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1231-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Dec 12, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeffrey Harris
THEME: What to do with finger foods … our themed answers today are all two-word FINGER FOODS, and the second of the two words is a verb that can apply to a FINGER:
17A. Crisp, spicy cookies : GINGER SNAPS (snaps one’s fingers)
30A. Triangular pieces of browned bread : TOAST POINTS (points a finger)
45A. Orange snacks : CHEESE CURLS (curls a finger)
60A. 17-, 30- and 45-Across, literally and figuratively : FINGER FOODS
COMPLETION TIME: 05m 05s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Cuts at an angle, as a mirror : BEVELS
A bevelled edged is like a chamfered edge. The edge of a mirror is often bevelled, meaning that it is cut at an angle that isn’t perpendicular to the mirror’s surface.

11. Car navigation aid, for short : GPS
GPS stands for Global Positioning System. The modern GPS system that we use today was built by the US military who received the massive funding needed because of fears during the Cold War of the use of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles. We civilians, all round the world, owe a lot to President Ronald Reagan because he directed the military to make GPS technology available to the public for the common good. President Reagan was moved to do so after the Soviet Union shot down KAL flight 007 carrying 269 people, just because the plane strayed accidentally into Soviet airspace.

14. Balm ingredient : ALOE
Aloe vera has a number of alternate names that are descriptive of its efficacy as a medicine. These include the First Aid plant, Wand of Heaven, Silent Healer and Miracle Plant.

15. "Grease" co-star Newton-John : OLIVIA
Olivia Newton-John is an Australian singer and actress, although she was born in Cambridge, England. Newton-John’s father was an officer in the British Security Services and worked on the Enigma code-breaking project during WWII. Through her mother, Olivia is also the granddaughter of Max Born, the atomic physicist and Nobel Prize winner.

17. Crisp, spicy cookies : GINGER SNAPS (snaps one’s fingers)
"Ginger snap cookies" are known as "ginger nut biscuits" back in Ireland where I come from ...

19. Orangutan, e.g. : APE
Orangutans are arboreal creatures, in fact the largest arboreal animals known to man. Orangutans are native to Indonesia and Malaysia, living in the rain forests. Like many animals in rain forests these days, orangutans are endangered, with only two species surviving. The word "orangutan" is Malay, meaning "man of the forest".

21. First son of Seth : ENOS
Enos was the son of Seth and the grandson of Adam and Eve.

22. Kilmer of Hollywood : VAL
Val Kilmer's first big leading role in a movie was playing Jim Morrison in Oliver Stone's 1991 biopic "The Doors". A few years later, Morrison was chosen for the lead in another big production, "Batman Forever". Things haven't really gone as well for Kilmer since then, I'd say. Off the screen, he flirted with the idea of running for Governor of New Mexico in 2010. A Hollywood actor as a Governor? Would never happen ...

35. Hannibal Lecter's choice of wine : CHIANTI
A blog reader was kind enough to point out to me that in the Thomas Harris book "Silence of the Lambs", Hannibal Lechter shows exquisite taste in choosing an Amarone, a fine robust wine from the Valpolicella region of Italy, to accompany his dish of liver and fava beans. When the story moved to the big screen, the wine was apparently "dumbed down" to something more readily recognizable by us movie-goers, and so Hannibal will forever be associated with Chianti wines.

Hannibal Lecter is a character created by author Thomas Harris, first appearing in his novel "Red Dragon". Lecter also features prominently in "Red Dragon's" famous sequel "The Silence of the Lambs", and even more so in the third book, "Hannibal Rising". The latter title is a "prequel" exploring Lecter's childhood and development into a serial killer. Famously, Lecter was portrayed in the 1991 film version of "The Silence of the Lambs" by Welsh actor Anthony Hopkins.

39. Sound boosters : AMPS
An electric guitar, for example, needs an amplifier to take the weak signal created by the vibration of the strings and turn it into a signal powerful enough for a loudspeaker.

45. Orange snacks : CHEESE CURLS (curls a finger)
The snack food known as “cheese curls” are sold under various brand names including “Cheetos” and “Cheese Doodles” in North America, and “Wotsits” in the UK.

50. Friars Club event : ROAST
The Friars Club is a private show-business club in New York City that has roots dating back to 1904. Back then the club was called the Press Agents Association. Within a few years the name was changed to reflect its broadening membership of actors and musicians. The name “Friar” was chosen as it comes from the Latin for “brother”, deemed to a good name for a fraternal organization.

51. U.F.O. shapes, traditionally : SAUCERS
In 1952, the USAF revived its studies of reports of UFO sightings in a program called Project Blue Book. Project Blue Book ran from 1952 until it was shut down in 1969 with the conclusion that there was no threat to national security and that there were no sightings that could not be explained within the bounds of modern scientific knowledge.

53. Prominent part of a basset hound : EAR
The Basset Hound wouldn’t be my favorite breed of dog, to be honest. Basset Hounds have a great sense of smell with an ability to track a scent that is second only to that of the Bloodhound. The name “Basset” comes from the French word for “rather low”, a reference to the dog’s short legs.

54. Falco of "The Sopranos" : EDIE
Edie Falco won her three Emmy Awards for playing Carmela Soprano in HBO's outstanding drama series called "The Sopranos".

"The Sopranos" is an outstanding television drama that was made by HBO and is a story about Italian-American mobsters in New Jersey. "The Sopranos" has made more money than any other television series in the history of cable television. It's "must see TV" ...

58. Web address, for short : URL
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

65. Letter before omega : PSI
The Greek letter psi is the one that looks a bit like a trident or a pitchfork.

Omega is the last letter of the Greek alphabet, and is the one that looks like a horseshoe. The word "omega" literally means "great O" (O-mega). Compare this with the Greek letter Omicron meaning "little O" (O-micron).

69. Nobel laureate Mandela : NELSON
As a young man, Nelson Mandela led the armed wing of the African National Congress (ANC). Mandela was eventually arrested and admitted to charges of sabotage and was sentenced to life in prison in 1964. He remained behind bars for 27 years, mainly in the infamous prison on Robben Island. As the years progressed, Mandela became a symbol of the fight against apartheid. He was released in 1990, and immediately declared his commitment to peace and reconciliation with South Africa’s white minority. Mandela was elected president of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) in 1994, an office that he held until 1999.

Down
2. Muhammad ___ : ALI
Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. was born in 1942 in Louisville, Kentucky. Clay changed his name to Muhammad Ali when he converted to Islam in 1964. Who can forget Muhammad Ali lighting the Olympic flame for the 1996 games in Atlanta? Ali was presented with a gold medal during those '96 Games, a replacement for the medal he won at the 1960 Olympics. He had thrown the original into the Ohio River as a gesture of disgust after being refused service at a "whites only" restaurant.

