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Greetings from Dundalk, County Louth in Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland, and have extended my stay until October 24th. I am focused on getting the puzzle solved and at least a basic post up each day. It's proving to be difficult to do much more than that due to pressure of time, which I am sure you can understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

1216-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 16 Dec 12, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Matt Ginsberg
THEME: Hearing Double … the theme answers today are all 3-word homonyms of fairly well-known phrases:
23A. Souvenir from the Petrified Forest? : WOOD YOU MINED (Would you mind?)
29A. What randy bucks do? : NEED THE DOE (knead the dough)
31A. Agreement from the Gipper's coach? : AYE OF KNUTE (“eye of newt”)
42A. Plucky housekeeper? : MAID OF METTLE (made of metal)
56A. "Well done, Sir Lancelot," in Franglais? : C’EST GOOD, KNIGHT (say goodnight)
64A. Soothsayer's shoelace problem? : KNOT FOR PROPHET (not for profit)
78A. Shorten a bar mitzvah by 50%? : HALVE THE RITE (have the right)
93A. Polar explorer, after getting religion? : BYRD OF PRAY (bird of prey)
95A. Tagline for the biopic "Dudley" starring bandleader Brown? : LES IS MOORE (less is more)
101A. Where Macy's keeps the wedding dresses? : AISLE OF WHITE (Isle of Wight)
3D. Book about the writing style of the Mongols? : PROSE AND KHANS (pros and cons)
54D. Abdicated? : THREW THE REIGN ("Through the Rain")
COMPLETION TIME: 26m 55s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … OLMOS (Olmes), ALIOTO (Alieto)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Food that jiggles : ASPIC
"Aspic" is a French word for "jelly".

20. First U.S. screen portrayer of Dr. Fu Manchu : OLAND
Warner Oland was a Swedish actor, best remembered for his portrayal of Charlie Chan in a series of 16 highly successful Hollywood movies. Before playing Charlie Chan, Oland made a name for himself playing another Asian role on screen, that of Dr. Fu Manchu.

23. Souvenir from the Petrified Forest? : WOOD YOU MINED (Would you mind?)
Petrified Forest National Park is in northeastern Arizona. The park is so named as it is home to large deposits of petrified wood. Petrified wood is the fossilized remains of vegetation.

27. Two-fifths of 'N Sync? : ENS
There are two letters N in “‘N Sync”.

'N Sync was a boy band from Orlando, Florida that was formed in 1995. The name of the group came from a comment by the mother of band member Justin Timberlake, who said the boys voices sounded "in sync". But, it's also true that the letters of the name 'N Sync are the last letters of the given names of the five band members:
- Justin Timberlake
- Chris Kirkpatrick
- Joey Fatone
- Lance "Lansten" Bass
- JC Chasez

28. Actor Edward James ___ : OLMOS
Edward James Olmos is a Mexican American actor. I mostly remember Olmos as the Lieutenant who was the boss of Crockett and Tubbs on television’s “Miami Vice”.

31. Agreement from the Gipper's coach? : AYE OF KNUTE (“eye of newt”)
George Gipp was Notre Dame’s first All-American football player. Just two weeks after getting the award, Gipp (aka “The Gipper”) developed pneumonia and died. Famously, on his deathbed he told the Notre Dame coach Knute Rockne to “win just one for the Gipper”. Ronald Reagan used that same line a lot in his political campaigns, as the actor-turned-politician played the Gipper in the movie “Knute Rockne, All American”.

The witches in Shakespeare's "Macbeth" have some lovely lines as they cast a spell:
Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
Adder's fork, and blind-worm's sting,
Lizard's leg, and howlet's wing,--
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.

35. Force : DINT
A "dint" is an effort or power, as in "he made it by dint of hard work". "By dint of" is a new expression to me, but it has been around since the early 1300s. I must have been out that day ...

