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1001-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Oct 12, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Susan Gelfand
THEME: MADE THE A-LIST … each of the theme answers is a celebrity with the initials “AA”:
20A. Second first lady : ABIGAIL ADAMS
28A. American Dance Theater founder : ALVIN AILEY
35A. Oscar-winning actor for "Little Miss Sunshine" : ALAN ARKIN
48A. Tennis champion with a stadium named after him : ARTHUR ASHE
56A. Achieved great fame ... or what 20-, 28-, 35- and 48-Across did? : MADE THE A-LIST
COMPLETION TIME: 5m 13s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Muslim pilgrim's destination : MECCA
Mecca is in the Makkah province of Saudi Arabia and is the holiest city in Islam. Every year several million Muslims perform the Hajj, a holy pilgrimage to Mecca.

6. Indian prince : RAJA
"Raja" is an Indian word for "monarch".

10. Kemo ___ : SABE
“Kemosabe” is a term used by the Tonto character in the iconic radio and television program “The Lone Ranger”. “Kemosabe” doesn't really mean anything outside of the show, and in fact was written as “ke-mo sah-bee” in the original radio show scripts. The term was created by longtime director of “The Lone Ranger”, Jim Jewell. To come up with the term, Jewell used the name of a boy’s camp that his father-in-law established called Kamp Kee-Mo Sah-Bee.

14. Map collection : ATLAS
We call a book of maps an “atlas” after a collection of maps published by the famous Flemish geographer Gerhadus Mercator. Mercator's collection contained a frontispiece with an image of Atlas the Titan from Greek mythology holding up the world on his shoulders. That image gave us our term "atlas".

19. Watch chains : FOBS
A fob is attached to another object to make access to it easier. And so a key fob is a chain attached to a key so that it can be retrieved easily. There are also watch fobs, of course.

20. Second first lady : ABIGAIL ADAMS
Abigail Adams had a unique distinction being married to John Adams. Abigail was the first Second Lady of the US, and then became the second First Lady!

28. American Dance Theater founder : ALVIN AILEY
Alvin Ailey was a dancer who formed his own group in New York in 1958, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. The most famous work that Ailey choreographed was called “Revelations”.

33. Part of the eye around the pupil : IRIS
The iris is the colored part of the eye with an aperture in the center that can open or close depending on the level of light hitting the eye.

35. Oscar-winning actor for "Little Miss Sunshine" : ALAN ARKIN
The actor Alan Arkin won his only Oscar (Best Supporting Actor) for his role in "Little Miss Sunshine" from 2006, a movie I just did not understand ...

40. K2 and Kilimanjaro: Abbr. : MTS
K2 is the second highest mountain on the planet (at 28, 251 ft), with Mount Everest being higher by over 700 feet. K2 is known the "Savage Mountain" as it is relatively difficult to climb, having claimed 1 in 4 mountaineers who have attempted to reach the summit. It has never been climbed in winter. The name K2 dates back to what was called the Great Trigonometric Survey, a British survey of the geography of India carried out during the 19th century. Included in this survey were the heights of many of the Himalayan peaks, including Everest. The original surveyor, a Thomas Montgomerie, included two peaks he first called K1 and K2. He discovered later that the locals called K1 Masherbrum (the 22nd highest mountain in the world), but the remote K2 had no local name that he could find, so it was christened Mount Godwin-Austen. This name was rejected by the Royal Geographic Society although it does still appear on some maps. So, the most common name used is K2, that original notation in a surveyor's notebook.

Kilimanjaro is a dormant volcano in Tanzania, and is the highest mountain in the whole of Africa. I was having lunch recently with the parents of my son’s girlfriend. The young lady’s mother casually mentioned in the conversation that she summited Kilimanjaro last year. I paid for lunch …

43. Pitcher Hershiser : OREL
Orel Hershiser is big into poker now that he has retired from Major League Baseball. He lives in Las Vegas, and when he isn't working for ESPN, apparently he is at the poker tables at least five times a week.

48. Tennis champion with a stadium named after him : ARTHUR ASHE
Arthur Ashe was a professional tennis player from Richmond, Virginia. In his youth, Ashe found himself having to travel great distances to play against Caucasian opponents due to the segregation that still existed in his home state. He was rewarded for his dedication by being selected for the 1963 US Davis Cup team, the first African American player to be so honored. Ashe continued to run into trouble because of his ethnicity though, and in 1968 was denied entry into South Africa to play in the South African Open. In 1979 Ashe suffered a heart attack and had bypass surgery, with follow-up surgery four years later during which he contracted HIV from blood transfusions. Ashe passed away in 1993 due to complications from AIDS. Shortly afterwards, Ashe was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton.

52. ___ the Impaler : VLAD
Vlad III was a 15th century ruler in modern-day Bulgaria. He was given the name “Vlad the Impaler” after he died, and this suggests that he was in the habit of impaling his enemies. His father, Vlad II, was known as Vlad Dracul, which translates as Vlad the Devil or Dragon. As a result, Vlad the Impaler was also known by the diminutive form of his father’s name i.e. Dracula! Bram Stoker borrowed this name for his famous 1897 novel titled “Dracula”.

53. Largest asteroid in the solar system : CERES
Ceres is the smallest dwarf planet in our solar system. Ceres was discovered in 1801 and is the largest body in the asteroid belt. For fifty years Ceres was classified as the eighth planet circling our sun.

54. Digestion aids : ENZYMES
Enzymes are basically catalysts, chemicals that act to increase the rate of a particular chemical reaction. For example, starches will break down into sugars over time, especially under the right conditions. However, in the presence of the enzyme amylase (found in saliva) this production of sugar happens very, very quickly.

60. Erica who wrote "Fear of Flying" : JONG
The author Erica Jong’s most famous work is her first, “Fear of Flying”, a novel published in 1973. Over twenty years later she wrote “Fear of Fifty: a midlife memoir”, published in 1994.

61. Winter frost : HOAR
The Old English word "har" meant "gray, venerable, old", and came into English as "hoar" (and later "hoary") with the same meaning. The term "hoar-frost" dates back to the 13th century, and reflects the similarity of the white feathers of frost to the gray/white of an old man's beard.

62. ___ Circus (ancient Roman stadium) : NERO’S
The Circus of Nero was also called the Circus of Caligula, as it was started by Caligula and finished by Nero. This particular Roman circus was the site of the first state-sponsored martyrdoms of Christians, in 65 AD. The martyrs were mainly executed by crucifixion, and some believe that St. Peter met his fate at the site.

65. Ye ___ Shoppe : OLDE
The word "olde" wasn't actually used much earlier than the 1920s. "Olde" was introduced to give a quaint antique feel to brand names, shop names etc.

67. Some Scots : GAELS
The Gaels were speakers of one of the Erse tongues. There are actually three Erse languages: Irish, Manx (spoken on the Isle of Man) and Scots Gaelic. In their own tongues, these would be Gaeilge (in Ireland), Gaelg (on the Isle of Man) and Gaidhlig (in Scotland).

69. Alimony givers or receivers : EXES
The word “alimony” derives from the Latin “alimonia”, meaning “nourishment, food, support”.

70. Precipitation around 32 degrees : SLEET
Sleet is a term used to describe two weather conditions. One is a shower of ice pellets, smaller than hail, and the second is a mixture of rain and snow, with the snow melting as it falls. It's the second definition that I have always used ...

Down
4. Down Under capital : CANBERRA
Canberra is the capital city of Australia. The city is located in what’s called the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) an area independent of any of the other Australian territories. In this sense, there is a similarity between Canberra in the ACT and Washington in the District of Columbia. Canberra was chosen as the nation’s capital in 1908, a choice that was a compromise in deference to the two largest cities, Sydney and Melbourne.

6. San ___, Calif. : RAFAEL
San Rafael isn't far from here, and is the county seat of Marin County in the North San Francisco Bay. Like many cities in California, San Rafael owes its name to a Spanish mission, Mission San Rafael Arcángel.

8. First corner after "Go" in Monopoly : JAIL
The commercial game of Monopoly is supposedly a remake of "The Landlord's Game" created in 1903 by a Quaker woman called Lizzie Phillips. Phillips used her game as a tool to explain the single tax theory of American economist Henry George. The Landlord's Game was first produced commercially in 1924. The incredibly successful derivative game called Monopoly was introduced in 1933 by Charles Darrow, who became a very rich man when Parker Brothers bought the rights to the game just two years later in 1935.

9. Dashiell Hammett hound : ASTA
Asta is the wonderful little dog in the superb movie "The Thin Man" starring William Powell and Myrna Loy (as Nick and Nora Charles). In the original story by Dashiell Hammett, Asta was a female Schnauzer, but on screen Asta was played by a wire-haired fox terrier called "Skippy". Skippy was also the dog in "Bringing up Baby" with Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn, the one who kept stealing the dinosaur bone. Skippy retired in 1939, so Asta was played by other dogs in the remainder of "The Thin Man" films.

10. African big-game hunt : SAFARI
"Safari" is a Swahili word, meaning "journey" or "expedition".

13. Officer on a PT boat: Abbr. : ENS
Ensign is (usually) the most junior rank of commissioned officer in the armed forces. The name comes from the tradition that the junior officer would be given the task of carrying the ensign flag.

PT Boats were motor torpedo boats: small speedy vessels that used torpedoes as their primary weapon against large surface ships. The "PT" stands for "Patrol Torpedo". The most famous PT Boats that served during WWII were probably PT-41 that carried General Douglas MacArthur and his family from Corregidor to Mindanao in his escape from the Philippines, and PT-109 that was commanded by Lieutenant John F. Kennedy, future President of the United States.

21. Actress Scala : GIA
Gia Scala's most famous role was that of the mute resistance fighter in "The Guns of Navarone". Scala was born in Liverpool, England to an Irish mother and Italian father. She lived some years in Italy before moving to New York City. It's probably good that she played a mute character in "The Guns of Navarone" as who knows what her accent was like!

24. Garden of Eden woman : EVE
According to the Book of Genesis, Adam and Eve lived in a garden "in" Eden, with Eden being geographically located by reference to four rivers, including the Tigris and the Euphrates. Some scholars hypothesize that Eden was located in Mesopotamia, which encompasses much of modern-day Iraq.

