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Greetings from Las Vegas, Nevada (again!)

My wife and I are on vacation until Friday, July 25th; a road trip through the backroads of the states east of California. I anticipate late-night solving and posting, with acknowledgement of comments and emails suffering. Please, don't be offended at my silence as I prioritize the writing of posts! We had a long and strenuos hike today in Red Rock Canyon outside Vegas in 100-degree weather, complete with a touch of heatstroke (scary), and saw the Cirque de Soleil show "Zarkana" this evening (amazing, as all Cirque shows are).

Bill

1201-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Dec 12, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Joon Pahk
THEME: None
COMPLETION TIME: 23m 03s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. What many a character in "The Iceman Cometh" expresses : PIPE DREAM
In common parlance, a “pipe dream” is a vain hope for something that is unlikely to take place. The original pipe dreams were visions that were experienced after taking opiates.

"The Iceman Cometh" is a play written by American playwright Eugene O'Neill and first performed in 1946 on Broadway. The play centers on some down-and-out men in a shabby saloon in Manhattan. The title is a reference to the "ice man", the man who would have delivered ice to homes back in the time of the play. The reference is to a bawdy joke in which the "ice man" was having an affair with someone's wife.

10. Part of a Spanish forest : ARBOL
“Arbol” is Spanish for “tree”.

15. 1997 voice role for Meg Ryan : ANASTASIA
"Anastasia" is an animated musical from Don Bluth and Gary Goldman. The storyline is based on the urban myth that Anastasia, the youngest daughter of Tsar Nicholas II, survived the family's execution by the Bolsheviks in 1918. Anastasia is voiced by Meg Ryan, although when Anastasia sings she is played by Liz Callaway.

18. Corny fare? : PONES
Pone is another word for corn bread, from the Powhatan word “apan” meaning “something baked”.

19. Second-largest moon in the solar system : TITAN
Titan is the largest moon of Saturn. Titan is unusual in many ways, including the fact that it is the only known satellite in the solar system that is has its own atmosphere (our own moon does not, for example). Titan is the second largest moon in the solar system, after Ganymede that orbits Jupiter. Titan is so large that it has a greater volume than Mercury, the solar system’s smallest planet.

20. Month before Tishri : ELUL
Elul is the month in the Hebrew calendar that occurs in August-September.

22. Astronomer's calculation: Abbr. : GST
Greenwich Sidereal Times (GST).

Astronomers use sidereal time to know where to locate given stars in the night sky. Sidereal time is a time scale that takes into account the Earth’s rotation relative to stars with a fixed location in the night sky.

23. Lab directive? : STAY
The Labrador breed of dog has been around at least since 1814, and the chocolate Labrador appeared over a century later in the 1930s.

24. Desert gullies : WADIS
"Wadi" is an Arabic term referring to a valley, or perhaps a (mostly) dry riverbed. In English we might call this a wash, or in Spanish an "arroyo".

26. Letter after Oscar : PAPA
The NATO phonetic alphabet is also called the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) phonetic alphabet. It goes Alfa, Bravo, Charlie etc.

27. The dark side : YIN
The yin and the yang can be explained using many different metaphors. In one, as the sun shines on a mountain, the side in the shade is the yin and the side in the light is the yang. The yin is also regarded as the feminine side, and the yang the masculine. The yin can also be associated with the moon, while the yang is associated with the sun.

38. Where blackbirds may be baked? : IN A PIE
“Sing a Song of Sixpence” is an English nursery rhyme that dates back to the 1700s. In the rhyme there are a couple of lines that go :
Four and twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie
This seems to be a reference to the practice in the 16th century of “baking” live birds into a pie for special occasions. When the crust was cut open the birds would fly away, much to the amusement of the diners.

39. Poses a bomb threat? : GOES DEEP
A bomb is a long pass in American football, for which a receiver would have to “go deep”.

40. Emulated Tiresias : FORESAW
Tiresias of Thebes was a blind prophet of Greek mythology. Tiresias was noted for his seven-year transformation into a woman.

43. Texter's "bye now" : TTYL
Talk To You Later (TTYL).

46. "Every saint has a ___": Oscar Wilde : PAST
If you didn't know Oscar Wilde was Irish, you will when you see the name he was given at birth: Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde!

50. Magic, on scoreboards : ORL
The Orlando Magic were formed in 1989 as an NBA expansion team. A local paper was asked to run a competition to suggest names for the new team and the community came up with its four top picks of "Heat", "Tropics", "Juice" and "Magic". A committee then opted for "Orlando Magic". A good choice I think ...

51. Subject of King Deioces : MEDE
Deioces was the first king of the Medes.

The Medes were an ancient people that lived in what is now northwestern Iran. The Medes held sway in the region only for about 60 years, until Cyrus the Great came along and defeated Astyages, the king of Media (not to be confused with Howard Stern, the self-proclaimed "king of all media"!).

52. Eponymous container : DEWAR
A vacuum flask is also called a Dewar flask, named after the container’s inventor Sir James Dewar. A Dewar flask is made from two flasks, one inside the other and joined at the neck. The gap between the flasks is evacuated so that there is very little air to conduct heat or transmit heat by convection from inside one flask to the outside of the other.

53. National Voting Rights Museum locale : SELMA
The Bloody Sunday march took place between Selma and Montgomery, Alabama on 7 March 1965. The 600 marchers involved were protesting the intimidation of African-Americans registering to vote. When the marchers reached Dallas County, Alabama they encountered a line of state troopers reinforced by white males who had been deputized that morning to help keep the peace. Violence broke out with 17 marchers ending up in hospital, one nearly dying. Because the disturbance was widely covered by television cameras, the civil rights movement picked up a lot of support that day.

55. Virginia v. Sebelius subject, in headlines : OBAMACARE
Virginia v. Kathleen Sibelius, Secretary of Health and Human Services was the decision made by the US Supreme Court upholding most provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (also known as Obamacare).

59. Prominently demonstrated : WRIT LARGE
Something “writ large” is expressed in a more obvious way.

61. 1999 Best Director winner : SAM MENDES
Sam Mendes is a director from England known for directing “American Beauty”, “Road to Perdition” and the James Bond movie “Skyfall”. Mendes was married for several years to actress Kate Winslet.

Down
2. Certain harpooner : INUIT
The Inuit peoples live in the Arctic, in parts of the US, Russia, Greenland and Canada.

4. Locke work : ESSAY
John Locke was the English philosopher who postulated that the mind is a blank slate (or "tabula rasa") when we are born, and that we fill that slate with our experiences and observations.

7. That, in Toledo : ESO
Toledo is a city in central Spain.

9. Fill-in-the-blank story : MAD LIB
Mad Libs is a word game, usually played by American kids. The idea is that one player provides a list of words which are then inserted into blank spots in a story, usually with hilarious results (they say!).

10. Washer, e.g.: Abbr. : APPL
A washer is an appliance (appl.)

11. 2014 World Cup locale, for short : RIO
The next three FIFA World Cups (soccer) will be hosted by Brazil (2014), Russia (2018) and Qatar (2022).

12. India's so-called "Garden City" : BANGALORE
Bangalore is the third most-populous city in India and is located in the south of the country. Today Bangalore is known as the Silicon Valley of India because it is a center of excellence for all things related to the semiconductor and information technology industries. I had the privilege of spending a very enjoyable few days working in Bangalore when I was in that line of work.

21. Paywall charges : USER FEES
A paywall is the system used by websites to protect content from being accessed by anyone who isn’t a paid-up subscriber.

27. Beasts of the East : YETIS
A yeti is a beast of legend, also called an abominable snowman. "Yeti" is a Tibetan term, and the beast is fabled to live in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet. Our equivalent legend in North America is that of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch. The study of animals whose existence have not yet been substantiated is called cryptozoology.

29. "1234" singer, 2007 : FEIST
Feist is the stage name of Canadian singer-songwriter Leslie Feist. Feist sings as a solo act, and is also a member of the indie rock group Broken Social Scene.

31. Egg-laying mammal : MONOTREME
Monotremes are mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth to live young. The most famous example of a monotreme has to be the platypus.

32. Belladonna lily : AMARYLLIS
Plants of the genus Amaryllis are known as belladonna lilies, although they are only distant cousins of lilies. The shape of the flower of an Amaryllis plant only resembles that of a lily.

34. Dutch financial giant : ING
ING is a huge Dutch banking institution created via a merger in 1991. The company headquarters is in a spectacular building in Amsterdam called simply ING House. ING stands for Internationale Nederlanden Groep.

41. ___ walk (old house feature) : WIDOW’S
Some older coastal houses may have a railed rooftop platform that is called a widow’s walk. Despite the romantic myth that such structures were used by the wives and widows of mariners to look out to sea, a widow’s walk is just an architectural feature.

45. "I finally got around to reading the dictionary. Turns out the ___ did it": Steven Wright : ZEBRA
Steven Wright is a remarkable and drole comedian from Cambridge, Massachusetts.

51. Bread spread : MAYO
Mayonnaise originated in the town of Mahon in Menorca, a Mediterranean island belonging to Spain. The Spanish called the sauce “salsa mahonesa” after the town, and this morphed into the French word “mayonnaise” which we use today.