37. What mayo is part of : ANO
May (mayo) is one of the months in the Spanish year (año).

38. Tolkien trilogy, to fans : LOTR
J. R. R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings” is the second best-selling novel ever written, with only “A Tale of Two Cities” by Charles Dickens having sold more copies around the world. Remarkably I think, the third best-selling novel was also written by Tolkien, namely “The Hobbit”.

39. Measure of purity : KARAT
A karat (also “carat”, the spelling outside of North America) is a measure of the purity of gold alloys, with 24-karat representing pure gold.

40. Knobby : NODOSE
Something that is “nodose” is very knobby, has lots of “nodes”.

45. Drama set at the Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce ad agency : MAD MEN
If you haven't seen the AMC show "Mad Men" then I urge you to go buy the first season on DVD and allow yourself to get addicted. It is a great series set in the sixties, telling all that goes on in and around the advertising business on Madison Avenue in New York City. It brings you right back to the days of three-martini lunches, office affairs, and chain-smoking of cigarettes. Great stuff ...

47. Nautical direction : ALEE
"Alee" is the direction away from the wind. On the other hand, if a sailor points into the wind then he or she is pointing "aweather".

55. Some salmon : COHOS
The Coho salmon is silver along the side of its body, but only during the phase of its life while it is in the ocean. When spawning and heading up into a freshwater river, the Coho has bright red sides.

56. "Well done, Sir Lancelot," in Franglais? : C’EST GOOD, KNIGHT (say goodnight)
The slang portmanteau “Franglais” is used in both English and in French, but tends to have different meanings in each language. In English, “Franglais” describes the often-humorous combination of English and French words, as in “Je suis tired” and “Je ne care pas”. In France, “Franglais” refers to the unwelcome importation of English words into the French language, as in “le week-end” and “un parking”.

59. Python in "The Jungle Book" : KAA
Kaa is the python character in Rudyard Kipling’s “The Jungle Book”.

"The Jungle Book" by Rudyard Kipling was originally published in 1894, and is a collection of adventure stories or fables featuring the animals of the jungle and a young boy called Mowgli. Baloo is a sloth bear who teaches the cubs of a wolf pack the Law of the Jungle. His most challenging pupil however is no lupine, but the man-cub Mowgli.

60. Handel bars? : ARIA
George Frideric Handel was the King of the Oratorio. Handel's most famous oratorio is "Messiah", which had its debut perfromance in Dublin, Ireland, back in 1742.

72. Pleasure boats : SLOOPS
Sloops and cutters are sailboats, and each has just one mast. One major difference between the two types of vessel is that the mast on a cutter is set much further aft than the mast on a sloop.

75. ___ Jima : IWO
Iwo Jima is a volcanic island located south of Tokyo that today is uninhabited. There were about a thousand Japanese civilians living on the island prior to WWII. In 1944, there was a massive influx of Japanese military personnel in anticipation of the inevitable US invasion. As the Japanese military moved in, the civilians were forced out and no one has lived there ever since.

76. Stage assistant : GRIP
On a film set, grips are the lighting and rigging technicians, with the key grip being the name given to the leader of the whole team. The first “grips” were technicians that worked in the circus in its early days. The name “grip” possibly comes from the bags called grips. in which the technicians carried their tools.

78. Shorten a bar mitzvah by 50%? : HALVE THE RITE (have the right)
A Jewish girl becomes a Bat Mitzvah at 12 years of age, the age at which she becomes responsible for her actions. Boys become Bar Mitzvahs at 13. The terms translate into English as daughter and son of the commandments.

85. Qatari bigwig: Var. : AMEER
An emir is a prince or chieftain, most notably in the Middle East. In English, “emir” can also be written as “amir” and “ameer” (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

Qatar is a sovereign state in the Middle East occupying the Qatar Peninsula, itself located in the Arabian Peninsula. Qatar lies on the Persian Gulf and shares one land border, with Saudi Arabia to the south. Qatar has more oil and gas reserves per capita of population than any other country in the world. In 2010, Qatar had the fastest growing economy in the world, driven by the petrochemical industry.