3. Charged particle : ION
Excitation of an atom occurs when the atom absorbs energy and at least one of its electrons moves out of its resting orbit into a higher orbit. When the electron returns to it lowest orbit it may do so by emitting the excess energy in the form of a photon, that is by emitting a characteristic color of light. If sufficient energy is used to excite the atom, the electron may break out of orbit completely, in which case the atom becomes a positively-charged ion.

4. TV's Philbin : REGIS
Regis Philbin is an amazingly popular television personality. Philbin is in such high demand and has had such a long career, that he holds the Guinness World Record for the most time spent in front of a television camera (in excess of 16,000 hours).

5. East Indies island famous for its 19-Acrosses : BORNEO
Borneo is the third largest island on the planet (after Greenland and New Guinea), and is located north of Australia in Maritime Southeast Asia. Most of the island is part of Indonesia (taking up 73% of the island) with almost all of the remainder being part of Malaysia (26%). The final 1% is home to the sovereign state of Brunei.

6. Pro golfer Ernie : ELS
Ernie Els is a South African golfer. Els a big guy but he has an easy fluid golf swing that has earned him the nickname "The Big Easy". He has a child who suffers from autism and so Els has been very effective in raising money for charities that focus on the condition.

9. Surgery that takes weight off, informally : LIPO
Liposuction dates back to the 1920s when it was developed by a surgeon in France. However, the procedure quickly lost favor when a French model developed gangrene after surgery. As a result it wasn't until the mid-seventies that modern liposuction took off, after being popularized by two Italian-American surgeons in Rome.

10. Vidal ___ (shampoo brand) : SASSOON
Vidal Sassoon was a hairdresser and businessman from London, England. Sassoon is credited with “liberating” women from the hair salon by popularizing hairstyles that one could “wash and wear”.

12. Genre for Andy Warhol : POP ART
An artistic work in the Pop Art style includes images taken from popular culture, perhaps from the news or an advertisement. The pop art movement started in the mid-fifties in Britain and emerged in the late-fifties in the US.

Andy Warhol went through a period of painting iconic American products, including Coca-Cola bottles and Campbell's tomato soup cans. In 1964 he participated in a gallery show called "The American Supermarket". Along with other pop artists he contributed works including a painting of a can of Campbell's tomato soup. He priced the painting at $1,500, and sold autographed cans of soup for $6 a piece.

13. Processes, as ore : SMELTS
Metals are found in ore in the form of oxides. In order to get pure metal from the ore, the ore is heated and the metal oxides within are reduced (i.e. the oxygen is removed) in the chemical process known as smelting. The oxygen is extracted by adding a source of carbon or carbon monoxide which uses up the excess oxygen atoms to make carbon dioxide, a waste product of smelting (and of course, a greenhouse gas).

23. Lady ___ (pop diva) : GAGA
Lady Gaga is the stage name of singer Stefani Germanotta from New York City. I've seen Lady Gaga interviewed on television a few times, and she sure is "unique". Her music is of course out of my league, but she does know how to put on a show.

28. "La Dolce ___" : VITA
The title of the celebrated 1960 Federico Fellini film "La Dolce Vita" translates from Italian as "The Good Life". There is a character in the film called Paparazzo who is a news photographer. It is this character who gives us our word "Paparazzi", a term used for photographers who make careers out of taking candid shots of celebrities.

31. SeaWorld whale : SHAMU
Shamu was the name of the third orca, or killer whale, ever to be featured in a public exhibition. Shamu starred in a popular SeaWorld show in San Diego in the sixties. After she died in 1971, her name lived on as the name "Shamu" is still used by SeaWorld for its killer whale shows. That original Shamu was retired after she grabbed and refused to let go of the leg of one of her trainers.

43. Gloria of Miami Sound Machine : ESTEFAN
Gloria Estefan is a Cuban American singer who was born in Havana. Estefan fled Cuba along with her family after the Cuban Revolution, and ended up in Miami. Her father fought for the US military in Vietnam and also took part in the doomed Bay of Pigs invasion. Years later, Gloria herself was approached by the CIA to work for the agency due to her skill with languages. She ended up doing quite well singing instead ...

47. Fashion icon Ralph : LAUREN
Ralph Lauren is an American fashion designer, born Ralph Liftshitz in the Bronx, New York. Lauren started off working as a salesman for Brooks Brothers after spending two years in the US Army. He then opened a necktie store, featuring his own tie designs. The ties were sold under the name "Polo", which became Lauren's most famous brand. Other Lauren brands are Purple Label and Black Label.

55. They're rolled in craps : DICE
If one considers earlier versions of craps, then the game has been around for a very long time and probably dates back to the Crusades. Craps may be derived from an old English game called "hazard", also played with two dice and which was mentioned in Geoffrey Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" from the 1300s. The American version of the game came here courtesy of the French and first set root in New Orleans where it was given the name "crapaud", a French word meaning "toad".

61. Record producer Brian : ENO
Brian Eno started out his musical career with Roxy Music. However, Eno's most oft-played composition (by far!) is Microsoft's "start-up jingle", the 6-second sound you hear when the Windows operating system is booting up. Eno might have annoyed the Microsoft folks when he stated on a BBC radio show:
I wrote it on a Mac. I’ve never used a PC in my life; I don’t like them.

63. Genetic stuff : DNA
I've always been fascinated by the fact that the DNA of living things is so very similar across different species. Human DNA is almost exactly the same for every individual (to the degree of 99.9%). However, those small differences are sufficient to distinguish one individual from another, and to determine whether or not individuals are close family relations.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Barbershop floor sweepings : HAIR
5. Cuts at an angle, as a mirror : BEVELS
11. Car navigation aid, for short : GPS
14. Balm ingredient : ALOE
15. "Grease" co-star Newton-John : OLIVIA
16. CD-___ : ROM
17. Crisp, spicy cookies : GINGER SNAPS (snaps one’s fingers)
19. Orangutan, e.g. : APE
20. Scottish form of "John" : IAN
21. First son of Seth : ENOS
22. Kilmer of Hollywood : VAL
23. Prepares oneself : GETS SET
27. In the open : OVERT
29. Bit of fireplace residue : ASH
30. Triangular pieces of browned bread : TOAST POINTS (points a finger)
34. Student transcript fig. : GPA
35. Hannibal Lecter's choice of wine : CHIANTI
36. "Marching" insects : ANTS
38. Even the slightest bit : AT ALL
39. Sound boosters : AMPS
42. Golf reservation : TEE TIME
44. Towing org. : AAA
45. Orange snacks : CHEESE CURLS (curls a finger)
49. Band's booking : GIG
50. Friars Club event : ROAST
51. U.F.O. shapes, traditionally : SAUCERS
53. Prominent part of a basset hound : EAR
54. Falco of "The Sopranos" : EDIE
58. Web address, for short : URL
59. Ambulance destinations, in brief : ERS
60. 17-, 30- and 45-Across, literally and figuratively : FINGER FOODS
65. Letter before omega : PSI
66. Start of a play : ACT ONE
67. Make a show-offy basket : DUNK
68. "On the other hand ..." : YET
69. Nobel laureate Mandela : NELSON
70. Remain : STAY