26. The "S" of GPS: Abbr. : SYS
GPS stands for Global Positioning System. The modern GPS system that we use today was built by the US military who received the massive funding needed because of fears during the Cold War of the use of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles. We civilians, all round the world, owe a lot to President Ronald Reagan because he directed the military to make GPS technology available to the public for the common good. President Reagan was moved to do so after the Soviet Union shot down KAL flight 007 carrying 269 people, just because the plane strayed accidentally into Soviet airspace.

38. Grant-giving org. : NEA
The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is an agency funded by the federal government that offers support and financing for artistic projects. The NEA was created by an Act of Congress in 1965. Between 1965 and 2008, the NEA awarded over $4 billion to the arts, with Congress authorizing around $170 million annually through the eighties and much of the nineties. That funding was cut to less than $100 million in the late nineties due to pressure from conservatives concerned about the use of funds, but it is now back over the $150 million mark.

39. Special Operations warrior : NAVY SEAL
SEAL is an acronym used by the US Navy's SEa, Air and Land teams. The SEALs were born out of the Navy's special warfare groups from WWII, like the Underwater Demolition Teams and the Motor Torpedo Boat Squadrons. The Navy SEAL unit was established soon after President Kennedy's speech in which he announced the plan to put a man on the moon, as in the same speech the president allocated $100m of funding to strengthen special operations forces. The Navy used some of this money to set up guerrilla and counter-guerrilla units, which soon became the SEALs.

45. Target for a certain bark beetle : ELM TREE
Dutch elm disease is a fungus devastating to all species of elm trees that is transmitted by the elm bark beetle. The disease is thought to have originated in Asia and is now rampant in Europe and North America. Even though there is a hybrid of elm known as the Dutch elm, the disease isn't named after the tree. Rather, the disease is called "Dutch" as it was identified in 1921 by a phytopathologist (plant pathologist) in the Netherlands.

46. Comic Charlotte : RAE
Charlotte Rae is an American actress, best known for playing the character Edna Garrett on two sitcoms from the seventies and eighties: "Diff'rent Strokes" and "The Facts of Life". Towards the end of the series, the Edna Garrett character operated her own gourmet food shop called “Edna’s Edibles”.

57. "My country, 'tis of ___" : THEE
The patriotic song “America” is also known by its first line, “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee”. The song was written by Samuel Francis Smith in 1831, and was the de facto national anthem of the country until “The Star-Spangled Banner” was declared the official anthem.

58. April 1 news story, maybe : HOAX
April Fool's Day is celebrated on April 1st in the western world. In the US (and Ireland) one can make practical jokes all day long if one wants. But in the UK there is a noon deadline. Anyone pranking after midday is called an "April Fool".

63. Corrida cheer : OLE
In Spain, bullfighting is known locally as “corrida de toros”, literally "race of bulls".

64. Across-the-Atlantic flier of old, briefly : SST
The most famous Supersonic Transport (SST) was the Concorde, a plane that's no longer flying. Concorde had that famous "droop nose". The nose was moved to the horizontal position during flight to create the optimum aerodynamic shape thereby reducing drag. It was lowered during taxi, takeoff and landing so that the pilot had better visibility. The need for the droop nose was driven largely by the delta-shaped wings. The delta wing necessitates a higher angle of attack at takeoff and landing than conventional wing designs, so the pilot needed the nose lowered so that he or she could see the ground.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Muslim pilgrim's destination : MECCA
6. Indian prince : RAJA
10. Kemo ___ : SABE
14. Map collection : ATLAS
15. "'Tis a pity" : ALAS
16. Shortly, to a poet : ANON
17. Bloodhound's trail : SCENT
18. Move like a butterfly : FLIT
19. Watch chains : FOBS
20. Second first lady : ABIGAIL ADAMS
23. Daydream : REVERIE
25. Doctorate grillings : ORALS
27. Declare : AVER
28. American Dance Theater founder : ALVIN AILEY
32. Mister : English :: ___ : German : HERR
33. Part of the eye around the pupil : IRIS
34. Football field units: Abbr. : YDS
35. Oscar-winning actor for "Little Miss Sunshine" : ALAN ARKIN
40. K2 and Kilimanjaro: Abbr. : MTS
43. Pitcher Hershiser : OREL
44. Prefix with dynamic : AERO-
48. Tennis champion with a stadium named after him : ARTHUR ASHE
52. ___ the Impaler : VLAD
53. Largest asteroid in the solar system : CERES
54. Digestion aids : ENZYMES
56. Achieved great fame ... or what 20-, 28-, 35- and 48-Across did? : MADE THE A-LIST
60. Erica who wrote "Fear of Flying" : JONG
61. Winter frost : HOAR
62. ___ Circus (ancient Roman stadium) : NERO’S
65. Ye ___ Shoppe : OLDE
66. Part of the U.S. that's usually first with election returns : EAST
67. Some Scots : GAELS
68. One giving orders : BOSS
69. Alimony givers or receivers : EXES
70. Precipitation around 32 degrees : SLEET

Down
1. Pas' mates : MAS
2. Catchall abbr. : ETC
3. Butcher's knife : CLEAVER
4. Down Under capital : CANBERRA
5. Up and about : ASTIR
6. San ___, Calif. : RAFAEL
7. "That's ___ ask" : ALL I
8. First corner after "Go" in Monopoly : JAIL
9. Dashiell Hammett hound : ASTA
10. African big-game hunt : SAFARI
11. Deviation from the standard : ANOMALY
12. Winter Olympics vehicle : BOBSLED
13. Officer on a PT boat: Abbr. : ENS
21. Actress Scala : GIA
22. "___ say!" : DO AS I
23. Cheerleader's cheer : RAH
24. Garden of Eden woman : EVE
26. The "S" of GPS: Abbr. : SYS
29. Lab containers : VIALS
30. Like the verb "be" in many languages: Abbr. : IRR
31. Suffix with no-good : -NIK
36. No-good sort : LOUSE
37. Airport info: Abbr. : ARR
38. Grant-giving org. : NEA
39. Special Operations warrior : NAVY SEAL
40. PC alternative : MAC
41. Vibrating effect : TREMOLO
42. Leaves high and dry : STRANDS
45. Target for a certain bark beetle : ELM TREE
46. Comic Charlotte : RAE
47. Gets too high, for short? : ODS
49. Property dividers that may need clipping : HEDGES
50. Card game for romantics? : HEARTS
51. Photo lab abbr. : ENL
55. Witty put-downs : ZINGS
57. "My country, 'tis of ___" : THEE
58. April 1 news story, maybe : HOAX
59. Comfort : EASE
60. Occupation : JOB
63. Corrida cheer : OLE
64. Across-the-Atlantic flier of old, briefly : SST


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0930-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Sep 12, Sunday

Announcement
I recently started solving the LA Times crossword, and a week ago I launched an LA Times crossword blog. If you work on the LA Times puzzle, then please check out my new blog at LAXCrossword.com. For that matter, if you know anyone who likes to solve the LA Times crossword, please think about sending them an email pointing them to LAXCrossword.com!



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Elayne Cantor & Vic Fleming
THEME: Car Talk … all of the theme answers are parts of a car, each with a cryptic clue:
23A. What Katie Holmes lost in divorce court? : CRUISE CONTROL
28A. Commuter on a crowded bus, e.g.? : REAR BUMPER
55. Epiphany? : HEADLIGHT
69A. What "Send" triggers? : AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
80A. Legal proceeding over a meth bust? : CRANKCASE
110A. Smell of sour milk? : TURN SIGNAL
118A. Bling-bling? : HOOD ORNAMENTS
COMPLETION TIME: 43m 31s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … NET (vet), SION (Siov!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. First name in the White House : BARACK
President Obama’s first name, Barack, is Swahili with roots in an old Arabic word meaning “blessed”. Barack was the President’s father’s name. President Obama's middle name is Hussein, an Arabic word meaning “good” or “handsome one”. Hussein was the name of the President’s grandfather on the paternal side. His surname, Obama, doesn’t really have a translation, but is common among the Luo tribe of Kenya.

19. Start of a seasonal song : ADESTE
The lovely hymn "Adeste Fideles" (aka "O Come, All Ye Faithful") was written by one John Francis Wade in the 13th century. Well, he wrote the original four verses, with four more verses being added over time.

23. What Katie Holmes lost in divorce court? : CRUISE CONTROL
Tom Cruise’s real name is Tom Cruise Mapother IV. Cruise was born in Syracuse, New York, one of my favorite cities in the US.because that’s where I met my wife-to-be …

Katie Holmes is an actress who first came to prominence in the television drama “Dawson’s Creek”. Off screen she is famous as the ex-wife of Tom Cruise.

26. Money of Laos : KIP
The kip has been the unit of currency in Laos since 1952.

30. Huck Finn's father : PAP
"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain was first published in 1884, not here in the US but rather in England. The original launch planned for the US had to be delayed until the following year because some rascal had defaced the plate for one of the illustrations, making an obscene joke. Once the problem was spotted a new plate had to be made and 30,000 copies already printed had to be reworked to cover up the obscenity.

31. Knicks venue, for short : MSG
Madison Square Garden is an arena in New York City used for a variety of events. In the world of sports it is home to the New York Rangers of the NHL, as well as the New York Knicks of the NBA. "The Garden" is also the third busiest music venue in the world in terms of ticket sales.

33. "Sing of old ___ and the ancient ways": Yeats : EIRE

“Sing of old Eire and the ancient ways” is a line from the W. B. Yeats poem “To the Rose Upon the rood of Time”

Irish poet and dramatist William Butler Yeats won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1923, for "inspired poetry" that gave "expression to a whole nation". He was the first Irishman so honored.

34. Prefix with -meter : ANEMO-
An anemometer is an instrument for measuring the speed of wind. The most common form of anemometer is the one with four hemispherical cups that rotate faster as wind speed increases.

40. 1946 Best Supporting Actor nominee William : DEMAREST
The actor William Dearest won the 1946 best supporting actor for his performance in “The Jolson Story”.

Uncle Charley on the TV sitcom "My Three Sons" was played by two actors over the life of the show. The role was originated by William Frawley, but he had to drop out due to failing health. William Demarest took over in 1965 and played Uncle Charlie right through the end of the show's run in 1972.

46. Leon who won a Pulitzer for his biography of Henry James : EDEL
Leon Edel wrote a highly respected biography of author Henry James, for which he won a Pulitzer Prize.

47. Actor Patel of "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" : DEV
Dev Matel is an actor from Harrow in England. Patel is best known for playing the lead in the hit movie “Slumdog Millionaire”. Most recently I saw him a lovely 2012 film called “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” alongside an incredible cast that included Judi Dench, Bill Nighy, Maggie Smith and Tom Wilkinson.

