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Vacation Alert

I am currently on vacation in Ireland, returning on October 9th. I am hoping to complete a blog post each evening, even if it is only the basics (solved grid and clues, plus explanation of theme). I apologize in advance if I am late in posting.

Bill

1101-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Nov 12, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: George Barany & Victor Barocas
THEME: BCC … each of the theme answers stretches across the whole grid from left to right, with the letters “CC” blind i.e. hidden behind black squares:
1A. With 4- & 9-Across, sports news of 1919 : BLA(C)K SOX S(C)ANDAL
17A. With 18- & 19-Across, Toys "R" Us department : ELE(C)TRONI(C) GAMES
34A. With 37- & 39-Across, Fredric March's last film : THE I(C)EMAN (C)OMETH
45A. With 47- & 48-Across, like some student activities : EXTRA(C)URRI(C)ULAR
64A. With 67- & 69-Across, role that garnered 12 consecutive unsuccessful Emmy nominations, 1985-96 : JESSI(C)A FLET(C)HER
73A. With 74- & 75-Across, "invisible" part of a distribution list ... or a hint to this puzzle's theme : BLIND (C)ARBON (C)OPY
COMPLETION TIME: 20m 14s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. With 4- & 9-Across, sports news of 1919 : BLA(C)K SOX S(C)ANDAL
In the 1919 Black Sox Scandal, eight Chicago White Sox players conspired to throw the World Series for financial gain. The tale is told in "Eight Men Out", a movie released in 1988 based on the book "8 Men Out" written by Eliot Asinof and published in 1963.

14. Part of E.N.T. : EAR
An Ear, Nose and Throat specialist is an ENT.

20. Figure in Raphael's "The School of Athens" : PLATO
Plato was a Greek philosopher and mathematician. He was a student of the equally famous and respected Socrates, and Plato in turn was the teacher and mentor of the celebrated Aristotle.

“The School of Athens” is a painting by Raphael, thought by many to be his masterpiece. The painting is a fresco, and can be seen in the Apostolic Palace in the Vatican.

26. Not moved from the original location : IN SITU
“In situ” is a Latin phrase meaning "in the place".

30. Lib ___ (U.K. party member) : DEM
For most of the 1980s, the UK’s Liberal and Social Democratic Parties were in an alliance, and then finally merged into a party called the Liberal Democrats in 1988. The Lib Dems were the third largest party after the 2010 general election, with neither of the top two parties having sufficient seats to form a government. The Lib Dems agreed to enter into a coalition with the Conservative Party, and so Tory David Cameron is now Prime Minister and Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg is Deputy Prime Minister.

34. With 37- & 39-Across, Fredric March's last film : THE I(C)EMAN (C)OMETH
"The Iceman Cometh" is a play written by American playwright Eugene O'Neill first performed in 1946, on Broadway. The play centers on some down-and-out men in a shabby saloon in Manhattan. The title is a reference to the "ice man", the man who would have delivered ice to homes back in the day. The reference is to a bawdy joke that the "ice man" was having an affair with someone's wife.

Fredric March was a stage and screen actor from Racine, Washington. March won the Best Actor Oscar twice, for performances in “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” in 1932 and “The Best Years of Our Lives” in 1946.

41. ___ Gallimard, protagonist of "M. Butterfly" : RENE
“M. Butterfly” is a 1988 play by David Henry Hwang, which was made into a film in 1993 starring Jeremy Irons and John Lone. The storyline is inspired by Puccini’s opera “Madama Butterfly”.

44. Tributary of the High Rhine : AARE
The Aar (also called the "Aare" in German) is the longest river entirely in Switzerland. A famous spot along the Aar is the Reichenbach Falls in the center of the country, actually a series of waterfalls near the city of Meiringen. These falls are celebrated in the world of literature as it was here that Sherlock Holmes fell to his supposed doom with his nemesis Professor Moriarty (in "The Adventure of the Final Problem").

49. Third of November? : VEE
The third letter in “November” is “V”.

52. Egyptian headdress feature : ASP
The asp is a venomous snake found in the Nile region of Africa. It is so venomous that the asp was used in ancient Egypt and Greece as a means of execution. Cleopatra observed such executions noting that the venom brought on sleepiness without any painful spasms. When the great queen opted to commit suicide, the asp was therefore her chosen method.

60. Like "Wedding Crashers" or "Bridesmaids" : R-RATED
Not only does the 2005 romantic comedy "Wedding Crashers" star Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn, but if you rent it you'll see cameos from Democratic pundit James Carville and Republican Senator John McCain.

“Bridesmaids” is a 2011 comedy movie co-written by and starring Kristen Wiig. I wasn’t mad about this film until Chris O’Dowd turned up as a traffic cop. Wiig and O’Dowd were great together I thought, pity about the rest of the movie …

63. A current flows into it : ANODE
The two terminals of a battery are called the anode and the cathode. Electrons travel from the anode to the cathode creating an electric current.

64. With 67- & 69-Across, role that garnered 12 consecutive unsuccessful Emmy nominations, 1985-96 : JESSI(C)A FLET(C)HER
Jessica Fletcher is the lead character in the television show “Murder, She Wrote”. Jessica was played by veteran actress Angela Lansbury.

70. Brother of Moses : AARON
In the Bible and the Qur'an, Aaron was the older brother of Moses and was a prophet. Aaron became the first High Priest of the Israelites.

72. Iraq war danger, for short : IED
Sadly, having spent much of my life in the border areas between southern and Northern Ireland, I am all too familiar with the devastating effects of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs). No matter what one's politics, one has to admire the bravery of soldiers who spend their careers defusing (or attempting to defuse) such devices in order to save the lives and property of others. Of course these days IEDs are very much in the news in Iraq and Afghanistan.

73. With 74- & 75-Across, "invisible" part of a distribution list ... or a hint to this puzzle's theme : BLIND (C)ARBON (C)OPY
A blind carbon copy (Bcc) is a copy of a document or message that is sent to someone without other recipients of the message knowing about that extra copy.

I wonder do the kids of today know that "cc" stands for carbon copy, and do they have any idea what a carbon copy was? Do you remember how messy carbon paper was to handle?

Down
2. ___ column (construction piece) : LALLY
A lally column provides vertical support to horizontal beams in a building. The lally column is a hollow steel column, filled with concrete so that it resists buckling. The column takes its name from its inventor, American John Lally, who started producing them in the 1800s.

4. Organic compound with a double-bonded oxygen : KETONE
Ketones are organic compounds. Many sugars are ketones, as is the solvent acetone.

5. Isl. south of Corsica : SAR
Sardinia is an autonomous region of Italy, an island in the Mediterranean off the west coast of the country and south of the French island of Corsica. Sardinia is the second largest island in the Mediterranean (Sicily is the largest).

Corsica is a large island in the Mediterranean Sea belonging to France. Napoléon Bonaparte was born on Corsica, in the town of Ajaccio.

6. "___ mio" : O SOLE
"'O sole mio" is a famous Italian song from Naples, written in 1898. The lyrics are usually sung in the original Neapolitan, as opposed to Italian. The title translates from Neapolitan into "My Sun" (and not into "O, My Sun" as one might expect). It's a love song of course, sung by a young man declaring that there is a sun brighter than that in the sky, the sun that is his lover's face. Awww ...

7. Princess known as the Defender of the Elijans : XENA
The Xena character, famously played by actress Lucy Lawless, was introduced in a made-for-TV movie called “Hercules and the Amazon Women”. Lawless reprised the role in a series called "Hercules: The Legendary Journeys". Xena became so popular that a series was built around her character, with Lawless retained for the role.

9. Composer Dominick whose name means "silver" in Italian : ARGENTO
Dominick Argento is a classical composer from York, Pennsylvania. Argento has written fourteen operas in all, the most famous probably being “Postcard from Morocco”.

12. Enzyme suffix : -ASE
Enzymes are basically catalysts, chemicals that act to increase the rate of a particular chemical reaction. For example, starches will break down into sugars over time, especially under the right conditions. However, in the presence of the enzyme amylase (found in saliva) this production of sugar happens very, very quickly.

13. "___ Miz" : LES
The 1980 musical "Les Miserables" is an adaptation of the 1862 novel of the same name by Victor Hugo. The show opened in London in 1985, and is the longest running musical in the history of London's West End. My wife and I saw "Les Miz" in the Queen's Theatre in London quite a few years ago, but were only able to get tickets in the very back row. The theater seating is very steep, so the back row of the balcony is extremely high over the stage. One of the big events in the storyline is the building of a street barricade over which the rebels fight. At the height we were seated we could see the stagehands behind the barricade, sitting drinking Coke, even having a cigarette. On cue they would get up and catch a dropped rifle or an actor that had been shot. It was pretty comical. I didn't really enjoy the show that much, to be honest. Some great songs, but the storyline seemed to get lost ...

25. Feds : G-MEN
The nickname “G-men” is short for "Government Men" and refers to agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

28. Aquarium fish : TETRA
The neon tetra is a freshwater fish, native to parts of South America. The tetra is a very popular aquarium fish and millions are imported into the US every year. Almost all of the imported tetras are farm-raised in Asia and very few come from their native continent.

31. N.F.L. record-holder for consecutive starts : FAVRE
Brett Favre is best known as the former starting-quarterback for the Green Bay Packers, and now plays for the Minnesota Vikings. Among the many NFL records held by Favre, he has thrown the most career touchdown passes, and has made the most consecutive starts.

32. Embarassing spelling mistake? : ONE R
“Embarassing” should be spelled with two Rs, not one R.

34. Fountain name : TREVI
The Trevi Fountain is a huge fountain in Rome, the largest constructed in the Baroque style. The tradition is that if one throws a coin in the fountain, one is guaranteed a return visit to the city one day. Tourists throw in an amazing 3,000 euros (over $4,000) every day. The money is collected and is used to stock a supermarket for the needy of the city.

35. Spells : HEXES
"Hexen" is a German word meaning "to practice witchcraft". The use of the word "hex" in English started with the Pennsylvania Dutch in the early 1800s.

40. "Tales of the City" novelist : MAUPIN
“Tales of the City” is a series of eight novels written by Armistead Maupin. The original stories were published in serial form in a couple of San Francisco newspapers.

46. Ute or Cree : AMERIND
The Amerind peoples are the indigenous people of the Americas. “Amerind” is a portmanteau of the words “American” and “indigenous”.

51. What's put before the carte? : A LA
“Carte” is a word sometimes used in French for a menu. Menu items that are "à la carte" are priced and ordered separately, as opposed to "table d'hôte" which is a fixed price menu with limited choice.

53. New York's ___ Island : STATEN
Staten Island is part of New York City and is the least populous of the city's five boroughs. The island was originally called Staaten Eylandt by Henry Hudson and was named after the Dutch parliament, the Staaten Generaal.

55. "Backdraft" crime : ARSON
“Backdraft” is a very compelling action movie released in 1991. Directed by the great Ron Howard, the film stars Kurt Russell and Robert De Niro in a story about Chicago firefighters who are up against a dangerous arsonist. There used to be a special effects show based on “Backdraft” at Universal Studios Hollywood. We took our kids to see that show, and that turned out to be a mistake. They left it in tears having been scared out of their skins …

56. Wing it : AD LIB
"Ad libitum" is a Latin phrase meaning "at one's pleasure". In common usage the phrase is usually shortened to "ad lib". On the stage the concept of an "ad lib" is very familiar. For example, an actor may substitute his or her own words for forgotten lines using an ad lib, or a director may instruct an actor to use his or her own words at a particular point in a performance to promote a sense of spontaneity.