57. "Hill Street Blues" production co. : MTM
MTM Enterprises was a television production company founded in 1969 by Mary Tyler Moore, originally to produce the “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. The company subsequently produced the likes of “The Bob Newhart Show”, “Rhoda”, “WKRP in Cincinnati”, “Hill Street Blues” and “St. Elsewhere”. That’s a lot of great television ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. What many a character in "The Iceman Cometh" expresses : PIPE DREAM
10. Part of a Spanish forest : ARBOL
15. 1997 voice role for Meg Ryan : ANASTASIA
16. It's in front of a benched player : PIANO
17. It may be replaced by a dash : CURSE WORD
18. Corny fare? : PONES
19. Second-largest moon in the solar system : TITAN
20. Month before Tishri : ELUL
22. Astronomer's calculation: Abbr. : GST
23. Lab directive? : STAY
24. Desert gullies : WADIS
26. Letter after Oscar : PAPA
27. The dark side : YIN
28. Happens to : BEFALLS
30. Italian almond cookies : AMARETTI
35. Put more layers on : RECOAT
36. Tremendously : SOMETHING FIERCE
38. Where blackbirds may be baked? : IN A PIE
39. Poses a bomb threat? : GOES DEEP
40. Emulated Tiresias : FORESAW
42. Realize : NET
43. Texter's "bye now" : TTYL
44. All ___ (store sign) : SIZES
46. "Every saint has a ___": Oscar Wilde : PAST
50. Magic, on scoreboards : ORL
51. Subject of King Deioces : MEDE
52. Eponymous container : DEWAR
53. National Voting Rights Museum locale : SELMA
55. Virginia v. Sebelius subject, in headlines : OBAMACARE
58. Accord : AMITY
59. Prominently demonstrated : WRIT LARGE
60. Binary, in a way : YES/NO
61. 1999 Best Director winner : SAM MENDES

Down
1. Accords : PACTS
2. Certain harpooner : INUIT
3. First section : PART A
4. Locke work : ESSAY
5. Decahedron-shaped die, to a gamer : D-TEN
6. Still green, or still red : RAW
7. That, in Toledo : ESO
8. Ran : AIRED
9. Fill-in-the-blank story : MAD LIB
10. Washer, e.g.: Abbr. : APPL
11. 2014 World Cup locale, for short : RIO
12. India's so-called "Garden City" : BANGALORE
13. It's beside the point : ONE’S PLACE
14. Got older and slower : LOST A STEP
21. Paywall charges : USER FEES
24. Effortlessly : WITH EASE
25. Like con men? : ANTI
26. Betrayed anxiety, say : PACED
27. Beasts of the East : YETIS
29. "1234" singer, 2007 : FEIST
30. Seemingly expressing : AS IF TO SAY
31. Egg-laying mammal : MONOTREME
32. Belladonna lily : AMARYLLIS
33. What like charges do : REPEL
34. Dutch financial giant : ING
37. No longer to be found : GONE
41. ___ walk (old house feature) : WIDOW’S
45. "I finally got around to reading the dictionary. Turns out the ___ did it": Steven Wright : ZEBRA
46. Tough nut to crack : PECAN
47. Court determination : AWARD
48. Certain noncom : SARGE
49. They may be clear-cut : TREES
51. Bread spread : MAYO
52. Lowland : DALE
54. High point: Abbr. : MTN
56. Direct : AIM
57. "Hill Street Blues" production co. : MTM

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1130-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Nov 12, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Gary Cee
THEME: None
COMPLETION TIME: 23m 33s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. With 1-Across, hybrid tea's ancestor : CHINA
1. See 5-Across : ROSE
The China Rose is an important ancestor to many hybrid tea roses. Hybrid tea roses were created by crossing relatively hardy hybrid perpetual roses and more delicate tea roses.

10. Noxious compounds, briefly : PCBS
Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) ...

14. "Wir leben Autos" sloganeer : OPEL
Adam Opel founded his company in 1863, first making sewing machines in a cowshed. Commercial success brought new premises and a new product line in 1886, namely penny-farthing bicycles. Adam Opel died in 1895, leaving his two sons with a company that made more penny-farthings and sewing machines than any other company in the world. In 1899 the two sons partnered with a locksmith and started to make cars, but not very successfully. Two years later, the locksmith was dropped in favor of a licensing arrangement with a French car company. By 1914, Opel was the largest manufacturer of automobiles in Germany. My Dad had an Opel in the seventies, a station wagon (we'd say "estate car" in Ireland) called an Opel Kadett.

15. Kind of cortex : RENAL
The outermost layer of an organ is known as the cortex. The cortical layers that are most familiar to the man on the street (like me!) are the cerebral cortex of the brain and the renal cortex of the kidney.

17. "Turn me on, dead man," supposedly, in the Beatles' "Revolution 9" : BACKWARD MESSAGE
When the track “Revolution 9” from the Beatles’ “White Album” is played backwards, there is a section that appears to say “Turn me on, dead man”. This helped fuel an existing urban legend that Paul McCartney died in a car crash in 1966 and was replaced by someone who just looked like him.

21. Next-to-last word in the Lord's Prayer : EVER
The Lord's Prayer is a central prayer in Christian religions, and is found in two places in the New Testament. In the version in the Gospel of Matthew the last line of the prayer is "deliver from evil". In the Gospel of Luke the last line is "lead us not into temptation". The last words of the prayer as it most often said today are:
For thine is the kingdom,
The power, and the glory,
For ever and ever,
Amen

22. Like sherpas : ASIAN
In the Tibetan language, Sherpa means "eastern people" (sher = east, pa = people). Sherpas are an ethnic group from Nepal, but the name is also used for the local guides who assist mountaineers in the Himalayas, and particularly on Mount Everest.

23. Nicks producing cuts? : STEVIE
Singer Stevie Nicks came to fame as the lead singer of Fleetwood Mac. Nicks has a very distinctive voice, heard at its best in the famous 1977 album "Rumours".

25. Early psychoanalyst Coriat : ISADOR
Isador Coriat was one of America’s first psychoanalysts.

28. Coastal diver : TERN
Terns are seabirds that are found all over the world. The Arctic Tern makes a very long-distance migration. One Arctic Tern that was tagged as a chick in Great Britain in the summer of 1982, was spotted in Melbourne, Australia just three months later. The bird had traveled over 14,000 miles in over those three months, an average of about 150 miles a day. Remarkable …

32. Morsel for a ladybug : APHID
Aphids are called "greenfly" back in the British Isles where I come from. The most effective way to control aphids in my experience is to make sure there are plenty of ladybugs in the garden (called ladybirds in Ireland!).

34. "There ___ spoon" ("The Matrix" line) : IS NO
“There is no spoon” is a line uttered by the character Neo in “The Matrix” film. The idea is that Neo learns that the spoon he holds in his hand is not real and so he can manipulate it with his mind.

The 1999 movie sensation "The Matrix" was meant to be set in a nondescript urban environment. It was actually shot in Australia, as one of the co-producers of the film was the Australian company, Village Roadshow Pictures. You can pick up all sorts of clues about the location when watching the film, including a view of Sydney Harbour Bridge in a background shot. Also, traffic drives along on the left and there are signs for the "lift" instead of an "elevator".

35. Apology start : MEA
Roman Catholics are very familiar with the Latin phrase "mea culpa" meaning "my fault", as it is used in the Latin Mass. The additional term "mea maxima culpa" translates as "my most grievous fault".

36. Subject of a 2007 YouTube sensation : PIANO-PLAYING CAT
Nora is a grey tabby cat from New Jersey who features in a YouTube video that went viral in 1997. In the clip, Nora climbs up to a piano keyboard and “plays” the instrument, tapping away at the keys.

41. Longtime "Headlines" reader : LENO
“The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” features a segment known as “Headlines”. In the segment, Leno reads out newspaper headlines submitted by viewers from all around the world. They can be hilarious, either by design or by accident.

46. Olin of "Havana" : LENA
The lovely Lena Olin is a Swedish actress, clearly someone who had acting in her blood. Olin's mother was the actress Britta Holmberg and her father the actor and director Stig Olin. Lena Olin had a very successful career in Sweden, often working with the great Ingmar Bergman. Olin's breakthrough international and English-speaking role was playing opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" released in 1988. Way back in 1974, the lovely Miss Olin was crowned Miss Scandinavia in a beauty pageant for Nordic women held in Helsinki, Finland.

"Havana" is a movie starring Robert Redford and Lena Olin that is set in Cuba on the eve of the Cuban Revolution.

51. Enlightened Buddhist : ARHAT
“Arhat” is a Sanskrit word, the exact translation of which is somewhat disputed, with the various Buddhist traditions assuming different meanings. Translations vary from "worthy one" to "vanquisher of enemies".

55. Mauna ___ : KEA
Mauna Kea is a dormant volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii, the peak of which is the highest point in the whole state. Mauna Kea is in effect the tip of a gigantic volcano rising up from the seabed. So, the "real" height of the volcano is over 33,000 feet, which is significantly "taller" than even Mount Everest, which has an elevation of 29,029 feet above sea level.

62. How a ship might turn : ALEE
"Alee" is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing "aweather".

65. Intrigue, once, informally : OLDS
The Oldsmobile Intrigue was a mid-size car made by GM from 1998 to 2002. The Intrigue was the first model to be phased out after GM made the decision to do away with the Oldsmobile badge.

Down
2. Some deceptive designs : OP ART
Op art is also known as optical art, and puts optical illusions to great effect.

4. Rotarian relative : ELK
The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (BPOE) was founded in 1868 and is a social club that has about a million members today. The Elks started out as a group of men getting together in a "club" in order to get around the legal opening hours of taverns in New York City. The club took on a new role as it started to look out for poor families of members who passed away. The club now accepts African Americans as members (since the seventies) and women (since the nineties), but atheists still aren't welcome.

9. Bitter, e.g. : ALE
The term “bitter” is used in England for what we are more likely to call “pale ale” here in North America.

11. Missouri's first elected female senator : CLAIRE MCCASKILL
Claire McCaskill has been a US Senator for Missouri since 2007.

12. N.Y.C. racetrack moniker : BIG A
The Aqueduct Racetrack in Queens, New York is known by many as the Big A. The track opened in 1894 and was located near an aqueduct belonging to the Brooklyn Water Works, which gave the name.

13. Antique gun : STEN
The STEN gun was an iconic armament used by the British military forces. The name STEN is an acronym. The S and the T comes from the name of the gun's designers, Shepherd and Turpin. The EN comes from the Enfield brand name, which in turn comes from the Enfield location where the guns were manufactured for the Royal Small Arms Factory, an enterprise owned by the British government.

19. Actress Thompson : SADA
Sada Thompson was an actress from Des Moines, Iowa. Thompson is best known for playing the mother and wife in the eighties television drama series called “Family”.

26. Panasonic subsidiary : SANYO
Sanyo is a Japanese electronics manufacturer, based near Osaka and founded in 1947. The company name means "three oceans" reflecting the original aim to sell its products all around the world (across three oceans, the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian).

32. Tail of a dog? : APSO
The Lhasa apso breed of dog originated in Tibet and is named after Lhasa (the capital city) and apso (a Tibetan word meaning "bearded"). The Lhasa apso has been around since 800 BC and is one of the oldest breeds in the world, one very closely related to the ancestral wolf.

33. Zero-spin particle : PION
“Pion” is short for “pi meson”, and is the name given to a subatomic particle.

34. "The L Word" producer Chaiken : ILENE
Ilene Chaiken was the executive producer for the Showtime drama series "The L Word". The show deals with lesbian, bisexual and transgender people living in West Hollywood. The title refers to "the L word": lesbian.

