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Greetings from Blackrock in Dublin, Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland until October 9th. I plan on doing the puzzle each day (with a pint, no doubt), although I may be a little late due to time zone differences. I am sure that you understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

1028-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Oct 12, Sunday



Last Sunday's Competition Puzzle
Anyone still looking to unravel the Sunday crossword from last weekend can check out my solution, which I posted after the competition deadline had passed.



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Michael Sharp (aka Rex Parker) & Caleb Madison
THEME: What The … each of the theme answers sounds like something well known, but with a THE or two inserted:
23A. "Come on, woman, shape that wood!"? : LATHE, LADY, LATHE (from “Lay Lady Lay”)
38A. Cheerful superhero? : CAPTAIN BLITHE (from “Captain Bligh”)
52A. Take a patient approach to revenge? : WAIT AND SEETHE (from “wait and see”)
71A. Ones who stop giving to their church? : TITHE BREAKERS (from “tiebreakers”)
89A. Softly exhale cheap sentiment? : BREATHE CHEESE (from “Brie cheese”)
101A. Mad scientist's sadistic exclamation upon attacking the Empire State? : WRITHE, NEW YORK! (from “Rye, New York”)
119A. What the Grim Reaper's backup carries? : SCYTHE OF RELIEF (from “sigh of relief”)
15D. "If you don't like my anger, do something about it!"? : SO SOOTHE ME! (from “so sue me!”)
76D. Hate coke? : LOATHE BLOW (from “low blow”)
COMPLETION TIME: 32m 40s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … CASTRO (Castho!), TROW (thow)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Auckland native : KIWI
Unlike many nicknames for people of a particular country, the name "Kiwi" for a New Zealander isn't offensive at all. The term comes from the flightless bird called the kiwi, which is endemic to New Zealand and is the country's national symbol. "Kiwi" is a Maori word, and the plural (when referring to the bird) is simply "kiwi". However, when you have two or more New Zealanders with you, they are Kiwis (note the "s", and indeed the capital "K"!).

19. Setting for the 2012 film "Argo" : IRAN
“Argo” is a 2012 movie that is based on the true story of the rescue of six diplomats hiding out during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. The film was directed by and stars Ben Affleck, and is produced by Grant Heslov and George Clooney, the same pair who produced the excellent “Good Night, and Good Luck”. I haven’t seen “Argo” yet, but I hear good things …

20. Title partner of "the Swan" in a Yeats poem : LEDA
In Greek mythology, Leda was the beautiful Queen of Sparta who was seduced by Zeus when he took the form of a swan. She produced two eggs from the union. One egg hatched into the beautiful Helen, later to be known as Helen of Troy, over whom the Trojan War was fought. The other egg hatched into the twins Castor and Pollux. Castor and Pollux had different fathers according to the myth. Pollux was the son of Zeus and was immortal, while Castor was the son of Leda's earthly husband, and so he was a mortal. William Butler Yeats wrote a famous sonnet called “Leda and the Swan” in 1924.

21. "___ Her Standing There" : I SAW
“I Saw Her Standing There” is a Beatles song that was released in 1963, the B-side to “I Want to Hold Your Hand”.

22. Creed of the "Rocky" series : APOLLO
In the “Rocky” series of films, Rocky Balboa was given the ring name “The Italian Stallion”. Rocky's first real opponent was Apollo Creed, known in the ring as “The Master of Disaster”.

23. "Come on, woman, shape that wood!"? : LATHE, LADY, LATHE (from “Lay Lady Lay”)
I’m not a big fan of Bob Dylan, to be honest, but I like his 1969 song “Lay Lady Lay”. Dylan’s voice is less abrasive than usual on his recording of this song, and perhaps that’s why I took to it. “Lay Lady Lay” was written for the soundtrack of the movie “Midnight Cowboy”, but Dylan missed the deadline for submission so it never made it into the film.

27. Start of a choosing rhyme : EENY
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

28. Uploaded pic, often : JPEG
An image file on a computer can be compressed so that it takes up less space. Sometimes the compression is "lossless" meaning even though the file is compressed and data it is discarded, the image still looks the same. One example of data that can be discarded without loss of quality is to not bother recording the color information of pixels that are the same color as others. Just saying "this pixel is the same is that one" takes up less space. One can compress files even more if one allows loss of quality. One well known compression algorithm that is "lossy" is the jpeg format. The person compressing the file can decide how much quality will suffer in jpeg format, with larger compressed files being of higher quality than the smaller ones.

