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Vacation Alert

I am currently on vacation in Ireland, returning on October 9th. I am hoping to complete a blog post each evening, even if it is only the basics (solved grid and clues, plus explanation of theme). I apologize in advance if I am late in posting.

Bill

1118-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 18 Nov 12, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Timothy Polin
THEME: Star-Crossed Lovers … the theme answers are pairs of lovers from celebrated movies, and intersecting each pair of lovers are the names of the actors who played them on film:
1A. Christie who played half of 3-Down : JULIE
57A. Sharif who played half of 3-Down : OMAR
3D. "Doctor Zhivago" : LARA AND YURI

13D. McAvoy who played half of 24-Across : JAMES
16D. Knightley who played half of 24-Across : KEIRA
24A. "Atonement" : CECILIA AND ROBBIE

33D. Bogart who played half of 64-Across : HUMPHREY
36D. Bergman who played half of 64-Across : INGRID
64A. "Casablanca" : ILSA AND RICK

82A. Winslet who played half of 67-Down : KATE
111A. DiCaprio who played half of 67-Down : LEONARDO
67D. "Titanic" : ROSE AND JACK

80D. Leigh who played half of 105-Across : VIVIEN
87D. Gable who played half of 105-Across : CLARK
105A. "Gone With the Wind" : SCARLETT AND RHETT
COMPLETION TIME: 28m 47s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … OS X (OS N), PAX (pan)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Christie who played half of 3-Down : JULIE
Julie Christie is a very talented British actress, actually born in British India. One of her most famous roles was Lara in the the epic 1965 film “Doctor Zhivago”.

10. Key of Mozart's "Jupiter" Symphony: Abbr. : C MAJ
Mozart’s wonderful “Jupiter” Symphony is Symphony No. 41 in C major. The Jupiter was the last symphony that Mozart composed.

14. John O'Hara's "Appointment in ___" : SAMARRA
"Appointment in Samarra" was John O'Hara's first novel, published in 1934. Samarra is a city north of Baghdad in Iraq, although the story itself takes place in a fictional town in Pennsylvania. The novel deals with the last three days in the life of Julian English, describing how he destroys himself with a series compulsive acts leading up to his suicide. This one doesn't qualify as light reading for the plane ...

17. Indian melody : RAGA
Raga isn't really a type of music, but has been described as the "tonal framework" in which Indian classical music is composed. Ravi Shankar is perhaps the most famous raga virtuoso (to us Westerners).

22. Religious scholar : IMAM
An imam is a Muslim leader, often the person in charge of a mosque or perhaps a Muslim community.

24. "Atonement" : CECILIA AND ROBBIE
Ian McEwan is an English novelist with a track record of writing well-received novels. His most famous work at the moment I would say is "Atonement" which has benefited from the success of the fabulous movie adaptation released in 2007.

27. Dame Joan Sutherland delivery : ARIA
Dame Joan Sutherland was an operatic soprano from Sydney, Australia. Sutherland’s voice was described as “the voice of the century” by none other than Luciano Pavarotti.

30. Equine shades : ROANS
A roan horse has an even mixture of white and colored hairs on the body with the head, lower legs, mane and tail having a more solid color.

32. Section of the Medicare law covering hospital and nursing care : PART A
Medicare is divided into four parts:
A: Hospital Insurance
B: Medical Insurance
C: Medicare Advantage Plans
D: Prescription Drug Plans

33. Kind of bar : HOOKAH
A hookah is a waterpipe, a device for smoking tobacco in which the smoke is passed through a water basin before it is inhaled.

35. Honshu city devastated by the 2011 tsunami : SENDAI
Sendai is a city in Japan that was badly damaged in the 9.0 earthquake of 2011 that caused such a devastating tsunami.

37. Signature followers, for short : PSS
One adds a PS (post scriptum, or simply "postscript") at the end of a letter. A second postscript is a post post scriptum, a PPS.

39. Freudian mediators : EGOS
Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the super-ego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The super-ego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

45. Drum kit components : TOMS
The tom-tom is a drum played with the hands, which gave its name to a dull, repeating beat or sound.

57. Sharif who played half of 3-Down : OMAR
Omar Sharif is the great Hollywood actor from Egypt, who played such memorable roles in the movies "Doctor Zhivago" and "Lawrence of Arabia". But to me he is my bridge hero (the card game). In his heyday he was one of the best players in the world.