48. Dealy-bobs : GIZMOS
The word "gizmo" (also “gismo”) was originally slang used by both the US Navy and the Marine Corps, but the exact origin seems unknown. Nowadays, "gizmo" is a general term used for a device or a part when the correct name escapes one (so I use it a lot ...). Oh, and Gizmo is the name of the dog belonging to my son and his fiancee.

51. Digit in military lingo : NINER
“Niner” is the way one might say the number “9” in radio-telephony, and in the military.

64. Strep treater, for short : ENT
An Ear, Nose and Throat specialist is an ENT.

Streptococcus bacteria multiply and divide along a single axis so that they form linked chains. That behavior gives the genus of bacteria its name, as “streptos” is Greek for “easily twisted, like a chain”. I had a battle with streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat) recently and it was not at all pleasant, I must say. Another species of streptococcus is responsible for that terrible “flesh-eating” infection that makes the news from time to time.

66. "Dreaming of You" singer : SELENA
Singer Selena Quintanilla-Perez, known professionally simply as "Selena", was murdered in 1995 by the president of her own fan club at the height of her career. In a 1997 biopic about Selena's life, Jennifer Lopez played the title role.

68. Sholem Aleichem protagonist : TEVYE
The enduring musical “Fiddler on the Roof” is based on a collection of stories by Sholem Alecheim about Tevye, a milkman in Tsarist Russia. The musical version of the tales first opened on Broadway in 1964. "Fiddler on the Roof" had such a long run that it became the first musical to reach 3,000 performances.

77. They tend IVs : RNS
Registered nurses are RNs.

78. Judea's ___ the Great : HEROD
Herod the Great was made King of the Roman province of Judea (now the southern part of Israel). Herod the Great’s son was Herod Antipas, the Herod who appears in the New Testament in the stories of the execution of Jesus of Nazareth and John the Baptist.

80. Legal proceeding over a meth bust? : CRANKCASE
In most internal combustion engines the pistons that move up and down are arranged in a line, and connected to a crankshaft that runs along the bottom of the engine. The up and down motion of the pistons turns the crankshaft, which turning motion is "transmitted" (via the transmission) to the wheels. The case surrounding the crankshaft is called the crankcase. The crankcase contains a lot of oil that is squirted onto the crankshaft to lubricate it. Excess oil falls to the bottom of the crankcase and into a reservoir called the oil pan.

“Crank” is a street name used for the drug methamphetamine, also called “meth” and “crystal meth”.

83. Hero makers : DELIS
"Hero" is another name for a submarine sandwich. The hero originated in New York City in the 1800s among Italian immigrants who wanted an Italian sandwich that reminded them of home. The name "hero" was first coined in the 1930s, supposedly by a food critic in the "New York Herald Tribune" when he wrote that "one had to be a hero" to finish the gigantic sandwich. Hero is a prevalent term to this day in New York City, reserved for a submarine sandwich with an Italian flavor.

92. Gen. Robt. ___ : E LEE
Robert E. Lee is of course renowned as a southern officer in the Civil War. Lee was a somewhat reluctant participant in that he opposed the secession of his home state of Virginia from the Union. At the beginning of the war, President Lincoln invited Lee to take command of the whole Union Army but Lee declined, choosing instead to stay loyal to his home state.

101. Vice-presidential family : BIDENS
Vice President Joe Biden was a US Senator representing the state of Delaware from 1973 until he joined the Obama administration. While he was a senator, Vice President Biden commuted to Washington from Wilmington, Delaware almost every working day. He was such an active customer and supporter of Amtrak that the Wilmington Station was renamed as the Joseph R. Biden Railroad Station in 2011. Biden has made over 7,000 trips from that station, and the Amtrak crews were known to even hold the last train for a few minutes so that he could catch it. Biden earned himself the nickname “Amtrak Joe”.

107. Theologian Johann : ECK
During the Protestant Reformation of the 16th and 17th centuries, as Martin Luther was attacking the policies of the Catholic Church, Johann Eck was one of the leading defenders of Catholicism. The two had public debates, with Luther generally coming out ahead.

113. English king ___ the Peaceful : EDGAR
Edgar the Peaceful was King of England from 959 to 975. Edgar was known as “the Peaceful” not because of his style of rule, but because his reign was a period of relative peace.

123. Wild equine of 79-Across : ONAGER
The onager is also known as the Asiatic wild ass. The onager is a little larger than a donkey, and looks like a cross between a donkey and a horse. One characteristic of the onager is that is remarkably “untamable”.

124. Company with a 2004 I.P.O. : GOOGLE
Google is the most used search engine on the Internet. The Google site now receives over one billion queries every single day. Google.com is the most visited website on the Internet.

126. ABC, e.g., in Variety-speak : NET
I think the idea here is that according to “Variety” magazine, a television network like ABC might be called a “net”.

Down
2. One-named Brazilian soccer star : ADRIANO
Adriano Leite Ribeiro is a Brazilian soccer player who usually goes just by the name “Adriano”. I hear that his performance on the field tends to be a little inconsistent.

5. Price abbr. : CTS
This one foxes me. CTS … cost to serve?

Oops! Someone just pointed out that "cents" are abbreviated "cts." Don't I feel foolish ...

7. ___ McAn shoes : THOM
Thom McAn footwear was introduced in 1922 by the Melville Corporation (now CVS Caremark). The brand was named after a Scottish golfer called Thomas McCann. The Thom McAn line is epitomized by the comfortable leather casual and dress shoe, so sales have really been hurt in recent decades by the growing popularity of sneakers.

10. Elongated swimmer : GAR
The fish known as a gar is very unusual in that it is often found in very brackish water. What is interesting about gar is that their swim bladders are vascularized so that they can actually function as lungs. So many species of gar can be seen coming to the surface and taking a gulp of air. This adaptation makes it possible for them to live in conditions highly unsuitable for other fish that rely on their gills to get oxygen out of the water. Indeed, quite interesting …

11. Ancient assembly sites : AGORAS
In early Greece the "agora" was a place of assembly. Often the assemblies held there were quite formal, perhaps for the reading of a proclamation. Later in Greek history, things became less formal as the agora evolved into a market place. Our contemporary word "agoraphobia" comes from these agorae, in the sense that a sufferer has a fear of open spaces, a fear of "public meeting places".

12. Genesis man who lived 239 years : PELEG
In the Hebrew Bible, Peleg is one of the ancestors of the Israelites. Peleg lived to the ripe old age of 239 years. Today in Israel, Peleg is a common family name.

14. Dual-___ : CARB
The carburetor is a device in an internal combustion engine that has the job of blending air and fuel prior to combustion. When you hit the accelerator on a car, you're not actually directly controlling the amount of fuel going to the engine. Instead, you're controlling the amount of air that the carburetor gets. The carburetor then sucks in the amount of fuel it needs for efficient combustion.

15. Shade akin to almond : ECRU
The shade called ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word "ecru" comes from French and means "raw, unbleached". "Ecru" has the same roots as our word "crude".

17. Weavers' willows : OSIERS
Most willows (trees and shrubs of the genus Salix) are called just that, willows. Some of the broad-leaved shrub varieties are called sallow, and the narrow-leaved shrubs are called osier. The variety known as osier is commonly used in basketry, as osier twigs are very flexible.

29. Iago, to Othello : AIDE
Iago is the schemer in Shakespeare's "Othello". Iago is a soldier who fought alongside Othello and feels hard done by, missing out on promotion. He hatches a plot designed to discredit his rival Cassio by insinuating that Cassio is having an affair with Desdomona, Othello's wife. By the end of the play it's Iago himself who is discredited and Othello (before committing suicide) apologizes to Cassio for having believed Iago's lies. Heavy stuff ...

31. Word before A or T : MODEL
The Ford Model A was the original car produced by the Ford Motor Company. The first production run lasted from 1903 to 1904, when it was replaced by the Model C. The name “Model A” was brought back in 1927 and used for the successor to the Model T.

The Ford Model T was the first really affordable car that was offered for sale, and it was produced from 1908 to 1927. It was the Model T that ushered in the era of assembly line production, which greatly cut down the cost of manufacture. The Model T's engine was designed to run on petrol, kerosene or ethanol.

32. Side of a road : BERM
A berm is narrow ledge, usually at the top or bottom of a slope. The name “berm” is also used as the shoulder of a road in some parts of the United States.

35. California's Harvey ___ College : MUDD
Harvey Mudd was a mining engineer, and president of Cyprus Mines Corporation. He lent his name to Harvey Mudd College, a science and engineering college in Claremont, California.

38. Life after death? : OBIT
"Obituary" comes from the Latin "obituaris", originally the word for the record of a death of a person, although the literal meaning is "pertaining to death".

39. Looney Tunes toon, informally : TAZ
The carnivorous marsupial known as the Tasmanian devil is aptly named, in the sense that the only place the animal is found in the wild is on the island of Tasmania. The “little devils” are about the size of a small dog, and they have the strongest bite for their size of any known mammal.

44. "The Lady's Got Potential" musical : EVITA
"Evita" was the followup musical to "Jesus Christ Superstar" by Andrew Lloyd Weber and Time Rice. Both of these works were originally released as album musicals, and very successful ones at that (I remember buying the albums when they first came out). For the original album's cast of "Evita" they chose Irish singer Colm Wilkinson (or C. T. Wilkinson, as we know him back in Ireland) to play "Che", the narrator of the piece.

49. Unglazed ceramic jars : OLLAS
An olla is a traditional clay pot used for the making of stews.

53. Mozart's Donna ___ : ELVIRA
Donna Elvira is a soprano part in Mozart’s opera “Don Giovanni”.

"Don Giovanni" is a comic opera by Mozart, with the libretto in Italian by Lorenzo Da Ponte. The opera follows the adventures of Don Giovanni, a young rakish nobleman who finally comes to a bad end.

54. Synthetic fabrics : RAYONS
Rayon is a little unusual in the textile industry in that it is not truly a synthetic fiber, but nor can it be called a natural fiber. Rayon is produced from naturally occurring cellulose that is dissolved and then reformed into fibers.