32. Jack ___ : SPRAT
Jack Sprat was a nickname given in the 16th century to people of small stature. Jack featured in a proverb of the day:
Jack will eat not fat, and Jull doth love no leane. Yet betwixt them both they lick the dishes cleane.
Over time, this mutated into a nursery rhyme that is still recited in England:
Jack Sprat could eat no fat. His wife could eat no lean. And so between them both, you see, they licked the platter clean.

34. Dry white wines : SOAVES
Soave is a dry white wine produced in the area around the city of Verona in northeast Italy.

36. Some protests : BOYCOTTS
“Boycott” ... another word given to the world by the Irish! Englishman Captain Charles Boycott found himself on the wrong side of the local community in County Mayo in the west of Ireland, and in a concerted campaign he was refused service by all around him. His name lives on …

38. Cheerful superhero? : CAPTAIN BLITHE (from “Captain Bligh”)
Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall wrote "Mutiny on the 'Bounty'", based on a true story. They followed up their successful novel with two more works, creating what is now called the "Bounty Trilogy". The three books are:
1. "Mutiny on the 'Bounty'", the tale of the mutiny against Captain Bligh.
2. "Men Against the Sea", the story of Captain Bligh and the eighteen men set adrift in an open boat by the mutineers.
3. "Pitcairn's Island", a narrative about the lives of the mutineers on South Sea islands after the mutiny.

41. Facts of life? : OBIT
"Obituary" comes from the Latin "obituaris", originally the word for the record of a death of a person, although the literal meaning is "pertaining to death".

42. Oklahoma birthplace of Oral Roberts : ADA
Back in 1889, Jeff Reed was hired to carry the mail between the two communities of Stonewall and Center in what was then called the Indian Territory. Reed had moved to the area from Texas and he bought some land in between the two limits of his mail route and built himself a log cabin. Pretty soon other settlers built homes nearby and in 1891 the settlement got its own post office. As postman, Reed got to name the new post office and he called it Ada, after his oldest daughter. Ada is now a county seat and has over 17,000 residents. One of the sons of the city of Ada was the televangelist Oral Roberts.

46. Onetime U.N. leader : U THANT
U Thant was a diplomat from Burma who served as the third Secretary-General of the United Nations, taking over from Dag Hammarskjöld. In Burmese, he was known as Pantanaw U Thant. The “U” is an honorific in Burmese, simply the equivalent of “Mr.” in English.

61. Sallie ___ : MAE
“Sallie Mae” is a nickname for SLM Corporation, created in 1972 by the US government as the Student Loan Marketing Association. By 2004 the government had severed all its ties with Sallie Mae, and today SLM is basically a profit-focused lender.

77. "Hoarders" airer : A AND E
The A&E television network used to be a favorite of mine, with the "A&E" standing for "arts and entertainment". A&E started out airing a lot of the old classic dramas, as well as biographies and arts programs. Now there seems to be more reality TV, with one of the flagship programs being "Dog the Bounty Hunter". A slight change of direction I'd say ...

“Hoarders” is a documentary show on the A&E channel that tells the stories of real-life people who suffer from compulsive hoarding.

80. Hombre, formerly : NINO
In Spanish, a boy (niño) grows up to be a man (hombre).

89. Softly exhale cheap sentiment? : BREATHE CHEESE (from “Brie cheese”)
Brie is a soft cheese, named after the French province of Brie where it originated.

95. San Antonio mayor Julián, keynote speaker at the 2012 Democratic convention : CASTRO
Julián Castro is the current mayor of San Antonio, Texas. When Castro was elected to office in 2009 he was 34 years old, making him the youngest ever mayor of the city. In 2012, Castro became the first ever Hispanic to deliver a keynote address at a Democratic National Convention.