58. Baba au ___ : RHUM
Rum baba (also “baba au rhum” in French) is a small yeast cake saturated in rum, and sometimes filled with whipped cream. Rum baba is derived from the recipe for the tall "babka" yeast cake that was introduced to the world by the Polish communities. The Polish words "baba" and "babka" mean "old woman" or "grandmother" in English. I guess someone must have thought that all grandmothers were saturated in rum!

60. Mac platform : OS X
Apple introduced the Mac OS X Operating System in 2000. Each version of this operating system has had a code name, and that code name is always a type of big cat. The versions and code names are:
- 10.0: Cheetah
- 10.1: Puma
- 10.2: Jaguar
- 10.3: Panther
- 10.4: Tiger
- 10.5: Leopard
- 10.6: Snow Leopard
Interestingly, the earlier beta version was called Kodiak, after the bear, and not a cat at all.

63. Moniker for Israel's Netanyahu : BIBI
Benjamin “Bibi” Netanyahu has been the Prime Minister of Israel since 2009, the only leader of the country who was born in the state of Israel.

64. "Casablanca" : ILSA AND RICK
The movie "Casablanca" was released in January of 1943, timed to coincide with the Casablanca Conference, the high-level meeting between Roosevelt and Churchill. The film wasn't a box-office hit, but gained critical acclaim, winning three Oscars including Best Picture. The signature song "As Time Goes By" was written many years earlier for a 1931 Broadway musical called "Everybody's Welcome", and was a hit in 1931 for Rudy Vallee. But today we all remember the Casablanca version, sung by Dooley Wilson ("Sam" in the film). Poor Dooley didn't get to record it as a single, due to a musician's strike in 1943, so the 1931 Rudy Vallee version was re-released that year and became an even bigger hit second time round.

69. With 8-Down, deposer of Milton Obote : IDI
8D. See 69-Across : AMIN
Idi Amin received most of his military training in the British armed forces, eventually achieving the highest rank possible for a Black African in the British Colonial Army in 1959, that of Warrant Officer. On his return to Uganda Amin joined his country's military and quickly rose to the rank of Deputy Commander of the Army. During that time he was quite the athlete. He was a noted rugby player and swimmer, and for nine years held the Ugandan national light-heavyweight boxing title. By the early seventies, Amin was commander of all the armed forces of Uganda and in 1971 seized power in a military coup, displacing the country's president Milton Obote. There followed seven years of brutal rule by Amin during which it is estimated that between 100,000 and 500,000 people were murdered. Amin was ousted from power in 1979 after a war with Tanzania, and fled to Libya where he stayed for a year. He then moved to Saudi Arabia, where he was financially supported by the Saudi Royal Family for the remainder of his life. Amin died in 2003.

70. Safety squeeze result, for short : RBI
In baseball, a squeeze play is one in which a batter bunts the ball expecting to be thrown out at first, but gives a runner at third base a chance to score. In a safety squeeze the runner at third waits to see where the bunt is going before heading for home. In a suicide squeeze, the runner heads home as soon as the pitcher throws the ball.

71. Future race of fiction : ELOI
In the 1895 novel by H. G. Wells called "The Time Machine", there were two races that the hero encountered in his travels into the future. The Eloi are the “beautiful people” who live on the planet's surface. The Morlocks are a race of cannibals living underground who use the Eloi as food.

72. Moppet of black-and-white TV : OPIE
Ron Howard sure has come a long way since playing Opie Taylor on "The Andy Griffith Show". Howard has directed some fabulous movies, including favorites of mine like "Apollo 13", "A Beautiful Mind" and "The Da Vinci Code". And today, "Opie" is a grandfather ...

79. Canonized Norwegian king : ST OLAV
Of the many kings of Norway named Olaf/Olav (and there have been five), Olaf II is perhaps the most celebrated as he was canonized and made patron saint of the country. Olaf II was king from 1015 to 1028, and was known as "Olaf the Big" (or Olaf the Fat) during his reign. Today he is more commonly referred to as "Olaf the Holy". After Olaf died he was given the title of Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae, which is Latin for “Norway’s Eternal King”.

82. Winslet who played half of 67-Down : KATE
Kate Winslet is one of my favorite actresses, someone known for taking both the big Hollywood roles while still finding the time to act in smaller, independent films. Perhaps her most famous part was played opposite Leonardo DiCaprio in "Titanic", although she won her Oscar for a more dramatic role in "The Reader". But my favorite of her performances is in the romantic comedy "The Holiday" from 2006. I love that movie ...