Down
1. Witch : HAG
2. Muhammad ___ : ALI
3. Charged particle : ION
4. TV's Philbin : REGIS
5. East Indies island famous for its 19-Acrosses : BORNEO
6. Pro golfer Ernie : ELS
7. Ivy growth : VINE
8. Welsh form of "John" : EVAN
9. Surgery that takes weight off, informally : LIPO
10. Vidal ___ (shampoo brand) : SASSOON
11. Carved idol : GRAVEN IMAGE
12. Genre for Andy Warhol : POP ART
13. Processes, as ore : SMELTS
18. Toward the rising sun : EAST
23. Lady ___ (pop diva) : GAGA
24. Provider of N.F.L. coverage : ESPN
25. "I can't take anymore!" : THAT TEARS IT!
26. Strategic maneuver : TACTIC
28. "La Dolce ___" : VITA
31. SeaWorld whale : SHAMU
32. Bathroom floor workers : TILERS
33. Amigo : PAL
37. Observes : SEES
38. Had a meal : ATE
40. Low poker holding : PAIR
41. Droops : SAGS
43. Gloria of Miami Sound Machine : ESTEFAN
45. Goosebump-producing : CREEPY
46. Like some voices after shouting : HOARSE
47. Fashion icon Ralph : LAUREN
48. Ride the waves on a board : SURF
52. Dirt clumps : CLODS
55. They're rolled in craps : DICE
56. Worldwide: Abbr. : INTL
57. Swelled heads : EGOS
61. Record producer Brian : ENO
62. Not at home : OUT
63. Genetic stuff : DNA
64. Where clouds are : SKY

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1230-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Dec 12, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Steve Savoy
THEME: Plus Ten … today’s themed answers are well known phrases with “IO” added to suit the clue:
22A. Sign-off for Spanish spies? : CLASSIFIED ADIOS (classified ads)
34A. Two bottled liquids kept in a cabinet? : WINE AND IODINE (wine and dine)
47A. Champion model maker at the county fair? : DIORAMA QUEEN (drama queen)
65A. Wacky exercise regimen? : WILD CARDIO (wild card)
68A. 20 cigarettes per unit and 10 units per carton, e.g.? : PACK RATIOS (pack rats)
82A. Green room breakfast item? : STUDIO MUFFIN (stud muffin)
93A. Musical composition about a lumberjack's seat? : STUMP ORATORIO (stump orator)
113A. Try-before-you-buy opportunities at knickknack stores? : CURIO RENT EVENTS (current events)
15D. Like Ben-Hur and company when not racing? : OFF THE CHARIOTS (off the charts)
46D. "Gangsta's Paradise" buyer? : COOLIO CUSTOMER (cool customer)
COMPLETION TIME: 24m 33s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

11. Rental car add-on : GPS
GPS stands for Global Positioning System. The modern GPS system that we use today was built by the US military who received the massive funding needed because of fears during the Cold War of the use of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles. We civilians, all round the world, owe a lot to President Ronald Reagan because he directed the military to make GPS technology available to the public for the common good. President Reagan was moved to do so after the Soviet Union shot down KAL flight 007 carrying 269 people, just because the plane strayed accidentally into Soviet airspace.

19. Megan of "Will & Grace" : MULLALLY
Megan Mullally is an actress probably best known for playing Karen Walker on the TV sitcom “Will & Grace”. Mullally also has a recurring role on the sitcom “Parks and Recreation”, playing Tammy Swanson, the ex-wife of Ron Swanson. In real life Tammy and Ron aren’t exes, as Megan Mullally is married to actor Nick Offerman who plays Ron Swanson.

26. Peyton Manning's former teammates : COLTS
Even I know that Eli Manning and his older brother Peyton are both quarterbacks!

27. Chuck of NBC News : TODD
Chuck Todd is a television journalist. Todd is the Chief White House Correspondent for NBC.

28. Grub around : ROOTLE
To rootle around is to root around, to dig with the snout.

33. Hosen material : LEDER
Lederhosen is the German word for leather breeches, traditional garments worn by males in Bavaria and Austria.

37. Language that is mostly monosyllabic : LAO
Lao, the language of Laos, does not use spaces between words (or periods!), although this is apparently changing. Spaces are used between sentences and clauses.

39. Lifeguard's skill, for short : CPR
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has for decades involved the simultaneous compression of the chest to pump blood using the heart, and artificial respiration by blowing air into the lungs. Nowadays emergency services are placing more emphasis on heart compressions, and less on artificial respiration.

54. Drain cleaner, chemically : NAOH
Caustic soda is sometimes called lye. Chemically, caustic soda it is sodium hydroxide (NaOH). It's nasty stuff, a white solid in its pure form. When you add it to water it generates an awful lot of heat, a property that is taken advantage of in using lye as a drain cleaner.

56. Singer Falana and others : LOLAS
Lola Falana is a singer, dancer and actress who grew up in Philadelphia. In the sixties Falana had an affair with, and later became good friends with, Sammy Davis Jr. Davis helped get her act into Las Vegas where she was very successful, eventually earning Falana the nickname “Queen of Las Vegas”. With her success came money, and so she became the highest paid female performer in Vegas at that time. Sadly, Falana suffers from multiple sclerosis, a disease that forced her to cut short her career as an entertainer.

59. Handel's "___ e Leandro" : ERO
The Greek myth of Hero and Leander gave rise to a couple of operas (one by Giovanni Bottesini and another by Arrigo Boito) and a more famous cantata from George Frideric Handel, all called "Ero e Leandro".

60. At full speed : AMAIN
"Amain" is an old term meaning “at great speed” or “of great strength”.

63. Movies often with shootouts : OATERS
The term "oater", used for a western movie, comes from the number of horses seen, as horses love oats!

71. World capital that's home to Zog I Boulevard : TIRANE
Tirane is the capital city of Albania and has been so since 1920. The city was seized by the Nazis in WWII but was liberated in 1944, at which point the Communists seized power. The Communists were ousted in the elections of 1992 leaving a void that led to much bloodshed and an eventual EU military mission to stabilize the capital and the rest of the country. Today things have become so calm that Albania is a member of NATO.

Zog I served as Prime Minister of Albania from 1922 to 1924, then as President from 1925 to 1928 and finally as King from 1928 to 1939.

72. Volatile stuff : TNT
TNT is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

79. Hoppy pub quaff : IPA
India Pale Ale is a style of beer that comes from England. The beer was originally intended for transportation from England to India, hence the name.

81. Forbes competitor : INC
“Inc.” is a business magazine that specializes in articles about growing companies. “Inc.” publishes a list of the 500 fastest-growing private companies in the country each year, calling it the “Inc. 500”.