37. Realty reference : PLAT
A plat is a map showing actual and planned features, so a town might have a plat showing existing and intended buildings.

38. Big blasts from the past, briefly : N-TESTS
The first test of a hydrogen bomb was in 1954 at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The test may have been a technical success but it was an environmental disaster because the actual yield of 15 megatons was unexpected (the military anticipated only 4-6 megatons). The resulting nuclear fallout caused many deaths and led to birth defects in generations to come.

39. Actress Rowlands : GENA
Gena Rowlands is an actress best known for the films made with her husband, actor and director John Cassavetes. More recently, Rowlands played a lead role opposite James Garner in the weepy, weepy 2004 film “The Notebook”. “The Notebook” was directed by her son, Nick Cassavetes.

45. ___ Hari : MATA
Mata Hari was the stage name used by Margaretha Geertuida Zella, born in the Netherlands in 1876. After an unsuccessful and somewhat tragic marriage, Zella moved to Paris in 1903 where she struggled to make a living. By 1905 she was working as an exotic dancer and using the name Mata Hari. She was a successful courtesan, notably moving in various circles of high-ranking military officers. She apparently worked as a double agent, both for the French and the Germans. When Mata Hari was accused by the French of passing information to the enemy, she was tried, found guilty and executed by firing squad at the height of WW1, in 1917.

46. Hall-of-Fame football coach Tom : LANDRY
Although Tom Landry was a football player, he is best known as the head coach for the Dallas Cowboys. As coach he had a run of 20 consecutive winning seasons, a record that has yet to be broken. Landry had an impressive record during WWII as well. He completed a tour of 30 missions as co-pilot in a B-17 Flying Fortress in Europe, and survived a crash landing in Belgium. In his days with the Dallas Cowboys, Landry was noted for wearing a fedora hat, and there is even an image of that famous hat on his tombstone in Texas State Cemetery. He passed away in the year 2000.

49. Sniggled : EELED
Sniggling is the name of a fishing technique used to catch eels.

54. 1961 space chimp : ENOS
Enos was a chimpanzee who was launched into Earth orbit in 1961 by NASA on a Mercury Atlas 4 rocket. Enos’s flight was a rehearsal for the first orbital flight made by an American, astronaut John Glenn. Enos returned from his mission safely, but died the following year from dysentery.

57. Friend of Frodo : SAM
Samwise Gamgee is the sidekick to Frodo Baggins in Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings”.

Frodo Baggins is a principal character in J. R. R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings". Frodo is a Hobbit, and is charged with the quest of destroying Sauron's Ring in the fires of Mount Doom.

58. Cinque minus due : TRE
In Italian, cinque (five) minus due (two) is tre (three).

59. Way overseas : TAO
The Chinese character "tao" translates as "path", but the concept of Tao signifies the true nature of the world.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. See 5-Across : ROSE
5. With 1-Across, hybrid tea's ancestor : CHINA
10. Noxious compounds, briefly : PCBS
14. "Wir leben Autos" sloganeer : OPEL
15. Kind of cortex : RENAL
16. Detrained, e.g. : ALIT
17. "Turn me on, dead man," supposedly, in the Beatles' "Revolution 9" : BACKWARD MESSAGE
20. Go off : ERR
21. Next-to-last word in the Lord's Prayer : EVER
22. Like sherpas : ASIAN
23. Nicks producing cuts? : STEVIE
25. Early psychoanalyst Coriat : ISADOR
28. Coastal diver : TERN
29. Flirt, maybe : BAT AN EYE
32. Morsel for a ladybug : APHID
34. "There ___ spoon" ("The Matrix" line) : IS NO
35. Apology start : MEA
36. Subject of a 2007 YouTube sensation : PIANO-PLAYING CAT
40. Many a beneficiary : SON
41. Longtime "Headlines" reader : LENO
42. Helpers after crashes : TECHS
43. One way to watch movies : ON DEMAND
46. Olin of "Havana" : LENA
47. On the schedule : SLATED
48. Bundled, say : AS A SET
51. Enlightened Buddhist : ARHAT
53. Need to keep one's place? : RENT
55. Mauna ___ : KEA
56. Go nowhere : BE AT A STANDSTILL
60. Become clumped : CAKE
61. Ivy's support, maybe : ARBOR
62. How a ship might turn : ALEE
63. Olympic vehicle : SLED
64. Like rats' nests : MESSY
65. Intrigue, once, informally : OLDS

Down
1. Bench attire : ROBES
2. Some deceptive designs : OP ART
3. Order confirmation? : SECRET HANDSHAKE
4. Rotarian relative : ELK
5. Chickenhearted : CRAVEN
6. On hand : HERE
7. Little by little : IN DRIBS AND DRABS
8. Many vets recall it : NAM
9. Bitter, e.g. : ALE
10. Relay : PASS ON
11. Missouri's first elected female senator : CLAIRE MCCASKILL
12. N.Y.C. racetrack moniker : BIG A
13. Antique gun : STEN
18. Eccentric : WEIRDO
19. Actress Thompson : SADA
24. Course through the body? : VEIN
26. Panasonic subsidiary : SANYO
27. Yours, in Paris : A TOI
30. "Hot dog!" : YEAH
31. Hot dogs, say : EATS
32. Tail of a dog? : APSO
33. Zero-spin particle : PION
34. "The L Word" producer Chaiken : ILENE
37. Realty reference : PLAT
38. Big blasts from the past, briefly : N-TESTS
39. Actress Rowlands : GENA
44. Opposite of down : ELATED
45. ___ Hari : MATA
46. Hall-of-Fame football coach Tom : LANDRY
49. Sniggled : EELED
50. Accounts : TALES
51. Nuts and bolts : ABCS
52. Not fantastic : REAL
54. 1961 space chimp : ENOS
57. Friend of Frodo : SAM
58. Cinque minus due : TRE
59. Way overseas : TAO

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1129-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Nov 12, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Sharon Delorme
THEME: DON’T SWEAT IT … each of the theme answers starts with a brand name of anti-perspirant:
17A. The library in an old mansion may have one : SECRET PANEL
25A. '60s protest sign : BAN THE BOMB
35A. Extent to which you may do as you please : DEGREE OF FREEDOM
48A. Having firm control : SURE-HANDED
60A. Reassuring words ... or a hint to 17-, 25-, 35- and 48-Across : DON’T SWEAT IT
COMPLETION TIME: 10m 07s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Whirled weapons : BOLAS
Bolas are heavy balls connected by cords that constitute a throwing weapon. Bolas are often used to capture animals by tripping them as they run, and are usually associated with gauchos, the South American cowboys.

6. Brasserie list : CARTE
A brasserie is a kind of French restaurant that’s usually a step up from a bistro. “Brasserie” is the French word for “brewery”, and the original brasseries in France served beer that was brewed on the premises.

11. Buster Keaton missile : PIE
Buster Keaton was a comic actor, most famous for his work during the silent era. Keaton starred in and co-directed the 1926 silent comedy “The General”, lauded by many as the greatest movie of all time.

15. Malaria may cause these : AGUES
Malaria is a disease passed onto humans by mosquitoes. As a result of the disease, a parasite invades human red blood cells and multiplies causing fever and possibly coma or death. Over 750,000 people died from malaria in 2009, out of 225 million cases reported.

16. "The Fair Maid of the ___" (Renaissance comedy) : INN
“The Fair Maid of the Inn” is a Renaissance comedy play, the authorship of which is much disputed.

19. Initials seen at a checkout counter : NCR
NCR is an American company that has been in business since 1884, originally called the National Cash Register Company. The company has done well in a market where new technologies seem to be constantly disrupting the status quo.

20. Doe in a Disney film : ENA
Ena is Bambi's aunt in the 1942 Disney film “Bambi”. The movie is based on the novel "Bambi, A Life in the Woods" written by Austrian author Felix Salten, first published in 1923.

21. One thrown from a horse? : LARIAT
Our word “lariat” comes from the Spanish “la reater” meaning “the rope”.

23. Penne ___ vodka : ALLA
Penne alla vodka is a pasta dish with a sauce made of vodka, cream , tomatoes, onions and sausage or bacon.

27. Besmirches : TARS
"Besmirch" is a derivative of "smirch", with both words meaning to "make dirty". In particular, to besmirch is to sully someone's reputation.

29. State of France : ETAT
In French, a state (état) is a political division (division politique).

41. Dragon in a 2008 best seller : TATTOO
“The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” is a sensational hit novel by the Swedish author Stieg Larsson, originally titled in Swedish as “Men Who Hate Women”. It is the first in a trilogy of successful books, all of which were only published after Larsson's death.

42. Demanding sort : DIVA
"Diva" comes to us from Latin via Italian. "Diva" is the feminine form of "divus" meaning "divine one". The word is used in Italy to mean "goddess" or "fine lady", and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

43. Certain jelly : ASPIC
"Aspic" is a French word for "jelly".

56. Like Braille characters : RAISED
The Braille system of reading and writing was devised in 1825 by Louis Braille, who was himself afflicted with blindness. Braille characters are composed of six positions or dots, each arranged in two columns of three dots each. Every dot can be raised or not raised, given a total of 64 possible characters.

65. Louis Malle's "___ Amants" : LES
“Les Amants” (“The Lovers”) is a 1958 French movie directed by Louis Malle when he was just 25 years old. The film was a great success in France but when it was first shown here in the US, a theater manager was convicted of distributing obscene material.

67. Sporty 1990s Toyota : PASEO
The Paseo is a compact car sold in the US by Toyota from 1991 to 1997. "Paseo" is Spanish for "walk, stroll".

Down
5. Silverstein of kid-lit : SHEL
Author Shel Silverstein had a varied career and did a lot more than write books. Silverstein was a poet, composer, cartoonist and screenwriter among other things. One of his successful children's books is "The Giving Tree", which was first published in 1964. "The GivingTree" tells of a young boy who has a special relationship with a tree in a forest. The message of the book seems to be that the tree provides the little boy with everything he needs.

6. "State of the Union" director, 1948 : CAPRA
I can’t tell you how many of Frank Capra’s movies are on my list of all-time favorites. He directed such classics as “It Happened One Night”, “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town”, “Lost Horizon”, “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”, “Meet John Doe”, “Arsenic and Old Lace” and the holiday favorite “It’s a Wonderful Life”. Capra also did his bit during WWII, enlisting just a few days after Pearl Harbor was attacked. Given his great talent, and the fact that he enlisted at the relatively advanced age of 44, the US Army put him to work directing 11 documentary war films in the “Why We Fight” series, for which he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal.

