawn by Winsor McCay in the early 1900s. The strip was called “Little Nemo in Slumberland” when it was published in the “New York Herald”, and then “In the Land of Wonderland Dreams” when it moved to the “New York American”.

41. J'adore perfumer : DIOR
Christian Dior was a French fashion designer. As WWII approached, Dior was called up by the French military, drawing a temporary halt to his career in fashion. He left the army in 1942 and for the duration of the war designed clothes for wives of Nazi officers and French collaborators. After the war his designs became so popular that he helped reestablish Paris as the fashion center of the world.

42. Perennial succulent : ALOE
Aloe vera has a number of alternate names that are descriptive of its efficacy as a medicine. These include the First Aid plant, Wand of Heaven, Silent Healer and Miracle Plant.

49. Manhattan Project physicist : FERMI
Enrico Fermi was born in Rome, Italy. Fermi moved to the US just before WWII, largely to escape the anti-Semitic feelings that were developing in Italy under Mussolini. It was Fermi's work at the University of Chicago that led to the construction of the world's first nuclear reactor. Fermi died at 53 years of age from stomach cancer . Cancer was a prevalent cause of death among the team working on that first nuclear pile.

50. Jazz vocalist Shaw : MARLENA
Marlena Shaw is a jazz and blues singer from New Rochelle, New York. Shaw started singing professionally in the sixties, and is still going strong.

52. Antelope related to the gemsbok : ORYX
The oryx is a large antelope species, mainly found in Africa but also in the Arabian Peninsula. One species was introduced by man into the White Sands Missile Range. As a result, the oryx is now considered an invasive species in the neighboring White Sands National Monument.

The gemsbok is an antelope native to southern Africa, a relative of the oryx. The gemsbok was introduced into North America in the late sixties and is thriving here. That is largely because we don’t have lions running around, which are the gemsbok’s natural predator.

55. Mitt Romney and others, once : CEOS
Mitt Romney was born Willard Mitt Romney in 1947 in Detroit, Michigan. Romney’s parents named him after J. Willard Marriott (the hotel magnate) who was the father’s best friend, and after Milton “Mitt” Romney who was the father’s cousin and quarterback for the Chicago Bears.

59. "The Lord of the Rings" tree creature : ENT
Ents are those tree-like creatures that live in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth, in his series of books "The Lord of the Rings". “Ent” is an Old English word for “giant”.

60. U.K. mil. decorations : DSOS
The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a British military award, usually presented to officers with the rank of Major or higher.

63. Con : BILK
The word "bilk", meaning "to defraud", comes from the card game of cribbage.

65. China's Zhou ___ : EN-LAI
Zhou Enlai (also Chou En-Lai) was the first government leader of the People's Republic of China and held the office of Premier from 1949 until he died in 1976. Zhou Enlai ran the government for Communist Party Leader Mao Zedong, often striking a more conciliatory tone with the West than that of his boss. For example, he was instrumental in setting up President Nixon's famous visit to China in 1972. Zhou Enlai died just a few months before Mao Zedong, with both deaths leading to unrest and a dramatic change in political direction for the country.

66. With the bow, in music : ARCO
“Arco” is a musical direction instructing a string player to return to normal bowing technique after a passage played using some other technique (perhaps pizzicato).

69. Blonde Anderson : LONI
Loni Anderson's most famous role was that of Jennifer Marlowe on the sitcom "WKRP in Cincinnati". Anderson has been married four times, most famously to actor Burt Reynolds from 1988 to 1993.

72. Death Row Records co-founder, familiarly : DRE
Dr. Dre is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is perhaps as well known for his own singing career as he is for producing records and starting the careers of others such Snoop Dog, Eminem and 50 Cent.

78. Like election laws, typically : ARCANE
Something that is “arcane” is something understood by only a few, something perhaps mysterious.

82. Watson of the Harry Potter films : EMMA
Emma Watson is the English actress famous for playing Hermione Granger in the “Harry Potter” movies. Watson is continuing her education while pursuing her acting career, and studied at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island.

83. Musical with the song "Seasons of Love" : RENT
The musical “Rent” is based on the Puccini opera “La bohème”. "Rent" tells the story of struggling artists and musicians living in the Lower East Side of New York, and is set against the backdrop of the AIDS epidemic. We saw “Rent” on Broadway quite a few years ago and we were quite disappointed …

88. Big vein : LODE
A lode is metal ore deposit that's found between two layers of rock or in a fissure.

90. Some Blu-ray players : SONYS
A Blu-ray disc looks just like a standard DVD or CD, but it has a lot more capacity for data storage making it an ideal medium for high-definition movies. The name "Blu-ray" comes from the fact that a Blu-ray player uses a "blue laser" to read the disc, unlike a standard DVD player which uses a "red laser".