58. "We ___ Get Out of This Place" : GOTTA
The Animals were a band from Newcastle in England who made it big in America as part of the British Invasion. The big hit for the Animals was "The House of the Rising Sun"from 1964, but their 1965 release "We Gotta Get out of This Place" had a lot of success too, largely due to the Vietnam War. The lyrics really, really resonated with the GIs fighting in Southeast Asia, for obvious reasons. The song was used on movie and TV show soundtracks to recreate that "rush to the door" sentiment, and it features on the TV series' "China Beach" and "Tour of Duty", as well as in the 1987 movie "Hamburger Hill".

61. About 90% of its land is owned communally : SAMOA
The official name for the South Pacific country is the Independent State of Samoa. "Samoa" is the western part of the island group, with American Samoa lying to the southeast. The whole group of islands used to be known as Navigators Island, a name given by European explorers in recognition of the seafaring skills of the native Samoans.

70. One-sixth of a drachma : OBOL
An obol is also known as an obolus. The obol was a silver coin used in Greece that was worth one sixth of a drachma.

71. Borgia enemy : MEDICI
The House of Medici was a dynasty from the the Italian Republic of Florence. The Medici family went into the world of finance and built the largest bank in Europe in the 15th century. Significantly, the Medicis produced four Popes around this time, and then the family moved from the status of common citizens to become hereditary Dukes of Florence. By the middle of the 18th century the family ruled the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, but ended up fiscally bankrupt.

The Borgias were a Papal family that was very prominent during the Renaissance in Europe. Two of the Borgias became popes: Pope Caxtius III and Pope Alexander VI.

72. ___ Pet : CHIA
Chia is a flowering plant in the mint family, and the Chia Pet is an invention of a San Francisco company. Chia Pets are terracotta figurines to which are applied moistened chia seeds. The seeds sprout and as they grew the seedlings become the "fur" of the Chia Pet.

73. Greek architectural style : IONIC
An Ionic column is relatively ornate. It usually has grooves running up and down its length and at the top there is a "scroll" design called a "volute". The scroll design makes it a popular inclusion in academic buildings.

80. Northern Plains people : CREE
The Cree are one of the largest groups of Native Americans on the continent. In the US most of the Cree nation live in Montana on a reservation shared with the Ojibwe people. In Canada most of the Cree live in Manitoba.

84. Spanish direction : SUR
“Sur” is Spanish for “south”.

87. Local council member: Abbr. : ALD
The term "alderman" comes from English law, and is used for a member of a municipal assembly or council. In some locations in the US some cities have a Board of Aldermen instead of a city council.

95. Pauline work : EPISTLE
By definition, an epistle is a writing sent by one person to a group of people, with the name "epistle" coming from the Greek word for "a letter". The 21 epistles of the New Testament are letters from various of the Apostles to groups of Christians, with most of them being written by Paul.

96. Ones reliant on the local blood supply : TSETSES
Tsetse flies live on the blood of vertebrate mammals. The name "tsetse" comes from Tswana, a language of southern Africa, and translates simply as "fly". Tsetse flies are famous for being carriers of the disease known as "sleeping sickness". Sleeping sickness is caused by a parasite which is passed onto humans when the tsetse fly bites into human skin tissue. If one considers all the diseases transmitted by the insect, then the tsetse fly is responsible for a staggering quarter of a million deaths each year.

98. Dramamine user's fear : NAUSEA
Dramamine is a brand name for dimenhydrinate, a drug used to counteract motion sickness.

100. ___ Landing (part of Philadelphia) : PENN’S
Penn’s Landing along the Delaware river in Philadelphia is a waterfront area named for William Penn, the city’s founder. Penn landed near Penn’s Landing when he first arrived in the area.

102. One of the Lennons : SEAN
Sean Lennon is the only child of John Lennon and Yoko Ono. Sean’s godfather is Elton John.

106. Company with a 1996 I.P.O. : YAHOO
Jerry Yang and David Filo called their company "Yahoo!" for two reasons. Firstly, a Yahoo is a rude, unsophisticated brute from Jonathan Swift's "Gulliver's Travels". Secondly, Yahoo stands for "Yet another Hierarchical Officious Oracle".

111. Capital of the Swiss canton of Valais : SION
Sion is the capital of Valais, a canton in the southwest of Switzerland.

115. Toy warnings? : GRRS
A toy breed of dog might say “grr!”

120. Skiing gold medalist Tommy : MOE
Tommy Moe was the first American male skier to win two medals in a single Winter Olympics, in 1994 at Lillehammer in Norway. It was considered a surprise result, as Moe had up to that point not won a single World Cup race.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. First name in the White House : BARACK
7. Old Navy's owner : THE GAP
13. Dandy : ACE
16. Like one battery terminal: Abbr. : POS
19. Start of a seasonal song : ADESTE
20. Tribute : HOMAGE
21. Source of some intolerance : LACTOSE
23. What Katie Holmes lost in divorce court? : CRUISE CONTROL
25. Unsteady : ERRATIC
26. Money of Laos : KIP
27. Shoots in the foot : LAMES
28. Commuter on a crowded bus, e.g.? : REAR BUMPER
30. Huck Finn's father : PAP
31. Knicks venue, for short : MSG
32. Throw in the towel : BAG IT
33. "Sing of old ___ and the ancient ways": Yeats : EIRE
34. Prefix with -meter : ANEMO-
36. Some modern memos : ENOTES
40. 1946 Best Supporting Actor nominee William : DEMAREST
43. Bro's greeting : YO, DUDE
45. Beam of support : I-BAR
46. Leon who won a Pulitzer for his biography of Henry James : EDEL
47. Actor Patel of "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" : DEV
48. Dealy-bobs : GIZMOS
51. Digit in military lingo : NINER
55. Epiphany? : HEADLIGHT
59. Some August newborns : LEOS
62. Slaw, e.g. : SALAD
64. Strep treater, for short : ENT
65. Preschooler : TOT
66. "Dreaming of You" singer : SELENA
68. Sholem Aleichem protagonist : TEVYE
69. What "Send" triggers? : AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
74. Family : TRIBE
75. Giggles : TEHEES
76. Noise in a nest : COO
77. They tend IVs : RNS
78. Judea's ___ the Great : HEROD
79. Home for a 123-Across : ASIA
80. Legal proceeding over a meth bust? : CRANKCASE
83. Hero makers : DELIS
85. Programming behind computer pop-ups : ADWARE
88. "___ second" : IN A
89. 1950s coup site : CUBA
92. Gen. Robt. ___ : E LEE
93. Thickly cover : CARPET
97. With one's heart, if nothing else : IN SPIRIT
101. Vice-presidential family : BIDENS
103. TV excerpts : CLIPS
104. Spot for a farm laborer's sunburn : NAPE
105. More lighthearted : GAYER
107. Theologian Johann : ECK
109. Potentially slanderous remark : LIE
110. Smell of sour milk? : TURN SIGNAL
113. English king ___ the Peaceful : EDGAR
116. Suffix with balloon or cartoon : -IST
117. Harebrained : ASININE
118. Bling-bling? : HOOD ORNAMENTS
122. Bleepers : CENSORS
123. Wild equine of 79-Across : ONAGER
124. Company with a 2004 I.P.O. : GOOGLE
125. Word before sale or after sales : TAG
126. ABC, e.g., in Variety-speak : NET
127. Feared folklore figure : OGRESS
128. Picks up : SENSES

Down
1. Wrongful discharge award : BACK PAY
2. One-named Brazilian soccer star : ADRIANO
3. Extended one's stint : REUPPED
4. "___ said ..." : AS I
5. Price abbr. : CTS
6. Bases for boats : KEELS
7. ___ McAn shoes : THOM
8. Practice, as skills : HONE
9. 911 V.I.P.'s : EMTS
10. Elongated swimmer : GAR
11. Ancient assembly sites : AGORAS
12. Genesis man who lived 239 years : PELEG
13. Tipped off : ALERTED
14. Dual-___ : CARB
15. Shade akin to almond : ECRU
16. Round entree : POT PIE
17. Weavers' willows : OSIERS
18. Diary tidbit : SECRET
22. Circus employee : TAMER
24. Lock up : CAGE
29. Iago, to Othello : AIDE
31. Word before A or T : MODEL
32. Side of a road : BERM
35. California's Harvey ___ College : MUDD
37. Some sleepwear : NIGHTIES
38. Life after death? : OBIT
39. Looney Tunes toon, informally : TAZ
41. Restroom sign : MEN
42. Preferred groups : A-LISTS
44. "The Lady's Got Potential" musical : EVITA
49. Unglazed ceramic jars : OLLAS
50. Comprehended : SEEN
52. Scottish turndowns : NAES
53. Mozart's Donna ___ : ELVIRA
54. Synthetic fabrics : RAYONS
55. ___ bar : HEATH
56. Accustomed (to) : ENURED
57. Coat and tie, e.g. : ATTIRE
58. "We ___ Get Out of This Place" : GOTTA
60. Viewed remotely? : ONSCREEN
61. About 90% of its land is owned communally : SAMOA
63. Like dunderheads : DENSE
66. Lieu : STEAD
67. Odist's "before" : ERE
70. One-sixth of a drachma : OBOL
71. Borgia enemy : MEDICI
72. ___ Pet : CHIA
73. Greek architectural style : IONIC
80. Northern Plains people : CREE
81. Facility : KNACK
82. Lenny's friend on "The Simpsons" : CARL
84. Spanish direction : SUR
86. Dam that aids in fish-catching : WEIR
87. Local council member: Abbr. : ALD
90. Number-one : BIGGEST
91. ___ all-time high : AT AN
94. Pier group? : PILINGS
95. Pauline work : EPISTLE
96. Ones reliant on the local blood supply : TSETSES
97. Whole : INTACT
98. Dramamine user's fear : NAUSEA
99. Oasis, often : SPRING
100. ___ Landing (part of Philadelphia) : PENN’S
101. Fit in : BELONG
102. One of the Lennons : SEAN
106. Company with a 1996 I.P.O. : YAHOO
108. Rock-climbing challenges : CRAGS
111. Capital of the Swiss canton of Valais : SION
112. About : IN RE
113. Nose out : EDGE
114. Effectuates : DOES
115. Toy warnings? : GRRS
119. It fits in a lock : OAR
120. Skiing gold medalist Tommy : MOE
121. Almost forever : EON


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0929-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Sep 12, Saturday

Announcement
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QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Joe DiPietro
THEME: None
COMPLETION TIME: 42m 27s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 4 … INEZ (Inee!), SEZ (see), TREN (trem), JAN STEEN (Jan Steem!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. Jenna Bush ___, former first daughter : HAGER
Jenna Bush is one of the twin daughters of President George W. Bush. During her father’s 2004 presidential campaign, Jenna met and started dating Henry Hager who was a White House aide for Deputy chief of staff Karl Rove. The couple were married in 2008.