“State of the Union” is a 1948 movie directed by Frank Capra starring Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn. The film’s about an aircraft tycoon (Tracy) making a run for the US Presidency, with someone else (Hepburn) pulling the strings.

10. Night school subj. : ESL
English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

11. Old-time bowling alley worker : PIN BOY
Before the days of automation, there used to be a “pin boy” positioned behind the pins in a bowling alley. His job was to reposition pins that had been knocked down and to return the balls to the bowlers.

12. 1040 figure : INCOME
Form 1040 was originally created just for tax returns from 1913, 1914 and 1915, but it's a form that just will not go away ...

18. Q neighbor : TAB
Like most features on our computer keyboards, the tab key is a hangover from the days of typewriters. When using a typewriter, making entries into a table was very tedious as it involved lots of tapping on the spacebar and backspace key. So, a lever was added to typewriters that allowed the operator to "jump" across the page to positions that could be set by hand. Later this was simplified to a tab key, which could be depressed causing the carriage to jump to the next tab stop in much the same way that the modern tab key works on a computer.

22. Law school-sanctioning org. : ABA
The American Bar Association (ABA) was founded back in 1878 and is a voluntary association for lawyers and law students. The ABA focuses on setting academic standards for law schools and setting ethical codes for the profession.

24. Sci. major : ASTR
Astronomy is studied in a physics department at a university.

26. ___ du combat : EPEE
I think that an “épée du combat” is a real sword that can be used in combat, and an “épée de salle” (classroom sword) is a practice sword.

30. Actress Benaderet : BEA
Bea Benaderet, as well as playing Kate Bradley on "Petticoat Junction" and Pearl Bodine on “The Beverly Hillbillies”, was the voice of Betty Rubble on "The Flintstones".

33. Amateur film subject, maybe : UFO
In 1952, the USAF revived its studies of reports of UFO sightings in a program called Project Blue Book. Project Blue Book ran from 1952 until it was shut down in 1969 with the conclusion that there was no threat to national security and that there were no sightings that could not be explained within the bounds of modern scientific knowledge.

34. Sign of success : SRO
Standing Room Only (SRO).

37. Ancient land around today's Jordan : EDOM
Edom is an ancient Iron Age kingdom located in the south of modern-day Jordan. The area is known for its red-colored sandstone, which gave the kingdom its name. The Hebrew word "Edom" translates as "red".

40. Catchphrase of Jean-Luc Picard on "Star Trek: T.N.G." : MAKE IT SO
When Gene Roddenberry was creating the “Star Trek” spin-off series “Star Trek: The Next Generation”, I think he chose a quite magnificent name for the new starship captain. The name "Jean-Luc Picard" is imitative of one or both of the twin-brother Swiss scientists Auguste and Jean Felix Piccard. The role of Picard was of course played by the wonderful Shakespearean actor Patrick Stewart.

45. Safari sightings : PRIDES
A group of lions is a pride of lions.

"Safari" is a Swahili word, meaning "journey" or "expedition".

46. Suffix with bombard : -IER
A bombardier is an artillery officer, or the member of the crew on a military aircraft who drops bombs.

50. Some iPods : NANOS
The iPod Nano is the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There have been five versions of the Nano to date and the current Nano as well as playing tunes is an FM player, records voice memos, and even has a pedometer!

51. "I'll second that" : DITTO
"Ditto" was originally used in Italian (from Tuscan dialect) to avoid repetition of the names of months in a series of dates. Ditto is just another wonderful import from that lovely land ...

52. Steel city of Germany : ESSEN
I knew a man back in Ireland, a German national from the city of Essen. He had very sad tales to tell from the days of WWII. As a young boy he lost his (socialist) parents during the Nazi purges early in the war. In 1943 he was living with his grandmother and still attending school when he was drafted into the army along with the rest of his class (at 14 years of age). His platoon leader was his school teacher who made a point of tutoring the boys in place of military drilling. One day he was on guard duty with his class/platoon at the dam above the city, and along come the Dam Busters with their bouncing bombs. The raid was successful (from the perspective of the Allies), but he described terrible famine faced by the people below the dam due to flooding of the farmland that surrounded the target factories.

57. Co-star of DiCaprio in "What's Eating Gilbert Grape" : DEPP
“What's Eating Gilbert Grape” is a 1993 film adapted from a 1991 novel of the same name by Peter Hedges. The film stars Johnny Depp in the title role, and Leonardo DiCaprio as Gilbert’s mentally disabled brother.

60. J.F.K. or F.D.R. : DEM
JFK and FDR were both members of the Democratic Party.

John F. Kennedy actually earned a degree in International Affairs in 1940, graduating cum laude from Harvard University. As a senator, in 1956 he was was awarded an honorary law degree (LLD) by his alma mater.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt was the only child of Sara Delano and James Roosevelt Sr. The Delano family history in America goes back to the pilgrim Philippe de Lannoy, an immigrant of Flemish descent who arrived at Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1621. The family name "de Lannoy" was anglicized here in the US, to "Delano".

61. Constellation next to Scorpius : ARA
The constellation of Ara takes its name from the Latin word for "altar".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Whirled weapons : BOLAS
6. Brasserie list : CARTE
11. Buster Keaton missile : PIE
14. Notable time span : EPOCH
15. Malaria may cause these : AGUES
16. "The Fair Maid of the ___" (Renaissance comedy) : INN
17. The library in an old mansion may have one : SECRET PANEL
19. Initials seen at a checkout counter : NCR
20. Doe in a Disney film : ENA
21. One thrown from a horse? : LARIAT
22. Peek-___ : -A-BOO
23. Penne ___ vodka : ALLA
25. '60s protest sign : BAN THE BOMB
27. Besmirches : TARS
28. Check information : PAYEE
29. State of France : ETAT
30. Top of a wardrobe : BLOUSE
35. Extent to which you may do as you please : DEGREE OF FREEDOM
41. Dragon in a 2008 best seller : TATTOO
42. Demanding sort : DIVA
43. Certain jelly : ASPIC
47. Brief race distance, briefly : ONE-K
48. Having firm control : SURE-HANDED
54. Simple : MERE
55. Direction in a bartender guide : STIR
56. Like Braille characters : RAISED
58. Numerical prefix : TRI-
59. C.P.A., at times: Abbr. : AUD
60. Reassuring words ... or a hint to 17-, 25-, 35- and 48-Across : DON’T SWEAT IT
62. It may make the face turn red : IRE
63. Not act subtly : EMOTE
64. Readies : PREPS
65. Louis Malle's "___ Amants" : LES
66. Foundation layer : MASON
67. Sporty 1990s Toyota : PASEO

Down
1. "Take your chairs" : BE SEATED
2. Like many a restaurant drive-thru : OPEN LATE
3. Small-town paper, informally : LOCAL RAG
4. Unlike this clue: Abbr. : ACR
5. Silverstein of kid-lit : SHEL
6. "State of the Union" director, 1948 : CAPRA
7. "Let's take it from the top" : AGAIN
8. Charge : RUN AT
9. Where crowns go : TEETH
10. Night school subj. : ESL
11. Old-time bowling alley worker : PIN BOY
12. 1040 figure : INCOME
13. Get dressed : ENROBE
18. Q neighbor : TAB
22. Law school-sanctioning org. : ABA
24. Sci. major : ASTR
26. ___ du combat : EPEE
30. Actress Benaderet : BEA
31. Place for parking : LOT
32. Many a time : OFT
33. Amateur film subject, maybe : UFO
34. Sign of success : SRO
36. Prepare a plaque, perhaps : ETCH
37. Ancient land around today's Jordan : EDOM
38. Some furniture sets : DINETTES
39. Like a mushy banana, say : OVERRIPE
40. Catchphrase of Jean-Luc Picard on "Star Trek: T.N.G." : MAKE IT SO
43. Attack : ASSAIL
44. Stitch up : SUTURE
45. Safari sightings : PRIDES
46. Suffix with bombard : -IER
49. It might whet your appetite : AROMA
50. Some iPods : NANOS
51. "I'll second that" : DITTO
52. Steel city of Germany : ESSEN
53. Drops on the field? : DEW
57. Co-star of DiCaprio in "What's Eating Gilbert Grape" : DEPP
60. J.F.K. or F.D.R. : DEM
61. Constellation next to Scorpius : ARA

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1128-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Nov 12, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Adam G. Perl
THEME: Algebra … today we need to solve an algebra problem:
17A. Start of an algebra problem : X PLUS Y IS SIXTEEN
36A. The rest of the algebra problem : X MINUS Y IS FOUR
58A. Answer to the algebra problem : X IS TEN AND Y IS SIX

Firstly: x + y = 16
Secondly: x - y = 4
Adding the above two equations gives (x+x) + (y-y) = 16 + 4
or 2x + 0 = 20, so x = 10
Putting x = 10 into the first equation gives
10 + y = 16, so y = 6
Putting x = 10 into the second equation gives
10 - y = 4, confirming that y = 6
COMPLETION TIME: 15m 23s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. "Major" beast : URSA
The constellation called Ursa Major (Latin for "Larger Bear") is often just called the Big Dipper because of its resemblance to a ladle or dipper. Ursa Major also resembles a plow, and that's what we usually call the same constellation back in Ireland: the "plough".

10. Porter's regretful Miss : OTIS
“Miss Otis Regrets” is a Cole Porter composition written in 1934 that is usually sung in a blues style. Porter wrote the song as a friendly bet. He had boasted that he could write a song about any subject, so the challenge from some friends was to create something using the next words they should hear. Porter and friends were at lunch in a restaurant, and they heard a waiter at an adjoining table say “Miss Otis regrets she’s unable to lunch today”. And that became a classic song …

14. From Basra, say : IRAQI
It's quite a coincidence that the Iraqi city of Basra has a name that is an anagram of "Arabs", isn't it? Basra also features in the H. G. Wells science-fiction tale "The Shape of Things to Come". Written in 1933, the storyline predicts a global conflict (WWII) that breaks out in 1940 lasting for ten years, after which chaos reigns as no victor emerges. Following worldwide plague, a benevolent dictatorship emerges and the world moves towards a serene utopia. In time, the dictators are overthrown and peacefully retired, and the people of the Earth live happily ever after, all citizens of one global state with its capital in Basra in the Middle East.