84. Golfer Ballesteros : SEVE
Seve Ballesteros was a very entertaining golfer from Spain, once ranked as the world’s number one player. Sadly, Ballesteros died from brain cancer in 2011, at the age of 54.

87. Toronto media inits. : CBC
CBC is Canadian National Broadcasting, Canada's national public radio and television broadcaster. In terms of financing and structure, CBC is akin to the BBC in Britain. But as commercial advertising is permitted, it perhaps more akin to RTE, the national broadcasting company in my homeland of Ireland.

94. Nitpicks : CAVILS
To cavil is to make petty objections that really aren’t necessary.

104. Guess in Battleship : D-TEN
Battleship is a remarkably fun guessing game that I used to play as a child. Back then we would play it just using pencil and paper, although these days kids are more likely to play an electronic version.

105. "Gone With the Wind" : SCARLETT AND RHETT
In Margaret Mitchell’s novel “Gone with the Wind”, when Rhett Butler finally walks out on Scarlett O’Hara he utters the words “My dear, I don’t give a damn”. Most of us are more familiar with the words spoken by Clark Gable in the film adaption of the story: “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.”

108. Late comic Richard : JENI
Stand up comic Richard Jeni's life was cut all too short, by his own hand in 2007.

109. Somewhat, in music : POCO
“Poco” is an Italian word for “little” and is used in musical notation to mean “to a small degree, a little”.

111. DiCaprio who played half of 67-Down : LEONARDO
Hollywood star Leonardo DiCaprio is from Los Angeles, California. DiCaprio’s mother was visiting a museum in Italy when she was pregnant and felt the first kick of her unborn child. At the moment of that first kick, Mama DiCaprio was looking at a painting by Leonardo da Vinci, and so named her son Leonardo.

113. Ammunition giant : OLIN
Olin Corporation is a chemical company based in Clayton, Missouri. The company started out making explosives for the mining industry and quickly moved into the production of cartridges fro guns.

Down
1. Anonymous female in a court case : JANE ROE
Though the English court system does not use the term today, John Doe first appeared as the "name of a person unknown" in England in 1659, along with another unknown, Richard Roe. Joe Blow is just a variant of John Doe, and Jane Doe is an unknown female.

2. From Assisi, e.g. : UMBRIAN
The Italian town of Assisi is in Umbria. Assisi is famous as the birthplace of St. Francis and as the home to the Franciscan religious order. It was also the home to Saint Clare and her order of the Poor Sisters (later known as the Poor Clares).

3. "Doctor Zhivago" : LARA AND YURI
"Doctor Zhivago" is of course the epic novel by Boris Pasternak, first published in 1957. I haven't tried to read it but the 1965 film version is a must-see, directed by David Lean and starring Omar Sharif in the title role. The story centers on Yuri Zhivago, a doctor and poet, and how he is affected by the Russian Revolution and the Russian Civil War.

6. Hanging tapestry : ARRAS
A famous arras is seen in Shakespeare's "Hamlet". In one pivotal scene, Polonius is hiding behind a tapestry listening to an argument between Hamlet and Gertrude. Hamlet hears Polonius, mistakes his identity, and stabs wildly through the cloth, killing Polonius. The name "arras", used for such a tapestry, comes from the French town of Arras which was famous for the production of fine wall hangings.

7. Vindictive one, in myth : HERA
In Greek mythology, Hera was the wife of Zeus and was noted for her jealousy and vengeful nature, particularly against those who vied for the affections of her husband. The equivalent character to Hera in Roman mythology was Juno. Hera was the daughter of Cronus and Rhea.

10. Pony : CRIB SHEET
A pony is a word-for-word translation of a text in a foreign language. The term “pony” is especially used when a student uses such a translation as a crib sheet in an examination.

11. Cousin of the rumba : MAMBO
The form of music and dance known as mambo developed in Cuba. “Mambo” means “conversation with the gods” in Kikongo, a language spoken by slaves taken to Cuba from Central Africa.

13. McAvoy who played half of 24-Across : JAMES
James McAvoy is a Scottish actor that I knew mainly for television work in the UK until a few years ago when he broke into Hollywood films. He played opposite Forest Whitaker as Idi Amin in “The Last King of Scotland” and also the romantic lead in “Atonement” opposite Keira Knightly.