The Forbes 400 is a list published annually by “Forbes Magazine”, a list of the 400 Americans with the largest net worth. Top of the list for the 17 years up to 2010 was Bill Gates. In the year 2000, the 400 wealthiest people controlled 12.2% of the country’s Gross Domestic Product. That's 12.2% ... I wonder what Thomas Jefferson would have thought of that …

86. Onetime high fliers : SSTS
The most famous Supersonic Transport (SST) was the Concorde, a plane that's no longer flying. Concorde had that famous "droop nose". The nose was moved to the horizontal position during flight to create the optimum aerodynamic shape thereby reducing drag. It was lowered during taxi, takeoff and landing, so that the pilot had better visibility. The need for the droop nose was driven largely by the delta-shaped wings. The delta wing necessitates a higher angle of attack at takeoff and landing than conventional wing designs, so the pilot needed the nose lowered so that he or she could see the ground.

87. God holding a thunderbolt : ZEUS
Zeus was the father of the gods and the father of men in Ancient Greek religion. Zeus ruled the Olympian gods who resided on Mount Olympus. The Roman equivalent of Zeus was Jupiter.

93. Musical composition about a lumberjack's seat? : STUMP ORATORIO (stump orator)
I guess a stump orator is one giving an oration while standing on a stump!

“To stump” can mean to go on a speaking tour during a political campaign. This peculiarly American term dates back to the 19th century. Back then a “stump speech” was an address given by someone standing on a large tree stump that provided a convenient perch to help the speaker get his or her message across to the crowd.

103. Division of biology : MITOSIS
Mitosis is the process by which the complement of chromosomes in a cell nucleus replicates and then divides into two identical sets of new chromosomes. Mitosis is followed by division of the cell itself, resulting in two identical cells. Meiosis is a special type of cell division that results in reproductive cells that have half the full complement of chromosomes. The reproductive cells join together, with one cell coming from each parent, to form a new cell with a full complement of chromosomes. That new cell develops into offspring that have characteristics of both parents.

105. Paperback publisher since 1941 : AVON
Avon was a noted publisher of comic books and paperbacks. The company was founded in 1941, and focused on pretty low-brow literature designed for popular appeal.

109. Wally of cookie fame : AMOS
Wally Amos was a talent agent, one who was in the habit of taking home-baked cookies with him as an enticement to get celebrities to see him. He was urged by friends to open a cookie store (the cookies were that delicious, I guess) and this he did in Los Angeles in 1975 using the name "Famous Amos". The store was a smash hit and he was able build on the success by introducing his cookies into supermarkets. The brand was eventually bought up making Wally a rich man, and Famous Amos cookies are still flying off the shelf.

110. Stunner : TASER
Victor Appleton wrote a novel for young adults called "Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle". The company that developed the TASER electroshock weapon named their product as a homage to the novel, as TASER stands for "Thomas A. Swift's Electric Rifle". Interesting, eh?

112. Shortstop Garciaparra : NOMAR
Nomar Garciaparra is one of only thirteen players to have hit two grand slams during a single game in the Majors. He accomplished the feat in 1999 for the Boston Red Sox against the Seattle Mariners.

116. Golfer Norman and others : GREGS
Greg Norman is from Australia, a golfer who spent a long time ranked as the world’s number one in the eighties and nineties. Off the golf course, Norman is a very, very successful businessman. One of his more visible ventures is his winery called Greg Norman Estates.

119. Brontë heroine : EYRE
"Jane Eyre" is of course the novel written by Charlotte Brontë, under the pen name Currer Bell. Over the years, I've shared here on my blogs that the "Jane Eyre" story line is a little too dark and Gothic for my taste, but a very persuasive blog reader convinced me to look more at the romantic side of the story and give it a second chance. I watched a wonderful 4-hour television adaptation of the novel made by the BBC a while back and I have to say that because I was focused on the relationship between Jane and Rochester, I was able to push past the Gothic influences (that depress me) so I really enjoyed the story. I thoroughly recommend the 2006 BBC adaptation to fans of the novel.

121. El ___ : PASO
Although there have been human settlements in the El Paso area for thousands of years, the first European settlement was founded in 1659 by the Spanish. That first community was on the south bank of the Rio Grande, and was called El Paso del Norte (the North Pass). Most of the urban development under Spanish rule took place on the south side of the river, with El Paso del Norte acting as the center of governance for the Spanish for the territory of New Mexico. The Rio Grande was chosen as the border between Mexico and the US in 1848, so most of the city of El Paso del Norte became part of the Mexican state of Chihuahua (and is now called Cuidad Juarez). The area north of the river developed as a US military post, eventually becoming the modern city of El Paso, Texas.

Down
4. Modern communications, for short : IMS
Even though instant messaging had been around since the 1960s, it was AOL who popularized the term “instant message” in the eighties and nineties.

6. "Silas Marner" author : ELIOT
"Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe" is a novel written by George Eliot and first published in 1861. There's an excellent BBC TV version of the tale (shown on PBS) starring Ben Kingsley in the title role with Patsy Kensit playing Eppie, the young orphaned child that Marner takes under his wing.

7. Mendeleev who created the periodic table : DMITRI
Dmitri Mendeleev was a Russian chemist. When Mendeleev classified elements according to their chemical properties, he noticed patterns and was able to group elements into his famous 1869 Periodic Table. So powerful was his table that he actually predicted the properties of some elements that had not even been discovered in 1869. Element number 101, mendelevium, was named after Mendeleev.

13. The "S" of OS: Abbr. : SYS
I always think of an operating system as that piece of software that sits between the hardware on my computer and the programs that I choose to run. Developers of application programs don't really have to worry about being able to "talk to" the countless different types of hardware found in the wide variety of computers that are manufactured, they just need to talk to the handful of operating systems that are out there, like Windows, MAC and Unix. The operating system takes care of the rest.

14. Eponymous Italian city : BOLOGNA
The deli meat known as "boloney" is an American invention. It was given the name "boloney" because it resembles Italian mortadella sausage, which originated in the city of Bologna in northern Italy.

15. Like Ben-Hur and company when not racing? : OFF THE CHARIOTS (off the charts)
Lew Wallace was a general for the Union Army during the Civil War, and was also an author. He wrote a very successful and celebrated book called “Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ”, first published in 1880.

17. Jazz pianist McCoy ___ : TYNER
McCoy Tyner is a jazz pianist from Philadelphia. For many years, Tyner was a member of the John Coltrane Quartet.

21. Pope Agatho's successor : LEO II
Pope Saint Leo II was leader of the Roman Catholic Church for less than a year before he died in 683.

30. Cymric : WELSH
The Welsh-language name for Wales is Cymru, which is Latinized into Cambria.

31. Petal pusher? : SEPAL
In a flower, the sepals are those green, leaf-like structures that are “interleaved” with the petals, providing support. Prior to acting as support for the petals, the sepals protect the flower in bud.