15. Time to stuff stockings : NOEL
“Noël” is the French word for the Christmas season, ultimately coming from the Latin word for "birth" i.e. "natalis". Noel has come to be used as an alternative name for a Christmas carol.

20. Toby filler : ALE
The verb "mug" means to make an exaggerated facial expression. The term comes from mugs used to drink beer (called Toby mugs) that are the made in the shape of heads with grotesque expressions.

30. Poet with a "fanatic's heart" : YEATS
Irish poet and dramatist William Butler Yeats won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1923 for "inspired poetry" that gave "expression to a whole nation". Yeats was Ireland's first Nobel laureate.

33. Québec assent : OUI
The name "Québec" comes from an Algonquin word "kebec" meaning "where the river narrows". This refers to the area around Quebec City where the St. Lawrence River narrows as it flows through a gap lined by steep cliffs.

41. Kitty : POT
The "pot" in a card game has been referred to as the kitty since the 1880s. It's not certain how the name "kitty" evolved but possibly it came from "kit", the necessary equipment for the game.

42. "L'___ c'est moi" : ETAT
"L'Etat, c'est moi" is a French phrase, supposedly spoken by Louis XIV on his deathbed. It translates to "I am the State", and would appear to mean that Louis considered himself to be "above his station" as it were. However, many dispute the quotation, and argue that Louis actually said on his deathbed that even though he was dying, the State would live on.

43. Alternative to Yahoo! : AOL
Founded as Quantum Computer Services in 1983, the company changed its name in 1989 to America Online. As America Online went international, the acronym AOL was used in order to shake off the "America-centric" sound to the name. During the heady days of AOL's success the company could not keep up with the growing number of subscribers, so people trying to connect often encountered busy signals. That's when users referred to AOL as "Always Off-Line".

Jerry Yang and David Filo called their company "Yahoo!" for two reasons. Firstly, a Yahoo is a rude unsophisticated brute from Jonathan Swift's "Gulliver's Travels". Secondly, Yahoo stands for "Yet another Hierarchical Officious Oracle".

45. It has feathers and flies : DART
Darts is a wonderful game often played in British and Irish pubs, even over here in America. The scoring in a traditional game of darts is difficult to describe in a sentence or two, but the game of darts called "Round the Clock" is simply hitting the numbers 1 through 20 in sequence.

47. Black Sabbath's genre : METAL
Black Sabbath are an English heavy metal band set up in 1969 in Birmingham in the north of the country. Black Sabbath’s most famous band member was the lead singer, Ozzy Osbourne. Ozzy was kicked out of the group in 1979 as his drug usage was becoming overly disruptive.

54. Meditation sounds : OMS
Om is a sacred mystic word from the Hindu tradition. Om is sometimes used as a mantra, a focus for the mind in meditation.

57. Messenger ___ : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

67. Fictional Flanders and Devine : NEDS
Ned Flanders lives next door to Homer on TV's "The Simpsons". Ned is voiced by actor Harry Shearer and has been around since the very first episode aired in 1989.

"Waking Ned Devine" is an entertaining comedy film from 1998 set in Ireland. It's all about Ned Devine who wins a fortune from the National Lottery but also who dies before he can claim the prize. The whole village conspires to "keep him alive" so that the winnings will be delivered and the locals can share the loot. Worth a rental ...

69. Historic English county : ESSEX
Essex is a county in England, referred to as one of the “home counties”.

The home counties are the counties that surround the city of London, outside of London itself. "Home county" is not an official designation but has been in popular use since the 1800s.

Down
1. Beiderbecke of jazz : BIX
Bix Beiderbecke was a jazz cornet player and composer. Beiderbecke was very influential in the world of jazz in the 1920s in particular and is said to have invented the jazz ballad style.

2. Dadaist Jean : ARP
Hans Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn't the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both "Hans" and "Jean" translate into English as "John". In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. He was sent home …

Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

5. Fine cotton thread : LISLE
Lisle is a cotton fabric that has been through an extra process at the end of its manufacture that burns off lint and the ends of fibers leaving the fabric very smooth and with a clean edge.

7. Parks in front of a bus? : ROSA
Rosa Parks was one of a few brave women in days gone by who refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white woman. It was the stand taken by Rosa Parks on December 1, 1955 that sparked the Montgomery, Alabama Bus Boycott. President Clinton presented Ms. Parks with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1996. When she died in 2005, Rosa Parks became the first ever woman to have her body lie in honor in the US Capital Rotunda.

8. Sonnet part : SESTET
A sestet is a group of six lines of poetry similar to a quatrain, a group of four lines.

A sonnet is a short poem with varying rhyming schemes but always with 14 lines. The sonnet form has been around at least since the 13th century.

9. Xenophobes' fear : ALIENS
Xenophobia is the uncontrollable fear of foreigners. The word comes from Greek, with “xeno” meaning guest, stranger or foreigner, and “phobia” meaning fear, horror or aversion.

10. Muesli morsel : OAT
"Muesli" is a Swiss-German term describing a breakfast serving of oats, nuts, fruit and milk. Delicious ...

11. Mrs. Robinson's movie : THE GRADUATE
When Mike Nichols was making the 1967 film "The Graduate" he apparently became obsessed with the music of Simon and Garfunkel, who were just coming into the limelight. Nichols made a deal with Paul Simon to write three songs that he could use on the soundtrack of his new movie. Simon and Garfunkel were touring constantly around that time, so Nichols had to badger Simon to hold up his end of the bargain. When Nichols was ready to lay down the film's soundtrack there was only one commissioned song available, so Nichols had to basically beg Paul Simon for anything. Simon mentioned that he was finishing up one new song, but it wasn't written for the film. It was more a celebration of former times, with lyrics about baseball great Joe DiMaggio and former First Lady, Mrs. Roosevelt. Nichols informed Simon that the song was no longer about Mrs. Roosevelt, and it was about Mrs. Robinson ...

23. Menu general : TSO
General Tso's chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zontang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

24. Gumbo thickener : ROUX
A roux is a mixture of wheat flour and clarified butter (or other fat) cooked together until it can be used as a thickening agent. Roux is an essential ingredient in French cooking, although "healthier" versions are being used more and more these days.

Gumbo is a type of stew or soup that originated in Louisiana. The primary ingredient can be meat or fish, but to be true gumbo it must include the "holy trinity" of vegetables, namely celery, bell peppers and onion. Okra used to be a requirement but this is no longer the case. Okra gave the dish its name as the vernacular word for this African vegetable is "okingumbo”, from the Bantu language spoken by many of the slaves brought to America.

26. Actress Harper of "No Country for Old Men" : TESS
“No Country for Old Men” is a 2007 thriller made by the Coen brothers that is based on a novel of the same name by Cormac McCarthy. I have to put this one on my list as I hear good things about it. It won several Oscars and stars Tommy Lee Jones, a favorite actor of mine.

34. Cause of a boom and bust? : TNT
TNT is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. Trinitrotoluene was first produced by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand in 1863, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

35. Young newt : EFT
Newts wouldn't be my favorite animals. They are found all over the world living on land or in water depending on the species, but always associated with water even if it is only for breeding. Newts metamorphose through three distinct developmental stages during their lives. They start off as larvae in water, fertilized eggs that often cling to aquatic plants. The eggs hatch into tadpoles, the first developmental form of the newt. After living some months as tadpoles swimming around in the water, they undergo another metamorphosis, sprouting legs and replacing their external gills with lungs. At this juvenile stage they are known as efts, and leave the water to live on land. A more gradual transition takes place then, as the eft takes on the lizard-like appearance of the adult newt.

37. Smidge : IOTA
Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet. We use the word "iota" to portray something very small as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

44. "Dropped" drug : LSD
LSD (colloquially known as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn't until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man ...

45. Compound in Agent Orange : DIOXIN
Agent Orange is a defoliant used by the US Military as a chemical weapon, particularly during the Vietnam War. Agent Orange is a mixture of two herbicides, and one of these herbicides was shown to be contaminated with an extremely toxic dioxin compound that has been linked to various forms of cancer and birth defects. The name “Agent Orange” arose as the chemical was shipped into the field in 55-gallon barrels with an identifying orange stripe.

47. More Scroogelike : MEANER
The classic 1843 novella "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens has left us with a few famous phrases and words. Firstly, it led to the popular use of "Merry Christmas", and secondly it gave us the word "scrooge" meaning a miserly person. And thirdly, everyone knows that the character Scrooge was fond of using the now famous line "Bah! Humbug!".

51. Battlefield fare: Abbr. : MRE
The Meal, Ready-to-Eat (MRE) comes in a lightweight package that's easy to tote around. The MRE replaced the more cumbersome Meal, Combat, Individual (MCI) in 1981, a meal-in-a-can. In turn, the MCI had replaced the C-ration in 1958, a less sophisticated meal-in-a-can with a more limited choice.

56. Slaughter in baseball : ENOS
Enos Slaughter has a remarkable playing record in Major League Baseball over a 19-year career. Slaughter's record is particularly remarkable given that he left baseball for three years to serve in the military during WWII.