16. Knightley who played half of 24-Across : KEIRA
The English actress Keira Knightley had her big break in movies when she co-starred in 2002’s “Bend It Like Beckham”. Knightley played one of my favorite movie roles, Elizabeth Bennett in 2005’s “Pride and Prejudice”. Knightley won a Golden Globe for that performance, although that 2005 film isn’t the best adaptation of the Austen’s novel in my opinion.

21. Coffee Cakes maker : DRAKE’S
Drake’s bakery was founded in Brooklyn, New York in 1888 when it specialized in selling pound cake by the slice. Drake’s eventually ended up in the hands of Hostess Brands, and was shut down in November 2012.

31. ___ Miguel Island : SAO
São Miguel Island is the largest island in the archipelago of the Azores.

The Azores is an archipelago of nine volcanic islands in the North Atlantic lying about 1,000 miles west of Portugal. The Azores are an autonomous region belonging to Portugal.

33. Bogart who played half of 64-Across : HUMPHREY
Humphrey Bogart's breakthrough movie was "The Petrified Forest" from 1936, but for me, nothing beats "Casablanca". Although, if you haven't seen it, check out the original "Sabrina" from 1954, a real delight.

34. Department north of Paris : OISE
The department in northern France known as Oise is named for the River Oise.

The River Oise rises in Belgium and joins up with the River Seine just outside Paris.

36. Bergman who played half of 64-Across : INGRID
Ilsa Lund was of course played by Ingrid Bergman in the 1942 movie "Casablanca". I love the words of one critic describing the chemistry between Bogart and Bergman in this film: "she paints his face with her eyes". Wow ...

40. Feared force : GESTAPO
Gestapo is a contraction for "Geheime Staatspolizei", or "Secret State Police". The Gestapo was formed in 1934, not long after Adolf Hitler took power as Chancellor of Germany in 1933.

41. "1984" superstate : OCEANIA
The action in George Orwell's 1949 novel "Nineteen Eighty-Four" takes place in the intercontinental super-state of Oceania. Orwell created two other super-states, Eurasia and Eastasia.

47. ___ Americana : PAX
The term “Pax Americana” is sometimes used to describe the relative peace in the western world that came after WWII resulting from the power and influence enjoyed by the US. The concept isn’t a new one, as there was also the Pax Romana in the days of the Roman Empire, and the Pax Britannica brought about under the influence of the British Empire.

49. Umm al-Quwain, e.g. : EMIRATE
Umm al-Quwain is the least populous of the sovereign emirates in the Middle East country called the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The name “Umm al-Quwain” translates from Arabic as “Mother of the Two Powers”.

50. Novelist who translated "Alice in Wonderland" into Russian : NABOKOV
Vladimir Nabokov was a Russian American novelist who originally penned his works in Russian before moving to English. Nabokov’s most famous and most respected work in English is his 1955 novel “Lolita”.

Vladimir Nabokov's novel "Lolita" has a famously controversial storyline, dealing with a middle-aged man's obsession and sexual relationship with a 12-year-old girl. Although "Lolita" is considered a classic today, after Nabokov finished it in 1953 the edgy subject matter made it impossible for him to find a publisher in the US (where Nabokov lived). In 1955, he resorted to publishing it in English at a printing house in Paris. Publication was followed by bans and seizures all over Europe. A US printing house finally took on the project in 1958, by which time the title had such a reputation that it sold exceptionally quickly. "Lolita" became the first book since "Gone with the Wind" to sell over 100,000 copies in its first three weeks in stores.

55. Tentacled "Spider-Man" meanie : DOC OCK
Otto Octavius is a supervillain in the comic book universe. Also known as Doctor Octopus, Octavius is primarily a foe of Spider-Man.

66. Terre in the eau zone? : ILE
In French, an island (île) is a piece of ground (terre) surrounded by water (eau).

67. "Titanic" : ROSE AND JACK
When James Cameron made his epic movie “Titanic”, released in 1997, it was the most expensive film ever made, costing about $200 million. It was a good investment for the studio as it became the highest-grossing film of all time, bringing in over $1.8 billion. “Titanic” remained the highest-grossing film until 2010, when Cameron eclipsed the prior record with “Avatar”.

76. Hunky-dory : COOL
Surprisingly, the term "hunky-dory" has been around a long time, and is documented back in the mid-1800s. No one is really sure of its origin, but some say it is an Anglicization of Honcho dori, that back in the day was a street of ill repute in Yokohama, Japan.