35. A.T.M. maker : NCR
NCR is an American company that has been in business since 1884, originally called the National Cash Register Company. The company has done well in a market where new technologies seem to be constantly disrupting the status quo.

45. Figaro in "The Barber of Seville," e.g. : BARITONE
Figaro is the central character in at least two operas: "The Barber of Seville" by Rossini, and "The Marriage of Figaro" by Mozart. The two storylines are based on plays by Pierre Beaumarchais, with one basically being a sequel to the other.

46. "Gangsta's Paradise" buyer? : COOLIO CUSTOMER (cool customer)
Coolio is the stage name of rapper Artis Leon Ivey, Jr. In 2009, Coolio joined fellow-American Le Toya Jackson as one of the house guests in "Celebrity Big Brother" (UK version) and apparently he created quite a stir on the show with some outrageous comments. But Coolio also showed a softer side with a spontaneous and emotional reaction to the election of Barack Obama to the office of US President as he watched the election results coming in live in the Big Brother house.

49. "Time, the devourer of all things" writer : OVID
The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso is today known simply as Ovid. Ovid is usually listed alongside the two other great Roman poets: Horace and Virgil.

50. Skewed to one side : ALOP
I had to go to one of my two huge volumes of the OED to find the definition of "alop". It means "lop-sided". A lovely word, I think, but it's amazing that it seems to have avoided the Internet!

51. It juts into the Persian Gulf : QATAR
Qatar is a sovereign state in the Middle East occupying the Qatar Peninsula, itself located in the Arabian Peninsula. Qatar lies on the Persian Gulf and shares one land border, with Saudi Arabia to the south. Qatar has more oil and gas reserves per capita of population than any other country in the world. In 2010, Qatar had the fastest growing economy in the world, driven by the petrochemical industry.

61. Capone henchman : NITTI
Frank Nitti was one of the top henchmen working for Al Capone. Unlike American-born Capone, Nitti was actually from Italy, near the city of Salerno. When Capone was eventually put away for 11 years for tax evasion, Nitti was convicted of the same crime. Nitti was only imprisoned for 18 months, and when released he was labelled as the new head of Capone's Chicago Outfit. However the truth seems to be that he was just a frontman, with others making the decisions.

63. Elusive African animal : OKAPI
The okapi is closely related to the giraffe, although it does have markings on its legs and haunches that resemble those of a zebra. The okapi’s tongue is long enough to reach back and wash its eyeballs, and can go back even further to clean its ears inside and out.

64. Unmitigated : ARRANT
"Arrant" means "out-and-out, complete", and is a variant of "errant".

66. Dr. ___ : DRE
Dr. Dre is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as producing records and starting the careers of others such Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

69. Do : COIF
A coif is a hairdo. The term “coif” comes from an old French term “coife” used for a skull-cap that was worn under a helmet back in the late 13th century.

70. Pacifiers : SOPS
Cerberus is a dog with three heads that appears in both Greek and Roman mythology. Cerberus had the job of guarding the gates of Hades and preventing those who had crossed the River Styx from ever escaping. A sop is a piece of food that has been dipped in some liquid, as one might sop a piece of bread in soup. There is an idiomatic expression, "to give a sop to Cerberus", which means to give someone a bribe, or pay someone off. The idea is that if one could bribe Cerberus, give him a sop to eat, then he would let you pass and escape from Hades.

76. "Don't Nobody Bring Me No Bad News" musical, with "The" : WIZ
"The Wiz", the 1975 musical, was written by Charlie Smalls, and is an African-American adaptation of Baum's "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz". The film version of the stage show was released in 1978, starring Diana Ross as Dorothy and Michael Jackson as the Scarecrow. I haven't seen it, though. "The Wizard of Oz" scares me, as the flying monkeys creep me out. There, I've admitted it in public ...

84. Mail letters : USPS
The US Postal Service (USPS) is a remarkable agency in many ways. For starters, the governments right and responsibility to establish the Post Office is specifically called out in Article One of the US constitution. Also, the first postmaster general was none other than Benjamin Franklin. And the USPS operates over 200,000 vehicles, which is the largest vehicle fleet in the world.

95. Gunner's tool : RAMROD
A ramrod is a “stick” that is inserted into the barrel of an older firearm in order to pack the bullet or ball up against the charge of gunpowder.

98. Hops dryer : OAST
An oast is a kiln used for drying hops as part of the brewing process. Such a structure might also be called an "oast house".

100. Bantu language : RUANDA
There are hundreds of Bantu languages, mainly spoken in central, east and southern Africa. The most commonly spoken Bantu language is Swahili, with Zulu coming in second.

103. Skin disorder : MANGE
Mange is skin disorder in animals caused by parasitic mites that embed themselves in the skin, perhaps living in hair follicles. The same disorder in humans is called scabies.

107. Singer ___ Marie : TEENA
Teena Marie is a very successful R&B singer, born Mary Christine Brockert.

110. Morse dashes : TEES
A “dah” or "dash" is Morse code for the letter “T”.

Samuel Morse was a very accomplished and reputable painter (he was engaged to paint a portrait of President John Adams, for example). In 1825 Morse was in Washington working on a commissioned painting when he received a one-line letter by horse messenger telling him that his wife was ill. He left immediately for his home in New Haven, Connecticut but by the time that Morse arrived his wife had already died and had been buried. This single event spurred him to move from painting to the development of a rapid means of long distance communication, leading to the single-wire telegraph and Morse code.

114. Panasonic competitor : RCA
During WWI, the US government actively discouraged the loss of certain technologies to other countries, including allies. The developing wireless technologies were considered to be particularly important by the army and navy. The government prevented the General Electric Company from selling equipment to the British Marconi Company, and instead facilitated the purchase by GE of the American Marconi subsidiary. This purchase led to GE forming the Radio Corporation of America that we know today as RCA.

