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1202-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 2 Dec 12, Sunday





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Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Steven E. Atwood
THEME: Lo and behold! … each of the theme answers is a well known term or expression, with an “LO” added:
23A. Consideration in choosing a deli? : THE LOX FACTOR (the X factor)
28A. Part of a butcher's stand-up routine? : LOIN JOKE (in joke)
35A. Laundry basket of just colors or just whites? : CLASSIFIED LOAD (classified ad)
46A. Wise lawmaker most likely to be re-elected? : FAVORITE SOLON (favorite son)
61A. Artistic expression on the slopes? : SLALOM DANCING (slam dancing)
67A. Causing Election Day delays? : SLOWING VOTERS (swing voters)
84A. Chart indicating the progression of darkness after sunset? : GLOAMING TABLE (gaming table)
93A. Power in Hollywood? : DIRECTOR’S CLOUT (director’s cut)
103A. Paintball weapons? : BLOB GUNS (BB guns)
113A. When there might be a two-for-one special on ice cream drinks? : FLOAT TUESDAY (Fat Tuesday)
COMPLETION TIME: 30m 40s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 …. LOVORNO (Livorna), NOES (naes)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. 64 or 1,000 : CUBE
64 is the cube of 4 (4 x 4 x 4 = 64) and 1,000 is the cube of 10 (10 x 10 x 10 = 1,000)

19. Head of a family : CAPO
More properly called a "caporegime", a "capo" is high-ranking member of the Mafia (Cosa Nostra).

20. Woodcutter of legend : ALI BABA
There is some controversy about the story "Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves" in that it has been suggested it was not part of the original collection of Arabic tales called "One Thousand and One Nights". The suggestion is that the Ali Baba tale was added by one of its European translators.

23. Consideration in choosing a deli? : THE LOX FACTOR (the X factor)
Lox is a a cured salmon fillet, finely sliced. The term "lox" comes into English via Yiddish, and derives from the German word for salmon, "Lachs".

41. ___-Pei (dog breed) : SHAR
The Shar Pei breed of dog is that one with the wrinkly face and really dark tongue. The breed originated in China, with "Shar Pei" being the British spelling of the Cantonese name.

42. Reqmt. for certain graduate studies : LSAT
The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) has been around since 1948.

45. Actress Sommer : ELKE
Elke Sommer is a German-born actress who was at the height of her success on the silver screen in the sixties. Sommer won a Golden Globe as Most Promising Newcomer Actress for her role opposite Paul Newman in 1964's "The Prize". She also sings and has released several albums. Now she focuses on painting, producing artwork that is strongly influenced by Marc Chagall.

46. Wise lawmaker most likely to be re-elected? : FAVORITE SOLON (favorite son)
Solon was an Athenian statesman and lawmaker in Ancient Greece. He gave his name to our contemporary word "solon" meaning "a wise lawmaker".

52. Protestant denom. : AME
The African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church was founded in 1816 in Philadelphia.

53. Anthony Eden, Earl of ___ : AVON
Sir Anthony Eden served as Britain's Foreign Secretary during WWII, and then as Prime Minister from 1955-57. I think it's fair to say that Eden doesn't have a great reputation as a statesman. He was proud of his stance in favor of peace over war, so his critics characterized him as an appeaser. His major stumble on the world stage occurred with the Suez Crisis in 1956. Egypt's President Nasser unilaterally nationalized the Suez Canal causing war to be declared on Egypt by Britain, France and Israel. Within a few months political pressure from the US and the USSR caused the allies to withdraw, bolstering Egypt's national reputation. Eden never recovered from the loss of face at home, and it is felt that the stress even affected his health. Eden resigned in January 1957.

55. French spouse : MARI
“Mari” is the French word for “husband”.

58. Rock's ___ Fighters : FOO
Foo Fighters is described as an alternative rock band, one formed in 1994 by the drummer from Nirvana, Dave Grohl. The original "Foo fighters" were unidentified flying objects reported by allied airmen during WWII. Spooky ...

61. Artistic expression on the slopes? : SLALOM DANCING (slam dancing)
Slalom is an anglicized version of the Norwegian word "slalam", meaning "skiing race".

Moshing (also “slam dancing”) is the pushing and shoving that takes place in the audience at a concert (usually a punk or heavy metal concert). The area directly in front of the stage is known as the mosh pit. When a performer does a "stage dive" it is into (or I suppose "onto") the mosh pit. It doesn't sound like fun to me. Injuries are common in the mosh pit, and deaths are not unknown.