57. Bygone gas brand : SOHIO
Standard Oil of Ohio was formed in 1911, and was one of the companies that resulted from the breakup of John D. Rockefeller’s behemoth Standard Oil. The company used the brand name “Sohio” at service stations within Ohio, and “Boron” in other states. Sohio merged with BP in 1968.

61. Spanish appetizer : TAPA
"Tapa" is the Spanish word for "lid", and there is no clear rationale for why this word came to be used for an appetizer. There are lots of explanations cited, all of which seem to involve the temporary covering of one's glass of wine with a plate or item of food to either preserve the wine or give one extra space at the table.

66. ___ Lanka : SRI
The name Sri Lanka translates from Sanskrit into English as "venerable island". Before 1970, Sri Lanka was known as Ceylon, a name given to the country during British rule. The lion on the country’s national flag symbolizes the fight against British colonialism.

68. "___ Beso" : ESO
"Eso Beso" is Spanish for "That Kiss", and is the name of a hit song recorded by Canadian-born singer Paul Anka.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. With 4- & 9-Across, sports news of 1919 : BLA(C)K SOX S(C)ANDAL
14. Part of E.N.T. : EAR
15. Stand for a sitting : EASEL
16. Part of a waste reduction strategy : REUSE
17. With 18- & 19-Across, Toys "R" Us department : ELE(C)TRONI(C) GAMES
20. Figure in Raphael's "The School of Athens" : PLATO
22. Painter's aid : LADDER
24. Drawer at a doctor's office? : SYRINGE
26. Not moved from the original location : IN SITU
30. Lib ___ (U.K. party member) : DEM
31. Times or Century : FONT
33. Some French? : DES
34. With 37- & 39-Across, Fredric March's last film : THE I(C)EMAN (C)OMETH
41. ___ Gallimard, protagonist of "M. Butterfly" : RENE
42. Something to contemplate : NAVEL
44. Tributary of the High Rhine : AARE
45. With 47- & 48-Across, like some student activities : EXTRA(C)URRI(C)ULAR
49. Third of November? : VEE
50. Like bright red cardinals : MALE
52. Egyptian headdress feature : ASP
54. Children of ___ (descendants of Jacob) : ISRAEL
56. Goldsmith, for one : ARTISAN
60. Like "Wedding Crashers" or "Bridesmaids" : R-RATED
63. A current flows into it : ANODE
64. With 67- & 69-Across, role that garnered 12 consecutive unsuccessful Emmy nominations, 1985-96 : JESSI(C)A FLET(C)HER
70. Brother of Moses : AARON
71. Beauty pageant judging criterion : POISE
72. Iraq war danger, for short : IED
73. With 74- & 75-Across, "invisible" part of a distribution list ... or a hint to this puzzle's theme : BLIND (C)ARBON (C)OPY

Down
1. Urban cacophony : BEEPS
2. ___ column (construction piece) : LALLY
3. Toward the back : AREAR
4. Organic compound with a double-bonded oxygen : KETONE
5. Isl. south of Corsica : SAR
6. "___ mio" : O SOLE
7. Princess known as the Defender of the Elijans : XENA
8. Declined, as stocks : SLID
9. Composer Dominick whose name means "silver" in Italian : ARGENTO
10. Almost reaches : NEARS
11. Musical syllable before and after "da" : DUM
12. Enzyme suffix : -ASE
13. "___ Miz" : LES
21. Comparatively neat : TIDIER
23. Racket : DIN
25. Feds : G-MEN
27. Model : IDEAL
28. Aquarium fish : TETRA
29. Program presenter : USHER
31. N.F.L. record-holder for consecutive starts : FAVRE
32. Embarassing spelling mistake? : ONE R
34. Fountain name : TREVI
35. Spells : HEXES
36. Sign with an arrow : ENTER
38. Mangle : MAUL
40. "Tales of the City" novelist : MAUPIN
43. Make-up person? : LIAR
46. Ute or Cree : AMERIND
51. What's put before the carte? : A LA
53. New York's ___ Island : STATEN
55. "Backdraft" crime : ARSON
56. Wing it : AD LIB
57. Bygone gas brand : SOHIO
58. "Take ___ breath" : A DEEP
59. Uncool : NERDY
61. Spanish appetizer : TAPA
62. Get an ___ effort : E FOR
64. Get one's point across? : JAB
65. Suffix with arbor or ether : -EAL
66. ___ Lanka : SRI
68. "___ Beso" : ESO

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1031-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Oct 12, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Stu Ockman
THEME: Concoction from Macbeth … four of the theme answers are ingredients in the BREW concocted by the three WITCHES in Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”. Maybe they boiled up their evil elixir for Halloween?
17A. 64-Across ingredient : TOOTH OF WOLF
21A. 64-Across ingredient : SLIPS OF YEW
40A. 64-Across ingredient : BLIND-WORM’S STING
57A. 64-Across ingredient : LIZARD’S LEG
64A. "Macbeth" recipe : WITCHES BREW
COMPLETION TIME: 23m 50s!
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. Billy of "Titanic" : ZANE
Billy Zane is an actor from Chicago, Illinois. One of Zane’s most prominent roles was the title character in the 1996 superhero film called “The Phantom”. He also played the somewhat creepy bad guy in the 1989 thriller movie called “Dead Calm”.

11. "Eternally nameless" Chinese principle : TAO
The Chinese character "tao" translates as "path", but the concept of Tao signifies the true nature of the world.

15. Ruler of Asgard : ODIN
In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. Odin's wife Frigg was the queen of Asgard whose name gave us our English term "Friday" (via Anglo-Saxon). Odin's son was Thor, and his name gave us the term "Thursday".

16. Tool with a curved head : ADZ
An adze (also adz) is similar to an axe, but different in that the blade of an adze is set at right angles to the tool's shaft. An axe's blade is set in line with the shaft.

19. "From my cold, dead hands!" sloganeer : NRA
The National Rifle Association (NRA) used the slogan “I’ll give you my gun when you pry it from my cold, dead hands”. These words became quite famous when they were used at an NRA convention in 2000 by Charlton Heston, who was then president of the NRA. Heston ended a speech he made with the words “From my cold, dead hands!” while holding up into the air a replica of a Sharps rifle.

20. "Elephant Boy" boy : SABU
The 1937 British film "Elephant Boy" starred a young Indian elephant driver called Sabu Dastagir. Sabu (he was often known just by the one name) made more British films over the next few years, including "The Thief of Baghdad" in 1940 and the 1942 version of "The Jungle book". Sabu moved to Hollywood and became a US citizen in 1944. He joined the US Army Air Forces and served as a tail gunner in the Pacific, eventually winning the Distinguished Flying Cross for valor and bravery. Sadly, in 1963 Sabu died of a heart attack at only 39 years of age.

23. Bireme or trireme tool : OAR
Triremes were galleys used in the Mediterranean by a number of cultures, including the Ancient Greeks and Romans. The trireme was so called because there were three rows of oars on each side of the vessel. The term “trireme” comes from the Latin “tres remi” meaning “three-oar”. There was also a less ambitious version of the trireme that had only two banks of oars, and that was known as a bireme.

27. Eve who wrote "The Vagina Monologues" : ENSLER
Eve Ensler is a playwright whose most famous work is “The Vagina Monologues”. When Ensler was only 23 years of age she adopted a 15 year old boy. We are familiar with that boy on the big screen these days … actor Dylan McDermott.

31. Capt. Jean-___ Picard : LUC
When Gene Roddenberry was creating the “Star Trek” spin-off series “Star Trek: The Next Generation”, I think he chose a quite magnificent name for the new starship captain. The name "Jean-Luc Picard" is imitative of one or both of the twin-brother Swiss scientists Auguste and Jean Felix Piccard. The role of Picard was of course played by the wonderful Shakespearean actor Patrick Stewart.

36. "___ Ben Adhem" : ABOU
Abou Ben Adhem, also known as Ibrahim Bin Adham, was an Arab Muslim saint. He was made famous in the western world with the publication in 1838 of the poem "Abou Ben Adhem" that was composed by James Henry Leigh Hunt, the English poet.

45. French seasoning : SEL
"Sel" is the French word for "salt".

46. GPS display features: Abbr. : RDS
GPS stands for Global Positioning System. The modern GPS system that we use today was built by the US military who received the massive funding needed because of fears during the Cold War of the use of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles. We civilians, all round the world, owe a lot to President Ronald Reagan because he directed the military to make GPS technology available to the public for the common good. President Reagan was moved to do so after the Soviet Union shot down KAL flight 007 carrying 269 people, just because the plane strayed accidentally into Soviet airspace.

48. Strut one's stuff, say : SASHAY
To "sashay" is to strut along in a showy manner. “Sashay” is an Anglicized form of the French word “chassé”, a sliding step used in square dancing.

50. Illinois senator who became president : OBAMA
President Obama served three terms in the Illinois State Senate, from 1997 to 2004. The future President ran unsuccessfully for the US House of Representatives in 2000, and then successfully for the US Senate in 2004. Famously, State Senator Obama delivered the keynote address to the Democratic National Convention in 2004, just a few months before winning that US Senate seat.

53. Jacuzzi sigh : AAH
Jacuzzi is one of those brand names that has become so much associated with the product that it is often assumed to be a generic term. The Jacuzzi company was founded in 1915 by the seven (!) Jacuzzi brothers in Berkeley  California. The brothers, who were Italian immigrants, pronounced their name "ja-coot-si", as one might suspect when one realizes the name is of Italian origin. The company started off by making aircraft propellers and then small aircraft, but suspended aircraft production in 1925 when one the brothers was killed in one of their planes. The family then started making hydraulic pumps, and in 1948 developed a submersible bathtub pump so that a son of one of the brothers could enjoy hydrotherapy for his rheumatoid arthritis. The "hydrotherapy product" took off in the fifties with some astute marketing towards "worn-out housewives" and the use of celebrity spokesman Jack Benny.

56. Muscle car in a 1964 song : GTO
GTO stands for Gran Turismo Omologato.

60. Some calls to smokeys : APBS
An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

In CB slang a “smokey” is a police officer. The term is used because Smokey Bear, the US Forest Service’s mascot, wears a hat that is similar to that worn by many highway patrol officers.

63. Cousin ___ of '60s TV : ITT
In the television sitcom "The Addams Family", the family had a frequent visitor called Cousin Itt. Itt is a short man with long hair that runs from his head to the floor. Cousin Itt was played by Italian actor Felix Silla.

64. "Macbeth" recipe : WITCHES BREW
As the three witches in Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” are boiling up their evil brew, they call out all the exotic ingredients. Stirring away they also repeat several times the famous lines:
Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.

66. Flock formation : VEE
Apparently geese fly in that V-formation for a couple of reasons. One is that it makes for efficient flight and conserves energy. The leading bird gets no advantage, but every following bird gets to "slipstream" a little. It has been noted that the lead bird drops to the back of the formation when he/she gets fatigued. It's also thought that the flock can stick together more easily when in formation, so it is more difficult to lose someone along the way.