87. London can : LOO
When I was growing up in Ireland, a "bathroom" was a room that had a bath and no toilet. The separate room with the commode was called "the toilet" or sometimes the W.C. (the water closet). Apparently the term closet was used because in the 1800s when homeowners started installing toilets indoors they often displaced clothes and linens in a "closet", as a closet was the right size to take the commode. It has been suggested that the British term "loo" comes from Waterloo (water-closet ... water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure. Another suggestion is that the term comes from the card game of "lanterloo" in which the pot was called the loo!

88. Alpine wind : FOEHN
A foehn wind is a dry wind that comes off the downwind side of a mountain range. The air is dry as the wind has lost its moisture by being forced upwards as it hit the upwind side of the mountains.

92. Memo opener : IN RE
The term "in re" is Latin, derived from "in" (in) and "res" (thing, matter). "In re" literally means "in the matter", and is used to mean "in regard to", or "in the matter of".

93. Polar explorer, after getting religion? : BYRD OF PRAY (bird of prey)
Rear Admiral Richard Byrd was an officer in the US Navy, famous as an aviator and explorer of the polar regions. Byrd was the first person to cross the South Pole by air, in 1929. Three years earlier, Byrd claimed he had flown over the North Pole, and would have been the first person to have done so if this was true. But whether or not Byrd actually made it over the North Pole continues to be the subject of much debate.

95. Tagline for the biopic "Dudley" starring bandleader Brown? : LES IS MOORE (less is more)
Les Brown and His Band of Renown are a big band that started to perform in the late thirties and are still going strong today. Les Brown led the band from the start, and worked with the likes of Doris Day, Bob Hope and Tony Bennett. Brown passed away in 2001, and the band is now led by his son Les Brown, Jr.

The comic actor Dudley Moore was perhaps most famous in his homeland of the UK as half of a groundbreaking double act called simply Peter Cook and Dudley Moore. Relatively late in his career, Moore broke into Hollywood with a supporting role in “Foul Play” (1978) and leading roles in “10” (1979) and “Arthur” (1981). Moore was also a highly accomplished piano player and gave many concert performances.

99. Freddy Krueger's street : ELM
Freddy Krueger is the creepy serial killer in the “A Nightmare on Elm Street” movies. Krueger has a burned and disfigured face, wears a brown fedora and a leather glove with metal razors that he uses to kill his victims during their nightmares. He is played by the actor Robert Englund in all of the films.

101. Where Macy's keeps the wedding dresses? : AISLE OF WHITE (Isle of Wight)
The Isle of Wight is the largest island in England, and lies about five miles off the south coast of the country.

105. Wimple wearer : NUN
A wimple is a garment worn mainly in medieval Europe by women. The wimple covers the back of the head, neck and chin. It was tradition back then for genteel women to cover their hair. In modern times, habits worn by nuns include wimples.

106. Home to the 90-Down, once : SHEA
Shea Stadium in Flushing Meadows, New York was named after William A. Shea, the man credited with bringing National League baseball back to the city in the form of the New York Mets. Shea Stadium was dismantled (not imploded) in 2008-2009, and the site now provides additional parking for the new stadium that's nearby called Citi Field.

109. Popular smartphone app : GPS
GPS stands for Global Positioning System. The modern GPS system that we use today was built by the US military who received the massive funding needed because of fears during the Cold War of the use of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles. We civilians, all round the world, owe a lot to President Ronald Reagan because he directed the military to make GPS technology available to the public for the common good. President Reagan was moved to do so after the Soviet Union shot down KAL flight 007 carrying 269 people, just because the plane strayed accidentally into Soviet airspace.

111. Guitarist Duane and others : EDDYS
Duane Eddy is a rock and roll guitarist from Corning, New York.

Down
2. André and Mia's adoptive daughter : SOON-YI
Soon-Yi Previn is the adopted daughter of actress Mia Farrow and pianist/conductor André Previn. After Farrow and Previn divorced, Farrow started seeing famed movie director Woody Allen. That relationship ended when Farrow discovered that Allen was having an affair with her daughter Soon-Yi. Woody Allen and Soon-Yi Previn were married in 1997.