96. 1978-79 CBS detective drama : KAZ
“Kaz” was a crime drama that ran for 22 episodes on CBS in the late seventies. The show never caught on …

98. Big bygone bird : MOA
Moas were flightless birds native to New Zealand that are now extinct. The fate of the Moa is a great example of the detrimental effect that humans can have on animal populations. The Maoris arrived in New Zealand about 1300 AD, upsetting the balance of the ecosystem. The Moa were hunted to extinction within 200 years, which had the knock-on effect of killing off the Haast's Eagle, the Moa's only predator prior to the arrival of man.

99. ___ Kong : HONG
Hong Kong first became part of the British Empire after the First Opium War in 1842. In 1898, Britain signed a 99-year lease to retain control of Hong Kong. That control ended 99 years later in 1997 with a formal transfer of sovereignty back to China.

101. Mad scientist's sadistic exclamation upon attacking the Empire State? : WRITHE, NEW YORK! (from “Rye, New York”)
There is a Rye City in Westchester County, New York and a separate Rye Town right next door.

106. "Popsicle," in "Fifty Shades of Grey," for one : SAFEWORD
A “safeword” is code word used in the world of bondage and discipline, a signal by a submissive partner that the dominant partner has crossed a boundary creating undesired discomfort.

"Fifty Shades of Grey" is an incredibly popular erotic novel by British writer E. L. James. “Fifty Shades of Grey” is the fastest-selling paperback of all time. And there are two other titles to complete the trilogy: “Fifty Shades Darker” and "Fifty Shades Freed".

110. Anatomical ring : AREOLE
An areola (sometimes “areole”) in anatomy is a small ring of color, as in the areola surrounding the nipple, and the areola surrounding the pupil of the eye. “Areola” comes from Latin, meaning "small open space", and is a diminutive of the Latin word "area", meaning "open space".

113. Rake : ROUE
"Roue" is a lovely word, I think, describing a less-than-lovely man. A roue could otherwise be described as a cad, someone of loose morals. "Roue" comes from the French word "rouer" meaning "to break on a wheel". This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

A "rake" (short for “rakehell”) is defined as a man who is habituated to immoral conduct (isn't it always the man??!!). The rake is a character who turns up frequently in novels and films, only interested in wine, women and song, and not accepting the responsibilities of life. Good examples would be Wickham in Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and Daniel Cleaver (the Hugh Grant part) in the movie "Bridget Jones’s Diary". "Rake/rakehell" comes from the Old Norse "reikall", meaning "a vagrant or a wanderer".

116. Canon fodder? : FILM
The Japanese company called Canon is noted mainly in the US for producing quality cameras. The company started out as Precision Optical Industry Laboratory in 1937 making camera bodies. The name was changed in 1947 to Canon.

117. Prime minister of 1945 : ATTLEE
Clement Attlee served as leader of Britain's Labour Party and as Deputy Prime Minister in the coalition government during the war years under the leadership of Winston Churchill, a Conservative. Attlee swept into power right after WWII in a landslide victory over Churchill and was responsible for major changes not only in Britain but around the waning British Empire. It was under Attlee that former British colonies like India, Pakistan, Burma, Sri Lanka and Jordan became independent. Also, the Palestine Mandate was terminated in 1948, while he was in office, with the state of Israel being declared the very next day.

126. Log time : YULE
"Yule" celebrations coincide with Christmas, and the words "Christmas" and "Yule" have become synonymous in much of the world. However, Yule was originally a pagan festival celebrated by Germanic peoples. The name "Yule" comes from the Old Norse word "jol" that was used to describe the festival.

A Yule log is a large log made from a very hard wood that is burned as part of the Christmas celebration.

127. Sailors' saint : ELMO
St. Elmo is the patron saint of sailors. He lends his name to the electrostatic weather phenomenon (often seen at sea) known as St. Elmo's fire. The "fire" is actually a plasma discharge caused by air ionizing at the end of a pointed object (like the mast of a ship), something often observed during electrical storms.

128. Ends of Alaska? : SCHWAS
A “schwa” is an unstressed and toneless vowel found in a number of languages including English. Examples from our language are the “a” in “about”, the “e” in “taken” and the “i” in pencil.

131. 1,000 years before the coronation of Queen Elizabeth I : DLIX
The Elizabethan Era, the period associated with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, is considered by many to be the golden age of English history, the age of Shakespeare and the English Renaissance. Elizabeth I was the last sovereign of the House of Tudor, the daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn.