17. Crush, e.g. : ORANGE SODA
The Crush brand of soft drinks was invented in 1916, and originally was produced in an orange flavor as Ward's Orange Crush.

19. "The Gondoliers" nurse : INEZ
"The Gondoliers" is a delightful operetta by W. S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan, first performed in 1889 at the Savoy Theatre in London. “The Gondoliers” was the last great success for Gilbert and Sullivan after a long string of hits. I last saw "The Gondoliers" decades ago, an amateur production in the small town where I was living at the time in Ireland. Great fun!

21. Like George Bush's promised nation : GENTLER
When then Vice President George H. W. Bush was running for president in 1988, he very much stood for a continuation of policies embraced by President Reagan. Bush also worked hard for win over moderate voters, by promising a “kinder and gentler nation”.

31. Explorer Amundsen : ROALD
The first men to reach the South Pole were in a party led by the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, on December 14, 1911. Famously, a team led by Robert Falcon Scott reached the pole just 33 days later, only to find that they had been beaten in their quest. Scott and the whole of his team perished on the journey back out of the Antarctic.

32. Spirograph, e.g. : TOY
One of my favorite toys as a child was my Spirograph. A Spirograph is a geometric drawing device that uses cogs and gears with holes for pens and pencils. Movement of gears in combinations produces lovely geometric patterns on paper.

33. Lovers of all things Barbie, say : GIRLIE GIRLS
The famous Barbie doll was created by businesswoman Ruth Handler and first appeared on store shelves in 1959. Barbie was based on a German fashion doll called Bild Lilli that had been introduced four years earlier. Lilli had been a German cartoon character before taking on a three-dimensional form. Prior to the introduction of Bild Lilli and Barbie, children’s dolls were primarily representations of infants.

39. Noted rock site: Abbr. : GIB
Gibraltar is a small British territory on the Mediterranean coast just south of Spain. The British gained control of the area, which is just 2.6 square miles, during the War of the Spanish Succession in 1704. The ownership of Gibraltar is contested by the Spanish, but successive UK governments refuse to cede the territory as it is a major base for the Royal Navy. Gibraltar is right at the entrance to the Mediterranean from the Atlantic.

42. Buck for a tune? : OWENS
Buck Owens was a very successful country star, along with his backing band, the Buckaroos. Owens had 21 number one hits in the country music charts, but never had a record that successfully crossed over to the popular charts. From 1968 to 1986, Owens was the co-host of the TV show “Hee Haw”.

44. He was traded between Chicago teams in 1992 : SOSA
Sammy Sosa was right in the public eye in 1998 when he and Mark McGwire were vying to be the first to surpass the home run record held by Roger Maris. McGwire fell out of public favor due to stories of steroid abuse (stories which he later admitted were true) while Sosa fell of out favor when he was found to be using a corked bat in a 2003 game.

47. Some blight : GHETTOS
The first "ghetto" was an island in Venice that was used for confining Venetian Jews. The same island was used to store slag from a foundry, and “getto” was the Venetian word for "slag". The term ghetto spread across Europe, at the beginning always associated with repressed Jewish populations. Ultimately it came to mean any urban area housing a minority group under economic and social pressure.

49. Thick vegetable soup : POTTAGE
A pottage is a thick soup or stew, and is the Old French word for a potted dish.

52. It's a wrap : SERAPE
Serape is the English pronunciation and spelling of the Spanish word "zarape". A zarape is like a Mexican poncho, a soft woolen blanket with a whole in the middle for the head. Most have colorful designs that use traditional Mayan motifs.

59. Autobús alternative : TREN
In Spanish, an “autobús” is a bus, and a “tren” is a train.

60. Like some elephants : ASIAN
There are only three species of elephant living today, with all others being extinct. These are the African bush elephant, the African forest elephant, and the Asian elephant (or "Indian elephant"). As is well known, the African elephant is distinguished from the Asian/Indian elephant by its much larger ears.

61. CNBC subj. : NYSE
The roots of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) go back to 1792 when a group of 24 stock brokers set up the New York Stock & Exchange Board. They did so in an agreement signed under a buttonwood tree outside 68 Wall Street. That document became known as the Buttonwood Agreement.

CNBC is a business news channel owned by NBC. Launched in 1989, up until 1991 CNBC was known as the Consumer News and Business Channel.

Down
2. City originally known as the Town of York : TORONTO
Beautiful Toronto is the largest city in Canada, and the fourth largest city in North America (after New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Houston).

6. Univ. aides : RAS
RAs are resident assistants or resident advisers, the peer leaders found in residence halls, particularly on a college campus.

7. In a swivet : AGOG
“Swivet” is an American term of unknown origin, meaning “panic, fluster”.

9. Anxiolytic, e.g., for short : TRANQ
An “anxiolytic” is an antipanic drug, a minor tranquilizer.

10. Sichuan cooking ingredient : CHILI OIL
Sichuan (also Szechwan) is a province in southwest China. Sichuan is noted for its cuisine, which is hot and spicy as it uses plenty of garlic, chili peppers and the Sichuan peppercorn. A famous Szechwan dish in the US is Kung Pao chicken.

11. It may help you get a grip : PINE TAR
Pine tar is applied to the handles of baseball bats as it is a sticky substance and improves the batter’s grip. In a 1983 game, the Yankees manager Billy Martin protested a home run hit by George Brett of the Royals because the pine tar on his bat extended beyond the regulation 18 inches. The home run was later allowed as it was determined that the 18-inch rule was in place for economic reasons, and had nothing to do with competitive advantage. If pine tar gets on a baseball it renders it unusable for play, and baseballs cost money!

12. Earl in the Baseball Hall of Fame : AVERILL
Earl Averill was a Major League Baseball center fielder who played mainly in the 1930s.

18. Health products co. : GNC
General Nutrition Centers (GNC) is a retailer of health and nutrition supplements based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

26. Cardinal pts.? : TDS
The Arizona Cardinals were founded in 1898 as the Chicago Cardinals. That makes the Cardinals the oldest continuously-run professional football team in the whole country.

29. Object of some hazing : PLEBE
Plebe is a slang term for a freshman in the US military and naval academies. Plebe is probably short for "plebeian", the name given to someone of the common class in Ancient Rome (as opposed to a Patrician). "Pleb" is a shortened version of plebeian, and is a term used outside of the military schools.

34. Taurus, for one : EARTH SIGN
Each of the twelve astrological signs is associated with one of the classical elements:
- Fire signs: Aries, Leo, Sagittarius
- Earth signs: Taurus, Capricorn, Virgo
- Air signs: Libra, Aquarius, Gemini
- Water signs: Cancer, Scorpio, Pisces

35. Dutch Golden Age painter : JAN STEEN
Jan Steen was a Dutch painter active in the Dutch Golden Age, the 17th century. Steen's most famous work is probably “The Feast of Saint Nicholas”, which you can see at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.

36. One who's usually gone : SOT
Our word "sot" comes from the Old English "sott", meaning a fool. The word "sot" started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

40. Wood lice and pill bugs : ISOPODS
Isopods are small crustaceans (meaning they have exoskeletons), with seven pairs of legs. Examples would be woodlice and pill bugs. The name "isopod" comes from the Greek "iso" (same) and "pod" (foot).

46. ___ one (nobody) : NARY A
The adjective "nary" means "not one", as in “nary a soul”.

50. Storms and others : GEOS
Geos were small vehicles manufactured by General Motors mainly in the nineties. Geos were designed to compete head-to-head with the small imports that were gaining market share at the time in the US. Some Geo models that you might remember are the Metro, the Prizm and the Storm. The cars were actually built as joint-ventures with Japanese manufacturers. The Prizm was a GM/Toyota project, the Metro was GM/Suzuki, and the Storm was GM/Isuzu.

53. Star of the motivational video "Be Somebody ... or Be Somebody's Fool" : MR T
Mr. T's real name is Laurence Tureaud. Mr. T is famous for many things, including the wearing of excessive amounts of jewelry. He started this habit when he was working as a bouncer, wearing jewelry items that had been left behind by customers at a nightclub so that the items might be recognized and claimed. It was also as a bouncer that he adopted the name Mr. T. His catchphrase comes from the movie "Rocky III". In the film, before he goes up against Rocky Balboa, Mr. T says, "No, I don't hate Balboa, but I pity the fool". He parlayed that line into quite a bit of success. He had a reality TV show called "I Pity the Fool", and produced a motivational video called "Be Somebody ... or Be Somebody's Fool!".

55. "Por ___ Cabeza" (tango standard) : UNA
“Por una cabeza” is one of the most famous Argentine tangos, oft-featured in memorable scenes in big Hollywood movies. You might recall tangos in 1992’s “Scent of a Woman” or 1994’s “True Lies”, for example, both of which were danced to “Por una cabeza”. The title of the song translates to “by a head”. The “by a head” in this context is the distance by which a horse might win a race. The lyrics tell of a man who compares his addiction to gambling on horses to his attraction to women.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Lead : STAR
5. Intestines, e.g. : TRACT
10. Dealers in books and records : CPAS
14. "___ it down!" : TONE
15. Jenna Bush ___, former first daughter : HAGER
16. Workers' place : HIVE
17. Crush, e.g. : ORANGE SODA
19. "The Gondoliers" nurse : INEZ
20. Stiff : POTENT
21. Like George Bush's promised nation : GENTLER
23. Summer mountain feature : SNOWCAP
25. "That's enough!" : QUIT IT!
27. Bill producers : ATMS
28. Kind of woman : KEPT
31. Explorer Amundsen : ROALD
32. Spirograph, e.g. : TOY
33. Lovers of all things Barbie, say : GIRLIE GIRLS
35. Filter target : JUNK EMAIL
36. Odd one : STRANGE BIRD
39. Noted rock site: Abbr. : GIB
42. Buck for a tune? : OWENS
43. Cause of a car rental surcharge : DENT
44. He was traded between Chicago teams in 1992 : SOSA
45. Add as a bonus : TOSS IN
47. Some blight : GHETTOS
49. Thick vegetable soup : POTTAGE
52. It's a wrap : SERAPE
53. Like some plugs : MALE
54. Needs from : REQUIRES OF
56. Tear : RIVE
57. Litter, e.g. : YOUNG
58. Go off-shore, maybe : WADE
59. Autobús alternative : TREN
60. Like some elephants : ASIAN
61. CNBC subj. : NYSE