3. Book about the writing style of the Mongols? : PROSE AND KHANS (pros and cons)
The Mongols are an ethnic group that is found today in modern Mongolia, in China and in Russia.

4. Iraq war hazard, briefly : IED
Sadly, having spent much of my life in the border areas between southern and Northern Ireland, I am all too familiar with the devastating effects of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs). No matter what one's politics, one has to admire the bravery of soldiers who spend their careers defusing (or attempting to defuse) such devices in order to save the lives and property of others. Of course these days IEDs are very much in the news in Iraq and Afghanistan.

5. Small, low island : CAY
A "key" (also "cay") is a low island offshore, as in the Florida Keys. Our term in English comes from the Spanish "cayo" meaning "shoal, reef".

7. Former San Francisco mayor : ALIOTO
Joseph Alioto was the 36th mayor of San Francisco, serving from 1968 to 1976.

8. Stately home : MANSE
A manse is a minister’s home in various Christian traditions. "Manse" derives from "mansus", the Latin for “dwelling”. The term can also be used for any stately residence.

10. Postscript: Abbr. : ADDN
One adds a PS (post scriptum, or simply "postscript") at the end of a letter. A second postscript is a post post scriptum, a PPS.

11. Former attorney general Gonzales : ALBERTO
Alberto Gonzales served as US Attorney General in the administration of President George W. Bush. Having held that office, Gonzales was the highest-ranking Hispanic in the executive branch of the US government to date.

12. Kind of salad : WALDORF
As one might expect, the Waldorf salad was first created at the Waldorf Hotel in New York City (now the Waldorf-Astoria), back in the 1890s. The classic version of the Waldorf salad is made from apples, celery and walnuts dressed in mayonnaise and served on a bed of lettuce. Anyone who is a fan of the BBC sitcom “Fawlty Towers” will remember how much trouble Basil Fawlty had coming up with a Waldorf salad for an American guest, as the kitchen was “out of Waldorfs” …

13. Steve ___, 1980 Olympic track champion : OVETT
Steve Ovett is a retired British middle distance runner from England, a gold medal winner in the 1980 Olympics in Moscow. Ovett had a very public rivalry with fellow English Olympian Sebastian Coe.

17. Leopard spot : ROSETTE
The clusters of spots (not the individual spots) on a leopard and other spotted mammals are known as rosettes.

24. Bones next to humeri : ULNAS
The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the "thumb-side" of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the "pinkie-side".

The humerus is the long bone in the upper arm.

30. Horatian piece : EPODE
An epode is a lyric poem made up of couplets in which the first line is long, and the second line much shorter. The form was invented by the Greek poet Archilochus, and was most famously used by the Roman poet Horace.

One of Ancient Rome's leading lyric poets was Quintus Horatius Flaccus, or "Horace" as we tend to know him.

32. Balcony cry : O ROMEO
In the balcony scene in Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”, Juliet utters the famous line:
O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo?
Every schoolkid must have commented with a giggle “he’s down in the garden!” Of course, “wherefore” isn’t an archaic word for “where”, but rather an old way of saying “why”. So Juliet is asking, “Why art thou Romeo, a Montague, and hence a sworn enemy of the Capulets?”

39. Alaska's ___ Peninsula : KENAI
The Kenai Peninsula juts out into the Gulf of Alaska from Alaska’s southern coast. The Kenai Peninsula is home to several towns, including Homer, Alaska. Home is nicknamed “the end of the road” as it is a terminus for North America’s paved highway system.

43. Sacha Baron Cohen persona : ALI G
Ali G is a fictional character created by British comedian Sacha Baron Cohen. Baron Cohen achieved international fame playing another of his personae, Borat, the protagonist in the 2006 movie "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan".