68. Banned book of 1955 : LOLITA
Vladimir Nabokov's novel "Lolita" has a famously controversial storyline, dealing with a middle-aged man's obsession and sexual relationship with a 12-year-old girl. Although "Lolita" is considered a classic today, after Nabokov finished it in 1953 the edgy subject matter made it impossible for him to find a publisher in the US (where Nabokov lived). In 1955, he resorted to publishing it in English at a printing house in Paris. Publication was followed by bans and seizures all over Europe. A US printing house finally took on the project in 1958, by which time the title had such a reputation that it sold exceptionally quickly. "Lolita" became the first book since "Gone with the Wind" to sell over 100,000 copies in its first three weeks in stores.

70. "A Doll's House" wife : NORA
"A Doll's House" is probably the most famous play by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. The play deals with the feminist awakening of the lead character, Nora Helmer, and is sometimes referred to as the "first true feminist play".

71. Playwright Bertolt : BRECHT
Bertolt Brecht was a poet and playwright from Augsburg in Germany. Brecht’s most famous work here in North America is probably “The Threepenny Opera”, which was a collaboration with Kurt Weill.

Down
2. Greek colonnade : STOA
A stoa was a covered walkway in Ancient Greece. A stoa usually consisted of columns lining the side of a building or buildings, with another row of columns defining the other side of the walkway. The columns supported a roof. Often stoae would surround marketplaces in large cities.

3. Notable nose : PROBOSCIS
A proboscis is a long appendage attached to the head of an animal, sometimes referred to as an elongated “nose”. Many an insect has a proboscis, as does the elephant.

6. Some referee calls, for short : TKOS
In boxing, a knockout (KO) is when one of the fighters can't get up from the canvas within a specified time, usually 10 seconds. This can be due to fatigue, injury, or the participant may be truly "knocked out". A referee, fighter or doctor may also decide to stop a fight without a physical knockout, especially if there is concern about a fighter's safety. In this case the bout is said to end with a technical knockout (TKO).

11. Tucker who sang "Delta Dawn" : TANYA
Country singer Tanya Tucker's first hit was "Delta Dawn" in 1972, which she recorded at only 13 years of age.

12. Pertinent, in law : AD REM
The Latin term “ad rem” translates literally as "to the matter".

13. Conductor Seiji : OZAWA
Seiji Ozawa is most famous for his work as music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, although he is also the principal conductor of the Vienna State Opera. Ozawa is renowned for wearing a white turtleneck under his dress suit when he conducts, rather than the traditional starched shirt and white tie.

22. Rose Parade entry : FLOAT
Pasadena, California is famous for hosting the annual Rose Bowl football game, as well as the related Tournament of Roses Parade.

24. Bassoon part in two pieces : REED
Our modern bassoon first appeared in the 1800s and has had a place in the concert orchestra ever since.

27. Isle of exile : ELBA
I had a lovely two-week vacation in Tuscany once, including what was supposed to be a two-night stay on the island of Elba. I had envisioned Elba as a place full of history, and maybe it is, but it is also overrun with tourists who use it as a beach getaway. We left after one day and we won't be going back again …

29. Singer of 1976's "You'll Never Find Another Love Like Mine" : RAWLS
Lou Rawls was an American soul and blues singer known for his smooth vocal style. With his singing career well on the way, Rawls was asked to sing "The Star Spangled Banner" in 1977 at a Muhammad Ali fight in Madison Square Garden. This performance led to him being asked to sing the anthem many, many times in the coming years at sports events, with his last rendition being at a World Series game in 2005. Rawls passed away in January of the following year.

30. Church recesses : APSES
The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

33. The Great Lakes' ___ Locks : SOO
In the summer of 2010 I spent a very interesting afternoon watching ships make their way through the Soo Locks and Soo Canal between Lake Superior and the lower Great lakes. The name "Soo" comes from the US and Canadian cities on either side of the locks, both called Sault Ste. Marie.

34. Suffix with ranch : -ERO
A ranchero is one employed on a ranch and is a word with Spanish roots.

38. Draft-ready : ONE-A
The US government maintains information on all males who are potentially subject to military conscription, using what is called the Selective Service System. In the event that a draft was held, men registered would be classified into groups to determine eligibility for service. Class 1-A registrants are those available for unrestricted military service. Other classes are 1-A-O (conscientious objector available for noncombatant service), 4-A (registrant who has completed military service) and 4-D (Minister of religion).

41. "Goodbye, ___ Jean ..." : NORMA
“Candle in the Wind” is a 1973 song written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin in honor of Marilyn Monroe, hence the lyric “Goodbye, Norma Jean”. Elton John rewrote some of the words in honor of Diana, Princess of Wales and performed it at the princess’s memorial service. The line most descriptive of Diana in the 1997 version is “Goodbye, English rose”.

47. Australian city named after a naturalist : DARWIN
Darwin is the capital and largest city in the Northern Territory of Australia. HMS Beagle landed in the area in 1839. A lieutenant on the ship called the location Port Darwin, in honor of the famed naturalist Charles Darwin. Darwin wasn't on board the Beagle at the time, but he had been on the vessel’s prior voyage.

50. Antipasto bit : OLIVE
Antipasto is the first course of a meal in Italy. “Antipasto” translates as “before the meal”.

52. Member of an empire ruled by the Mexica : AZTEC
The Aztec people of Central America dominated the region in the 14th-16th centuries. Two traits of the Aztec people are oft cited today. They built some magnificent pyramids, and they also engaged in human sacrifice. The two traits were linked in a way. For the consecration of the Great Pyramid of Tenochtitlan, 84,400 prisoners were sacrificed over a period of four days.

54. Name in kitchen foil : ALCOA
The Aluminum Corporation of America (ALCOA) is the largest producer of aluminum in the United States. The company was founded in 1888 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where its headquarters are to this day.

58. Lover of Aeneas : DIDO
Dido was the founder of Carthage, and it’s first queen.

Aeneas was a Trojan who traveled to Italy and became the ancestor of all Romans. Aeneas’s story is told in Virgil’s epic poem “The Aeneid”.

59. Peter ___, general manager of the Met : GELB
Peter Gelb is the General Manager of the Metropolitan Opera in New York City. Peter is the son of Arthur Gelb who was once Managing Editor of “The New York Times”.

61. Aleph follower : BETH
Aleph is the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and beth the second.

62. Police jacket letters : SWAT
SWAT is an acronym for Special Weapons and Tactics. The first SWAT team was pulled together in the Los Angeles Police Department in 1968.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Quick wit : ESPRIT
7. Billy of "Titanic" : ZANE
11. "Eternally nameless" Chinese principle : TAO
14. In harm's way : AT RISK
15. Ruler of Asgard : ODIN
16. Tool with a curved head : ADZ
17. 64-Across ingredient : TOOTH OF WOLF
19. "From my cold, dead hands!" sloganeer : NRA
20. "Elephant Boy" boy : SABU
21. 64-Across ingredient : SLIPS OF YEW
23. Bireme or trireme tool : OAR
25. "On the other hand ..." : YET
26. Andean wool source : LLAMA
27. Eve who wrote "The Vagina Monologues" : ENSLER
30. Commotion : ADO
31. Capt. Jean-___ Picard : LUC
32. Relax : EASE UP
36. "___ Ben Adhem" : ABOU
40. 64-Across ingredient : BLIND-WORM’S STING
43. "Wait! There's more ..." : ALSO
44. Relax : LOOSEN
45. French seasoning : SEL
46. GPS display features: Abbr. : RDS
48. Strut one's stuff, say : SASHAY
50. Illinois senator who became president : OBAMA
53. Jacuzzi sigh : AAH
56. Muscle car in a 1964 song : GTO
57. 64-Across ingredient : LIZARD’S LEG
60. Some calls to smokeys : APBS
63. Cousin ___ of '60s TV : ITT
64. "Macbeth" recipe : WITCHES BREW
66. Flock formation : VEE
67. Prefix with -logical : IDEO-
68. Banned book of 1955 : LOLITA
69. PC key : ESC
70. "A Doll's House" wife : NORA
71. Playwright Bertolt : BRECHT

Down
1. Snacks on : EATS
2. Greek colonnade : STOA
3. Notable nose : PROBOSCIS
4. Fraternity initiation, e.g. : RITUAL
5. Roughly: Suffix : -ISH
6. Some referee calls, for short : TKOS
7. "Fantabulous!" : ZOWIE
8. Take up, as a cause : ADOPT
9. Zeros, in soccer : NILS
10. Wrap around : ENFOLD
11. Tucker who sang "Delta Dawn" : TANYA
12. Pertinent, in law : AD REM
13. Conductor Seiji : OZAWA
18. It may be embarrassing if it's open : FLY
22. Rose Parade entry : FLOAT
24. Bassoon part in two pieces : REED
27. Isle of exile : ELBA
28. Lacking value : NULL
29. Singer of 1976's "You'll Never Find Another Love Like Mine" : RAWLS
30. Church recesses : APSES
33. The Great Lakes' ___ Locks : SOO
34. Suffix with ranch : -ERO
35. Stalling-for-time syllables : UMS
37. Seat of a Catholic official : BISHOPRIC
38. Draft-ready : ONE-A
39. Hard on the eyes : UGLY
41. "Goodbye, ___ Jean ..." : NORMA
42. Grab onto : SNAG
47. Australian city named after a naturalist : DARWIN
49. Hospital condition : STABLE
50. Antipasto bit : OLIVE
51. What fishermen hope for : BITES
52. Member of an empire ruled by the Mexica : AZTEC
53. Cousin of a daisy : ASTER
54. Name in kitchen foil : ALCOA
55. Villain's chuckle : HEH
58. Lover of Aeneas : DIDO
59. Peter ___, general manager of the Met : GELB
61. Aleph follower : BETH
62. Police jacket letters : SWAT
65. College women's grp. : SOR

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1030-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Oct 12, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Alex Vratsanos
THEME: The Political Spectrum … the circled letters spell out political positions when read from top to bottom, with each position getting more conservative when moving from left to right:
- RADICAL
- LIBERAL
- MODERATE
- CONSERVATIVE
- REACTIONARY
COMPLETION TIME: 08m 45s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Singer Lou : RAWLS
Lou Rawls was an American soul and blues singer known for his smooth vocal style. With his singing career well on the way, Rawls was asked to sing "The Star Spangled Banner" in 1977 at a Muhammad Ali fight in Madison Square Garden. This performance led to him being asked to sing the anthem many, many times in the coming years with his last rendition being at a World Series game in 2005. Rawls passed away in January of the following year.

6. Latin 101 word : AMAT
"Amo, amas, amat: ... "I love, you love, he/she/it loves", in Latin.

10. Mystery writer John Dickson ___ : CARR
John Dickson Carr was an American author of crime fiction. Carr's most famous work is "The Hollow Man" published in 1935, a so-called "locked room mystery" in which two murders are committed in apparently impossible circumstances. "The Hollow Man" was selected in 1981 as the best "locked room mystery" of all time.

15. ___ Ness : LOCH
The Loch Ness monster has been talked about for centuries, but modern interest started in 1933 when a spate of sightings was reported. Those sightings don't seem to have stopped, with photographs really sparking the imagination.

16. Double curve : OGEE
An ogee is like an s-curve. Specifically it is a figure consisting of two arcs that curve in opposite directions (like an S) but both ends of the curve end up parallel to each other (which is not necessarily true for an S).