80. Leigh who played half of 105-Across : VIVIEN
As casting proceeded for the movie version of "Gone With the Wind", Clark Gable was a shoo-in from day one. The role of Scarlett was considered very desirable in the acting community, with Bette Davis on the short list, and Katherine Hepburn demanding an appointment with producer David O. Selznick to discuss the role. Vivien Leigh was an unlikely contender, an English actress for the definitive Southern belle role. Selznick was adamant though, and stuck by his choice despite a lot of protests.

87. Gable who played half of 105-Across : CLARK
Clark Gable was nominated for an Oscar for playing his most famous role, namely Rhett Butler in “Gone with the Wind”. However he won his Best Actor Academy Award for playing the lead in “It Happened One Night”, my personal favorite of all of his films.

89. Lobster trap : CREEL
A creel is a basket used for catching lobsters, for example. Creel is also the name given to the small wicker basket used to hold fish that have been caught by an angler. “Creel” is originally a Scottish word.

91. Clique : COTERIE
A “coterie” is a small group of friends who hang out together, often sharing a common interest. The term comes to us from French where a coterie was an organization of peasants all of whom held land owned by the same feudal lord.

93. Snowbird, typically : SENIOR
Snowbirds are people from Canada and the northern US who head south for the winter, to places like Florida and California.

95. Calder Cup org. : AHL
The American Hockey League (AHL) is the so-called development circuit for the National Hockey League (NHL), the equivalent of the minors in professional baseball. The AHL’s playoff trophy is called the Calder Cup, which is named for Frank Calder who was the first president of the NHL.

97. "Symphony in Black" and others : ERTES
Erté was the pseudonym of French artist (Russian born) Romain de Tirtoff. Erté is the French pronunciation of his initials "R.T."

99. Subject of a 1982 best seller on sexuality : G-SPOT
The full name for the G-Spot is the “Gräfenberg Spot”, named after German doctor Ernst Gräfenberg. Gräfenberg is best known for developing the intrauterine device (IUD).

100. Cause for a health panic : E COLI
Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

102. Cafeteria worker's headgear : SNOOD
A “snood” is a net or a bag worn over the hair. “Snood” comes from the Old English word “snod” meaning a ribbon for the hair.

103. Summer ermine : STOAT
Ermine is another name for the stoat. The stoat has dark brown fur in the summer, and white fur in the winter. Sometimes the term "ermine" is reserved for the animal during the winter when the fur is white. Ermine skins have long been prized by royalty and are often used for white trim on ceremonial robes.

106. Texter's "ciao" : TTYL
Talk To You Later (TTYL).

112. Lowercase letters resembling v's : NUS
The Latin equivalent of the Greek letter nu is "N". An uppercase nu looks just like the Latin capital N, however, the lowercase nu looks like our lowercase "v". Very confusing ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Christie who played half of 3-Down : JULIE
6. Epiphanies : AHAS
10. Key of Mozart's "Jupiter" Symphony: Abbr. : C MAJ
14. John O'Hara's "Appointment in ___" : SAMARRA
16. Doughnut ingredient, commercially : KREME
17. Indian melody : RAGA
18. Promotes recessive traits, say : INBREEDS
20. Picked some fruit : BERRIED
22. Religious scholar : IMAM
23. Prefix with byte : TERA-
24. "Atonement" : CECILIA AND ROBBIE
27. Dame Joan Sutherland delivery : ARIA
28. Holy ones are hard to handle : TERRORS
29. Some clerics : PARSONS
30. Equine shades : ROANS
32. Section of the Medicare law covering hospital and nursing care : PART A
33. Kind of bar : HOOKAH
35. Honshu city devastated by the 2011 tsunami : SENDAI
37. Signature followers, for short : PSS
38. Lighthouse, e.g. : GUIDE
39. Freudian mediators : EGOS
43. O'er there : YOND
45. Drum kit components : TOMS
46. Elocution : SPEECH
48. A large one offers many courses : MENU
51. Ties up a phone line, maybe : GABS
54. Psyched (up) : AMPED
56. Floundering : AT SEA
57. Sharif who played half of 3-Down : OMAR
58. Baba au ___ : RHUM
59. Team booster : RAH
60. Mac platform : OS X
62. Needlework, for short? : TAT
63. Moniker for Israel's Netanyahu : BIBI
64. "Casablanca" : ILSA AND RICK
67. Air all of one's grievances, say : RANT
68. Dude : BRO
69. With 8-Down, deposer of Milton Obote : IDI
70. Safety squeeze result, for short : RBI
71. Future race of fiction : ELOI
72. Moppet of black-and-white TV : OPIE
73. Made of a sturdy wood : OAKEN
75. Sub for : ACT AS
77. "Not broccoli again!" : YECH!
78. Shoot up : SOAR
79. Canonized Norwegian king : ST OLAV
81. Something taken by a scout : OATH
82. Winslet who played half of 67-Down : KATE
84. Golfer Ballesteros : SEVE
85. Phrase of resignation : I LOSE
87. Toronto media inits. : CBC
90. Developers' purchases : TRACTS
94. Nitpicks : CAVILS
96. Certain S O S : FLARE
98. Borefest : SNORE
99. Lead-in to a juicy rumor : GET THIS ...
102. Ushers : SEATERS
104. Guess in Battleship : D-TEN
105. "Gone With the Wind" : SCARLETT AND RHETT
108. Late comic Richard : JENI
109. Somewhat, in music : POCO
110. Stripped-down laptop : NETBOOK
111. DiCaprio who played half of 67-Down : LEONARDO
113. Ammunition giant : OLIN
114. Like the strings on many tennis rackets : NYLON
115. Specialty chef : SAUCIER
116. Small songbirds : TITS
117. Vehicle to take over a jump : SLED
118. Expressed audible admonishment : TSKED