44. Who wrote "A bear, however hard he tries, / Grows tubby without exercise" : MILNE
Alan Alexander (A.A.) Milne was an English author, best known for his delightful "Winnie-the-Pooh" series of books. He had only one son, Christopher Robin Milne, born in 1920. The young Milne was the inspiration for the Christopher Robin character in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Winnie-the-Pooh was named after Christopher Robin's real teddy bear, one he called Winnie, who in turn was named after a Canadian black bear called Winnie that the Milnes would visit in London Zoo. The original Winnie teddy bear is on permanent display at the main branch of the New York Public Library in New York.

45. Big truck maker : MACK
Mack Trucks were started by John Mack in the early 1900s, after he had spent some years working in companies that made carriages and electric motor cars. Along with his two brothers, Mack started their company to focus on building heavy-duty trucks and engines.

52. Psychology pioneer Alfred : ADLER
Alfred Adler was one of the group of medical professionals that founded the psychoanalytic movement. Today Adler is less famous than his colleague, Sigmund Freud.

53. Trick-taking card game : SKAT
When I was a teenager in Ireland, I had a friend with a German father. The father taught us the game of Skat, and what a great game it is. Skat originated in Germany in the 1800s and is to this day the most popular game in the country. I haven't played it in decades, but would love to play it again ...

54. Abdicated? : THREW THE REIGN (“Through the Rain”)
“Through the Rain” is a song co-written and recorded by Mariah Carey in 2002.

56. Photoshop command : CROP
Photoshop is a wonderful piece of software used for editing graphics. When I first bought it, it was really expensive (about $300, ten years ago), but now there are cost-effective, stripped-down versions available.

57. Locale of a 12/7/1941 attack : OAHU
As a result of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1945, 2,402 people were killed. 1,117 of the victims died on the USS Arizona.

58. Funny Fields : TOTIE
Totie Fields was the stage name of comedienne Sophie Feldman. “Totie” is a corruption of “Sophie” and was the nickname she was given as a child.

69. One of five Nicholases : POPE
There have been five popes who have taken the name Nicholas. Pope Nicholas V was in office from 1447 until he died in 1455. Just over a hundred years earlier, there had been an antipope who took the name Nicholas V. An antipope was someone who had significant support within the Roman Catholic Church and who made a competing claim in opposition to the legitimately elected pope. Antipope Nicholas V was consecrated at Old St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome during the pontificate of Pope John XXII who resided in Avignon in France.

71. Words from Sgt. Friday : I’M A COP
Jack Webb played Sergeant Joe Friday on "Dragnet" on both TV and radio ... and what a voice he had! Off the screen Webb was a lover of jazz, and he played the cornet. It was within the world of jazz that he met and fell in love with Julie London, the famous singer with "the smoky voice". The couple married and had two kids together.

74. U.K. mil. decoration : DSO
The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a British military award, usually presented to officers with the rank of Major or higher.

76. Feminist Germaine : GREER
Germaine Greer is a very outspoken Australian feminist who was catapulted into the limelight with her runaway bestseller "The Female Eunuch", first published in 1970. Greer has lived in the UK for many years, and I see her a lot on British television news/panel shows. Apparently she also made what I would have thought is an odd choice for her, to appear on the UK version of "Celebrity Big Brother". Mind you, she walked out of the house after just five days.

82. Fergie, for one : EX-ROYAL
Sarah Ferguson married Prince Andrew of the British Royal Family in 1986 and on the occasion of the wedding, Andrew and Sarah were made Duke and Duchess of York. Sarah Ferguson was in the news not that long ago when she was the target of a sting operation by a British tabloid newspaper. She was caught asking for 500,000 British pounds in order to help facilitate access to her ex-husband, Prince Andrew, and actually accepted 40,000 pounds in an envelope. After being exposed, Ferguson made the excuse that she had been drinking prior to soliciting the cash.

83. Bygone bookstore chain : BORDERS
Borders bookstores aren’t around anymore, having gone bankrupt in 2011. The first Borders bookstore was opened in Ann Arbor, Michigan in 1971 by brothers Tom and Louis Borders.