Sony was founded by Akio Morita and Masaru Ibuka. The two partners met in the Japanese Navy during WWII.

92. Louis XIV, for one : ROI
Louis XIV is perhaps the most famous of the kings ("rois") of France and was known as the "Sun King" (le Roi Soleil"). Louis XIV was king from 1638 to 1715, a reign of over 72 years, the longest reign of any European monarch.

100. Tchaikovsky's "Eugene ___" : ONEGIN
“Eugene Onegin” is a novel by the Russian author Alexander Pushkin. The novel is unusual in that it is written in verse form. “Eugene Onegin” was adapted into an opera of the same name by Pyotr Tchaikovsky.

102. House of ___ : ORANGE
The House of Orange-Nassau was a royal house of Europe founded by William I of Orange in 1544. The house itself was based in the Netherlands, although the Principality of Orange was located in what is now southern France.

103. Broadway smash starting in '87 : LES MIZ
The 1980 musical "Les Misérables" is an adaptation of the 1862 novel of the same name by Victor Hugo. The show opened in London in 1985, and is the longest running musical in the history of London's West End. My wife and I saw "Les Miz" in the Queen's Theatre in London quite a few years ago, but were only able to get tickets in the very back row. The theater seating is very steep, so the back row of the balcony is extremely high over the stage. One of the big events in the storyline is the building of a street barricade over which the rebels fight. At the height we were seated we could see the stagehands behind the barricade, sitting drinking Coke, even smoking cigarettes. On cue, the stagehands would get up and catch a dropped rifle, or an actor that had been shot. It was pretty comical. I didn't really enjoy the show that much, to be honest. Some great songs, but the musical version of the storyline just didn't seem to hang together for me.

113. Consort of Zeus : LETO
In Greek mythology, Zeus and Leto are the father and mother of the twins Apollo and Artemis. The twins are sometimes referred to as the Letoides, after their mother.

117. Summer cooler : ICEE
Icee is the brand name of one of those slushy drinks. Ugh ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Polo need : MALLET
7. Some ballroom dances : CHA-CHAS
14. Go by again : REPASS
20. Figures in TV's "V" : ALIENS
21. Acid, e.g. : ETCHANT
22. One-two wager : EXACTA
23. Ultranationalism? : JINGO ALL THE WAY (“jingle all the way”)
25. Sunday best : FINERY
26. Keep on hand : STOCK
27. View from une chalet, maybe : ALPES
28. Reforms? : MUTATES
29. Scream, so to speak : RIOT
31. Gray shades : TAUPES
35. Mil. stat : MIAS
36. Dame ___ Everage : EDNA
39. "Thriller" Grammy sweep? : THE DAY OF THE JACKO (“The Day of the Jackal”)
44. Appear that way : SEEM TO
46. Zero : NIL
47. More than dislike : LOATHE
48. Speed at which the apocalypse is coming? : TEMPO OF DOOM (“... Temple of Doom”)
51. Having allegorical meanings : AESOPIC
56. 43-Down follower : APOSTLE
57. Brought in : REAPED
61. Gold-compound salt : AURATE
62. Balkan native : SERB
64. Obsessive-compulsive soap purger? : RINSE PSYCHO (rinse cycle)
66. Source of indigo : ANIL
70. Kate who married a prince : MIDDLETON
73. Classic Jags : XKES
74. Big gambling loss in the Biggest Little City in the World? : RENO FAILURE (renal failure)
77. Venetian strip : SLAT
80. Louis Armstrong played one : CORNET
81. More gung-ho : KEENER
84. Excitement : AROUSAL
89. Former Treasury secretary Paul and former Yankee Paul : O’NEILLS
91. Bad precept for U.S. foreign policy? : AMERICAN EGO (American Eagle)
93. Spa item : LOOFAH
97. L-P center : MNO
98. Non compos mentis : ADDLED
99. Not a happy ending on the yellow brick road? : TOTO ANNIHILATION (total annihilation)
105. Choice word : ELSE
106. "Are you ___ out?" : IN OR
107. Do a hula, e.g. : GYRATE
108. Swerve : VEER
110. Goes (for) : RETAILS
112. Nastily slander : SLIME
116. Wrong : AMISS
120. What a chair may hold : AGENDA
121. TV detective with his unbalanced suspect? : HAMMER AND SICKO (hammer and sickle)
125. Solemn pieces : DIRGES
126. Like the Boston Tea Partiers : ANTI-TAX
127. Whence the phrase "Beware of Greeks bearing gifts" : AENEID
128. Opposite of dethrone : ENSEAT
129. Big name in pasta : RONZONI
130. Curses out? : BLEEPS