17. Competition for 3-year-olds : DERBY
A derby is a horserace, especially for 3-year-olds.

19. "The Lion King" lioness : NALA
In "The Lion King", Nala is a lioness and the childhood friend of Simba.

22. Resin in varnish : MASTIC
Mastic is a resin taken from the mastic tree. The resin can be dried then chewed like a gum. It is this characteristic that gave the tree its name, as the Greek verb "mastichein" means "to gnash the teeth". This is the same Greek root that gives us our word "masticate" meaning to chew.

26. City in Ukraine or Texas : ODESSA
The city of Odessa in Ukraine was founded relatively recently, in 1794 by Catherine the Great. The city was originally meant to be called Odessos after an ancient Greek city believed to have been located nearby. Catherine liked the way the locals pronounced the name as "Odessa", so went with the less Greek-sounding name.

The city of Odessa, Texas has as its symbol the jack rabbit. This is because from the thirties through the seventies, the city hosted a rodeo for roping rabbits. The Humane Society applied pressure and the city did away with the tradition in 1977.

30. Roy G. ___ : BIV
“Roy G. Biv” is an acronym for the colors in a rainbow:
Red
Orange
Yellow
Green
Blue
Indigo
Violet

33. Something that makes stops on the ocean? : AVAST
Avast is a nautical term used to tell someone to stop or desist from what they are doing. The word comes from the Dutch "hou vast" meaning "hold fast".

39. Mythical hunter : ORION
The very recognizable constellation of Orion is of course named after the Greek God Orion, the Hunter. If you take a look at the star in Orion's "right shoulder", the second brightest star in the constellation, you might notice that it is quite red in color. This is the famous star called Betelgeuse, a red supergiant, a huge star that is on its way out. Betelgeuse is expected to explode into a supernova within the next thousand years or so. You don't want to miss that ...

41. "The Time Machine" race : ELOI
In the 1895 novel by H. G. Wells called "The Time Machine", there were two races that the hero encountered in his travels into the future. The Eloi are the “beautiful people” who live on the planet's surface, while the Morlocks are a race of cannibals living underground who use the Eloi as food.

42. Medicinal plant : SENNA
Sennas are used as purgatives and laxatives.

44. ___ throat : STREP
Streptococcus bacteria multiply and divide along a single axis so that they form linked chains. That behavior gives the genus of bacteria its name, as “streptos” is Greek for “easily twisted, like a chain”. I had a battle with streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat) recently and it was not at all pleasant, I must say. Another species of streptococcus is responsible for that terrible “flesh-eating” infection that makes the news from time to time.

46. Rock genre : EMO
The musical genre of "emo" originated in Washington D.C. in the 80s, and takes its name from "emotional hardcore". Not my cup of tea ...

47. Pear variety : ANJOU
The Anjou pear is a cultivar of the European Pear. The Anjou pear is thought to have originated in Belgium or France (Anjou is a province in the Loire Valley of western France.

49. "The Hitler Diaries" and others : HOAXES
"Stern" is a news magazine published in Germany every week. It has a long history, dating back to 1948. "Stern" is famous for having published in 1983 excerpts from "The Hitler Diaries", supposedly lost diaries written by Adolf Hitler recovered from a plane crash near Dresden in 1945. The editors of "Stern", in trying to balance secrecy with the need for authentication, apparently did a shoddy job in determining if these books were indeed written by Hitler. Within weeks of the publication of the extracts in a blaze of publicity, the documents were proven to be obvious fakes written on modern paper with modern ink. Stern paid almost one million dollars in the early eighties for the fake diaries, much of which was never recovered.

63. Grammy winner Ronstadt : LINDA
Linda Ronstadt is a singer-songwriter from Tucson, Arizona. Ronstadt really does have a lovely voice, and can make any song her own. In the late seventies, she was the highest paid woman in the world of rock music.

64. Sanyo competitor : AIWA
Aiwa was a Japanese company that produced consumer electronics, mainly audio and video equipment.

Sanyo is a Japanese electronics manufacturer, based near Osaka and founded in 1947. The company name means "three oceans" reflecting the original aim to sell its products all around the world (across three oceans, the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian).

66. To have, to Henri : AVOIR
"Avoir", the French for "to have".

69. O. Henry Award winner for "Livvie Is Back" : WELTY
Eudora Welty was an author from Jackson, Mississippi who wrote short stories and novels about the American South. Welty won a Pulitzer in 1973 for her novel “The Optimist’s Daughter”. She was also awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, in 1980.

Down
1. Units of a dangerous dosage : RADS
A rad is a unit used to measure radiation levels that is largely obsolete now. The rad has been superseded by the rem.

2. Aid's partner : ABET
The word "abet" comes into English from the Old French "abeter" meaning "to bait" or "to harass with dogs" (it literally means "to make bite"). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of "abet" meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

4. Some fall babies : LIBRAS
The constellation of Libra is named for the scales held by the goddess of justice. Libra is the only sign of the zodiac that isn't named for a living creature.

6. 1836 battle site : ALAMO
The famous Alamo in San Antonio, Texas was originally known as Mission San Antonio de Valero. The mission was founded in 1718, and was the first mission established in the city. The Battle of the Alamo took place in 1836, a thirteen-day siege by the Mexican Army led by President General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Only two people defending the Alamo Mission survived the onslaught. One month later, the Texian army got its revenge by attacking and defeating the Mexican Army in the Battle of San Jacinto. During the surprise attack on Santa Anna's camp, many of the Texian soldiers were heard to cry "Remember the Alamo!".

7. Certain '60s teens : MODS
"Mod" is short for "modernist", and describes a subculture that originated in London in the late fifties. Young men who called themselves mods tended to wear tailored suits, listen to pop music and drive around on Italian motor scooters. Mods came into conflict with another subculture that emerged at the same time in the UK called the rockers. Rockers were into rock and roll music, and drove motorcycles  I remember as a young kid in school having to declare myself as either a mod or a rocker. I don't think our "gangs" back then were quite the same as they are today though …

9. Venue where Toscanini conducted : THE MET
The Metropolitan Opera of New York City is the largest classical music organization in the country, presenting about 220 performances each and every year. Founded in 1880, the Met is renowned for using technology to expand its audiences. Performances have been broadcast live on radio since 1931, and on television since 1977. And since 2006 you can go see a live performance from New York in high definition on the big screen, at a movie theater near you ...

Arturo Toscanini was an Italian conductor of classical music. Toscanini took up the baton for the first time under sensational circumstances in 1886. He was attending a performance of "Aida" in Rio de Janeiro in the role of assistant chorus master, on a night when a substitute conductor was leading the orchestra. The substitute was in charge because the lead conductor had been forced to step down by striking performers who would not work with him. The disgruntled lead conductor led the audience in booing the unfortunate substitute, forcing him off the stage. Yet another substitute attempted to lead the performance, but he could not overcome the hostility of the crowd. The musicians themselves begged Toscanini to take up the baton, for the first time in his life, and simply because he knew the score by heart. After over an hour of mayhem, Toscanini led the company in a remarkable performance to marvelous acclaim. He had just launched his conducting career.

11. Marble material : AGATE
A playing marble made from agate is called just that, an agate. Steelies on the other hand, are made from solid steel.

21. Heavens: Prefix : URANO-
"Urano-" comes from the Greek "ouranos" denoting the heavens.

23. Where Billy Budd went in "Billy Budd" : ASEA
"Billy Budd" is a novella by American author Herman Melville, although he didn't have time to finish it before he died in 1891. There is a fairly well-known operatic adaptation of the novella with a score by English composer Benjamin Britten.

25. Ulan ___, Mongolia : BATOR
The name "Ulan Bator" translates from Mongolian as "the Red Hero", and is Mongolia's capital city. The "Red Hero" name was chosen in honor of the country's national hero, Damdin Sükhbaatar. Sükhbaatar fought alongside the Soviet Red Army in the fight for liberation from Chinese occupation.

26. Some wraps : OBIS
The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied in what is called a butterfly knot.

27. Backgammon needs : DICE
The spots on a die are actually called "pips". As we all know, the numbers 1 through 6 are represented on each side of a a die, with the numbers placed so that the sum of the opposite sides of a die is always 7 (so 1 opposite 6, 2 opposite 5, and 3 opposite 4). The oldest known dice found are part of a backgammon set found in Iran that was 5,000 years old!

29. Verdi aria : ERI TU
The aria "Eri tu" is from Verdi's opera "Un ballo in maschera" (A Masked Ball). The opera tells the story of the assassination of King Gustav III of Sweden during a masked ball.

32. Director Welles : ORSON
Orson Welles is perhaps best-remembered in the world of film for his role in 1941’s “Citizen Kane”. In the world of radio, Welles is known for 1938’s famous broadcast of “The War of the Worlds”, a broadcast that convinced many listeners that the Earth was indeed being invaded by aliens.

34. Quizmaster Trebek : ALEX
Canadian-born Alex Trebek has been the host of the game show "Jeopardy" since 1984.

36. Madre's brothers : TIOS
In Spanish, one's mother's brother (madre's hermano) is an uncle (tio).

40. Jacket style : NEHRU
A Nehru jacket is very like a regular suit jacket, except that the collar buttons at the neck. It was originally created in the 1940s in India, and then marketed as the Nehru jacket in the west in the sixties. The name Nehru was lifted from Jawaharlal Nehru, the prime minister of India from 1947 to 1964.

43. Spanish liqueur : ANIS
Anis is a Spanish liqueur, equivalent to what's called anisette in other countries (in France, for example). It has a licorice taste as it is produced by distilling the seeds of the anis plant. Like all anis-type drinks, it is usually mixed with water and turns a milky white color when the water is added.

45. Old welfare measure : POOR LAW
Poor Laws were designed to put an infrastructure in place to provide relief for the poor. One of the most famous sets of Poor Laws were those enacted in Ireland in the 1800s. The Irish Poor Law Act was the first attempt to by the government to address social instability caused by poverty that was rampant in the country. The system quickly became overwhelmed with the advent of the Great Famine, which of course helped fuel emigration on a massive scale.

48. Composer Strauss : JOHANN
Of the many classical composers with the Strauss name, "The Waltz King" was Johann Strauss II. Among the many beautiful waltzes Strauss penned are "The Blue Danube" and "Tales from the Vienna Woods". He also composed the famous operetta "Die Fledermaus".

52. 1944 battle site : ANZIO
The WWII Battle of Anzio is famous for being one of the most famous blunders in military history. Operation Shingle was a surprise amphibious landing at Anzio, 35 miles south of Rome, designed to outflank the Germans and press home an attack on Rome. The element of surprise allowed a safe landing at Anzio, and the allies were able to drive jeeps right into the outskirts of Rome unchallenged. But that element of surprise was lost when Allied commander General John Lucas decided to delay the march on Rome until he had consolidated his position on the beaches, a position that was surrounded by high ground. The Germans used the delay to throw everything they had into the high ground and the allies were pinned down in a bloody battle. As a result, it took four months for the allies to fight their way inland.

54. More coquettish : COYER
A "coquet" is a male flirt, with "coquette" being the name for a female flirt. The word comes from French, and is the diminutive of "coq", the word for a cock. A cock might well be accused of "strutting his stuff" around the chicken run.