77. Skin growth : WEN
“Wen” is the common name for a number of different growths that can occur on or under the skin. A wen can be a lipoma for example, a benign fatty growth that can form under the skin.

79. Time ___ : INC
“Time” magazine has a readership of about 25 million, making it the largest circulation weekly news magazine in the world.

80. Mideast capital : SANA
Sana (also Sana’a) is the capital city of Yemen. Within the bounds of today's metropolis is the old fortified city of Sana where people have lived for over 2,500 years. The Old City is now a World Heritage Site.

81. Dallas player, for short : MAV
The Mavericks is the name of the NBA franchise in Dallas, Texas. The team was founded in 1980, and the Mavericks name was chosen by fan votes. The choice of “Mavericks” was prompted by the fact that the actor James Garner was a part-owner of the team, and Garner of course played the title role in the “Maverick” television series.

82. Jungle critter : ORANG
Orangutans are arboreal creatures, in fact the largest arboreal animals known to man. They are native to Indonesia and Malaysia, living in the rain forests. Like most species in rain forests these days, orangutans are endangered, with only two species surviving. The word "orangutan" is Malay, meaning "man of the forest".

84. Chart indicating the progression of darkness after sunset? : GLOAMING TABLE (gaming table)
“Gloaming” is an alternative word for twilight or dusk, and is often used poetically. The word is particularly associated with Scottish poetry, and notably the work of Robert Burns.

93. Power in Hollywood? : DIRECTOR’S CLOUT (director’s cut)
The film editing process involves several steps. An early stage is the rough editor’s cut, and this is followed by the director’s cut, which is the director’s own approved edit. Studios are the one’s with the money, so they usually preserve a “final cut privilege”. The studio usually makes changes to the director’s cut perhaps to provide a more saleable product, or maybe to shorten the film's run-time so that more screenings can be made in a day.

101. Prop for Mr. Monopoly or Mr. Peanut : CANE
Mr. Monopoly is also known as Rich “Uncle” Pennybags, and is the mascot of the game Monopoly. For years you could spot Mr. Monopoly reaching out of the “O” in the word Monopoly on the game board.

Planters is the company with the Mr. Peanut icon. Mr. Peanut was the invention of a first-grader called Antonio Gentile, a young man who won a design contest in 1916. A remarkable achievement, I'd say ...

103. Paintball weapons? : BLOB GUNS (BB guns)
A BB gun is an air pistol or rifle that shoots birdshot known as BBs. Birdshot comes in a number of different sizes, from size 9 (0.080" in diameter) to size FF (.23"). 0.180" diameter birdshot is size BB, which gives the airgun its name.

107. Voluminous ref. : OED
The "Oxford English Dictionary" (OED) contains over 300,000 "main" entries, and 59 million words in total. It is said it would take a single person 120 years to type it out in full. The longest entry for one word in the second edition of the OED is the verb "set". When the third edition was published in 2007, the longest entry for a single word became the verb "put". Perhaps not surprisingly, the most-quoted author in the OED is William Shakespeare, with his most quoted work being “Hamlet”. The most-quoted female author is George Eliot (aka Mary Ann Evans).

112. Salsa specification : CALIENTE
“Caliente” is Spanish for “hot”, as in temperature. I would have thought that "hot" with reference to spiciness in salsa would be "picante".

113. When there might be a two-for-one special on ice cream drinks? : FLOAT TUESDAY (Fat Tuesday)
“Mardi Gras” translates from French as “Fat Tuesday”, and gets its name from the practice of eating rich foods on the eve of the fasting season known as Lent.

120. Some printers : HPS
The giant multinational called HP (originally Hewlett-Packard) was founded in 1939 with an investment of $538, in a one-car garage in Palo Alto, California by Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard. The company name would have been Packard-Hewlett if Dave Packard had won a coin toss!

122. Mil. awards : DSCS
The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest honor awarded to members of the US Army. The DSC is equivalent to the Navy Cross and the Air Force Cross.

Down
2. Nuuanu Pali Lookout locale : OAHU
Nuʻuanu Pali is on the windward side of the Ko’olau Volcano on the island of O’ahu. Local folklore holds that one cannot carry pork over Nuʻuanu Pali, and indeed motorists have reported car engines stopping and refusing to start until pork had been removed from the vehicle, especially at night.