63. Affectionate sign-off : XOX
In the sequence XOX, I think the X represents a kiss, and the O a hug. Hugs and kisses ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Goose egg : BAGEL
6. "Major" beast : URSA
10. Porter's regretful Miss : OTIS
14. From Basra, say : IRAQI
15. Time to stuff stockings : NOEL
16. [sigh] : AH ME
17. Start of an algebra problem : X PLUS Y IS SIXTEEN
20. Toby filler : ALE
21. To ___ (perfectly) : A TEE
22. Heating option : GAS
23. Least fresh : TRITEST
27. Throw one's support behind : ENDORSE
29. "___ nerve!" : SOME
30. Poet with a "fanatic's heart" : YEATS
32. Passage preventers, often : NAYS
33. Québec assent : OUI
34. Jettison : TOSS
35. Outgoing flight stat : ETD
36. The rest of the algebra problem : X MINUS Y IS FOUR
41. Kitty : POT
42. "L'___ c'est moi" : ETAT
43. Alternative to Yahoo! : AOL
45. It has feathers and flies : DART
47. Black Sabbath's genre : METAL
49. Benchmarks: Abbr. : STDS
50. Think tank types : IDEA MEN
52. Like stir-fry : SAUTEED
54. Meditation sounds : OMS
55. One-in-a-million : RARE
57. Messenger ___ : RNA
58. Answer to the algebra problem : X IS TEN AND Y IS SIX
64. Steaming : IRED
65. Causes of some celebrity clashes : EGOS
66. Link with : TIE TO
67. Fictional Flanders and Devine : NEDS
68. Kind of day for a competitive cyclist : REST
69. Historic English county : ESSEX

Down
1. Beiderbecke of jazz : BIX
2. Dadaist Jean : ARP
3. Guy's mate : GAL
4. Regard as identical : EQUATE
5. Fine cotton thread : LISLE
6. Prefix with -form : UNI-
7. Parks in front of a bus? : ROSA
8. Sonnet part : SESTET
9. Xenophobes' fear : ALIENS
10. Muesli morsel : OAT
11. Mrs. Robinson's movie : THE GRADUATE
12. "Fine with me" : I’M EASY
13. Classic quintet : SENSES
18. Response to "Who, me?" : YES, YOU
19. Marked, in a way : XED
23. Menu general : TSO
24. Gumbo thickener : ROUX
25. "Wow!" : I’M IMPRESSED
26. Actress Harper of "No Country for Old Men" : TESS
28. Savvy about : ONTO
31. Until now : AS YET
34. Cause of a boom and bust? : TNT
35. Young newt : EFT
37. Smidge : IOTA
38. "Take ___ a sign" : IT AS
39. Subject of a cap, in sports : SALARY
40. Didn't go by foot : RODE
44. "Dropped" drug : LSD
45. Compound in Agent Orange : DIOXIN
46. Venerate : ADMIRE
47. More Scroogelike : MEANER
48. Tee off : ENRAGE
49. Equilibrium : STASIS
51. Battlefield fare: Abbr. : MRE
53. Pull together : UNITE
56. Slaughter in baseball : ENOS
59. Some highlight reel features, for short : TDS
60. Summer hrs. : DST
61. Parisian's possessive : SES
62. Ore suffix : -ITE
63. Affectionate sign-off : XOX

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1127-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Nov 12, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Peter A. Collins
THEME: Jimi … each of the theme answers today relate to musician Jimi Hendrix, with most being songs that he recorded:
56A. Musician born 11/27/42 : JIMI HENDRIX

5A. With 67-Across, song by 56-Across : FOXY
67A. See 5-Across : LADY

19A. With 32-Across, song by 56-Across : ALL ALONG THE
32A. See 19-Across : WATCHTOWER

42A. Song by 56-Across : PURPLE HAZE

9D. With 60-Down, song by 56-Across : HEY
60D. See 9-Down : JOE

11D. Song by 56-Across : FIRE
COMPLETION TIME: 11m 22s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … LINC (Lenc), ILIA (ilea)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. ___ Sea (inland body with high salinity) : ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad ...

5. With 67-Across, song by 56-Across : FOXY
67. See 5-Across : LADY
“Foxy Lady” is a 1967 song by the Jimi Hendrix Experience, written by Jimi Hendrix. “Foxy Lady” is noted for a famous Hendrix guitar riff and the use of the so-called “Hendrix chord”.

9. Sword part : HAFT
The “haft” of a weapon is its handle or hilt.

13. Radius, e.g. : BONE
The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the "thumb-side" of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the "pinkie-side".

14. Comic strip dog with a long tongue : ODIE
Odie is Garfield's best friend and is a slobbery beagle, a character in Jim Davis’s comic strip.

17. Ike's partner in 1960s-'70s music : TINA
Ike and Tina Turner were together as a husband/wife duo recording music for 16 years in the sixties and seventies. Ike and Tina's biggest hit has to be "Proud Mary", released in 1971. The partnership ended, along with their marriage, in the late seventies with Tina making accusations of abuse by her drug-addicted husband.

18. Bicycle shorts material : LYCRA
What we call spandex in the US is known as Lycra in the British Isles. “Spandex” was chosen as the name for the elastic fiber as it is an anagram of “expands”.

19. With 32-Across, song by 56-Across : ALL ALONG THE
32. See 19-Across : WATCHTOWER
“All Along the Watchtower” is a song written and recorded by Bob Dylan, famously covered by Jimi Hendrix in 1968. Dylan is known to have really liked the Jimi Hendrix interpretation of his song, saying that “it overwhelmed me …”

23. Chaos : BEDLAM
Bethlem Royal Hospital is a facility in London in the UK for treating mental illness. The original facility was a hospital way back in the 1300s, and had the name “Bedlam”. In the 1700s and 1800s the hospital actually made money out of its patients as it charged a penny to members of the public allowing them to visit the hospital and view the unfortunate inmates in their cells. Tens of thousands of such paid visits were made each year. Our word “bedlam” meaning uproar and confusion is derived from the hospital’s name, and it reflects the cruel and inhumane treatment endured by the inmates in days gone by.

28. Conveyance in an Ellington song : “A” TRAIN
The A Train in the New York City Subway system runs from 207th Street, through Manhattan and over to Far Rockaway in Queens. The service lends its name to a jazz standard "Take the 'A' Train", the signature tune of Duke Ellington and a song much sung by Ella Fitzgerald. One version of the lyric is:
You must take the A Train
To go to Sugar Hill way up in Harlem
If you miss the A Train
You'll find you've missed the quickest way to Harlem
Hurry, get on, now, it's coming
Listen to those rails a-thrumming (All Aboard!)
Get on the A Train
Soon you will be on Sugar Hill in Harlem.

37. Pres. Carter's alma mater : USNA
President Jimmy Carter is a graduate of the US Naval Academy (USNA). The future president served in the Navy on surface ships and submarines, and chose to pursue a career in the submarine service as he was interested in nuclear power and believed it had a great future in submarine design. As a result, Carter became an expert in nuclear propulsion. In 1952, the Navy sent him to the Chalk River Laboratories in Canada to lead the US effort to shutdown the reactor after an accident and partial meltdown of a reactor core. He and his team had to be lowered into the leaking reactor core for mechanical disassembly, staying there for only seconds at a time to minimise exposure to radiation. Decades later as US President, it was this experience that influenced his decision not to complete the development of the neutron bomb.

39. Fourth notes : FAS
“Fa” is the fourth note in the solfa scale: do, re, mi, fa …

41. Actress Taylor of "Six Feet Under" : LILI
The actress Lili Taylor had supporting roles in films like "Mystic Pizza", "The Haunting" and "Rudy", and she had a recurring role in the HBO series "Six Feet Under".

42. Song by 56-Across : PURPLE HAZE
“Purple Haze” is a 1967 song written and recorded by Jimi Hendrix that has been described as a “psychedelic drug song of the sixties”. In fact, the term “purple haze” came to refer to LSD. Having said that, Hendrix denied any relation of the lyrics to drugs at all.

44. City SSW of Seattle : TACOMA
Tacoma is a city on Puget Sound in the state of Washington. The city took its name from Mount Rainier that is nearby, as thepeak used to be known as Mount Tahoma.

46. Peacekeeping grp. : NATO
NATO is the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (or OTAN in French, "l'Organisation du Traité de l'Atlantique Nord"). NATO was founded not long after WWII in 1949 and is headquartered in Brussels, Belgium. The first NATO Secretary General was Lord Ismay, Winston Churchill's chief military assistant during WWII. Famously, Lord Ismay said the goal of NATO was "to keep the Russians out, the Americans in, and the Germans down."

53. London-based record label : EMI
EMI is a British music company, with the acronym originally standing for Electric and Musical Industries.

56. Musician born 11/27/42 : JIMI HENDRIX
Many of his contemporaries regarded Jimi Hendrix as the greatest electric guitarist in the history of rock music. Hendrix was from Seattle and didn't really have a really stellar start to his working life. He failed to finish high school and fell foul of the law by getting caught in stolen cars, twice. The courts gave him the option of the army or two years in prison. Hendrix chose the former and soon found himself in the famous 101st Airborne. In the army, his less-than-disciplined ways helped him (as he would have seen it) because his superiors successfully petitioned to get him discharged after serving only one year of his two-year requirement, just to get him out of their hair.

59. "Deliverance" instrument : BANJO
The very memorable 1972 movie “Deliverance” is based on a novel of the same written by James Dickey. One might remember the film for the very disturbing “squeal like a pig” scene, but a much more pleasant memory is the fabulous “Duelling Banjos” instrumental scene early in the movie.

61. Panache : ELAN
Our word "élan" was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours i.e "style" or "flair".

Someone exhibiting panache is showing dash and verve, and perhaps has a swagger. “Panache” is a French word used for a plume of feathers, especially in a hat.

62. Lickety-split, in a memo : ASAP
“Lickety-split” is the latest in a line of terms that derived from the word “lick”, which was used in the sense of a “fast sprint in a race” back in the early 1800s. From “lick” there evolved “licketie”, “lickety-click”, “lickety-cut” and finally “lickety-split”, all just colorful ways to say “fast”.

64. Pete and Julie's "Mod Squad" partner : LINC
The 1999 movie "The Mod Squad" was an adaptation of the seventies television show of the same name. The part of Lincoln “Linc” Hayes was played by Omar Epps, Claire Danes played Julie Barnes and Giovanni Ribisi played Peter Cochran.

66. Where to buy GM and GE : NYSE
The roots of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) go back to 1792 when a group of 24 stock brokers set up the New York Stock & Exchange Board. They did so in an agreement signed under a buttonwood tree outside 68 Wall Street. That document became known as the Buttonwood Agreement.

68. Compound with a double-bonded carbon atom : ENOL
An enol is an alkene with a hydroxyl group, sort of part-alkene and part-alcohol. The term "enol" therefore, is a portmanteau of "alkene" and "alcohol".

Down
1. Former sitcom on the Beeb : AB FAB
“Absolutely Fabulous” (sometimes shortened to "Ab Fab") is a cult-classic sitcom produced by the BBC. The two stars of the show are Jennifer Saunders and Joanna Lumley.

2. "Good Times" actress Esther : ROLLE
Esther Rolle was an actress best known for playing the character Florida Evans on the sitcom “Maude” and on the show’s spinoff “Good Times”.

5. Bygone company with yellow-roofed kiosks : FOTOMAT
Fotomat kiosks were small drive-thru locations where customers could drop off photographic film for same-day development. The first kiosk opened in 1965, and around 1980 there were over 4,000 Fotomats all around the US. Most employees were females, known as “Fotomates”. Male employees were called “Fotomacs”.