Down
1. Anonymous female in a court case : JANE ROE
2. From Assisi, e.g. : UMBRIAN
3. "Doctor Zhivago" : LARA AND YURI
4. It may be drawn in a fight : IRE
5. On end : ERECT
6. Hanging tapestry : ARRAS
7. Vindictive one, in myth : HERA
8. See 69-Across : AMIN
9. Pea body? : SEEDPOD
10. Pony : CRIB SHEET
11. Cousin of the rumba : MAMBO
12. Over : AGAIN
13. McAvoy who played half of 24-Across : JAMES
14. Double-bridged instruments : SITARS
15. "Take ___ breath" : A DEEP
16. Knightley who played half of 24-Across : KEIRA
19. Ditch : SCRAP
20. Bad marks : BLOTS
21. Coffee Cakes maker : DRAKE’S
25. Sale bin items: Abbr. : IRRS
26. Sessanta minuti : ORA
31. ___ Miguel Island : SAO
33. Bogart who played half of 64-Across : HUMPHREY
34. Department north of Paris : OISE
36. Bergman who played half of 64-Across : INGRID
38. Lose touch with reality : GO MAD
40. Feared force : GESTAPO
41. "1984" superstate : OCEANIA
42. Smash : SHATTER
44. Colorful perennial : DAHLIA
45. Besmirch : TARNISH
47. ___ Americana : PAX
48. Don : MOB BOSS
49. Umm al-Quwain, e.g. : EMIRATE
50. Novelist who translated "Alice in Wonderland" into Russian : NABOKOV
52. Clear tables : BUS
53. Wise guy : SMART ASS
55. Tentacled "Spider-Man" meanie : DOC OCK
61. Snow cap? : SKI HAT
65. Tail off : ABATE
66. Terre in the eau zone? : ILE
67. "Titanic" : ROSE AND JACK
69. ___ minute : IN A
74. Parts of some bonds : ELECTRONS
76. Hunky-dory : COOL
80. Leigh who played half of 105-Across : VIVIEN
83. ___-80 (early home computer) : TRS
86. Is a good friend, in a way : LISTENS
87. Gable who played half of 105-Across : CLARK
88. Financial shellacking : BATH
89. Lobster trap : CREEL
91. Clique : COTERIE
92. Changed in popularity : TRENDED
93. Snowbird, typically : SENIOR
95. Calder Cup org. : AHL
96. Ate : FED ON
97. "Symphony in Black" and others : ERTES
99. Subject of a 1982 best seller on sexuality : G-SPOT
100. Cause for a health panic : E COLI
101. Assumed, say : TACIT
102. Cafeteria worker's headgear : SNOOD
103. Summer ermine : STOAT
106. Texter's "ciao" : TTYL
107. Talented : ABLE
112. Lowercase letters resembling v's : NUS

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This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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