3. Grp. that has held summit meetings in Caracas and Riyadh : OPEC
The OPEC cartel (the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) was formally established in 1960 and has been headquartered in Vienna since 1965. The US is actually the third largest oil producer in the world (after Russia and Saudi Arabia). One reason America isn't in OPEC, even though we are a big producer, is that we import a lot more than we export. But we all probably know that already …

Caracas is the capital city of Venezuela, and is officially known as Santiago de León de Caracas. Caracas lies on the northern coast of the country, and was founded by the Spanish over four hundred years ago.

4. Paul Bunyan, e.g. : FOLK HERO
Paul Bunyan is a giant of American myth, a skilled lumberjack.

5. Used a FedEx Office service : FAXED
FedEx began operations in 1973 as Federal Express, but now operates very successfully under it's more catchy abbreviated name. Headquartered in Memphis with its "SuperHub" at Memphis International Airport, FedEx is the world's largest airline in terms of tons of freight flown. And due to the presence of FedEx, Memphis Airport has the largest-volume cargo operation of any airport worldwide.

6. Actress Woodard : ALFRE
Alfre Woodard is an actress from Tulsa, Oklahoma. Woodard was nominated for an Oscar for her performance in the 1983 film “Cross Creek”. Off the stage and screen she is very active in the Democratic Party.

7. Actress Vardalos : NIA
Not only is the delightful Nia Vardalos the star of the 2002 hit movie "My Big Fat Greek Wedding", she also wrote the screenplay. The film never made it to number one at the box office, but it still pulled in more money than any other movie in history that didn't make it to number one. That record I think reflects the fact that the film wasn't a blockbuster but rather a so-called "sleeper hit", a movie that people went to see based on referrals from friends. The big fat mistake came when a spin-off TV show was launched called "My Big Fat Greek Life". It ran for only 7 episodes.

8. Source of northern exposure? : CBC
CBC stands for Canadian National Broadcasting, Canada's national public radio and television broadcaster. In terms of financing and structure, CBC is akin to the BBC in Britain. But as commercial advertising is permitted, it perhaps more akin to RTE, the national broadcasting company in my homeland of Ireland.

9. Belarus neighbor : LATVIA
The independent country of Latvia is one of the former Soviet Socialist Republics. People from Latvia are called Letts.

The Republic of Belarus is a landlocked country in Eastern Europe, located east of Poland and north of Ukraine. Belarus didn’t exist as an entity until the Russian Revolution when it was created as one of the Soviet Socialist Republics (SSR) that made up the USSR. The Republic of Belarus was formed soon after the USSR dissolved in 1990, but unlike many of the former Soviet Republics, Belarus has largely retained the old Soviet policies. Alexander Lukashenko is the country’s president and he believes in state ownership of the economy. Belarus and Russia have formal agreements in place that pledge cooperation.

10. Old minelayers : U-BOATS
U-boat stands for the German "Unterseeboot" (undersea boat). U-boats were primarily used in WWII to enforce a blockade against enemy commercial shipping, with a main objective being to cut off the supplies being transported to Britain from the British colonies and the US. The epic fight for control of the supply routes became known as the Battle of the Atlantic.

11. Critic Clive : BARNES
Clive Barnes was the dance and theater critic for “The New York Times” for many years, from 1965 to 1977. Although Barnes lived in New York City, he was born and raised in England. While living and working in the US he still wrote for many of the top publications in the UK.

12. Quarantine : SEAL OFF
The original use of our word “quarantine” back in the 1500s was as a legal term. A quarantine was the 40 days in which a widow had the legal right to reside in her dead husband’s house.

13. Composer Salieri : ANTONIO
If you've seen the brilliant 1984 movie "Amadeus", you'll have seen Salieri portrayed as being very envious and resentful of the gifted Mozart. It is no doubt true that two composers fought against each other, at least on occasion, but the extent of the acrimony between the two has perhaps been exaggerated in the interest of theater. Mozart and his wife had six children, but only two survived infancy. The youngest boy was called Franz Xaver Wolfgang Mozart, born just five months before his father died. Franz was to become a gifted composer, teacher, pianist and conductor, helped along the way by lessons from his father's supposed rival ... Antonio Salieri.

14. 1957 #1 R&B hit for Chuck Willis : CC RIDER
Chuck Willis was an R&B singer from Atlanta, Georgia. Willis had a number one hit in 1957 with the blues classic “C. C. Rider”, a song which inspired a popular new dance called ‘The Stroll”. His association with the Stroll led to Willis getting the nickname “the King of Stroll”.

18. Salinger girl : ESME
J. D. Salinger wrote a short story called "For Esme - with Love and Squalor", originally published in "The New Yorker" in 1950. It is a story about a young English girl called Esme and an American soldier, and is set in WWII.