6. Thor's father : ODIN
In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. Odin's wife Frigg was the queen of Asgard whose name gave us our English term "Friday" (via Anglo-Saxon). Odin's son was Thor, and his name gave us the term "Thursday".

8. "A Full Moon in March" poet : YEATS
Irish poet and dramatist William Butler Yeats won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1923, for "inspired poetry" that gave "expression to a whole nation". He was the first Irishman to be so honored.

9. With 60-Down, song by 56-Across : HEY
60. See 9-Down : JOE
“Hey Joe” is a rock song written in the sixties, most famously recorded by the Jimi Hendrix Experience in 1966. Jimi Hendrix was the last musician to appear at Woodstock in 1969, and “Hey Joe” was the last number he performed, so the song closed the whole festival.

11. Song by 56-Across : FIRE
“Fire” is a 1967 song written and recorded by Jimi Hendrix. Famously, “Fire” was covered by Red Hot Chili Peppers.

27. Sukiyaki ingredient : TOFU
Sukiyaki is a Japanese soup/stew prepared and served in a “nabemono”, a Japanese hot pot.

30. 1966 hurricane : INEZ
Hurricane Inez in 1966 was one of the deadliest storms on record. About 1,000 people died from Inez-related deaths across the Caribbean. In the US most of the dead were sailors lost in shipwrecks in the Straits of Florida.

33. Prima donna's delivery : ARIA
The Italian operatic term “prima donna” is used for the lead female singer in an opera company. “Prima donna” translates from Italian as “first lady”. The lead male singer is known as the “primo uomo”. The term “prima donna assoluta” is reserved for a prima donna who is generally accepted as being an outstanding performer.

34. After-bath powder : TALC
Talc is a mineral, actually hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days "baby powder" can also be cornstarch.

35. Card game for two : WAR
War is a card game, mainly played by young children.

42. Big ___ (baseball's David Ortiz) : PAPI
The Dominican American baseball player David Ortiz has the nickname “Big Papi”. After each home run that Ortiz scores, he looks upwards and points to the sky, a tribute to his mother who died in a car crash in 2002 when she was only 46 years old.

43. Period of inactivity : LATENCY
Something is said to be latent if it present, but not active.

48. What bloodhounds and dead fish do : SMELL
From the Middle Ages onwards, bloodhounds have been bred to track humans. All bloodhounds are said to be descended from hounds kept centuries ago at the Belgian Abbey of Saint Hubert. In fact, in French the breed is known as the “Chien de Saint-Hubert”.

53. Abba of Israel : EBAN
Abba Eban was an Israeli diplomat and politician, born Aubrey Solomon Meir Eban in Cape Town, South Africa. While working at the United Nations after WWII, Eban changed his given name to "Abba", the Hebrew word for "father". He made this change as reportedly as he could see himself as the father of the nation of Israel.

54. "The Wind Cries ___" (song by 56-Across) : MARY
“The Wind Cries Mary” is a 1967 song written and recorded by Jimi Hendrix. “The Wind Cries Mary” was released by Hendrix as the B-side to “Purple Haze”.

57. Hip parts : ILIA
The sacrum and the two ilia are three bones in the human pelvis.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. ___ Sea (inland body with high salinity) : ARAL
5. With 67-Across, song by 56-Across : FOXY
9. Sword part : HAFT
13. Radius, e.g. : BONE
14. Comic strip dog with a long tongue : ODIE
15. Spine-tingling : EERIE
16. Lash : FLOG
17. Ike's partner in 1960s-'70s music : TINA
18. Bicycle shorts material : LYCRA
19. With 32-Across, song by 56-Across : ALL ALONG THE
22. Half a school year: Abbr. : SEM
23. Chaos : BEDLAM
24. Splinter group : SECT
26. Rat-___ : A-TAT
28. Conveyance in an Ellington song : “A” TRAIN
32. See 19-Across : WATCHTOWER
37. Pres. Carter's alma mater : USNA
38. Having throbbing temples, maybe : IRATE
39. Fourth notes : FAS
40. Expensive : STEEP
41. Actress Taylor of "Six Feet Under" : LILI
42. Song by 56-Across : PURPLE HAZE
44. City SSW of Seattle : TACOMA
46. Peacekeeping grp. : NATO
47. Afternoon refreshers : NAPS
49. Long rant : TIRADE
53. London-based record label : EMI
56. Musician born 11/27/42 : JIMI HENDRIX
59. "Deliverance" instrument : BANJO
61. Panache : ELAN
62. Lickety-split, in a memo : ASAP
63. Passion : ARDOR
64. Pete and Julie's "Mod Squad" partner : LINC
65. Job for an actor : ROLE
66. Where to buy GM and GE : NYSE
67. See 5-Across : LADY
68. Compound with a double-bonded carbon atom : ENOL

Down
1. Former sitcom on the Beeb : AB FAB
2. "Good Times" actress Esther : ROLLE
3. "You can't teach ___ dog ..." : AN OLD
4. Lawsuit : LEGAL ACTION
5. Bygone company with yellow-roofed kiosks : FOTOMAT
6. Thor's father : ODIN
7. RR ___ : XING
8. "A Full Moon in March" poet : YEATS
9. With 60-Down, song by 56-Across : HEY
10. Three-point lines in basketball, e.g. : ARCS
11. Song by 56-Across : FIRE
12. Word after mule or school : TEAM
15. Choose : ELECT
20. Tool that turns : LATHE
21. Catch, in a way : HEAR
25. Sleepover game, maybe : TRUTH OR DARE
27. Sukiyaki ingredient : TOFU
29. Where sailors go : ASEA
30. 1966 hurricane : INEZ
31. A ponytail hangs over it : NAPE
32. What picked flowers may do : WILT
33. Prima donna's delivery : ARIA
34. After-bath powder : TALC
35. Card game for two : WAR
36. "Pardon the Interruption" airer : ESPN
40. Arrive, as darkness : SET IN
42. Big ___ (baseball's David Ortiz) : PAPI
43. Period of inactivity : LATENCY
45. Biology or English : MAJOR
48. What bloodhounds and dead fish do : SMELL
50. Bad ignition? : ARSON
51. Connect with an operator : DIAL O
52. Kick out : EXPEL
53. Abba of Israel : EBAN
54. "The Wind Cries ___" (song by 56-Across) : MARY
55. Neither Dems. nor Reps. : INDS
57. Hip parts : ILIA
58. 13 cards, maybe : HAND
60. See 9-Down : JOE

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1126-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Nov 12, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ed Sessa
THEME: Breakfast … At first sight, all of today’s themed clues seem to point to breakfast items, and then we discover that the answers have nothing do with breakfast at all:
20A. Pancakes : FLATTENS OUT
41A. Waffles : BLOWS HOT AND COLD
59A. French toast : A VOTRE SANTE
COMPLETION TIME: 7m 07s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

9. Von ___ family ("The Sound of Music" group) : TRAPP
"The Sound of Music" is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical made into a celebrated movie in 1965 starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. The musical is based on "The Story of the Trapp Family Singers", a memoir by Maria von Trapp. The von Trapp family ended up in Stowe, Vermont after the war and one family descended from the Vermont von Trapps lives here in the same town in which I reside in California.

14. Wife of Charlie Chaplin : OONA
Oona O'Neill dated J. D. Salinger and Orson Welles in her teens, but ended up marrying Charlie Chaplin. Oona was still pretty young when she married Chaplin, much to the dismay of her famous father, the playwright Eugene O'Neill. After the marriage Eugene disowned Oona as he was pretty upset about 54-year-old Chaplin marrying his 18-year-old daughter.

18. Of a church flock : LAIC
Anything described is laic (or laical) is related to the laity, those members of the church who are not clergy. The term "laic" ultimately comes from the Greek "laikos" meaning "of the people".

23. Firmament : SKY
“Firmament” is an old term for the sky or the heavens. Back then the sky was considered to be "firm", a solid dome covering the Earth.

25. Escargot : SNAIL
In order to eat snails, apparently they have to be “purged” before killing them. That means starving them or feeding them on something “wholesome” for several days before cooking them up. Ugh ...

30. Salsa or guacamole : DIP
“Salsa” is simply the Spanish for “sauce”.

Guacamole is one of my favorite dishes, and is made by mashing avocados and perhaps adding the likes of tomato, onion and lime juice. The guacamole recipe dates back as early as the 16th century, to the time of the Aztecs. “Guacamole” translates as “avocado sauce”.

36. Rolaids competitor : TUMS
The main ingredient in Tums antacid, made by GlaxoSmithKline, is calcium carbonate. Tums have been on the market since 1930. If you want to save a few pennies, Target brand antacid is identical to Tums, so I hear ...

38. Chaz's mother : CHER
Chaz Bono is the only child of the singers Sonny and Cher (although they both have children from other marriages). Chaz was named Chastity Sun Bono at birth and told her parents at the age of 18 that she was a lesbian. More recently Bono underwent gender reassignment surgery, and Chastity has legally changed his name to Chaz.

45. Western alliance since 1949 : NATO
NATO is the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (or OTAN in French, "l'Organisation du Traité de l'Atlantique Nord"). NATO was founded not long after WWII in 1949 and is headquartered in Brussels, Belgium. The first NATO Secretary General was Lord Ismay, Winston Churchill's chief military assistant during WWII. Famously, Lord Ismay said the goal of NATO was "to keep the Russians out, the Americans in, and the Germans down."

46. One of 18 on a golf course : HOLE
There’s an urban myth that the standard number of holes on a golf course is 18 because it takes 18 shots to polish off a fifth of scotch whisky. However, apparently the truth is that the standard number of holes in the Old Course at St. Andrews in Scotland settled down over time at 18, and that standard was adopted all around the world.

54. Walton of Walmart : SAM
Sam Walton used to work for Penney’s in Des Moines, Iowa, before founding the Walmart empire.

59. French toast : A VOTRE SANTE
“À votre santé” is French for "to your health". Cheers!

64. Bananalike fruit : PAPAW
The papaw (also “pawpaw”) tree is native to North America and has a fruit that looks similar to a papaya. Papaw probably gets its name from the word papaya, but papaw and papaya are two distinct species.

66. Algerian port : ORAN
Oran lies on the Algerian coast, and is famous for being the port where the French Navy was largely destroyed by the British during WWII in order to avoid the French vessels falling into the hands of Nazi Germany after France surrendered. This decisive and unexpected unilateral action by the British sent a very strong message around the world that Britain was willing to fight alone against the axis powers if necessary.