Down
1. Metric distance: Abbr. : KIL
A kilometer is a unit of length in the metric system, approximately equal to 3,281 feet. "Kilometer" is an American spelling. In the rest of the world the French spelling of "kilometre" is used.

2. Author Levin : IRA
As well as writing novels, Ira Levin was a dramatist and a songwriter. Levin's first novel was "A Kiss Before Dying", and his most famous work was "Rosemary's Baby" which became a Hollywood hit. His best known play is "Deathtrap", a production that is often seen in local theater (I've seen it a couple of times around here). "Deathtrap" was also was a successful movie, starring Michael Caine and Christopher Reeve. My favorite of Levin novels though are "The Boys from Brazil" and "The Stepford Wives".

8. Web site with a "Send Money" tab : PAYPAL
PayPal has been around since the year 2000, born out of a merger of two older companies: Confinity and X.com. PayPal was so successful that it was the first of the beleaguered dot.com companies to successfully complete an IPO after the attacks of 9/11. Then in 2002, PayPal was bought by eBay, for a whopping $1.5 billion.

9. Psychologist Jean : PIAGET
Jean Piaget was a psychologist and philosopher from Switzerland. Piaget was a great supporter of children’s education. Back in 1934 he stated that “only education is capable of saving our societies from possible collapse, whether violent, or gradual”. He might have a point …

10. P.R. hours : AST
Atlantic Standard Time (AST) is four hours behind Greenwich Mean Time, and one hour ahead of Eastern Standard Time. The list of locations that use AST includes Puerto Rico and the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

11. First name in Chicago politics : RAHM
The current Mayor of Chicago, Rahm Emanuel, was an Illinois representative in the US House before resigning to take up President Obama's offer to become the White House Chief of Staff.

14. Wall St. opening : IPO
An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital. usually to expand operations.

16. Black in country music : CLINT
Clint Black is a country music singer. Black was born in New Jersey, but grew up in Texas.

25. ___ Johnston, former fiancé of Bristol Palin : LEVI
Levi Johnston hit the headlines when Sarah Palin announced that her daughter Bristol was pregnant, and Levi Johnston was the father. The couple split up before the wedding. Johnston’s initial flirtations with celebrity included a nude photoshoot in "Playgirl" magazine.

30. London facilities : LOO
When I was growing up in Ireland, a "bathroom" was a room that had a bath and no toilet. The separate room with the commode was called "the toilet" or sometimes the W.C. (the water closet). Apparently the term closet was used because in the 1800s when homeowners started installing toilets indoors they often displaced clothes and linens in a "closet", as a closet was the right size to take the commode. It has been suggested that the British term "loo" comes from Waterloo (water-closet ... water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure.

32. Replacement refs, maybe? : SCABS
We first started calling strikebreakers "scabs" in the early 1800s, and before that a scab was a person who refused to join a trade union (back as early 1777). The word probably comes from the use of "scab" as a skin disease, and so is a term that is meant to insult.

33. "The Taming of the Shrew" setting : PADUA
Padua is a city in northern Italy, and was chosen by William Shakespeare as the setting for "The Taming of the Shrew". The play is one of Shakespeare’s earliest romantic comedies.

34. Backbeat component, often : SNARE
Snare drums are so called because they have a set of wire strands (called snares) stretched across the bottom surface of the drum. When the drum is struck, the snares vibrate against the bottom drumhead producing a unique sound.

40. Big wheel at a reception? : EDAM
Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps it travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

47. Smithereens : ATOMS
"Smithereens" is such a lovely word and I am proud to say that it comes from Irish. The Irish word "smiodar" means fragment. We add the suffix "-in" (anglicized as "-een") to words to indicate the diminutive form. So, "little fragment" is "smidirin", anglicized as "smithereens".