57. Carbon compound : ENOL
An enol is an alkene with a hydroxyl group, sort of part-alkene, part-alcohol. The term "enol" therefore, is a portmanteau of "alkene" and "alcohol".

59. ___ a soul : NARY
The adjective "nary" means "not one", as in “nary a soul”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Singer Lou : RAWLS
6. Latin 101 word : AMAT
10. Mystery writer John Dickson ___ : CARR
14. Bubbling over : ABOIL
15. ___ Ness : LOCH
16. Double curve : OGEE
17. Competition for 3-year-olds : DERBY
18. Together, musically : A DUE
19. "The Lion King" lioness : NALA
20. Breastbones : STERNUMS
22. Resin in varnish : MASTIC
24. Prefix with -batics : AERO-
25. Supplicate : BESEECH
26. City in Ukraine or Texas : ODESSA
29. Gourmand : EATER
30. Roy G. ___ : BIV
31. Haughty response : SNORT
33. Something that makes stops on the ocean? : AVAST
37. Frozen drink brand : ICEE
39. Mythical hunter : ORION
41. "The Time Machine" race : ELOI
42. Medicinal plant : SENNA
44. ___ throat : STREP
46. Rock genre : EMO
47. Pear variety : ANJOU
49. "The Hitler Diaries" and others : HOAXES
51. Subgroup : FACTION
54. Gator's cousin : CROC
55. Strong spate : ONRUSH
56. Like many eighth graders : FOURTEEN
60. White House policy honcho : CZAR
61. Out : AWAY
63. Grammy winner Ronstadt : LINDA
64. Sanyo competitor : AIWA
65. Staff member? : NOTE
66. To have, to Henri : AVOIR
67. Veg out : LOLL
68. Poetic adverb : NE’ER
69. O. Henry Award winner for "Livvie Is Back" : WELTY

Down
1. Units of a dangerous dosage : RADS
2. Aid's partner : ABET
3. Sported : WORE
4. Some fall babies : LIBRAS
5. Craft : SLYNESS
6. 1836 battle site : ALAMO
7. Certain '60s teens : MODS
8. Prefix with puncture : ACU-
9. Venue where Toscanini conducted : THE MET
10. Be green, in a way : CONSERVE
11. Marble material : AGATE
12. Archaeologist's find : RELIC
13. Get through to : REACH
21. Heavens: Prefix : URANO-
23. Where Billy Budd went in "Billy Budd" : ASEA
25. Ulan ___, Mongolia : BATOR
26. Some wraps : OBIS
27. Backgammon needs : DICE
28. Like certain odds, paradoxically : EVEN
29. Verdi aria : ERI TU
32. Director Welles : ORSON
34. Quizmaster Trebek : ALEX
35. A portion of : SOME
36. Madre's brothers : TIOS
38. F flat equivalent : E-NATURAL
40. Jacket style : NEHRU
43. Spanish liqueur : ANIS
45. Old welfare measure : POOR LAW
48. Composer Strauss : JOHANN
50. Not retired : ACTIVE
51. Kind of point : FOCAL
52. 1944 battle site : ANZIO
53. Rush hour speed : CRAWL
54. More coquettish : COYER
56. It may be tempted : FATE
57. Carbon compound : ENOL
58. Do some paper work : EDIT
59. ___ a soul : NARY
62. Trial : WOE

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1029-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Oct 12, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Gareth Bain
THEME: Beastly Beginnings … each of the theme answers starts with an animal:
17A. Devour : WOLF (DOWN)
24A. Waste time playfully : MONKEY (AROUND)
39A. Pay what's due : PONY (UP)
41A. Eat, eat, eat : PIG (OUT)
49A. Hoard : SQUIRREL (AWAY)
63A. Pertain to : BEAR (UPON)
COMPLETION TIME: 07m 04s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Indian tribe with a rain dance : HOPI
The Hopi nation live on a reservation that is actually located within the much larger Navajo reservation in Arizona.

5. Wood-shaping tool : ADZ
An adze (also adz) is similar to an axe, but different in that the blade of an adze is set at right angles to the tool's shaft. An axe's blade is set in line with the shaft.

15. Org. with sniffing dogs : DEA
The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) was set up in 1973 while President Nixon was in office.

16. Old Soviet naval base site : ODESSA
The city of Odessa in Ukraine was founded relatively recently, in 1794 by Catherine the Great. The city was originally meant to be called Odessos after an ancient Greek city believed to have been located nearby. Catherine liked the way the locals pronounced the name as "Odessa", so went with the less Greek-sounding name.

23. New York's Tappan ___ Bridge : ZEE
The Tappan Zee Bridge is more correctly called the Governor Malcolm Wilson Tappan Zee Bridge which crosses the Hudson River in New York. The bridge opened in 1955 and is showing its age. There are plans to replace it with a new bridge due to open in 2017.

28. Buffalo Bill : CODY
Buffalo Bill Cody was a great showman after he retired from the US Army. While serving in the Army, Buffalo Bill was awarded the Medal of Honor. William Frederick Cody earned his “Buffalo Bill” nickname while supplying buffalo meat to the Kansas Pacific Railroad. Cody “hunted” and slaughtered over 4,000 American bison in an 18-month period to fulfill his contract with the railroad.

32. "Honest" prez : ABE
Abraham Lincoln was born in a one-room log cabin in Hardin County, Kentucky making him the first president born in the West. His formal education was limited to a year and a half of schooling, but fortunately for us, Lincoln was an avid reader and educated himself over the years. Even though he was from a rural area, he avoided hunting and fishing because he did not like to kill animals even for food.

39. Pay what's due : PONY UP
“To pony up” means “to pay”. Apparently the term originated as slang use of the Latin term “legem pone” that was once used for “money”. “Legem Pone” was the title of the Psalm that was read out on March 25 each year, and March 25 was the first payday of the year in days gone by.

42. Porky's porcine sweetie : PETUNIA
Petunia Pig is a cartoon character in the “Looney Tunes” and “Merrie Melodies” universes. Petunia is the girlfriend of Porky Pig and has been around since 1937.

44. Tyrannosaurus ___ : REX
The Tyrannosaurus rex (usually written T. rex) was a spectacular looking dinosaur. "Tyrannosaurus" comes from the Greek words "tyrannos" (tyrant) and "sauros" (lizard), and the "rex" is of course Latin for "king". They were big boys, measuring 42 feet long and 13 feet tall at the hips, and weighing 7.5 tons.

45. Right-to-bear-arms org. : NRA
The NRA is the National Rifle Association, an organization that has been around since 1871. The NRA has had some celebrity presidents, including US President Ulysses S. Grant. It's often said that the NRA is the most powerful lobbying group in Washington.

The Second Amendment of the US Constitution was adopted in 1791 as part of the Bill of Rights. The actual text of the amendment is:
A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.
I hear that the wording and punctuation in the original text has led to some controversy over the years, some debate over the original intent …

46. Carter's successor : REAGAN
Ronald Reagan started out his political career as a member of the Democratic Party, but switched to the Republicans in the early fifties. He served as Governor of California for eight years, and vied unsuccessfully for the nomination for US President on two occasions. He finally succeeded in 1980 and defeated President Jimmy Carter and became the 40th US President in 1981.

55. Uganda's ___ Amin : IDI
Idi Amin received most of his military training in the British armed forces, eventually achieving the highest rank possible for a Black African in the British Colonial Army in 1959, that of Warrant Officer. On his return to Uganda Amin joined his country's military and quickly rose to the rank of Deputy Commander of the Army. During that time he was quite the athlete. He was a noted rugby player and swimmer, and for nine years held the Ugandan national light-heavyweight boxing title. By the early seventies, Amin was commander of all the armed forces of Uganda and in 1971 seized power in a military coup, displacing the country's president Milton Obote. There followed seven years of brutal rule by Amin during which it is estimated that between 100,000 and 500,000 people were murdered. Amin was ousted from power in 1979 after a war with Tanzania, and fled to Libya where he stayed for a year. He then moved to Saudi Arabia, where he was financially supported by the Saudi Royal Family for the remainder of his life. Amin died in 2003.

65. Like Jim Crow laws : RACIST
The Jim Crow laws were laws enacted to provide a “separate but equal” status for African Americans. “Jim Crow” was a pejorative term for an African American, one that probably originated in an offensive song-and-dance caricature called “Jump Jim Crow” that was performed by a white actor in blackface.

67. Lima's land : PERU
Peru's name comes from the word "Biru". Back in the early 1500s, Biru was a ruler living near the Bay of San Miguel in Panama. The territory over which Biru ruled was the furthest land south in the Americas known to Europeans at that time. The Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro was the first European to move south of Biru's empire and the land that he found was designated "Peru", a derivative of "Biru".

69. Boffo show sign : SRO
Standing Room Only (SRO).

Down
1. "The First Wives Club" actress Goldie : HAWN
I remember watching the ditsy Goldie Hawn character on "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In". Hawn used to give great performances on the show, convincing everyone that she was the stereotypical dumb blonde. Well, what a career she was to carve out for herself!

“The First Wives Club” is a fun movie starring three great actresses: Diane Keaton, Bette Midler and Goldie Hawn. Filming took place from December 1995 to March 1996, during which period each of the lead actors celebrated their 50th birthdays.

2. Melville opus : OMOO
Herman Melville mined his own experiences when writing his novels. Melville sailed from New Bedford, Massachusetts in 1841 on a whaler heading into the Pacific Ocean (a source for "Moby Dick"). Melville ended up deserting his ship 18 months later and lived with natives on a South Pacific Island for three weeks (a source for "Typee"). He picked up another whaler and headed for Hawaii, where he joined the crew of a US navy frigate headed for Boston (a source for "Omoo").

3. Ill-gotten wealth : PELF
“Pelf” is money that has been gained by illegal means. The exact origin of the term is unclear, but it is probably related to the verb “to pilfer”.

8. Muhammad Ali strategy : ROPE-A-DOPE
The Rumble in the Jungle was that celebrated fight between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman, broadcast from Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo). The fight was set in Zaire because of financial arrangements between promoter Don King and Zaire's President Mobutu Seko. "Rope-a-dope" was the term coined by Ali to describe his incredibly successful strategy in the contest. From the second round onwards, Ali adopted a protected stance on the ropes, letting Foreman pound him with blows to the body and head, using his arms to take most of the punches. He kept this up until the eighth round, then opened up, and downed the exhausted Foreman with a left-right combination. I hate boxing, but have to say, that was an interesting fight.

9. "Much ___ About Nothing" : ADO
"Much Ado About Nothing" is a favorite of mine, a play of course by William Shakespeare. It is a comedic tale of two pairs of lovers with lots of mistaken identities and double meanings. I once saw it performed in the fabulous Globe Theatre in London ... by an all-female cast!

11. Japanese truck maker : ISUZU
Isuzu is a Japanese auto manufacturer, very successful in the medium and heavy truck market in particular. You'll be seeing fewer and fewer Isuzu passenger cars on American roads though, as the company exited the US passenger car market in 2008.

12. "Quaking" tree : ASPEN
The “quaking” aspen is so called because the structure of the leaves causes them to move easily in the wind, to “tremble”.

25. Spy grp. dissolved in 1991 : KGB
The Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti (KGB) was the national security agency of the Soviet Union until 1991. The KGB was dissolved at that time after the agency’s chairman led a failed attempt at a coup d'état designed to depose President Mikhail Gorbachev.