Down
1. Visits : STOPS AT
2. City originally known as the Town of York : TORONTO
3. An arm and a leg and then some : ANATOMY
4. Keeps it coming, maybe : RENEWS
5. What leftovers may be for : THE TAKING
6. Univ. aides : RAS
7. In a swivet : AGOG
8. Grant : CEDE
9. Anxiolytic, e.g., for short : TRANQ
10. Sichuan cooking ingredient : CHILI OIL
11. It may help you get a grip : PINE TAR
12. Earl in the Baseball Hall of Fame : AVERILL
13. "___ me!" : SEZ
18. Health products co. : GNC
22. Distended : TURGID
24. Livened (up) : PERKED
26. Cardinal pts.? : TDS
29. Object of some hazing : PLEBE
30. It's everything, it's said : TIMING
33. Hits the gas : GUNS IT
34. Taurus, for one : EARTH SIGN
35. Dutch Golden Age painter : JAN STEEN
36. One who's usually gone : SOT
37. Kings and queens, say : TWO PAIR
38. Work out : RESOLVE
39. Was given the right to vote : GOT A SAY
40. Wood lice and pill bugs : ISOPODS
41. Starting figure on a utility bill : BASE FEE
44. Scattered : STREWN
46. ___ one (nobody) : NARY A
48. Market add-on : -EER
50. Storms and others : GEOS
51. What can open laterally? : EQUI-
53. Star of the motivational video "Be Somebody ... or Be Somebody's Fool" : MR T
55. "Por ___ Cabeza" (tango standard) : UNA


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0928-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Sep 12, Friday

Announcement
I recently started solving the LA Times crossword, and a week ago I launched an LA Times crossword blog. If you work on the LA Times puzzle, then please check out my new blog at LAXCrossword.com. For that matter, if you know anyone who likes to solve the LA Times crossword, please think about sending them an email pointing them to LAXCrossword.com!



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ed Sessa
THEME: None
COMPLETION TIME: 35m 39s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Menlo Park middle name : ALVA
Thomas Alva Edison was nicknamed "The Wizard of Menlo Park" by a newspaper reporter, a name that stuck. He was indeed a wizard, in the sense that he was such a prolific inventor. The Menlo Park part of the moniker recognizes the location of his first research lab, in Menlo Park, New Jersey.

5. Musical with the song "Bui Doi" : MISS SAIGON
“Miss Saigon” is a musical that premiered in London in 1989, and one that is based on Puccini’s opera “Madame Butterfly”. “Miss Saigon” was written by Claude-Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil, the duo responsible for “Les Misérables”. My wife and I saw both shows in London during their heyday, and I much preferred “Miss Saigon”. Back then the big thing was to have a big “special effect” in a stage musical, and for “Miss Saigon” this is the landing of a life-size helicopter on the stage. At the performance we attended there was an announcement that “the helicopter was broken”, so we had a fun time watching actors running around pretending there was a helicopter in that climactic scene ...

16. What cosmologists wonder : ARE WE ALONE?
Cosmology is the study of the origin, evolution and fate of the Universe.

22. Aquí, across the Pyrénées : ICI
“Here” is “aqui” in Spanish and “ici” in French.

The Pyrénées is a mountain range that runs along the border between Spain and France. Nestled between the two countries, high in the mountains, is the lovely country of Andorra, an old haunt of my family during skiing season …

23. Dovetail part : TENON
One simple type of joint used in carpentry is a mortise and tenon, basically a projection carved at the end of one piece of wood that fits into a hole cut into the end of another. The mortise is the "hole" and the tenon is the "projection".

25. Like some mus. notes : STAC
Staccato is a musical direction signifying that notes should be played in a disconnected form. The opposite of staccato would be legato: long and continuous notes played very smoothly.

26. Judge in 1990s news : ITO
Judge Lance Ito came in for a lot of criticism for his handling of the O.J. Simpson murder trial. The lead prosecutor in that trial was Marcia Clark, you might recall. I read her book "Without a Doubt" a few years ago, and she pointed out one trait of Judge Ito that I think is quite telling. Ito would almost always refer to the prosecutor as "Marcia", while addressing the men on both sides of the case as "Mister".

27. Neverland resident : FAIRY
Neverland is home to Peter Pan, Tinker Bell, Captain Hook and other characters created by J. M. Barrie.

29. Maker of a special-delivery flight : STORK
In German and Dutch society, storks resting on the roof of a house were considered a sign of good luck. This tradition led to nursery stories that babies were brought to families by storks.

30. What shows its ribs? : CORDUROY
There’s a myth that the name of textile known as “corduroy” comes from the French “corde du roi” (the cord of the king). It’s more likely that “corduroy” comes from a melding of “cord” and “duroy” (a coarse fabric that used to be made in England).

35. St. ___ (English boys' school founded in 948) : ALBANS
St. Albans School in the East of England is one of the oldest schools in the world. St. Albans was founded in the year 948 AD. The long, long list of “Old Albanians” includes Pope Adrian IV, the only English Pope (from 1154 to 1159). A more recent graduate is the renowned theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, author of “A Brief History in Time”.

38. Stadium ear piercer : VUVUZELA
A vuvuzela is a simple horn that produces a loud monotone note. The vuvuzela is a big hit with soccer fans in South Africa, and is now heard in stadiums all round the world after it was was introduced to us in the 2010 FIFA World Cup that was held in South Africa.

43. Swing a thurible around : CENSE
A thurible is a device that holds burning incense. It is a metal chamber at the end of a long chain and plays a big part in many Christian ceremonies.

44. Texas hoopster : MAV
The Mavericks is the name of the NBA franchise in Dallas, Texas. The team was founded in 1980, and the Mavericks name was chosen by fan votes. The choice of “Mavericks” was prompted by the fact that the actor James Garner was a part-owner of the team, and Garner of course played the title role in the “Maverick” television series.

45. Phishing lure? : SCAM
Phishing is the name given to the online practice of stealing usernames, passwords and credit card details by pretending to be a reliable and trustworthy entity. Phishers often send out safe-looking emails or instant messages that direct someone to an equally safe-looking website where the person might inadvertently enter sensitive information. “Phishing” is a variant of the word “fishing”, as in “fishing” for passwords, PIN numbers etc.

46. Arabian parent : SIRE
The Arab (or Arabian) breed of horse takes its name from its original home, the Arabian Peninsula. Like any animal that humans have over-bred, the horse falls prey to genetic diseases, some of which are fatal and some of which require the horse to be euthanized.

47. Eclipse alternative : MIATA
I've always liked the looks of the Mazda Miata, probably because it reminds me so much of old British sports cars. The Miata is built in Hiroshima, Japan.

The Mitsubishi Eclipse is a sports car that has been in production since 1989, a right-hand-drive vehicle built mainly for Japan and the UK (although I think there are left-hand-drive versions available now). The Eclipse was named after an 18th century English racehorse.

49. Like chestnuts : OLD
An "old chestnut" is a joke that is "well worn". The origin of the expression is very specific. It dates back to a play by William Diamond, first produced in 1816. In the story, one of the characters keeps telling the same joke over and over, with minor variations. The joke is about a cork tree, and an exasperated listener after hearing the joke one time too many refutes the use of the cork tree saying, "A Chestnut. I have heard you tell the joke 27 times and I'm sure it was a Chestnut!"

50. It may follow a cut : DEAL
Cut the cards, then deal them …

51. Milk curdler : RENNET
Rennet is an enzyme complex that is produced in the stomach of mammals. Rennet is used by children to digest a mother’s milk. It is also used to coagulate milk in cheese production.

52. Classic Robert Burns poem, with "A" : RED, RED ROSE
“A Red, Red Rose” is a song and poem by Scottish poet Robert Burns. The Burns work is based on a traditional Scottish air.

55. Certain something : AURA
An aura (plural: aurae) is an intangible quality that surrounds a person or thing, a "je ne sais quoi". "Je ne sais quoi" is French for "I don't know".

58. People person : SCREEN IDOL
There used to be a “People” page in each issue of “Time” magazine. This page was spun-off in 1974 as a publication of its own, which we now call “People” magazine.

Down
1. Mahatma Gandhi, for one : ASCETIC
Mohandas Gandhi was a political and spiritual leader in India in the first part of the 20th century, when the country was seeking independence from Britain. Gandhi was also referred to as "Mahatma", meaning "great soul". His remarkable philosophy of nonviolence and living a modest lifestyle was a great inspiration to the Indian people. India (and Pakistan) was granted independence in 1947. Sadly, Gandhi was assassinated the very next year by a Hindu nationalist.

3. Atlantic follower, in Monopoly : VENTNOR
Atlantic Avenue and Ventnor Avenue are properties in the game of Monopoly. The street names in the US version of Monopoly are locations in or around Atlantic City, New Jersey.

4. Turf leader? : ASTRO-
AstroTurf is the trademarked name of an artificial playing surface suitable for many ball sports. AstroTurf was invented in 1965 and originally went on the market as ChemGrass. The first really big application was in 1996 in the Houston Astrodome, so the name “AstroTurf” was applied and has remained ever since.

8. Hyperhidrotic : SWEATY
Hyperhidrosis is a medical condition characterized by excessive perspiration, above and beyond what is normal.

9. Otto goes after it : SETTE
“Sette, otto” is Italian for “seven, eight”.

10. Swiss banks may be affiliated with it : AARE
The Aar (also called the "Aare" in German) is the longest river entirely in Switzerland. A famous spot along the river is the Reichenbach Falls in the center of the country, actually a series of waterfalls near the city of Meiringen. These falls are celebrated in the world of literature as it was here that Sherlock Holmes fell to his supposed doom with his nemesis Professor Moriarty (in "The Adventure of the Final Problem").

11. Pier grp. : ILA
The International Longshoremen's Association (ILA).

13. Draw for an inside straight, say : ONE CARD
I guess that to “one card” is to go for a winning hand in poker by exchanging just one card.

14. Old fast-food chain whose mascot's head was an orange : NEDICK’S
Nedick’s was a fast-food restaurant chain that started out in New York City around 1920. Nedick’s originally had a reputation for making a great orange drink, so the restaurant’s logo was a man with an orange for a head. The chain was founded by Robert Neely and Orville Dickinson who melded their own family names to arrive at “Nedick’s”.