48. Red Wing or Blackhawk : NHLER
The Detroit Red Wings and Chicago Blackhawks play in the National Hockey League (NHL).

51. Bijou : GEM
The noun “bijou” is used for a small expensive trinket. “Bijou” is French for “jewel”.

53. Carnival Cruise Lines stop : ARUBA
Aruba is one of the so-called ABC Islands. The ABC Islands is the nickname given to the three westernmost islands of the Leeward Antilles in the Caribbean. The nickname comes from the first letters of the island names: Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao. All three of the ABC Islands are part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

55. Christine ___, "The Phantom of the Opera" girl : DAAE
I'm a bit jaded with big stage musicals I must admit, but I will always have time for Andrew Lloyd Webber's masterpiece "The Phantom of the Opera". "Phantom" is the longest running musical in the history of Broadway, and deservedly so. And now there is a sequel, which I would dearly love to see, so let's hope it gets over here soon. "Love Never Dies" opened in the West End in London in March 2010, but the opening in the US has been indefinitely postponed.

58. Junk : SCHLOCK
Schlock is trash, something shoddy. It comes from the American Yiddish word "shlak", with the same meaning.

62. Killed a hero? : ATE
"Hero" is another name for a submarine sandwich. The hero originated in New York City in the 1800s among Italian immigrants who wanted an Italian sandwich that reminded them of home. The name "hero" was first coined in the 1930s, supposedly by a food critic in the "New York Herald Tribune" when he wrote that "one had to be a hero" to finish the gigantic sandwich. Hero is a prevalent term to this day in New York City, reserved for a submarine sandwich with an Italian flavor.

64. Horne and Olin : LENAS
Lena Horne was an American jazz singer, actress, dancer and civil rights activist. Horne started out her career as a nightclub singer and then began to get some meaty acting roles in Hollywood. However, she ended up on the blacklist during the McCarthy Era for expressing left wing political views. One of her starring roles was in the 1943 movie "Stormy Weather" for which she also performed the title song.

The lovely Lena Olin is a Swedish actress, clearly someone who had acting in her blood. Olin's mother was the actress Britta Holmberg and her father the actor and director Stig Olin. Lena Olin had a very successful career in Sweden, often working with the great Ingmar Bergman. Olin's breakthrough international and English-speaking role was playing opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" released in 1988. Way back in 1974, the lovely Miss Olin was crowned Miss Scandinavia in a beauty pageant for Nordic women held in Helsinki, Finland.

67. W.W. II craft: Abbr. : LST
LST stands for Landing Ship, Tank. LSTs were the large vessels used mainly in WWII that had doors at either ends through which tanks and other vehicles could roll off and onto beaches. The design concept persists to this day in the huge fleet of commercial roll-on/roll-off car ferries, all inspired by the LST.

68. "Your Business" airer : MSNBC
“Your Business” is an MSNBC show aimed at small business owners.

69. Director Kurosawa : AKIRA
Akira Kurosawa was an Oscar-winning Japanese film director. His most famous movie to us in the West has to be "The Seven Samurai", the inspiration for "The Magnificent Seven" starring Yul Brynner, and indeed a basis for "Star Wars: The Clone Wars".

76. Hate coke? : LOATHE BLOW (from “low blow”)
Cocaine is sometimes called “blow”, and nasal inhalation of the drug can be termed “blowing”.

79. "Dragnet" message, for short : APB
An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

Jack Webb played Sergeant Joe Friday on "Dragnet" on both TV and radio ... and what a voice he had! Off the screen Webb was a lover of jazz, and he played the cornet. It was within the world of jazz that he met and fell in love with Julie London, the famous singer with "the smoky voice". Webb and London married and had two kids together.

90. Suppose, to Shakespeare : TROW
“Trow” is an archaic word for "think", more in the sense of "believe", as in "I think it's true".

92. Cornell who founded Western Union : EZRA
Ezra Cornell was an associate of Samuel Morse and made his money in the telegraph business. After Ezra retired he co-founded Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. He provided a generous endowment and donated his farm as a site for the school, and was then rewarded by having the institute named after him.

102. It might cause photophobia : IRITIS
Iritis is inflammation of the iris of the eye.

103. "One World" musician John : TESH
John Tesh is a pianist and composer, as well as a radio and television presenter.

116. Durst of Limp Bizkit : FRED
Fred Durst is the vocalist for the rock band Limp Bizkit. Durst chose the band’s name, and he was looking for something that turned people off. Sure enough, any record label interested in the band in its early days asked for a name change!