28. Al who created Joe Btfsplk : CAPP
Joe Btfsplk is a character in Al Capp's "Li'l Abner" cartoon strip. Btfsplk is the guy walking around with a black cloud over his head, a sign that he is the world's worst jinx. According to Al Capp, the name "Btfsplk" is a "rude sound", a so-called Bronx cheer.

29. Instrument with metal keys : OBOE
The oboe is perhaps my favorite of the reed instruments. The name "oboe" comes from the French "hautbois" which means "high wood". When you hear an orchestra tuning before a performance you'll note (pun intended!) that the oboe starts off the process by playing an "A". The rest of the musicians in turn tune to that oboe's "A". Oh, and if you want to read a fun book (almost an "exposé") about life playing the oboe, you might try "Mozart in the Jungle" by oboist Blair Tindall. I heard recently that the folks at HBO are working towards a pilot based on the book, and I can’t wait to see it!

34. Beekeepers : APIARISTS
An apiary is an area where bees are kept. The Latin word for “bee” is “apis”.

36. It's taboo : NO-NO
The word "taboo" was introduced into English by Captain Cook in his book "A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean". Cook described "tabu" (likely imitative of a Tongan word that he had heard) as something that was both consecrated and forbidden.

37. Continental coin : EURO
The European Union today stands at a membership of 27 states. The Euro is the official currency of only 16 of the 27. The list of states not using the Euro includes the UK, Denmark, Sweden and Norway.

38. Coup d'___ : ETAT
A coup d'état (often just "coup") is the sudden overthrow of a government, and comes from the French for "stroke of state".

40. Space race hero Gagarin : YURI
The Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first man in space when his spacecraft Vostok I made a single orbit of the Earth in 1961. Sadly, Gagarin died only seven years later in a plane crash.

44. Genetic material : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. Amino acids are delivered in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA and then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

47. They may fall apart under cross-examination : ALIBIS
"Alibi" is the Latin word for "elsewhere" as in, "I claim that I was 'elsewhere' when the crime was committed ... I have an 'alibi'".

50. Imam's holy book : QUR’AN
The Koran is also known as the Qur'an in English, a transliteration of the Arabic name for the holy text of the Muslim faith. The literal translation of "Koran" is "the recitation".

51. New York city with a name from antiquity : UTICA
Today, Utica in New York is known as “Second Chance City” due to the recent influx of refugees from war-torn parts of the world, and from Bosnia in particular. These immigrants have helped revitalize the area and reverse a trend of population loss.

52. Company that originated Frisbees and Boogie Boards : WHAM-O
The Frisbee concept started back in 1938 with a couple who had an upturned cake pan that they were tossing between each other on Santa Monica Beach in California. They were offered 25 cents for the pan on the spot, and as pans could be bought for 5 cents, the pair figured there was a living to be earned.

53. ___ Lingus : AER
Aer Lingus is my favorite airline! Well, the service isn't that great, but when I get on board an Aer Lingus plane I feel like I am back in Ireland. Aer Lingus is the national airline of Ireland, with "Aer Lingus" being a phonetic spelling of the Irish "aer-loingeas" meaning "air fleet". These days Aer Lingus can only lay claim to the title of Ireland's oldest airline as it is no longer the biggest. That honor goes to the controversial budget airline, Ryan Air.

61. [not my mistake] : SIC
"Sic" indicates that a quotation is written as originally found, perhaps including a typo. "Sic" is Latin for "thus, like this".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Indian tribe with a rain dance : HOPI
5. Wood-shaping tool : ADZ
8. Kind of tire : RADIAL
14. The answer to a preacher's prayers? : AMEN
15. Org. with sniffing dogs : DEA
16. Old Soviet naval base site : ODESSA
17. Devour : WOLF DOWN
19. Some online ads : POPUPS
20. "You cheated!" : NO FAIR
21. Cooler contents : ICE
23. New York's Tappan ___ Bridge : ZEE
24. Waste time playfully : MONKEY AROUND
28. Buffalo Bill : CODY
31. Teacher after a test, e.g. : GRADER
32. "Honest" prez : ABE
33. File folder projection : TAB
35. Choice of a political party : NOMINEE
39. Pay what's due : PONY UP
41. Eat, eat, eat : PIG OUT
42. Porky's porcine sweetie : PETUNIA
44. Tyrannosaurus ___ : REX
45. Right-to-bear-arms org. : NRA
46. Carter's successor : REAGAN
48. Chimney sweep coating : SOOT
49. Hoard : SQUIRREL AWAY
54. Crude home : HUT
55. Uganda's ___ Amin : IDI
56. Attached ___ (legalese phrase) : HERETO
60. Crops up : ARISES
63. Pertain to : BEAR UPON
65. Like Jim Crow laws : RACIST
66. "Don't you know who ___?" : I AM
67. Lima's land : PERU
68. Makes into law : ENACTS
69. Boffo show sign : SRO
70. Hankerings : YENS

Down
1. "The First Wives Club" actress Goldie : HAWN
2. Melville opus : OMOO
3. Ill-gotten wealth : PELF
4. Criminal renown : INFAMY
5. Deck out : ADORN
6. Pasture moisture : DEW
7. More madcap : ZANIER
8. Muhammad Ali strategy : ROPE-A-DOPE
9. "Much ___ About Nothing" : ADO
10. Withdrawal's opposite: Abbr. : DEP
11. Japanese truck maker : ISUZU
12. "Quaking" tree : ASPEN
13. Erased a tattoo, say : LASED
18. God, in Italian : DIO
22. Blue shade : CYAN
25. Spy grp. dissolved in 1991 : KGB
26. Many a song at a dance club : REMIX
27. Not a photocopy: Abbr. : ORIG
28. Al who created Joe Btfsplk : CAPP
29. Instrument with metal keys : OBOE
30. Tin can blemish : DENT
33. One doing piano repair : TUNER
34. Beekeepers : APIARISTS
36. It's taboo : NO-NO
37. Continental coin : EURO
38. Coup d'___ : ETAT
40. Space race hero Gagarin : YURI
43. Superannuated : AGED
44. Genetic material : RNA
47. They may fall apart under cross-examination : ALIBIS
48. Too sentimental : SYRUPY
49. Not hoard : SHARE
50. Imam's holy book : QURAN
51. New York city with a name from antiquity : UTICA
52. Company that originated Frisbees and Boogie Boards : WHAM-O
53. ___ Lingus : AER
57. Sporting sword : EPEE
58. Ripped : TORN
59. Big burden : ONUS
61. [not my mistake] : SIC
62. Superlative suffix : -EST
64. What a headphone goes over : EAR

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1028-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Oct 12, Sunday

Last Sunday's Competition Puzzle
Anyone still looking to unravel the Sunday crossword from last weekend can check out my solution, which I posted after the competition deadline had passed.



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Michael Sharp (aka Rex Parker) & Caleb Madison
THEME: What The … each of the theme answers sounds like something well known, but with a THE or two inserted:
23A. "Come on, woman, shape that wood!"? : LATHE, LADY, LATHE (from “Lay Lady Lay”)
38A. Cheerful superhero? : CAPTAIN BLITHE (from “Captain Bligh”)
52A. Take a patient approach to revenge? : WAIT AND SEETHE (from “wait and see”)
71A. Ones who stop giving to their church? : TITHE BREAKERS (from “tiebreakers”)
89A. Softly exhale cheap sentiment? : BREATHE CHEESE (from “Brie cheese”)
101A. Mad scientist's sadistic exclamation upon attacking the Empire State? : WRITHE, NEW YORK! (from “Rye, New York”)
119A. What the Grim Reaper's backup carries? : SCYTHE OF RELIEF (from “sigh of relief”)
15D. "If you don't like my anger, do something about it!"? : SO SOOTHE ME! (from “so sue me!”)
76D. Hate coke? : LOATHE BLOW (from “low blow”)
COMPLETION TIME: 32m 40s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … CASTRO (Castho!), TROW (thow)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Auckland native : KIWI
Unlike many nicknames for people of a particular country, the name "Kiwi" for a New Zealander isn't offensive at all. The term comes from the flightless bird called the kiwi, which is endemic to New Zealand and is the country's national symbol. "Kiwi" is a Maori word, and the plural (when referring to the bird) is simply "kiwi". However, when you have two or more New Zealanders with you, they are Kiwis (note the "s", and indeed the capital "K"!).

19. Setting for the 2012 film "Argo" : IRAN
“Argo” is a 2012 movie that is based on the true story of the rescue of six diplomats hiding out during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. The film was directed by and stars Ben Affleck, and is produced by Grant Heslov and George Clooney, the same pair who produced the excellent “Good Night, and Good Luck”. I haven’t seen “Argo” yet, but I hear good things …

20. Title partner of "the Swan" in a Yeats poem : LEDA
In Greek mythology, Leda was the beautiful Queen of Sparta who was seduced by Zeus when he took the form of a swan. She produced two eggs from the union. One egg hatched into the beautiful Helen, later to be known as Helen of Troy, over whom the Trojan War was fought. The other egg hatched into the twins Castor and Pollux. Castor and Pollux had different fathers according to the myth. Pollux was the son of Zeus and was immortal, while Castor was the son of Leda's earthly husband, and so he was a mortal. William Butler Yeats wrote a famous sonnet called “Leda and the Swan” in 1924.

21. "___ Her Standing There" : I SAW
“I Saw Her Standing There” is a Beatles song that was released in 1963, the B-side to “I Want to Hold Your Hand”.

22. Creed of the "Rocky" series : APOLLO
In the “Rocky” series of films, Rocky Balboa was given the ring name “The Italian Stallion”. Rocky's first real opponent was Apollo Creed, known in the ring as “The Master of Disaster”.

23. "Come on, woman, shape that wood!"? : LATHE, LADY, LATHE (from “Lay Lady Lay”)
I’m not a big fan of Bob Dylan, to be honest, but I like his 1969 song “Lay Lady Lay”. Dylan’s voice is less abrasive than usual on his recording of this song, and perhaps that’s why I took to it. “Lay Lady Lay” was written for the soundtrack of the movie “Midnight Cowboy”, but Dylan missed the deadline for submission so it never made it into the film.

27. Start of a choosing rhyme : EENY
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

28. Uploaded pic, often : JPEG
An image file on a computer can be compressed so that it takes up less space. Sometimes the compression is "lossless" meaning even though the file is compressed and data it is discarded, the image still looks the same. One example of data that can be discarded without loss of quality is to not bother recording the color information of pixels that are the same color as others. Just saying "this pixel is the same is that one" takes up less space. One can compress files even more if one allows loss of quality. One well known compression algorithm that is "lossy" is the jpeg format. The person compressing the file can decide how much quality will suffer in jpeg format, with larger compressed files being of higher quality than the smaller ones.

32. Jack ___ : SPRAT
Jack Sprat was a nickname given in the 16th century to people of small stature. Jack featured in a proverb of the day:
Jack will eat not fat, and Jull doth love no leane. Yet betwixt them both they lick the dishes cleane.
Over time, this mutated into a nursery rhyme that is still recited in England:
Jack Sprat could eat no fat. His wife could eat no lean. And so between them both, you see, they licked the platter clean.

34. Dry white wines : SOAVES
Soave is a dry white wine produced in the area around the city of Verona in northeast Italy.