84. Bull session? : RODEO
"Rodeo” is a Spanish word, which is usually translated as “round up”.

87. Inspector in Elizabeth George mysteries : LYNLEY
“The Inspector Lynley Mysteries” is a entertaining BBC series that is based on mystery novels written by Elizabeth George. The stories are all set in Great Britain, although Elizabeth George is an American writer based here in California.

90. See 106-Across : NY METS
The New York Mets baseball team was founded in 1962, a replacement for two teams that the city had lost, namely the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants. For several years the Mets played very poorly, finishing no better than second-to-last in their division. Then of course along came the “Miracle Mets” who beat the Baltimore Orioles in 1969 to claim the World Series in a huge upset.

92. "___ Only One" (Melissa Etheridge hit) : I’M THE
Melissa Etheridge is rock singer and songwriter. Etheridge is a vocal supporter of gay rights, having come out as a lesbian in 1993. Her partner gave birth to two children using sperm donated by singer David Crosby.

94. "Antigonae" composer Carl : ORFF
Carl Orff was a German composer whose most famous piece of music is the dramatic cantata from 1937 called "Carmina Burana".

96. Miss America identifier : SASH
The Miss America Pageant started out as a beauty contest in 1921. The event was held in Atlantic City, New Jersey and was an attempt to retain tourists following the Labor Day weekend.

104. Charlemagne's realm: Abbr. : HRE
Pepin the Short was Duke of the Franks from 751 to 768. Pepin expanded the Frankish Empire and then law dictated that he had to leave the Empire divided between his two sons, Carloman I and Charlemagne. Carloman I was given lands that were centered around Paris, and Charlemagne was given lands that completely surrounded his brothers territory. So it fell to Charlemagne to defend and extend the borders of the empire. It is because of this division of power that it's Charlemagne who we read about today, not Carloman I. It was Emperor Charlemagne who in effect founded the Holy Roman Empire.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Food that jiggles : ASPIC
6. "Along ___ spider ..." : CAME A
11. Gone, but not forgotten : AWOL
15. Horizontal: Abbr. : ACR
18. Ticked by : SORE AT
20. First U.S. screen portrayer of Dr. Fu Manchu : OLAND
21. Dangerous outpouring : LAVA
22. Overly : TOO
23. Souvenir from the Petrified Forest? : WOOD YOU MINED (Would you mind?)
25. Priests, at times : BLESSERS
27. Two-fifths of 'N Sync? : ENS
28. Actor Edward James ___ : OLMOS
29. What randy bucks do? : NEED THE DOE (knead the dough)
31. Agreement from the Gipper's coach? : AYE OF KNUTE (“eye of newt”)
34. Luth. or Presb. : PROT
35. Force : DINT
36. Crowning touch? : TIARA
37. What mayo is part of : ANO
38. Tolkien trilogy, to fans : LOTR
39. Measure of purity : KARAT
40. Knobby : NODOSE
42. Plucky housekeeper? : MAID OF METTLE (made of metal)
45. Drama set at the Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce ad agency : MAD MEN
47. Nautical direction : ALEE
48. Pasta suffix : -INI
49. Inquirers : ASKERS
50. Words before coming or made : HAS IT
52. Inclined : ASLANT
55. Some salmon : COHOS
56. "Well done, Sir Lancelot," in Franglais? : C’EST GOOD, KNIGHT (say goodnight)
59. Python in "The Jungle Book" : KAA
60. Handel bars? : ARIA
61. Wings: Lat. : ALAE
62. Lightning ___ : ROD
64. Soothsayer's shoelace problem? : KNOT FOR PROPHET (not for profit)
70. Link up with : TIE TO
72. Pleasure boats : SLOOPS
73. Affair of the heart : AMOUR
74. Chucklehead : DIMWIT
75. ___ Jima : IWO
76. Stage assistant : GRIP
77. Outpourings : SPATES
78. Shorten a bar mitzvah by 50%? : HALVE THE RITE (have the right)
83. Decorative pin : BROOCH
85. Qatari bigwig: Var. : AMEER
86. Ones with a lot of pull? : OXEN
87. London can : LOO
88. Alpine wind : FOEHN
91. Literally, "itself" : IPSO
92. Memo opener : IN RE
93. Polar explorer, after getting religion? : BYRD OF PRAY (bird of prey)
95. Tagline for the biopic "Dudley" starring bandleader Brown? : LES IS MOORE (less is more)
98. Out at the dentist's? : UNDER
99. Freddy Krueger's street : ELM
100. Ten Commandments no-no : IDOLATRY
101. Where Macy's keeps the wedding dresses? : AISLE OF WHITE (Isle of Wight)
105. Wimple wearer : NUN
106. Home to the 90-Down, once : SHEA
107. Nasty look : SNEER
108. "___ it!" : FORGET
109. Popular smartphone app : GPS
110. Dog command : HEEL
111. Guitarist Duane and others : EDDYS
112. Makes, as one's way : WENDS