J. D. Salinger was a very reclusive author, most famous for his novel “Catcher in the Rye”. Salinger fought in WWII after he was drafted into the US Army. He saw action on Utah Beach on D-Day, and in the Battle of the Bulge. He also spent a lot of time interrogating prisoners due to his knowledge of French and German, and he was one of the first Americans to go into a liberated concentration camp. He later spent time in hospital suffering from what was then called combat stress reaction, as he tried to deal with what he saw in the German camps.

24. Actress Lena : OLIN
The lovely Lena Olin is a Swedish actress, clearly someone who had acting in her blood. Olin's mother was the actress Britta Holmberg and her father the actor and director Stig Olin. Lena Olin had a very successful career in Sweden, often working with the great Ingmar Bergman. Olin's breakthrough international and English-speaking role was playing opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" released in 1988. Way back in 1974, the lovely Miss Olin was crowned Miss Scandinavia in a beauty pageant for Nordic women held in Helsinki, Finland.

30. Counter orders : BLTS
The BLT (bacon, lettuce and tomato) is the second most popular sandwich in the US, after the plain old ham sandwich.

33. SeaWorld attraction : SHAMU
Shamu was the name of the third orca, or killer whale, ever to be featured in a public exhibition. Shamu starred in a popular SeaWorld show in San Diego in the sixties. After she died in 1971, her name lived on as the name "Shamu" is still used by SeaWorld for its killer whale shows. That original Shamu was retired after she grabbed and refused to let go of the leg of one of her trainers.

35. Normandy campaign city : CAEN
Caen, on the River Orne, lies in the Calvados department of France in the northwest of the country. Caen is famous for the WWII Battle of Caen that left the town practically destroyed. Caen is also the burial place of the Norman King William I of England, also known as William the Conqueror after his victory at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

36. Writer Fleming : IAN
Ian Fleming is most famous of course for writing the "James Bond" series of spy novels. You might also know that he wrote the children's story "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang", which was made into a cute movie released in 1968 and even a stage musical that opened in 2002.

37. Writer Wallace : LEW
Lew Wallace was a general for the Union Army during the Civil War, and was also an author. He wrote a very successful and celebrated book called “Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ”, first published in 1880.

38. 11th-century king of Denmark : OLAF I
Olaf I was king of Denmark from 1086 to 1095. Olaf is the only Danish king for whom a burial site is not known. There is speculation that his body was cut into pieces and scattered across the country in an effort to rid Denmark of the misfortunes that plagued Olaf’s reign as king.

39. City on the Little Cuyahoga : AKRON
For part of the 1800s, Akron, Ohio was the fasting growing city in the country, feeding off the industrial boom of that era. The city was founded in 1825 and its location, along the Ohio and Erie canal connecting Lake Erie with the Ohio River, helped to fuel Akron's growth. Akron sits at the highest point of the canal and the name "Akron" comes from the Greek word meaning "summit". Indeed, Akron is the county seat of Summit County.

42. Italian port on the Tyrrhenian Sea : LIVORNO
Livorno is a port city on the west coast of Italy. The city is often called “Leghorn” in English and gave its name to the leghorn breed of chicken, and by extension to the cartoon character known as Foghorn Leghorn.

48. Olive ___ : OYL
"Thimble Theater" was the precursor comic strip to the famous "Popeye" drawn by E. C. Segar. Before Popeye came into the story, the brother and sister characters Castor Oyl and Olive Oyl were the main protagonists. And then along comes a sailor ...

61. ___ Paulo : SAO
São Paulo is the largest city in Brazil. São Paulo is also the city with the highest number of helicopters in the world. This is partly driven by the horrendous traffic jams in São Paulo, but also by the wealthy having a very real fear of being kidnapped on the city's streets.

63. Contents of jewel cases : CDS
A CD case is also known as a jewel box, and I am not sure why ...

68. "Vive ___!" : LE ROI
“Vive le roi!” is French for “Long live the king!”

71. Brian of ambient music : ENO
Brian Eno started out his musical career with Roxy Music. However, Eno's most oft-played composition (by far!) is Microsoft's "start-up jingle", the 6-second sound you hear when the Windows operating system is booting up.

72. Big maker of 65-Down : RCA
During WWI, the US government actively discouraged the loss of certain technologies to other countries, including allies. The developing wireless technologies were considered to be particularly important by the army and navy. The government prevented the General Electric Company from selling equipment to the British Marconi Company, and instead facilitated the purchase by GE of the American Marconi subsidiary. This purchase led to GE forming the Radio Corporation of America that we know today as RCA.