24. ___ Homme (perfume brand) : DIOR
Dior Homme is a fragrance for men introduced in 2005. My guess is that the perfume line was named for Christian Dior’s menswear division, which is also called Dior Homme.

25. Blackhawk carmaker : STUTZ
The Stutz Motor Company was a manufacturer of luxury cars in Indianapolis. Stutz was noted as a producer of fast cars and luxury vehicles for the elite.

28. MoMA's "Two Heads" and "Birds in an Aquarium" : ARPS
Hans Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn't the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German, he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both "Hans" and "Jean" translate into English as "John". In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing in the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. He was sent home …

The founding of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City was very much driven by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, the wife of John D. Rockefeller, son of the oil magnate. Working with two friends, she managed to get the museum opened in 1929, just nine days after the Wall Street Crash. The MoMA's sculpture garden bears the name of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and has done so since 1949.

31. Directive for murder? : DIAL M
“Dial M for Murder” is a great stage play by Frederick Knott, famously adapted into an excellent 1954 movie directed by Alfred Hitchcock. I’ve seen the play a couple of times, and the movie countless times. Excellent entertainment …

36. Tank named after a French W.W. II general : LECLERC
Philippe Leclerc de Hauteclocque was a French general during WWII. The general was born Philippe François Marie, count of Hauteclocque. During the war, the count used an alias in the French Resistance, namely Jacques-Philippe Leclerc. After the war he officially changed his name, incorporating “Leclerc” from his days in the Resistance.

39. Daley's successor as mayor of Chicago : EMANUEL
The current Mayor of Chicago, Rahm Emanuel, was an Illinois representative in the US House before resigning to take up President Obama's offer to become the White House Chief of Staff.

41. Some self-images : AVATARS
The Sanskrit word "avatar" describes the concept of a deity descending into earthly life and taking on a persona. It's easy to see how in the world of "online presences" one might use the word avatar to describe one's online identity.

43. John who wrote the textbook "How Does a Poem Mean?" : CIARDI
John Ciardi was mainly known as a poet, from Boston. Ciardi wrote a textbook on how to read, write and teach poetry called “How Does a Poem Mean?”. He also published a famous translation of Dante’s “Divine Comedy”.

46. Many a cab : SEDAN
The American "sedan" car is the equivalent of the British "saloon" car. By definition, a sedan car has two rows of seating and a separate trunk (boot in the UK), although in some models the engine can be at the rear of the car.

50. Fool on the ice : DEKE
A deke, also known as a dangle, is a technique used to get past an opponent in ice hockey. "Deke" is a colloquial shortening of the word "decoy".

53. Singer Carly ___ Jepsen : RAE
Carly Rae Jepsen is a singer/songwriter from Mission, British Columbia. Jepsen got her start on “Canadian Idol”, when she placed third in the show’s fifth season.

54. Pou ___ (basis of operations) : STO
"Pou sto" is Greek, meaning "where I may stand". The phrase has it roots in words spoken by Archimedes, who said that he could move the earth if given a place to stand. In contemporary use it describes a place on which to stand, or a basis of operation.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Menlo Park middle name : ALVA
5. Musical with the song "Bui Doi" : MISS SAIGON
15. Receives, as a visitor : SEES
16. What cosmologists wonder : ARE WE ALONE?
17. Word for quitters : CAN’T
18. Got through : PENETRATED
19. Heat : ESTRUS
21. Gorge : SATE
22. Aquí, across the Pyrénées : ICI
23. Dovetail part : TENON
24. Be feeble-minded : DOTE
25. Like some mus. notes : STAC
26. Judge in 1990s news : ITO
27. Neverland resident : FAIRY
29. Maker of a special-delivery flight : STORK
30. What shows its ribs? : CORDUROY
32. Things that are shot or fought : ROUNDS
33. One way to resign : IN PROTEST
35. St. ___ (English boys' school founded in 948) : ALBANS
38. Stadium ear piercer : VUVUZELA
42. Chicken's yellow part? : BELLY
43. Swing a thurible around : CENSE
44. Texas hoopster : MAV
45. Phishing lure? : SCAM
46. Arabian parent : SIRE
47. Eclipse alternative : MIATA
49. Like chestnuts : OLD
50. It may follow a cut : DEAL
51. Milk curdler : RENNET
52. Classic Robert Burns poem, with "A" : RED, RED ROSE
55. Certain something : AURA
56. Be disengaging? : BREAK A DATE
57. Grow tiresome : WEAR
58. People person : SCREEN IDOL
59. Some brackets : ELLS

Down
1. Mahatma Gandhi, for one : ASCETIC
2. Provide for tenancy : LEASE TO
3. Atlantic follower, in Monopoly : VENTNOR
4. Turf leader? : ASTRO-
5. Hikers' helpers : MAPS
6. Madness : IRE
7. Potential downside of the information age : SENSORY OVERLOAD
8. Hyperhidrotic : SWEATY
9. Otto goes after it : SETTE
10. Swiss banks may be affiliated with it : AARE
11. Pier grp. : ILA
12. Began brawling : GOT IT ON
13. Draw for an inside straight, say : ONE CARD
14. Old fast-food chain whose mascot's head was an orange : NEDICK’S
20. Bombing at a comedy club : UNFUNNY
24. ___ Homme (perfume brand) : DIOR
25. Blackhawk carmaker : STUTZ
28. MoMA's "Two Heads" and "Birds in an Aquarium" : ARPS
29. "Yeah, I did it ... oh well!" : SO SUE ME
31. Directive for murder? : DIAL M
32. Quick spins? : REVS
34. Whistler's production : TUNE
35. Rivets : ABSORBS
36. Tank named after a French W.W. II general : LECLERC
37. Inflatable lining : BLADDER
39. Daley's successor as mayor of Chicago : EMANUEL
40. Pass out on the field? : LATERAL
41. Some self-images : AVATARS
43. John who wrote the textbook "How Does a Poem Mean?" : CIARDI
46. Many a cab : SEDAN
48. Knocked out : IN AWE
50. Fool on the ice : DEKE
51. Cousin of a jig : REEL
53. Singer Carly ___ Jepsen : RAE
54. Pou ___ (basis of operations) : STO


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0927-12: New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Sep 12, Thursday

Announcement
I recently started solving the LA Times crossword, and a week ago I launched an LA Times crossword blog. If you work on the LA Times puzzle, then please check out my new blog at LAXCrossword.com. For that matter, if you know anyone who likes to solve the LA Times crossword, please think about sending them an email pointing them to LAXCrossword.com!



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Joel Fagliano
THEME: ON/OFF SWITCH … each of the theme answers is a well-known term containing the words On and OFF, but the ON and OFF are switched:
18A. Sports team management group : FROFFT ONICE (from FRONT OFFICE)
29A. Digress : GO ON OFF A TANGENT (from GO OFF ON A TANGENT)
45A. What a mayor wins, usually : ON-YEAR ELECTIOFF (from OFF-YEAR ELECTION)
56A. Toggle ... or a hint to 18-, 29- and 45-Across? : ON/OFF SWITCH
COMPLETION TIME: 27m 48s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Part of a metaphorical ladder : JOB
A particular job can be a step up the ladder.

4. Any of the Galápagos : ISLA
Isla is the Spanish for "island".

The Galápagos Islands lie over 500 miles west of Ecuador. The Galápagos owe their celebrity to the voyage of HMS Beagle which landed there in 1835, with Charles Darwin on board. It was Darwin’s study of various species on the islands that inspired him to postulate his Theory of Evolution.

8. Color classification quality : CHROMA
Colorfulness, chroma and saturation are related concepts that help define the intensity of a particular color. Frankly, I don’t really understand the specifics!

15. "Angels From the Realms of Glory," e.g. : NOEL
“Angels From the Realms of Glory” is a lovely Christmas carol written by James Montgomery, an English poet. It was first published in 1816.

17. Cellphone feature, for short : GPS
GPS stands for Global Positioning System. The modern GPS system that we use today was built by the US military who received the massive funding needed because of fears during the Cold War about the use of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles. We civilians, all round the world, owe a lot to President Ronald Reagan because he directed the military to make GPS technology available to the public for the common good. He was moved to do so after the Soviet Union shot down KAL flight 007 carrying 269 people, just because the plane strayed accidentally into Soviet airspace.

24. Language for a 37-Down : ERSE
There are actually three Erse languages: Irish, Manx (spoken on the Isle of Man) and Scots Gaelic. In their own tongues, these would be Gaeilge (in Ireland), Gaelg (on the Isle of Man) and Gaidhlig (in Scotland).

28. California's ___ Padres National Forest : LOS
The Santa Barbara National Forest in California was renamed to Los Padres National Forest in 1936.

32. Word appearing more than 20 times on Iran's flag : ALLAH
The Iranian flag in use today was adopted in 1980, a product of the Iranian Revolution. The flag is a tricolor composed of horizontal bands of green, white and red. Included in the green and red bands are the repeated words “Allahu Akbar”, which translates as “God is great”.

34. ___ meteor shower : LEONID
The two most famous meteor showers are the Perseids and Leonids. The Perseid meteor shower is most visible around 12 August each year, and the Leonid meteor shower is most notable around 17 November. The Perseids appear to emanate from the constellation Perseus, and the Leonids from the constellation Leo.

44. Capital on the Gulf of Guinea : ACCRA
Accra sits on Ghana's coast and is a major seaport as well as the country's capital city. The name "Accra" comes from a local word "Nkran" meaning "ants", a name chosen because of the large number of anthills found in the area when the city was founded.

45. What a mayor wins, usually : ON-YEAR ELECTIOFF (from OFF-YEAR ELECTION)
Off-year elections are general elections held in odd-numbered years. Elections for federal, state and gubernatorial offices usually occur in even-numbered years. Off-year elections tend to be devoted to municipal offices, such as that of mayor.

50. Orion ___ : NEBULA
The Orion Nebula is found in the constellation of Orion, just south of Orion’s Belt. Orion’s Nebula is very bright and is easily seen with the naked eye.

51. French word with a circumflex : ETRE
The French for “to be” is “être”.

A circumflex is a diacritic mark used routinely in some languages, such as French. For example, there’s a circumflex over the first “e” in “être”, the French for “to be”.

53. What portable Apple products run : IOS
iOS is what Apple now call their mobile operating system, previously known as iPhone OS.

54. It can be found in runes : NORSE
A rune is a character in an alphabet that is believed to have mysterious powers. In Norse mythology, the runic alphabet was said to have a divine origin.