115. Certain util. workers : EES
Electrical Engineers (EEs).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Working hours : UPTIME
7. Bit of a trickle : DROP
11. Rental car add-on : GPS
14. Series of rounds : BOUT
18. Unlikely to surprise : NORMAL
19. Megan of "Will & Grace" : MULLALLY
21. High : LOFTY
22. Sign-off for Spanish spies? : CLASSIFIED ADIOS (classified ads)
24. Wee : ELFIN
25. Suffix with human : -OID
26. Peyton Manning's former teammates : COLTS
27. Chuck of NBC News : TODD
28. Grub around : ROOTLE
29. Zero-calorie cooler : ICE WATER
31. Parched : SERE
32. Scale : WEIGHER
33. Hosen material : LEDER
34. Two bottled liquids kept in a cabinet? : WINE AND IODINE (wine and dine)
37. Language that is mostly monosyllabic : LAO
39. Lifeguard's skill, for short : CPR
40. Suffix with direct : -ORY
41. Some red spots : ACNE
44. Early education : ABCS
47. Champion model maker at the county fair? : DIORAMA QUEEN (drama queen)
53. Know-___ : HOW
54. Drain cleaner, chemically : NAOH
55. Early seventh-century year : DCV
56. Singer Falana and others : LOLAS
57. Ellipsoidal : OVATE
59. Handel's "___ e Leandro" : ERO
60. At full speed : AMAIN
62. Blather : ROT
63. Movies often with shootouts : OATERS
65. Wacky exercise regimen? : WILD CARDIO (wild card)
68. 20 cigarettes per unit and 10 units per carton, e.g.? : PACK RATIOS (pack rats)
71. World capital that's home to Zog I Boulevard : TIRANE
72. Volatile stuff : TNT
74. Lions' din : ROARS
75. "Well, looky there!" : OHO
76. Sweet-talked, maybe : WOOED
77. Have one's cake and eat ___ : IT TOO
79. Hoppy pub quaff : IPA
80. Covering : ATOP
81. Forbes competitor : INC
82. Green room breakfast item? : STUDIO MUFFIN (stud muffin)
86. Onetime high fliers : SSTS
87. God holding a thunderbolt : ZEUS
89. Expert finish? : -ISE
90. From ___ Z : A TO
91. Tiny chastisement : TSK
93. Musical composition about a lumberjack's seat? : STUMP ORATORIO (stump orator)
99. Home territories : TURFS
103. Division of biology : MITOSIS
105. Paperback publisher since 1941 : AVON
106. Siege weapon : CATAPULT
108. Swore : AVOWED
109. Wally of cookie fame : AMOS
110. Stunner : TASER
111. Its employees might have jumper cables: Abbr. : AAA
112. Shortstop Garciaparra : NOMAR
113. Try-before-you-buy opportunities at knickknack stores? : CURIO RENT EVENTS (current events)
116. Golfer Norman and others : GREGS
117. Fabricates : PRODUCES
118. Part of an applause-o-meter : NEEDLE
119. Brontë heroine : EYRE
120. Sonny : LAD
121. El ___ : PASO
122. Analyzes, in a way : ASSAYS

Down
1. Straighten out : UNCOIL
2. Some baton wielders : POLICE
3. Like stocks : TRADED
4. Modern communications, for short : IMS
5. Purse item : MASCARA
6. "Silas Marner" author : ELIOT
7. Mendeleev who created the periodic table : DMITRI
8. Regrets : RUES
9. Timeworn : OLD
10. Heavy-duty protection : PLATE ARMOR
11. Went smoothly : GLIDED
12. Go laboriously : PLOD
13. The "S" of OS: Abbr. : SYS
14. Eponymous Italian city : BOLOGNA
15. Like Ben-Hur and company when not racing? : OFF THE CHARIOTS (off the charts)
16. Handy : UTILE
17. Jazz pianist McCoy ___ : TYNER
20. Prettify : ADORN
21. Pope Agatho's successor : LEO II
23. Whizzed : FLEW
28. Fix the coloring of, say : REDYE
30. Cymric : WELSH
31. Petal pusher? : SEPAL
32. Dragged (on) : WORE
35. A.T.M. maker : NCR
36. Alternatives to chips, say : IOUS
38. One out? : ODD MAN
42. Poor : NOT SO HOT
43. One having a little lamb : EWE
44. Over : ANEW
45. Figaro in "The Barber of Seville," e.g. : BARITONE
46. "Gangsta's Paradise" buyer? : COOLIO CUSTOMER (cool customer)
48. Empathetic response : I CARE
49. "Time, the devourer of all things" writer : OVID
50. Skewed to one side : ALOP
51. It juts into the Persian Gulf : QATAR
52. Less : NOT AS
58. Examine carefully : VET
60. Insts. of learning : ACADS
61. Capone henchman : NITTI
63. Elusive African animal : OKAPI
64. Unmitigated : ARRANT
66. Dr. ___ : DRE
67. "I'm ___ you!" : ONTO
69. Do : COIF
70. Pacifiers : SOPS
73. Grilled cheese sandwich go-with : TOMATO SOUP
76. "Don't Nobody Bring Me No Bad News" musical, with "The" : WIZ
77. Logical start? : IDEO-
78. ___ a limb : OUT ON
80. Invite to the penthouse suite, say : ASK UP
83. Retiring : TIMID
84. Mail letters : USPS
85. Pro : FOR
88. Hold stuff : STOWAGE
92. Goes without nourishment : STARVES
94. Detox patients : USERS
95. Gunner's tool : RAMROD
96. Skirt : AVOID
97. "Just watch me!" : I CAN SO
98. Hops dryer : OAST
100. Bantu language : RUANDA
101. One way to deny something : FLATLY
102. Equilibria : STASES
103. Skin disorder : MANGE
104. White shade : IVORY
107. Singer ___ Marie : TEENA
109. Glow : AURA
110. Morse dashes : TEES
113. Mil. team leader : CPL
114. Panasonic competitor : RCA
115. Certain util. workers : EES

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1229-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Dec 12, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Joe Krozel
THEME: None
COMPLETION TIME: 44m 53s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Urban contemporary : TRITT
Travis Tritt is a country singer from Marietta, Georgia. Keith Urban is a country singer from New Zealand.

11. Sports org. of 1967-76 : ABA
The American Basketball Association (ABA) merged with the National Basketball Association (NBA) in 1976.

14. Olive-colored bird : VIREO
Vireos are pretty little birds native to the New World. Vireos' wings and bodies are mostly grey, but their head and throats are often a lovely olive green.

15. World powerhouse in table tennis : CHINA
Ping-pong is called table tennis in the UK, where the sport originated in the 1880s. Table tennis started as an after-dinner activity among the elite, and was called "wiff-waff". To play the game, books were stacked in the center of a table as a "net", two more books served as ""rackets" and the ball used was actually a golf ball. The game evolved over time with the rackets being upgraded to the lids of cigar boxes and the ball becoming a champagne cork (how snooty is that?). Eventually the game was produced commercially, and the sound of the ball hitting the racket was deemed to be a "ping" and a "pong", giving the sport its alternative name.

17. Bygone theory of astronomy : PTOLEMAIC SYSTEM
In astronomy, the Ptolemaic system (also called the geocentric model) describes an organization of the cosmos in which the Earth is at the center of the universe with all other celestial bodies orbiting around our planet.

Claudius Ptolemy was an Egyptian of Greek ethnicity who lived in the days when Egypt was ruled by Ancient Rome. Ptolemy was, among other things, a mathematician and astronomer. He published a famous treatise on astronomy called “Almagest” which included a list of 48 constellations in a star catalogue.