118. Disney doe : ENA
Ena is Bambi's aunt in the 1942 Disney film “Bambi”. The movie is based on the novel "Bambi, A Life in the Woods" written by Austrian author Felix Salten and first published in 1923.

122. Owner of Abbey Road Studios : EMI
The Abbey Road Studios in London was a large, Georgian townhouse built in the 1830s. It became a recording studio in 1931, and you can even see some YouTube video showing Sir Edward Elgar back then making recordings with the London symphony Orchestra. The studios passed through various owners and by the time the Beatles started their famous recording it was known as EMI Studios. The Beatles recorded practically all of their albums there, between 1962 and 1970. Famously they named a 1969 album after the studio, "Abbey Road". That's the one with the cover showing the Fab Four crossing the "zebra crossing" outside the studio.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Auckland native : KIWI
5. Surmounting : ATOP
9. Dude ranch handle : PARD
13. Sign of sensitivity? : PISCES
19. Setting for the 2012 film "Argo" : IRAN
20. Title partner of "the Swan" in a Yeats poem : LEDA
21. "___ Her Standing There" : I SAW
22. Creed of the "Rocky" series : APOLLO
23. "Come on, woman, shape that wood!"? : LATHE, LADY, LATHE (from “Lay Lady Lay”)
26. Brighter : ROSIER
27. Start of a choosing rhyme : EENY
28. Uploaded pic, often : JPEG
29. Go weak in the knees : MELT
31. In the past : ONCE
32. Jack ___ : SPRAT
34. Dry white wines : SOAVES
36. Some protests : BOYCOTTS
38. Cheerful superhero? : CAPTAIN BLITHE (from “Captain Bligh”)
41. Facts of life? : OBIT
42. Oklahoma birthplace of Oral Roberts : ADA
43. "___ surprised as you are!" : I’M AS
44. Cases for E.M.T.'s : ODS
46. Onetime U.N. leader : U THANT
50. Guard dog's target : BURGLAR
52. Take a patient approach to revenge? : WAIT AND SEETHE (from “wait and see”)
56. Benefit : SAKE
57. Abandon : DESERT
59. "Mamma ___!" : MIA!
60. Sleeper agent : MOLE
61. Sallie ___ : MAE
63. Barbaric : CRUEL
65. Some electrical workers : CABLEMEN
68. Stand offering, briefly : MAG
71. Ones who stop giving to their church? : TITHE BREAKERS (from “tiebreakers”)
74. Future grads: Abbr. : SRS
75. Emaciated : SKELETAL
77. "Hoarders" airer : A AND E
78. ___ loss : AT A
80. Hombre, formerly : NINO
81. Everyone's bets : POT
83. Ford sedan : TAURUS
85. T.A.'s overseer : PROF
89. Softly exhale cheap sentiment? : BREATHE CHEESE (from “Brie cheese”)
93. Tenacious sort : PITBULL
95. San Antonio mayor Julián, keynote speaker at the 2012 Democratic convention : CASTRO
96. 1978-79 CBS detective drama : KAZ
97. Fool : BOZO
98. Big bygone bird : MOA
99. ___ Kong : HONG
101. Mad scientist's sadistic exclamation upon attacking the Empire State? : WRITHE, NEW YORK! (from “Rye, New York”)
106. "Popsicle," in "Fifty Shades of Grey," for one : SAFEWORD
110. Anatomical ring : AREOLE
111. Like a 12-Down : NERDY
112. First-floor apartment, maybe : ONE B
113. Rake : ROUE
115. Ain't correct? : ISN’T
116. Canon fodder? : FILM
117. Prime minister of 1945 : ATTLEE
119. What the Grim Reaper's backup carries? : SCYTHE OF RELIEF (from “sigh of relief”)
124. Evan-___ (women's clothing brand) : PICONE
125. Its alphabet has 44 consonants : THAI
126. Log time : YULE
127. Sailors' saint : ELMO
128. Ends of Alaska? : SCHWAS
129. Farm females : SOWS
130. Macho man : STUD
131. 1,000 years before the coronation of Queen Elizabeth I : DLIX