Down
1. Some mil. brass : MAJS
2. Settled down : ALIT
3. Lead-in to type : LINO
4. Bikers' woes : LEG CRAMPS
5. Japanese mushroom : ENOKI
6. J.F.K. search party? : TSA
7. Clandestine group : CELL
8. Link letters : HTTP
9. Joint concern : ACHE
10. Opposite of flat : CHESTY
11. Part of a bray : HAW
12. Santa ___ : ANA
13. Dump : STY
14. Dump : REFUSE HEAP
15. Red-letter word : EXIT
16. Article of apparel that's not made where you might think : PANAMA
17. Like CH3CO2H : ACETIC
18. Run : STREAK
19. Asserts something : SAYS SO
24. Plaster support : LATH
28. 1980s New York Philharmonic maestro : MEHTA
30. Peter of "The Last Emperor" : O’TOOLE
32. Part of some e-mail addresses : AOL
33. Radar anomaly : UFO
34. Class action grp.? : PTA
36. Spanish 101 word : ESTA
37. Many-layered : DEEP
38. "Little" comics boy : NEMO
40. Rear : END
41. J'adore perfumer : DIOR
42. Perennial succulent : ALOE
43. Religious figure : JESUS
45. Sandbox frequenters : TOTS
49. Manhattan Project physicist : FERMI
50. Jazz vocalist Shaw : MARLENA
52. Antelope related to the gemsbok : ORYX
53. Cram : PACK
54. "Am ___ only one?" : I THE
55. Mitt Romney and others, once : CEOS
58. Pizzeria order : PIE
59. "The Lord of the Rings" tree creature : ENT
60. U.K. mil. decorations : DSOS
63. Con : BILK
65. China's Zhou ___ : EN LAI
66. With the bow, in music : ARCO
67. Really bright : NEON
68. Memo intro : IN RE
69. Blonde Anderson : LONI
71. Appropriate : DUE
72. Death Row Records co-founder, familiarly : DRE
75. Chap : FELLA
76. "Finally!" : AT LONG LAST
78. Like election laws, typically : ARCANE
79. Ugly one : TOAD
82. Watson of the Harry Potter films : EMMA
83. Musical with the song "Seasons of Love" : RENT
85. Sabotage : UNDERMINE
86. Dump, say : SELL
87. A long time : AGES
88. Big vein : LODE
90. Some Blu-ray players : SONYS
92. Louis XIV, for one : ROI
94. Wreath source : FIR
95. Solution reaction : AHA
96. Miss's partner : HIT
99. It might result in a meltdown : TIRADE
100. Tchaikovsky's "Eugene ___" : ONEGIN
101. Bag handlers : TOTERS
102. House of ___ : ORANGE
103. Broadway smash starting in '87 : LES MIZ
104. Pizzeria need : OVEN
109. Chart holder : EASEL
111. Spark, so to speak : IDEA
113. Consort of Zeus : LETO
114. Big oil exporter : IRAN
115. Mini's counterpart : MAXI
117. Summer cooler : ICEE
118. Record problem : SKIP
119. Lays the groundwork for? : SODS
121. Half a laugh : HAR
122. New element in each of this puzzle's theme answers : AN O
123. Geog. abbreviation : MTN
124. Tiny application : DAB


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4 comments :

Anonymous said...

27 Across is "View from une chalet" (ALPES). Shouldn't it be "UN chalet," as chalet is a masculine noun? Is it possible that Will Shortz may have actually made an editing mistake?

Bill Butler said...

That is very well spotted, one that got past me as well! I think you are quite correct, and the clue should read "View from un chalet", as "chalet" is indeed a masculine noun.

Well done!

Drago said...

I just did this puzzle today and I came here to make this same comment but it looks like I'm a few months late :)

First time I see such an error in a NYT puzzle.

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, Drago.

Yes, errors are few and far between on in the NYTimes puzzle in my experience. Often what I think is a slip turns out on further research to be perfectly correct.

I don't think that there's any defending "une" chalet, though :)

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I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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