29. Obituary word : NEE
"Née" is the French word for "born" when referring to a female. The male equivalent is "né".

30. Bugs : VWS
VW stands for Volkswagen, which translates from German into "people's car". The original "Volkswagen" was built under a directive from Adolf Hitler, who wanted a cheap car built that ordinary people could afford to purchase. He awarded the contract to engineer Ferdinand Porsche, whose name (paradoxically) would forever be associated with high-performance, expensive cars.

33. "Ugly Betty" actress : VANESSA WILLIAMS
Vanessa Williams has built quite a career for herself after briefly holding the 1983 Miss America title. Williams is now a successful actress and singer. On the big screen she did a fine job playing the lead opposite Arnold Schwarzenegger in 1996’s “Eraser”. On the small screen she had a major role in the hit comedy “Ugly Betty”. Williams is sometimes confused with fellow actress Vanessa A. Williams who is no relation.

40. "Idylls of the King," stylistically : NARRATIVE POETRY
"Idylls of the King" is a cycle of twelve poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson that retells the tale of King Arthur. One of the "idylls" is the story of Geraint and Enid. Tennyson’s Enid gave her name to the city of Enid, Oklahoma.

41. 1959 doo-wop classic : A TEENAGER IN LOVE
The classic song “A Teenager in Love” was released by Dion and the Belmonts in 1959.

42. Alpine native : LIECHTENSTEINER
Liechtenstein is a tiny country with an area of just over 61 square miles, located in the Alps between Switzerland and Austria. Liechtenstein has the highest gross domestic product per person in the world. The country is a winter sports haven attracting lots of visitors, and is also a tax haven with a strong financial center. There are actually more registered companies in Liechtenstein than there are citizens!

44. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Dan : ISSEL
Dan Issel is a retired basketball player who played for the Kentucky Colonels of the ABA, and the Denver Nuggets of the NBA.

45. Thrust item : EPEE
The French word for sword is "épée". In competitive fencing the épée is connected to a system that records an electrical signal when legal contact is made on an opponent’s body.

50. Balderdash : HORSE MANURE
"Balderdash" means a senseless jumble of words, and was originally (back before the late 1600s) a jumbled mix of liquids (like maybe beer and wine, or even beer and milk!).

54. E.E.C. part: Abbr. : EUR
The European Economic Community (also called "the Common Market") was a NAFTA-like structure that was eventually absorbed into today's European Union.

57. Grp. in gray : CSA
The Confederate States of America (CSA) set up government in 1861 just before Abraham Lincoln took office. Jefferson Davis was selected as President of the CSA at its formation and retained the post for the life of the government.

58. Gridiron distance: Abbr. : YDS
We never used the word "gridiron" when I was growing up in Ireland (meaning a grill used for cooking food over an open fire). So, maybe I am excused for finding out relatively recently that a football field gridiron is so called because the layout of yard lines over the field looks like a gridiron used in cooking!

Down
5. "___ is human ..." : TO ERR
Alexander Pope's 1709 poem "An Essay on Criticism" is the source of at least three well-known quotations:
- A little learning is a dangerous thing; Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring.
- To err is human, to forgive divine.
- For fools rush in where angels fear to tread.

7. Half of a classic religious symbol : CHI
Chi Rho is an ancient religious symbol in the Christian tradition. “Chi’ and “rho” are the first two letters in the Greek word for “Christ”.

8. ___-A-Che (rapper) : RIC
Ric-A-Che is a rapper. That's all I know. Oh, I guess he’s from Detroit ...

11. Deal preceder : ANTE
In a game of poker say, you need to ante up before the deal is made …

12. Participant in an 1899 conflict : BOER
There were two Boer Wars, the first fought between 1880 and 1881 and the second fought between 1899 and 1902. The Dutch settlers of the Boer republics took on the British Empire in both conflicts.

18. Risqué West : MAE
Mae West was always pushing the envelope when it came to the "sexy" side of show business, even in her early days in Vaudeville. One of the first plays in which West starred on Broadway was called "Sex", a work she penned herself. The show was a sell-out, but city officials had it raided and West found herself spending ten days in jail after being convicted of "corrupting the morals of youth". She started in movies in 1932, already 38 years old. West used her experience writing plays to rewrite much of the material she was given, and so really she was totally responsible for her own success and on-screen appeal.

19. Ones to whom an organization's messages are sent : SERVICE LIST
I think that the generally accepted definition of a “service list” is a catalogue of the services that are provided by an organization. I am not sure if that is what the clue is referring to though ...

24. Funny Carol and family : LEIFERS
Carol Leifer is a stand-up comedian who was discovered by David Letterman. Leifer has appeared on “Late Night with David Letterman” on over twenty-five different occasions.

26. Land visited by Paul in the New Testament : GALATIA
Galatia was an area in central Anatolia, which is now within the borders of modern Turkey. The land was settled by immigrant Gauls, which led to the name "Galatia".

27. Clarinet need : ONE REED
The clarinet is a lovely-sounding instrument, isn't it? The name comes from the Italian word "clarino" meaning "trumpet" with the "-et" suffix indicating "small".

32. Elided phrase in a Gershwin song : ‘S MARVELOUS
“‘S Wonderful” is a song by written by George and Ira Gershwin written for the musical “Funny Face”. “‘S Wonderful” was also sung by Gene Kelly in the 1951 film “An American in Paris”.

33. Easily corrupted : VENAL
Someone described as venal is open to bribery.

34. One-seat carriages : STANHOPES
A stanhope was a small, horse-drawn carriage with a high seat and a closed back. The carriage was named for a Captain Henry Stanhope.

36. Verona's river : ADIGE
The Adige is a river in the north of Italy, and the second longest river in the country after the River Po.

Three of William Shakespeare’s plays are set in Verona, a city in northern Italy:
- “Romeo and Juliet”
- “The Two Gentlemen of Verona”
- “The Taming of the Shrew”

46. Certain bird herd : EMUS
The emu has had a tough time in Australia since man settled there. There was even an "Emu War" in Western Australia in 1932 when migrating emus competed with livestock for water and food. Soldiers were sent in and used machine guns in an unsuccessful attempt to drive off the "invading force". The emus were clever, breaking their usual formations and adopting guerrilla tactics, operating as smaller units. After 50 days of "war", the military withdrew. Subsequent requests for military help for the farmers were ignored. The emus had emerged victorious …