Down
1. Metric distance: Abbr. : KIL
2. Author Levin : IRA
3. Summer recreation area : WATER PARK
4. Ready to mate : IN HEAT
5. Confederate : ALLY
6. Genteel gathering : TEA
7. Tasks around the house : ODD JOBS
8. Web site with a "Send Money" tab : PAYPAL
9. Psychologist Jean : PIAGET
10. P.R. hours : AST
11. First name in Chicago politics : RAHM
12. Weenie : DWEEB
13. Coach for dancing? : PARTY BUS
14. Wall St. opening : IPO
15. "If you don't like my anger, do something about it!"? : SO SOOTHE ME! (from “so sue me!”)
16. Black in country music : CLINT
17. Vote in : ELECT
18. Results of lying too much? : SORES
24. Involve : ENTAIL
25. ___ Johnston, former fiancé of Bristol Palin : LEVI
30. London facilities : LOO
32. Replacement refs, maybe? : SCABS
33. "The Taming of the Shrew" setting : PADUA
34. Backbeat component, often : SNARE
35. Drink to throw back : SHOT
37. Recognize as a source : CITE
39. Cry on arrival : I MADE IT
40. Big wheel at a reception? : EDAM
45. Snide response : SNICKER
47. Smithereens : ATOMS
48. Red Wing or Blackhawk : NHLER
49. Cold temps : TEENS
51. Bijou : GEM
52. "___ #1!" : WE’RE
53. Carnival Cruise Lines stop : ARUBA
54. Go over again : ITERATE
55. Christine ___, "The Phantom of the Opera" girl : DAAE
58. Junk : SCHLOCK
62. Killed a hero? : ATE
64. Horne and Olin : LENAS
66. It's measured in cups : BRA SIZE
67. W.W. II craft: Abbr. : LST
68. "Your Business" airer : MSNBC
69. Director Kurosawa : AKIRA
70. Family inheritance : GENES
72. Finish line, often : TAPE
73. Together, in music : A DUE
76. Hate coke? : LOATHE BLOW (from “low blow”)
79. "Dragnet" message, for short : APB
82. Spring phenomenon : THAW
84. Winning by a small margin : UP ONE
86. Dirt spreader : RUMOR MILL
87. Psalm starter : O, LORD
88. Unreliable : FLAKY
90. Suppose, to Shakespeare : TROW
91. They're often toasted : HONOREES
92. Cornell who founded Western Union : EZRA
94. Off-campus local : TOWNIE
97. Really sing : BELT OUT
100. Miracle-___ : -GRO
102. It might cause photophobia : IRITIS
103. "One World" musician John : TESH
104. Flatters : HONEYS
105. Hollered : YELLED
106. Wet bars? : SOAPS
107. Prankster-like : ANTIC
108. "Get on the stick!"? : FETCH
109. Tidies up, in a way : DUSTS
114. Come back : ECHO
116. Durst of Limp Bizkit : FRED
118. Disney doe : ENA
120. Deviate from the course : YAW
121. Bird ___ : FLU
122. Owner of Abbey Road Studios : EMI
123. Babe : FOX

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

4 comments :

Anonymous said...

I'm so disappointed that Will Shortz let through "blow" as a synonym for coke. What's happening to the Times?

Bill Butler said...

I am not a big fan of slang being used in crosswords myself. I'd rather sit there thinking of an obscure word from medieval times than try to track down something "off the street".

But, I accept that I am probably in the minority in that regard. It's just personal taste, I think.

Anonymous said...

I'd be more alarmed at the tendency to allow "convenient" misspellings into the puns and tricks. Like BREATHE CHEESE. It's not BREA cheese. If these composer clowns are going to be so clever, at least let them come up with items that are spelled correctly, even with their "I'm soooooo clever" tricks. If I had my way, you'd never ever see that crap, nor another rebus puzzle; EVER.

Bill Butler said...

Rebus puzzles are the most controversial type of puzzle, I think, based on feedback I receive. There are lovers and haters out there. Personally I fall in between and just accept that a good use of rebus squares can make a good puzzle, and a bad use a bad puzzle.

I am less fond of homophones as part of the theme (like this one). I find that one man's homophone is another man's misspelling. There are a lot of accents out there ...

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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