Down
1. What one may break during exercise : A SWEAT
2. André and Mia's adoptive daughter : SOON-YI
3. Book about the writing style of the Mongols? : PROSE AND KHANS (pros and cons)
4. Iraq war hazard, briefly : IED
5. Small, low island : CAY
6. Be at one (with) : COMMUNE
7. Former San Francisco mayor : ALIOTO
8. Stately home : MANSE
9. K.C.-to-Chicago direction : ENE
10. Postscript: Abbr. : ADDN
11. Former attorney general Gonzales : ALBERTO
12. Kind of salad : WALDORF
13. Steve ___, 1980 Olympic track champion : OVETT
14. Stinging rebuke : LASH
15. Was humbled : ATE DIRT
16. Like the ring in an eclipse : CORONAL
17. Leopard spot : ROSETTE
19. Scammed : TOOK
24. Bones next to humeri : ULNAS
26. Tranquilizing : SEDATING
30. Horatian piece : EPODE
32. Balcony cry : O ROMEO
33. Soundboard controls : FADERS
38. Deliberately delude : LIE TO
39. Alaska's ___ Peninsula : KENAI
41. Walk-___ (non-recruited athletes) : ONS
42. It may be rigged : MAST
43. Sacha Baron Cohen persona : ALI G
44. Who wrote "A bear, however hard he tries, / Grows tubby without exercise" : MILNE
45. Big truck maker : MACK
46. Have ___ (bathe) : A SOAK
50. Willing recipients? : HEIRS
51. Urgently : ASAP
52. Psychology pioneer Alfred : ADLER
53. Trick-taking card game : SKAT
54. Abdicated? : THREW THE REIGN ("Through the Rain")
56. Photoshop command : CROP
57. Locale of a 12/7/1941 attack : OAHU
58. Funny Fields : TOTIE
60. Just begun : AFOOT
63. Freckles, e.g. : DOTS
65. Salad bar supply : OLIVE OIL
66. Castle component : TOWER
67. ___ to go : RARIN’
68. Drop : OMIT
69. One of five Nicholases : POPE
70. Start of a basketball game : TIP-OFF
71. Words from Sgt. Friday : I’M A COP
74. U.K. mil. decoration : DSO
76. Feminist Germaine : GREER
78. Raining hard? : HAILING
79. Totally jazzed : AMPED UP
80. Some scriptural passages : LESSONS
81. 74-Down recipient, e.g. : HONOREE
82. Fergie, for one : EX-ROYAL
83. Bygone bookstore chain : BORDERS
84. Bull session? : RODEO
87. Inspector in Elizabeth George mysteries : LYNLEY
89. Obeyed a sentry, say : HALTED
90. See 106-Across : NY METS
92. "___ Only One" (Melissa Etheridge hit) : I’M THE
93. Cleared the dishes : BUSED
94. "Antigonae" composer Carl : ORFF
96. Miss America identifier : SASH
97. Allay : EASE
102. Neither Dem. nor Rep. : IND
103. Knock over : WOW
104. Charlemagne's realm: Abbr. : HRE

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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