36. Some protests : BOYCOTTS
“Boycott” ... another word given to the world by the Irish! Englishman Captain Charles Boycott found himself on the wrong side of the local community in County Mayo in the west of Ireland, and in a concerted campaign he was refused service by all around him. His name lives on …

38. Cheerful superhero? : CAPTAIN BLITHE (from “Captain Bligh”)
Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall wrote "Mutiny on the 'Bounty'", based on a true story. They followed up their successful novel with two more works, creating what is now called the "Bounty Trilogy". The three books are:
1. "Mutiny on the 'Bounty'", the tale of the mutiny against Captain Bligh.
2. "Men Against the Sea", the story of Captain Bligh and the eighteen men set adrift in an open boat by the mutineers.
3. "Pitcairn's Island", a narrative about the lives of the mutineers on South Sea islands after the mutiny.

41. Facts of life? : OBIT
"Obituary" comes from the Latin "obituaris", originally the word for the record of a death of a person, although the literal meaning is "pertaining to death".

42. Oklahoma birthplace of Oral Roberts : ADA
Back in 1889, Jeff Reed was hired to carry the mail between the two communities of Stonewall and Center in what was then called the Indian Territory. Reed had moved to the area from Texas and he bought some land in between the two limits of his mail route and built himself a log cabin. Pretty soon other settlers built homes nearby and in 1891 the settlement got its own post office. As postman, Reed got to name the new post office and he called it Ada, after his oldest daughter. Ada is now a county seat and has over 17,000 residents. One of the sons of the city of Ada was the televangelist Oral Roberts.

46. Onetime U.N. leader : U THANT
U Thant was a diplomat from Burma who served as the third Secretary-General of the United Nations, taking over from Dag Hammarskjöld. In Burmese, he was known as Pantanaw U Thant. The “U” is an honorific in Burmese, simply the equivalent of “Mr.” in English.

61. Sallie ___ : MAE
“Sallie Mae” is a nickname for SLM Corporation, created in 1972 by the US government as the Student Loan Marketing Association. By 2004 the government had severed all its ties with Sallie Mae, and today SLM is basically a profit-focused lender.

77. "Hoarders" airer : A AND E
The A&E television network used to be a favorite of mine, with the "A&E" standing for "arts and entertainment". A&E started out airing a lot of the old classic dramas, as well as biographies and arts programs. Now there seems to be more reality TV, with one of the flagship programs being "Dog the Bounty Hunter". A slight change of direction I'd say ...

“Hoarders” is a documentary show on the A&E channel that tells the stories of real-life people who suffer from compulsive hoarding.

80. Hombre, formerly : NINO
In Spanish, a boy (niño) grows up to be a man (hombre).

89. Softly exhale cheap sentiment? : BREATHE CHEESE (from “Brie cheese”)
Brie is a soft cheese, named after the French province of Brie where it originated.

95. San Antonio mayor Julián, keynote speaker at the 2012 Democratic convention : CASTRO
Julián Castro is the current mayor of San Antonio, Texas. When Castro was elected to office in 2009 he was 34 years old, making him the youngest ever mayor of the city. In 2012, Castro became the first ever Hispanic to deliver a keynote address at a Democratic National Convention.

96. 1978-79 CBS detective drama : KAZ
“Kaz” was a crime drama that ran for 22 episodes on CBS in the late seventies. The show never caught on …

98. Big bygone bird : MOA
Moas were flightless birds native to New Zealand that are now extinct. The fate of the Moa is a great example of the detrimental effect that humans can have on animal populations. The Maoris arrived in New Zealand about 1300 AD, upsetting the balance of the ecosystem. The Moa were hunted to extinction within 200 years, which had the knock-on effect of killing off the Haast's Eagle, the Moa's only predator prior to the arrival of man.

99. ___ Kong : HONG
Hong Kong first became part of the British Empire after the First Opium War in 1842. In 1898, Britain signed a 99-year lease to retain control of Hong Kong. That control ended 99 years later in 1997 with a formal transfer of sovereignty back to China.

101. Mad scientist's sadistic exclamation upon attacking the Empire State? : WRITHE, NEW YORK! (from “Rye, New York”)
There is a Rye City in Westchester County, New York and a separate Rye Town right next door.

106. "Popsicle," in "Fifty Shades of Grey," for one : SAFEWORD
A “safeword” is code word used in the world of bondage and discipline, a signal by a submissive partner that the dominant partner has crossed a boundary creating undesired discomfort.

"Fifty Shades of Grey" is an incredibly popular erotic novel by British writer E. L. James. “Fifty Shades of Grey” is the fastest-selling paperback of all time. And there are two other titles to complete the trilogy: “Fifty Shades Darker” and "Fifty Shades Freed".

110. Anatomical ring : AREOLE
An areola (sometimes “areole”) in anatomy is a small ring of color, as in the areola surrounding the nipple, and the areola surrounding the pupil of the eye. “Areola” comes from Latin, meaning "small open space", and is a diminutive of the Latin word "area", meaning "open space".

113. Rake : ROUE
"Roue" is a lovely word, I think, describing a less-than-lovely man. A roue could otherwise be described as a cad, someone of loose morals. "Roue" comes from the French word "rouer" meaning "to break on a wheel". This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

A "rake" (short for “rakehell”) is defined as a man who is habituated to immoral conduct (isn't it always the man??!!). The rake is a character who turns up frequently in novels and films, only interested in wine, women and song, and not accepting the responsibilities of life. Good examples would be Wickham in Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and Daniel Cleaver (the Hugh Grant part) in the movie "Bridget Jones’s Diary". "Rake/rakehell" comes from the Old Norse "reikall", meaning "a vagrant or a wanderer".

116. Canon fodder? : FILM
The Japanese company called Canon is noted mainly in the US for producing quality cameras. The company started out as Precision Optical Industry Laboratory in 1937 making camera bodies. The name was changed in 1947 to Canon.

117. Prime minister of 1945 : ATTLEE
Clement Attlee served as leader of Britain's Labour Party and as Deputy Prime Minister in the coalition government during the war years under the leadership of Winston Churchill, a Conservative. Attlee swept into power right after WWII in a landslide victory over Churchill and was responsible for major changes not only in Britain but around the waning British Empire. It was under Attlee that former British colonies like India, Pakistan, Burma, Sri Lanka and Jordan became independent. Also, the Palestine Mandate was terminated in 1948, while he was in office, with the state of Israel being declared the very next day.

126. Log time : YULE
"Yule" celebrations coincide with Christmas, and the words "Christmas" and "Yule" have become synonymous in much of the world. However, Yule was originally a pagan festival celebrated by Germanic peoples. The name "Yule" comes from the Old Norse word "jol" that was used to describe the festival.

A Yule log is a large log made from a very hard wood that is burned as part of the Christmas celebration.

127. Sailors' saint : ELMO
St. Elmo is the patron saint of sailors. He lends his name to the electrostatic weather phenomenon (often seen at sea) known as St. Elmo's fire. The "fire" is actually a plasma discharge caused by air ionizing at the end of a pointed object (like the mast of a ship), something often observed during electrical storms.

128. Ends of Alaska? : SCHWAS
A “schwa” is an unstressed and toneless vowel found in a number of languages including English. Examples from our language are the “a” in “about”, the “e” in “taken” and the “i” in pencil.

131. 1,000 years before the coronation of Queen Elizabeth I : DLIX
The Elizabethan Era, the period associated with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, is considered by many to be the golden age of English history, the age of Shakespeare and the English Renaissance. Elizabeth I was the last sovereign of the House of Tudor, the daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn.

Down
1. Metric distance: Abbr. : KIL
A kilometer is a unit of length in the metric system, approximately equal to 3,281 feet. "Kilometer" is an American spelling. In the rest of the world the French spelling of "kilometre" is used.

2. Author Levin : IRA
As well as writing novels, Ira Levin was a dramatist and a songwriter. Levin's first novel was "A Kiss Before Dying", and his most famous work was "Rosemary's Baby" which became a Hollywood hit. His best known play is "Deathtrap", a production that is often seen in local theater (I've seen it a couple of times around here). "Deathtrap" was also was a successful movie, starring Michael Caine and Christopher Reeve. My favorite of Levin novels though are "The Boys from Brazil" and "The Stepford Wives".

8. Web site with a "Send Money" tab : PAYPAL
PayPal has been around since the year 2000, born out of a merger of two older companies: Confinity and X.com. PayPal was so successful that it was the first of the beleaguered dot.com companies to successfully complete an IPO after the attacks of 9/11. Then in 2002, PayPal was bought by eBay, for a whopping $1.5 billion.

9. Psychologist Jean : PIAGET
Jean Piaget was a psychologist and philosopher from Switzerland. Piaget was a great supporter of children’s education. Back in 1934 he stated that “only education is capable of saving our societies from possible collapse, whether violent, or gradual”. He might have a point …

10. P.R. hours : AST
Atlantic Standard Time (AST) is four hours behind Greenwich Mean Time, and one hour ahead of Eastern Standard Time. The list of locations that use AST includes Puerto Rico and the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

11. First name in Chicago politics : RAHM
The current Mayor of Chicago, Rahm Emanuel, was an Illinois representative in the US House before resigning to take up President Obama's offer to become the White House Chief of Staff.

14. Wall St. opening : IPO
An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital. usually to expand operations.

16. Black in country music : CLINT
Clint Black is a country music singer. Black was born in New Jersey, but grew up in Texas.

25. ___ Johnston, former fiancé of Bristol Palin : LEVI
Levi Johnston hit the headlines when Sarah Palin announced that her daughter Bristol was pregnant, and Levi Johnston was the father. The couple split up before the wedding. Johnston’s initial flirtations with celebrity included a nude photoshoot in "Playgirl" magazine.

30. London facilities : LOO
When I was growing up in Ireland, a "bathroom" was a room that had a bath and no toilet. The separate room with the commode was called "the toilet" or sometimes the W.C. (the water closet). Apparently the term closet was used because in the 1800s when homeowners started installing toilets indoors they often displaced clothes and linens in a "closet", as a closet was the right size to take the commode. It has been suggested that the British term "loo" comes from Waterloo (water-closet ... water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure.

32. Replacement refs, maybe? : SCABS
We first started calling strikebreakers "scabs" in the early 1800s, and before that a scab was a person who refused to join a trade union (back as early 1777). The word probably comes from the use of "scab" as a skin disease, and so is a term that is meant to insult.

33. "The Taming of the Shrew" setting : PADUA
Padua is a city in northern Italy, and was chosen by William Shakespeare as the setting for "The Taming of the Shrew". The play is one of Shakespeare’s earliest romantic comedies.

34. Backbeat component, often : SNARE
Snare drums are so called because they have a set of wire strands (called snares) stretched across the bottom surface of the drum. When the drum is struck, the snares vibrate against the bottom drumhead producing a unique sound.

40. Big wheel at a reception? : EDAM
Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps it travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

47. Smithereens : ATOMS
"Smithereens" is such a lovely word and I am proud to say that it comes from Irish. The Irish word "smiodar" means fragment. We add the suffix "-in" (anglicized as "-een") to words to indicate the diminutive form. So, "little fragment" is "smidirin", anglicized as "smithereens".