68. Wahine's greeting : ALOHA
The Hawaiian word "Aloha" has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently "aloha" has come to mean "hello" and "goodbye", but only since the mid-1800s.

“Wahine” is the word for “woman”, in both Hawaiian and Maori.

70. Bordeaux buddies : AMIS
Bordeaux is perhaps the wine producing capital of the world. Wine has been produced in the area since the eighth century. Bordeaux has an administrative history too. During WWII, the French government relocated from Paris to the port city of Bordeaux when it became clear that Paris was soon to fall to the Germans. After the German's took France, the capital was famously moved to Vichy.

72. Popeye's ___' Pea : SWEE
Originally Popeye used the nickname "swee'pea" to address his girlfriend Olive Oyl. Then along comes a baby, found on Popeye's doorstep. Popeye adopts the little guy and raises him, calling him "Swee'Pea".

73. Distinctive Marilyn Monroe facial feature : MOLE
Marilyn Monroe was born in 1926 in LA County Hospital, the child of Gladys Pearl Baker. The young girl was given the name of Norma Jeane Mortenson on her birth certificate, but her mother changed this to Norma Jeane Baker almost immediately. She and her estranged husband, Martin Edward Mortensen, had separated before Baker became pregnant so it is suggested that the Mortensen name was used to just to give Norma Jeane "legitimacy". Norma Jeane married a Jim Dougherty when she 16 years old, and took his name to become Norma Jeane Dougherty in 1932. During WWII she was discovered by a photographer and became quite a successful model. The modelling earned her a screen test, at which time it was suggested that Norma Jean change her name yet again. The first name chosen for her by studio executives was Carole Lind (after Carole Lombard and Jenny Lind), but then Norma Jeane chose "Jeane Monroe" for herself, using her mother's maiden name. It didn't take long before the studio intervened again, suggesting that they had too many "Jeans" already. The name Marilyn Monroe was floated as it had a nice ring to it. Along with the new name, Marilyn changed from a brunette to a blonde and a star was born ...

Down
1. Remove, as a hat : DOFF
One doffs one's hat, usually as a mark of respect. To doff is to take off, with "doff" being a contraction of "do off".

3. She was the "I" in "The King and I" : ANNA
“The King and I” is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical based on a book by Margaret Landon called “Anna and the King of Siam” first published in 1944. Landon’s book is based on a true story, told in the memoirs of Anna Leonowens. Leonowens was the governess of the children of King Mongkut of Siam in the 1860s, and she also taught the king’s wives.

6. Horse color : ROAN
A roan horse has an even mixture of white and colored hairs on the body with the head, lower legs, mane and tail having a more solid color.

12. Amount for Peter Piper : PECK
The earliest written version of the "Peter Piper" nursery rhyme and tongue twister dates back to 1813 London:
Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,
A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked;
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,
Where's the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?
A peck is a unit of dry volume, equivalent to two gallons. Four pecks then make up a bushel.

22. Dubai's federation: Abbr. : UAE
The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a federation of seven emirates (states) in the Middle East. Included in the seven are Abu Dhabi and Dubai, with the city of Abu Dhabi being the UAE capital and cultural center.

33. Virginia Woolf's "___ of One's Own" : A ROOM
Virginia Woolf was an English author active in the period between the two World Wars. Woolf’s most famous novels were “Mrs. Dalloway”, “To the Lighthouse” and “Orlando”. She also wrote a long essay entitled “A Room of One’s Own” in which she states “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.”

34. Nabisco's ___ wafers : NILLA
As one might expect, Nilla is a shortened from of "vanilla". However, you won't find any vanilla in Nilla cookies or wafers. They have always been flavored with vanillin, synthetic vanilla. Is nothing sacred ...?

35. Passover supper : SEDER
The Passover Seder is a ritual feast that marks the beginning of the Jewish Passover holiday, celebrating the liberation of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt. One of the traditions at the meal is that the youngest child at the table asks "The Four Questions", all relating to why this night is different from all other nights in the year:
- Why is it that on all other nights during the year we eat either bread or matzoh, but on this night we eat only matzoh?
- Why is it that on all other nights we eat all kinds of herbs, but on this night we eat only bitter herbs?
- Why is it that on all other nights we do not dip our herbs even once, but on this night we dip them twice?
- Why is it that on all other nights we eat either sitting or reclining, but on this night we eat in a reclining position?

39. Greek vowel : ETA
Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character "H".

42. Scamp : SCALAWAG
Scallywag is actually a term we use in Ireland to describe a rogue, usually one that is harmless, and it comes from the Irish word "sgaileog" meaning a farm servant. The American use of "scalawag" as a rogue was originally borrowed as a nickname for southern white people that supported reconstruction after the Civil War.

48. Dallas cager, for short : MAV
The Mavericks is the name of the NBA franchise in Dallas, Texas. The team was founded in 1980, and the Mavericks name was chosen by fan votes. The choice of “Mavericks” was prompted by the fact that the actor James Garner was a part-owner of the team, and Garner of course played the title role in the “Maverick” television series.

In the early days of basketball, when a ball went out of bounds possession was awarded to the player who first retrieved the ball. This led to mad scuffles off the court, often involving spectators. As the game became more organized courts were routinely "caged", largely because of this out of bounds rule, to limit interaction with the crowd. It's because of these cages that basketball players are sometimes referred to today as "cagers".

50. "Law & Order" figs. : DAS
“Law & Order” ran for many, many years on NBC, from 1990 to 2010. “Law & Order” is a police drama that spawned a huge franchise of shows both here in the US and overseas. I am probably a bit biased, but my favorite is the trans-Atlantic version shown on BBC America called “Law & Order: UK”.

55. "___, I'm Adam" : MADAM
The three most famous palindromes in English have to be:
- Able was I ere I saw Elba
- A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!
- Madam, I'm Adam
One of my favorite words is "Aibohphobia", although it doesn't appear in the dictionary and is a joke term. It is a great way to describe a fear of palindromes, by creating a palindrome out of the suffix "-phobia".

57. Scheherazade offering : TALE
Scheherazade was a Persian queen of legend, and the storyteller of the wonderful "One Thousand and One Nights".

58. Good name for a Dalmatian : SPOT
The Dalmatian breed of dog originated in Dalmatia, in the Republic of Croatia. Here in the US, Dalmatians are known as "firehouse dogs”. This association dates back to the use of Dalmatians in firehouses to guard the valuable horses that pulled the fire engines.

60. Funny Martha of old TV : RAYE
Martha Raye was a comic actress as well as a singer. Strangely enough, Raye was famous for the size of her mouth, something that she used to her own advantage. As her nickname was "The Big Mouth", she made a little money appearing in commercials for the Polident denture cleaner in the eighties. Her line was, "So take it from the Big Mouth: new Polident Green gets tough stains clean!"

61. Pixar's "Finding ___" : NEMO
"Finding Nemo" is a 2003 animated blockbuster from Pixar. The film was the winner of the Oscar that year for Best Animated Feature. Believe it or not, "Finding Nemo" is the best-selling DVD of all time and, until 2010's "Toy Story 3", it was the highest-grossing, G-rated movie at the box office.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Dull-colored : DRAB
5. Financial reserves for later years, in brief : IRAS
9. Von ___ family ("The Sound of Music" group) : TRAPP
14. Wife of Charlie Chaplin : OONA
15. Top of the Capitol : DOME
16. Floor machine : WAXER
17. Fish propellers : FINS
18. Of a church flock : LAIC
19. Chilling, as Champagne : ON ICE
20. Pancakes : FLATTENS OUT
23. Firmament : SKY
24. What a barber must cut around : EAR
25. Escargot : SNAIL
27. Wee-hours periods, for short : AMS
30. Salsa or guacamole : DIP
32. Denigrates : DEMEANS
36. Rolaids competitor : TUMS
38. Chaz's mother : CHER
40. Spooky : EERIE
41. Waffles : BLOWS HOT AND COLD
44. Rarely visited room : ATTIC
45. Western alliance since 1949 : NATO
46. One of 18 on a golf course : HOLE
47. Reason for a 10th inning, say : TIE GAME
49. Finish : END
51. Feb. follower : MAR
52. Large amounts of bacon : SLABS
54. Walton of Walmart : SAM
56. Ave. intersectors : STS
59. French toast : A VOTRE SANTE
64. Bananalike fruit : PAPAW
66. Algerian port : ORAN
67. Give everyone a hand : DEAL
68. Wahine's greeting : ALOHA
69. F sharp major and others : KEYS
70. Bordeaux buddies : AMIS
71. Change the price on : RETAG
72. Popeye's ___' Pea : SWEE
73. Distinctive Marilyn Monroe facial feature : MOLE

Down
1. Remove, as a hat : DOFF
2. Stir up : ROIL
3. She was the "I" in "The King and I" : ANNA
4. Moisten, as a turkey : BASTE
5. Leisure class : IDLE RICH
6. Horse color : ROAN
7. Not quite right : AMISS
8. Inferior : SECOND RATE
9. Cheated on, romantically : TWO-TIMED
10. Sought office : RAN
11. Line of rotation : AXIS
12. Amount for Peter Piper : PECK
13. Rabbits, to eagles, e.g. : PREY
21. Wee bit : TAD
22. Dubai's federation: Abbr. : UAE
26. Bloodsucker : LEECH
27. Up, in baseball : AT BAT
28. Prefix with task : MULTI-
29. Struck down, biblically : SMOTE
31. Obsolescent directories : PHONE BOOKS
33. Virginia Woolf's "___ of One's Own" : A ROOM
34. Nabisco's ___ wafers : NILLA
35. Passover supper : SEDER
37. Big swallows : SWIGS
39. Greek vowel : ETA
42. Scamp : SCALAWAG
43. Gobbledygook : NONSENSE
48. Dallas cager, for short : MAV
50. "Law & Order" figs. : DAS
53. Scatter, as seeds : STREW
55. "___, I'm Adam" : MADAM
56. Trade punches in training : SPAR
57. Scheherazade offering : TALE
58. Good name for a Dalmatian : SPOT
60. Funny Martha of old TV : RAYE
61. Pixar's "Finding ___" : NEMO
62. Homophone for 57-Down : TAIL
63. "If all ___ fails ..." : ELSE
65. "I see it now!" : AHA

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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