75. Jewelry chain : ZALES
The first Zales jewelry store was opened by Morris and William Zale and Ben Lipshy in Wichita Falls, Texas, in 1924. Zales became successful largely by offering credit to their customers, a revolutionary concept at the time.

83. Braves' div. : NLE
The Atlanta Braves are the only team to have won baseball's World Series in three different home cities. They won as the Boston Braves in 1914, the Milwaukee Braves in 1957 and the Atlanta Braves in 1995.

84. High-performance cars : GTS
GT stands for "Grand Touring" or "Gran Turismo".

85. Bond girl Adams : MAUD
Maud Adams actually played two Bond girls, in "The Man with the Golden Gun" and "Octopussy", both times opposite Roger Moore as James Bond.

94. B-baller : CAGER
In the early days of basketball, when a ball went out of bounds possession was awarded to the player who first retrieved the ball. This led to mad scuffles off the court, often involving spectators. As the game became more organized courts were routinely "caged", largely because of this out of bounds rule, to limit interaction with the crowd. It's because of these cages that basketball players are sometimes referred to today as "cagers".

95. Small rented farms, in Britain : CROFTS
A croft is a small holding of land, one usually fenced off and including a dwelling. A croft is used by a crofter, someone who is typically a tenant farmer. The term “croft” is falling into disuse, but persists in the Scottish Highlands.

101. Terra ___ : COTTA
The name "terra cotta" comes to us from Latin via Italian and means "baked earth". Terra cotta is a ceramic made from clay which is left unglazed. Maybe the most famous work in terra cotta is the Terracotta Army, the enormous collection of life-size figures that was buried with the Qin Shi Huang, the First Emperor of China around 210 BC. I had the privilege of seeing some of this collection when it toured the US a few years ago, and just the few pieces on display were so very impressive.

102. "Aristotle Contemplating ___ of Homer" : A BUST
“Aristotle Contemplating a Bust of Homer” is an oil painting by Rembrandt. You can see this 1653 work at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art where it has been housed since 1961. The museum paid a record price of $2.3 million when it acquired the painting.

104. Legal scholar Guinier : LANI
Lani Guinier was the first African-American woman to achieve tenure at Harvard Law School.

105. Quaintly antique : OLDE
The word "olde" wasn't actually used much earlier than the 1920s. "Olde" was introduced to give a quaint antique feel to brand names, shop names etc.

109. Actress Lupino and others : IDAS
Actress Ida Lupino was also a successful director, in the days when women weren't very welcome behind the camera. Lupino had already directed four "women's" short films when she stepped in to direct the 1953 drama "The Hitch-Hiker", taking over when the original director became ill. "The Hitch-Hiker" was the first film noir movie to be directed by a woman, and represented somewhat of a breakthrough for women in the industry.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. [It's gone!] : POOF
5. A pop group might have one on Facebook : FAN CLUB
12. Pouch : SAC
15. 64 or 1,000 : CUBE
19. Head of a family : CAPO
20. Woodcutter of legend : ALI BABA
21. Rings : ENCLOSES
23. Consideration in choosing a deli? : THE LOX FACTOR (the X factor)
25. Without rhyme or reason : AT RANDOM
26. Baby pig, e.g. : SUCKLER
27. Name part meaning "from" : VAN
28. Part of a butcher's stand-up routine? : LOIN JOKE (in joke)
29. Camouflage : HIDE
30. Sharpness : BITE
31. French wave : ONDE
32. Pallid : ASHEN
35. Laundry basket of just colors or just whites? : CLASSIFIED LOAD (classified ad)
41. ___-Pei (dog breed) : SHAR
42. Reqmt. for certain graduate studies : LSAT
44. Get an ___ effort : A FOR
45. Actress Sommer : ELKE
46. Wise lawmaker most likely to be re-elected? : FAVORITE SOLON (favorite son)
51. Miniature : DWARF
52. Protestant denom. : AME
53. Anthony Eden, Earl of ___ : AVON
54. Red-berried tree : YEW
55. French spouse : MARI
58. Rock's ___ Fighters : FOO
59. Seeks, as office : RUNS FOR
61. Artistic expression on the slopes? : SLALOM DANCING (slam dancing)
64. Levels : STRATA
66. Thrust upward : HEAVED
67. Causing Election Day delays? : SLOWING VOTERS (swing voters)
73. Car category : MIDSIZE
77. Skin growth : WEN
78. Negatives : NOES
79. Time ___ : INC
80. Mideast capital : SANA
81. Dallas player, for short : MAV
82. Jungle critter : ORANG
84. Chart indicating the progression of darkness after sunset? : GLOAMING TABLE (gaming table)
87. Disturb : ROIL
88. Sched. listing : APPT
91. Eve preceders : AFTS
92. Boy: Lat. : PUER
93. Power in Hollywood? : DIRECTOR’S CLOUT (director’s cut)
98. "Don't be ___" : A PEST
99. Caught in ___ : A LIE
100. Thick skin : RIND
101. Prop for Mr. Monopoly or Mr. Peanut : CANE
103. Paintball weapons? : BLOB GUNS (BB guns)
107. Voluminous ref. : OED
108. Comes by : OBTAINS
112. Salsa specification : CALIENTE
113. When there might be a two-for-one special on ice cream drinks? : FLOAT TUESDAY (Fat Tuesday)
116. Beat in a price war : UNDERCUT
117. Props for Mr. Monopoly and Mr. Peanut : TOP HATS
118. Make : EARN
119. Building support : PIER
120. Some printers : HPS
121. Curse : SWEAR AT
122. Mil. awards : DSCS