48. Red Wing or Blackhawk : NHLER
The Detroit Red Wings and Chicago Blackhawks play in the National Hockey League (NHL).

51. Bijou : GEM
The noun “bijou” is used for a small expensive trinket. “Bijou” is French for “jewel”.

53. Carnival Cruise Lines stop : ARUBA
Aruba is one of the so-called ABC Islands. The ABC Islands is the nickname given to the three westernmost islands of the Leeward Antilles in the Caribbean. The nickname comes from the first letters of the island names: Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao. All three of the ABC Islands are part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

55. Christine ___, "The Phantom of the Opera" girl : DAAE
I'm a bit jaded with big stage musicals I must admit, but I will always have time for Andrew Lloyd Webber's masterpiece "The Phantom of the Opera". "Phantom" is the longest running musical in the history of Broadway, and deservedly so. And now there is a sequel, which I would dearly love to see, so let's hope it gets over here soon. "Love Never Dies" opened in the West End in London in March 2010, but the opening in the US has been indefinitely postponed.

58. Junk : SCHLOCK
Schlock is trash, something shoddy. It comes from the American Yiddish word "shlak", with the same meaning.

62. Killed a hero? : ATE
"Hero" is another name for a submarine sandwich. The hero originated in New York City in the 1800s among Italian immigrants who wanted an Italian sandwich that reminded them of home. The name "hero" was first coined in the 1930s, supposedly by a food critic in the "New York Herald Tribune" when he wrote that "one had to be a hero" to finish the gigantic sandwich. Hero is a prevalent term to this day in New York City, reserved for a submarine sandwich with an Italian flavor.

64. Horne and Olin : LENAS
Lena Horne was an American jazz singer, actress, dancer and civil rights activist. Horne started out her career as a nightclub singer and then began to get some meaty acting roles in Hollywood. However, she ended up on the blacklist during the McCarthy Era for expressing left wing political views. One of her starring roles was in the 1943 movie "Stormy Weather" for which she also performed the title song.

The lovely Lena Olin is a Swedish actress, clearly someone who had acting in her blood. Olin's mother was the actress Britta Holmberg and her father the actor and director Stig Olin. Lena Olin had a very successful career in Sweden, often working with the great Ingmar Bergman. Olin's breakthrough international and English-speaking role was playing opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" released in 1988. Way back in 1974, the lovely Miss Olin was crowned Miss Scandinavia in a beauty pageant for Nordic women held in Helsinki, Finland.

67. W.W. II craft: Abbr. : LST
LST stands for Landing Ship, Tank. LSTs were the large vessels used mainly in WWII that had doors at either ends through which tanks and other vehicles could roll off and onto beaches. The design concept persists to this day in the huge fleet of commercial roll-on/roll-off car ferries, all inspired by the LST.

68. "Your Business" airer : MSNBC
“Your Business” is an MSNBC show aimed at small business owners.

69. Director Kurosawa : AKIRA
Akira Kurosawa was an Oscar-winning Japanese film director. His most famous movie to us in the West has to be "The Seven Samurai", the inspiration for "The Magnificent Seven" starring Yul Brynner, and indeed a basis for "Star Wars: The Clone Wars".

76. Hate coke? : LOATHE BLOW (from “low blow”)
Cocaine is sometimes called “blow”, and nasal inhalation of the drug can be termed “blowing”.

79. "Dragnet" message, for short : APB
An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

Jack Webb played Sergeant Joe Friday on "Dragnet" on both TV and radio ... and what a voice he had! Off the screen Webb was a lover of jazz, and he played the cornet. It was within the world of jazz that he met and fell in love with Julie London, the famous singer with "the smoky voice". Webb and London married and had two kids together.

90. Suppose, to Shakespeare : TROW
“Trow” is an archaic word for "think", more in the sense of "believe", as in "I think it's true".

92. Cornell who founded Western Union : EZRA
Ezra Cornell was an associate of Samuel Morse and made his money in the telegraph business. After Ezra retired he co-founded Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. He provided a generous endowment and donated his farm as a site for the school, and was then rewarded by having the institute named after him.

102. It might cause photophobia : IRITIS
Iritis is inflammation of the iris of the eye.

103. "One World" musician John : TESH
John Tesh is a pianist and composer, as well as a radio and television presenter.

116. Durst of Limp Bizkit : FRED
Fred Durst is the vocalist for the rock band Limp Bizkit. Durst chose the band’s name, and he was looking for something that turned people off. Sure enough, any record label interested in the band in its early days asked for a name change!

118. Disney doe : ENA
Ena is Bambi's aunt in the 1942 Disney film “Bambi”. The movie is based on the novel "Bambi, A Life in the Woods" written by Austrian author Felix Salten and first published in 1923.

122. Owner of Abbey Road Studios : EMI
The Abbey Road Studios in London was a large, Georgian townhouse built in the 1830s. It became a recording studio in 1931, and you can even see some YouTube video showing Sir Edward Elgar back then making recordings with the London symphony Orchestra. The studios passed through various owners and by the time the Beatles started their famous recording it was known as EMI Studios. The Beatles recorded practically all of their albums there, between 1962 and 1970. Famously they named a 1969 album after the studio, "Abbey Road". That's the one with the cover showing the Fab Four crossing the "zebra crossing" outside the studio.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Auckland native : KIWI
5. Surmounting : ATOP
9. Dude ranch handle : PARD
13. Sign of sensitivity? : PISCES
19. Setting for the 2012 film "Argo" : IRAN
20. Title partner of "the Swan" in a Yeats poem : LEDA
21. "___ Her Standing There" : I SAW
22. Creed of the "Rocky" series : APOLLO
23. "Come on, woman, shape that wood!"? : LATHE, LADY, LATHE (from “Lay Lady Lay”)
26. Brighter : ROSIER
27. Start of a choosing rhyme : EENY
28. Uploaded pic, often : JPEG
29. Go weak in the knees : MELT
31. In the past : ONCE
32. Jack ___ : SPRAT
34. Dry white wines : SOAVES
36. Some protests : BOYCOTTS
38. Cheerful superhero? : CAPTAIN BLITHE (from “Captain Bligh”)
41. Facts of life? : OBIT
42. Oklahoma birthplace of Oral Roberts : ADA
43. "___ surprised as you are!" : I’M AS
44. Cases for E.M.T.'s : ODS
46. Onetime U.N. leader : U THANT
50. Guard dog's target : BURGLAR
52. Take a patient approach to revenge? : WAIT AND SEETHE (from “wait and see”)
56. Benefit : SAKE
57. Abandon : DESERT
59. "Mamma ___!" : MIA!
60. Sleeper agent : MOLE
61. Sallie ___ : MAE
63. Barbaric : CRUEL
65. Some electrical workers : CABLEMEN
68. Stand offering, briefly : MAG
71. Ones who stop giving to their church? : TITHE BREAKERS (from “tiebreakers”)
74. Future grads: Abbr. : SRS
75. Emaciated : SKELETAL
77. "Hoarders" airer : A AND E
78. ___ loss : AT A
80. Hombre, formerly : NINO
81. Everyone's bets : POT
83. Ford sedan : TAURUS
85. T.A.'s overseer : PROF
89. Softly exhale cheap sentiment? : BREATHE CHEESE (from “Brie cheese”)
93. Tenacious sort : PITBULL
95. San Antonio mayor Julián, keynote speaker at the 2012 Democratic convention : CASTRO
96. 1978-79 CBS detective drama : KAZ
97. Fool : BOZO
98. Big bygone bird : MOA
99. ___ Kong : HONG
101. Mad scientist's sadistic exclamation upon attacking the Empire State? : WRITHE, NEW YORK! (from “Rye, New York”)
106. "Popsicle," in "Fifty Shades of Grey," for one : SAFEWORD
110. Anatomical ring : AREOLE
111. Like a 12-Down : NERDY
112. First-floor apartment, maybe : ONE B
113. Rake : ROUE
115. Ain't correct? : ISN’T
116. Canon fodder? : FILM
117. Prime minister of 1945 : ATTLEE
119. What the Grim Reaper's backup carries? : SCYTHE OF RELIEF (from “sigh of relief”)
124. Evan-___ (women's clothing brand) : PICONE
125. Its alphabet has 44 consonants : THAI
126. Log time : YULE
127. Sailors' saint : ELMO
128. Ends of Alaska? : SCHWAS
129. Farm females : SOWS
130. Macho man : STUD
131. 1,000 years before the coronation of Queen Elizabeth I : DLIX

Down
1. Metric distance: Abbr. : KIL
2. Author Levin : IRA
3. Summer recreation area : WATER PARK
4. Ready to mate : IN HEAT
5. Confederate : ALLY
6. Genteel gathering : TEA
7. Tasks around the house : ODD JOBS
8. Web site with a "Send Money" tab : PAYPAL
9. Psychologist Jean : PIAGET
10. P.R. hours : AST
11. First name in Chicago politics : RAHM
12. Weenie : DWEEB
13. Coach for dancing? : PARTY BUS
14. Wall St. opening : IPO
15. "If you don't like my anger, do something about it!"? : SO SOOTHE ME! (from “so sue me!”)
16. Black in country music : CLINT
17. Vote in : ELECT
18. Results of lying too much? : SORES
24. Involve : ENTAIL
25. ___ Johnston, former fiancé of Bristol Palin : LEVI
30. London facilities : LOO
32. Replacement refs, maybe? : SCABS
33. "The Taming of the Shrew" setting : PADUA
34. Backbeat component, often : SNARE
35. Drink to throw back : SHOT
37. Recognize as a source : CITE
39. Cry on arrival : I MADE IT
40. Big wheel at a reception? : EDAM
45. Snide response : SNICKER
47. Smithereens : ATOMS
48. Red Wing or Blackhawk : NHLER
49. Cold temps : TEENS
51. Bijou : GEM
52. "___ #1!" : WE’RE
53. Carnival Cruise Lines stop : ARUBA
54. Go over again : ITERATE
55. Christine ___, "The Phantom of the Opera" girl : DAAE
58. Junk : SCHLOCK
62. Killed a hero? : ATE
64. Horne and Olin : LENAS
66. It's measured in cups : BRA SIZE
67. W.W. II craft: Abbr. : LST
68. "Your Business" airer : MSNBC
69. Director Kurosawa : AKIRA
70. Family inheritance : GENES
72. Finish line, often : TAPE
73. Together, in music : A DUE
76. Hate coke? : LOATHE BLOW (from “low blow”)
79. "Dragnet" message, for short : APB
82. Spring phenomenon : THAW
84. Winning by a small margin : UP ONE
86. Dirt spreader : RUMOR MILL
87. Psalm starter : O, LORD
88. Unreliable : FLAKY
90. Suppose, to Shakespeare : TROW
91. They're often toasted : HONOREES
92. Cornell who founded Western Union : EZRA
94. Off-campus local : TOWNIE
97. Really sing : BELT OUT
100. Miracle-___ : -GRO
102. It might cause photophobia : IRITIS
103. "One World" musician John : TESH
104. Flatters : HONEYS
105. Hollered : YELLED
106. Wet bars? : SOAPS
107. Prankster-like : ANTIC
108. "Get on the stick!"? : FETCH
109. Tidies up, in a way : DUSTS
114. Come back : ECHO
116. Durst of Limp Bizkit : FRED
118. Disney doe : ENA
120. Deviate from the course : YAW
121. Bird ___ : FLU
122. Owner of Abbey Road Studios : EMI
123. Babe : FOX

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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