62. Classic 1740 romance subtitled "Virtue Rewarded" : PAMELA
Samuel Richardson’s 1740 novel “Pamela” has a well-suited subtitle: “Virtue Rewarded”. Pamela is a maid who continually resists the improper advances of her employer. Eventually, the unwelcome suitor makes a proper offer of marriage, which Pamela accepts. The remainder of the story is about Pamela developing a relationship with her new husband, and trying to get comfortable with her new station in life. Sounds like one to put on my reading list ...

64. Kind of dye : AZO
Azo compounds have very vivid colors and so are used to make dyes, especially dyes with the colors red, orange and yellow.

66. Architect Saarinen : EERO
Eero Saarinen was a Finnish American architect, renowned in this country for his unique designs for public buildings such as Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Dulles International Airport Terminal, and the TWA building at JFK.

Down
2. Out, in a way : ON PAROLE
The term "parole" is a French word that we use in English, with the French "parole" meaning "word, speech". Of particular interest is the French phrase "parole d'honneur" which translates as "word of honor". In the early 1600s we started using "parole" to mean a promise by a prisoner of war not to escape, as in the prisoner giving his "word of honor" not to run off. Over time, parole has come to mean conditional release of a prisoner before he or she has served the full term of a sentence.

6. 48-Down follower : LEO
48. 6-Down preceder : CANCER
The twelve astrological signs of the zodiac are, in order:
- Aries
- Taurus
- Gemini
- Cancer
- Leo
- Virgo
- Libra
- Scorpio
- Sagittarius
- Capricorn
- Aquarius
- Pisces

7. Movement founded by Yasser Arafat : AL FATAH
“Fatah” is actually an acronym, formed from the initials (in reverse) of "Palestinian National Liberation Movement". Al Fatah is the largest political party in the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO).

Yasser (also Yasir) Arafat was born in Cairo in 1929, the son of two Palestinians and the second-youngest of seven children. Arafat was beaten by his father as a child and so did not have a good relationship with him. Arafat did not attend his father's funeral, nor did he visit his grave. The beatings were apparently administered because the young Arafat was repeatedly attending religious services in the Jewish quarter of Cairo. Arafat's explanation was that he wanted to "study the mentality" of the Jewish people.

10. ___ Swanson, "Parks and Recreation" boss : RON
Ron Swanson is the boss, the director of the parks and recreation department on the NBC sitcom “Parks and Recreation”. Swanson is played by the actor Nick Offerman.

“Parks and Recreation” is a sitcom that started airing on NBC in 2009, and it is a show that has grown on me. It stars the "Saturday Night Live" alum, Amy Poehler. The creators of "Parks and Recreation" are part of the team responsible for the American version of “The Office”, so you’ll notice some similarities in the style of the two shows, and some actors that have appeared in both.

11. 13-Down athlete : ORIOLE
The Baltimore Orioles was one of the eight charter teams of MLB's American League, so the franchise dates back to 1901. Prior to 1901, the team has roots in the Minor League Milwaukee Brewers, and indeed entered the American League as the Brewers. In 1902 the Brewers moved to St. Louis and became the Browns. The team didn't fare well in St. Louis, so when it finally relocated to Baltimore in the early fifties the team changed its name completely, to the Baltimore Orioles. The owners so badly wanted a fresh start that they traded 17 old Browns players with the New York Yankees. The trade didn't help the team's performance on the field in those early days, but it did help distance the new team from its past.

12. Diacritical mark : MACRON
A macron is a diacritical mark placed above a vowel. It is a horizontal line and is used to indicate that the vowel is long.

19. Popular corn chip, informally : FRITO
The Frito Corporation was started in 1932 by Elmer Doolin, basically in his mother’s kitchen. Doolin paid $100 for a corn chip recipe from a local restaurant and started producing Fritos at the rate of 10 pounds per day.

21. Expiation : PENANCE
Expiation is the act of atonement, of doing penance.

24. Even in Paris? : EGAL
"Egal" is the French word for "equal, alike", and a word we sometimes use in English. The national motto of France is of course "Liberté, égalité, fraternité", meaning "Liberty, equality, fraternity (brotherhood).

26. Mixed martial arts org. : UFC
The Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) is a largest promoter in the world of mixed martial arts competitions. I think the idea is that competitors fight each other in various disciplines to see who is the “best of the best” ...

30. Many a Browns fan : OHIOAN
The Cleveland Browns football team was a charter member of the All-American Football Conference, formed in 1946. Cleveland is the only NFL city that has never hosted, and has never sent a team to the Super Bowl.

37. Arthur Conan Doyle, e.g. : SCOTSMAN
The Scottish writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is most closely associated with his wonderful character Sherlock Holmes. Doyle also wrote a series of science fiction stories featuring the character Professor Challenger. The first book in which Challenger appears is the famous "The Lost World", a story about prehistoric creatures that are found living in the modern age on an isolated plateau in South America.

38. "Batman" villain in a cryogenic suit : MR FREEZE
Mr. Freeze is one of Batman’s enemies. In the original “Batman” television series, Mr. Freeze was played by three big names in different episodes, namely George Sanders, Otto Preminger and Eli Wallach. More recently, Mr. Freeze was played on the big screen in 1997’s “Batman & Robin” by Arnold Schwarzenegger.

41. "America's favorite active pro athlete," per a 2012 ESPN poll : TEBOW
Tim Tebow is a quarterback playing for the Denver Broncos. Tebow was the first college sophomore to win the Heisman Trophy.

43. Singer Lana ___ Rey : DEL
Lana Del Ray is the stage name of singer/songwriter Elizabeth Grant. Del Ray calls herself a “self-styled gangsta Nancy Sinatra”. Nice …

45. Exotic aquarium specimens : OCTOPI
Octopi move around by swimming through the water, and walking across the seabed. However, their fastest means of locomotion is jet propulsion, when they squeeze water out explosively to the rear creating forward motion.

46. Speechwriter who coined the phrase "Read my lips: no new taxes" : NOONAN
Peggy Noonan is an author and columnist, and was once a speechwriter for President Ronald Reagan. Noonan was responsible for one of President Reagan's most-remembered speeches, when he addressed the nation after the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster. She also came up with some famous phrases used by President George H. W. Bush, such as "a kinder, gentler nation", "a thousand points of light" and "read my lips; no new taxes".

47. Classical musician whose career has had its ups and downs? : YOYO MA
Yo-Yo Ma is a marvelous American cellist, born in Paris to Chinese parents. Ma started studying the violin when he was very young, working his way up (in size) to the viola and finally to the cello. He has said that he wanted to play the double bass, but it was just too big for his relatively small frame.

58. Fourth-largest state in population: Abbr. : FLA
The largest US states by population are, in order:
- California
- Texas
- New York
- Florida
- Illinois
The largest US states by population density are, in order:
- New Jersey
- Rhode island
- Massachusetts
- Connecticut
- Maryland

59. N.H.L. impossibility : TIE
National Hockey League games cannot end in a tie. If the scores are even after regular play then there is an overtime period. If the scores are still tied then the game is decided by a penalty shootout.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Part of a metaphorical ladder : JOB
4. Any of the Galápagos : ISLA
8. Color classification quality : CHROMA
14. Italian article : UNA
15. "Angels From the Realms of Glory," e.g. : NOEL
16. Like psychopaths, say : AMORAL
17. Cellphone feature, for short : GPS
18. Sports team management group : FROFFT ONICE (from FRONT OFFICE)
20. "You missed ___" : A SPOT
22. Suffix with diet : -ARY
23. "... boy ___ girl?" : OR A
24. Language for a 37-Down : ERSE
25. Some navels : OUTIES
28. California's ___ Padres National Forest : LOS
29. Digress : GO ON OFF A TANGENT (from GO OFF ON A TANGENT)
32. Word appearing more than 20 times on Iran's flag : ALLAH
33. Like some music : CHORAL
34. ___ meteor shower : LEONID
36. Muscle cramps, e.g. : SPASMS
40. Covered : COATED
44. Capital on the Gulf of Guinea : ACCRA
45. What a mayor wins, usually : ONYEARELECTIOFF
49. Engage in some pillow talk : COO
50. Orion ___ : NEBULA
51. French word with a circumflex : ETRE
52. Play (with) : TOY
53. What portable Apple products run : IOS
54. It can be found in runes : NORSE
56. Toggle ... or a hint to 18-, 29- and 45-Across? : ON/OFF SWITCH
60. Kitten call : MEW
62. Classic 1740 romance subtitled "Virtue Rewarded" : PAMELA
63. Contests : VIES
64. Kind of dye : AZO
65. To some extent : IN A WAY
66. Architect Saarinen : EERO
67. Shiny, say : NEW

Down
1. ___-eared : JUG
2. Out, in a way : ON PAROLE
3. Certain jazz club improvisation : BASS SOLO
4. Dope : INFO
5. To some extent : SORT OF
6. 48-Down follower : LEO
7. Movement founded by Yasser Arafat : AL FATAH
8. Age calculation at a vet clinic : CAT YEARS
9. Medical grp. : HMO
10. ___ Swanson, "Parks and Recreation" boss : RON
11. 13-Down athlete : ORIOLE
12. Diacritical mark : MACRON
13. See 11-Down : AL EAST
19. Popular corn chip, informally : FRITO
21. Expiation : PENANCE
24. Even in Paris? : EGAL
26. Mixed martial arts org. : UFC
27. Lose one's patience with, maybe : SNAP AT
30. Many a Browns fan : OHIOAN
31. Epitome of slowness : GLACIER
35. "This may be controversial, but ..." : DARE I SAY
37. Arthur Conan Doyle, e.g. : SCOTSMAN
38. "Batman" villain in a cryogenic suit : MR FREEZE
39. Cry at home, maybe : SAFE
41. "America's favorite active pro athlete," per a 2012 ESPN poll : TEBOW
42. Slippery : ELUSIVE
43. Singer Lana ___ Rey : DEL
45. Exotic aquarium specimens : OCTOPI
46. Speechwriter who coined the phrase "Read my lips: no new taxes" : NOONAN
47. Classical musician whose career has had its ups and downs? : YOYO MA
48. 6-Down preceder : CANCER
55. Very : OH SO
57. Small number : FEW
58. Fourth-largest state in population: Abbr. : FLA
59. N.H.L. impossibility : TIE
61. "That's crazy!" : WOW


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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