Down
1. Loan figs. : PCTS
2. Nuuanu Pali Lookout locale : OAHU
3. Grp. that has held summit meetings in Caracas and Riyadh : OPEC
4. Paul Bunyan, e.g. : FOLK HERO
5. Used a FedEx Office service : FAXED
6. Actress Woodard : ALFRE
7. Actress Vardalos : NIA
8. Source of northern exposure? : CBC
9. Belarus neighbor : LATVIA
10. Old minelayers : U-BOATS
11. Critic Clive : BARNES
12. Quarantine : SEAL OFF
13. Composer Salieri : ANTONIO
14. 1957 #1 R&B hit for Chuck Willis : CC RIDER
15. Or or nor: Abbr. : CONJ
16. "Let ___ good unto all men": Galatians 6:10 : US DO
17. Suffice : BE OK
18. Salinger girl : ESME
22. Like superhighways : LANED
24. Actress Lena : OLIN
30. Counter orders : BLTS
32. To the same extent : AS FAR
33. SeaWorld attraction : SHAMU
34. Offshore bank, e.g., for tax purposes : HAVEN
35. Normandy campaign city : CAEN
36. Writer Fleming : IAN
37. Writer Wallace : LEW
38. 11th-century king of Denmark : OLAF I
39. City on the Little Cuyahoga : AKRON
40. Clear, in a way : DEFOG
42. Italian port on the Tyrrhenian Sea : LIVORNO
43. Attic's purpose : STORAGE
47. Sport involving paddles : RAFTING
48. Olive ___ : OYL
49. Grazing area : LEA
50. "Wise" one : OWL
51. Patronized, as a restaurant : DINED AT
55. Fr. title : MME
56. Unyielding : ADAMANT
57. Lunatics' outbursts : RAVINGS
60. Denver-to-Albuquerque dir. : SSW
61. ___ Paulo : SAO
62. Quaker cereal : OH’S
63. Contents of jewel cases : CDS
65. Ones going through channels? : TVS
67. Fencing unit? : SWORD
68. "Vive ___!" : LE ROI
69. Kind of personality : ON-AIR
70. Up to, briefly : TIL
71. Brian of ambient music : ENO
72. Big maker of 65-Down : RCA
74. Permeate : IMBUE
75. Jewelry chain : ZALES
76. Turn inside out : EVERT
80. Separate out : SIFT
83. Braves' div. : NLE
84. High-performance cars : GTS
85. Bond girl Adams : MAUD
86. Given enough to be happy : APPEASED
88. Out around midday, say : AT LUNCH
89. Emphasize : POINT UP
90. Some car radio buttons : PRESETS
94. B-baller : CAGER
95. Small rented farms, in Britain : CROFTS
96. Keep out of sight : LIE LOW
97. High, in a way : ON DOPE
98. Pay for a hand : ANTE
101. Terra ___ : COTTA
102. "Aristotle Contemplating ___ of Homer" : A BUST
103. Certain bra specification : B-CUP
104. Legal scholar Guinier : LANI
105. Quaintly antique : OLDE
106. German quaff : BIER
109. Actress Lupino and others : IDAS
110. Undercover agent : NARC
111. Bits and pieces, e.g.: Abbr. : SYNS
114. "That's it!" : AHA
115. Roofing material : TAR

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Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost everyday as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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