49. Supporter of the Heller decision, 2008: Abbr. : NRA
District of Columbia v. Heller was a 2008 case decided by the US Supreme Court. The Court held that the US Constitution’s 2nd Amendment protected an individual's right to own a firearm for lawful use.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Urban contemporary : TRITT
6. "Git!" : SCRAM
11. Sports org. of 1967-76 : ABA
14. Olive-colored bird : VIREO
15. World powerhouse in table tennis : CHINA
16. Word of logic : NOR
17. Bygone theory of astronomy : PTOLEMAIC SYSTEM
20. Blanket : GENERAL
21. Round parts : BEERS
22. Hideous one : REPULSER
26. Get-___ (starts) : GOS
29. Obituary word : NEE
30. Bugs : VWS
33. "Ugly Betty" actress : VANESSA WILLIAMS
39. Governor, e.g. : ELECTED OFFICIAL
40. "Idylls of the King," stylistically : NARRATIVE POETRY
41. 1959 doo-wop classic : A TEENAGER IN LOVE
42. Alpine native : LIECHTENSTEINER
43. "Grazie ___!" (Italian for "Thank God!") : A DIO
44. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Dan : ISSEL
45. Thrust item : EPEE
48. Uses for a base : RESTS ON
50. Balderdash : HORSE MANURE
54. E.E.C. part: Abbr. : EUR
55. It may be bitter : ALE
56. "I did it!" : SUCCESS
57. Grp. in gray : CSA
58. Gridiron distance: Abbr. : YDS
59. Sporting boots, say : SHOD

Down
1. Tube rating : TV-PG
2. It may be performed by people in robes : RITE
3. Unyielding : IRON
4. Part of 1-Down : TELE-
5. "___ is human ..." : TO ERR
6. It has thousands of roots : SCALP
7. Half of a classic religious symbol : CHI
8. ___-A-Che (rapper) : RIC
9. Response: Abbr. : ANS
10. Wishy-washy reply : MAYBE
11. Deal preceder : ANTE
12. Participant in an 1899 conflict : BOER
13. ___ deal : ARMS
18. Risqué West : MAE
19. Ones to whom an organization's messages are sent : SERVICE LIST
23. Frayed, perhaps : UNWOVEN
24. Funny Carol and family : LEIFERS
25. "Woe is me!" types : SELF-PITIERS
26. Land visited by Paul in the New Testament : GALATIA
27. Clarinet need : ONE REED
28. Concealments : SECRECIES
31. "I'll be right with you" : WAIT ONE SEC
32. Elided phrase in a Gershwin song : ‘S MARVELOUS
33. Easily corrupted : VENAL
34. One-seat carriages : STANHOPES
35. Assailed : SET AT
36. Verona's river : ADIGE
37. They have their pride : LIONESSES
38. More crafty : SLYER
46. Certain bird herd : EMUS
47. Per : EACH
48. Wished otherwise : RUED
49. Supporter of the Heller decision, 2008: Abbr. : NRA
50. Allergy source : HAY
51. Played out : OLD
52. Abbr. after a telephone no. : RES
53. One with two or three stripes: Abbr. : NCO

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1228-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Dec 12, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ashton Anderson
THEME: None
COMPLETION TIME: 35m 44s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. Taqueria treat : ENCHILADA
“Enchilada” is the past participle of the Spanish word “enchilar” meaning “to add chile pepper to”. An enchilada is a basically a corn tortilla rolled around some filling and then covered in chili pepper sauce.

16. Critter with humanlike fingerprints : KOALA
The koala really does look like a little bear, but it's not even closely related. The koala is an arboreal marsupial and a herbivore, native to the east and south coasts of Australia. Koalas aren’t primates, and are one of the few mammals other than primates who have fingerprints. In fact, it can be very difficult to tell human fingerprints from koala fingerprints, even under an electron microscope.

17. Natalie Portman's birthplace : JERUSALEM
The actress Natalie Portman was born in Jerusalem, Israel. She moved to the US with her family when she was just three years old.

19. Where R.F.K. and his brother Teddy went to law school : UVA
The University of Virginia (UVA) was of course founded by Thomas Jefferson, who sat on the original Board of Visitors with former US Presidents James Madison and James Monroe. In fact, the original UVA campus was built on land that was once a farm belonging to President Monroe.

20. 10/15, e.g. : IDES
There were three important days in each month of the old Roman calendar. These days depended on the cycles of the moon but were eventually "fixed" by law. "Kalendae" were the first days of each month, originally the days of the new moon. "Nonae" were originally the days of the half moon. And "idus" (the ides) was originally the day of the full moon, eventually fixed at the 15th day of a month. Well, actually the ides were the 15th day of March, May, July and October. For all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. Go figure ...

30. Sabre ou pistolet : ARME
In French, a sword or gun (sabre ou pistolet) is a weapon (arme).

31. Square for a roll : PAT
A pat of butter is usually a square that is applied to a roll.

35. Opening pitch : SPIEL
A spiel is a lengthy speech or argument designed to persuade, perhaps a sales pitch. "Spiel" comes to us from German, either directly ("spiel" is the German for "play") or via the Yiddish "shpil".

38. Many an ascot wearer : FOP
An Ascot tie is that horrible-looking (I think!) wide tie that narrows at the neck, which these days is only really worn at weddings. The tie takes its name from the Royal Ascot horse race at which punters still turn up in formal wear at Ascot Racecourse in England.

39. It's a gas : XENON
The noble gases are those elements over on the extreme right of the Periodic Table. Because of their "full" complement of electrons, noble gases are very unreactive. The six noble gases that occur naturally are helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon and radon.

40. One coming from Mars? : CANDY BAR
Having lived on both sides of the Atlantic, I find the Mars Bar to be the most perplexing of candies! The original Mars Bar is a British confection (and delicious) first manufactured in 1932. The US version of the original Mars Bar is called a Milky Way. But there is candy bar called a Milky Way that is also produced in the UK, and it is completely different to its US cousin, being more like an American "3 Musketeers". And then there is an American confection called a Mars Bar, something different again. No wonder I gave up eating candy bars ...

51. Flimflam : FAST ONE
Flimflam is another word for a confidence trick. The term has been in use since the 1500s, would you believe?

53. "A failure of imagination," per Graham Greene : HATE
Graham Greene was a writer and playwright from England. Greene wrote some of my favorite novels, including “Brighton Rock”, “The End of the Affair”, “The Confidential Agent”, “The Third Man”, “The Quiet American” and “Our Man in Havana”. Greene’s books often feature espionage in exotic locales. Greene himself worked for MI6, the UK’s foreign intelligence agency. In fact, Greene’s MI6 supervisor was Kim Philby, the famed Soviet spy who penetrated high into British intelligence.

62. Old car with ignition trouble? : PINTO
The Pinto is a small car that was made by the Ford company from 1971 to 1980. The Pinto was of course named for the type of horse. Allegations were made in 1997 that the neck of the car’s fuel tank could easily break off in a collision leading to a deadly fire. However, the allegations were never really shown to be valid.

63. Spitfire landing locale : AERODROME
Aerodrome is a general term for a facility where aircraft take off and land. An aerodrome could be a small airstrip, a large commercial airport or even a military airbase. The term “aerodrome” is used quite often in the UK, but rarely here in the US.

The magnificent Supermarine Spitfire fighter aircraft is considered by most to have been key to the defeat of Germany’s Luftwaffe in the Battle of Britain. The plane was in production from the thirties through the fifties, and there were more Spitfires produced that any other British aircraft.

64. "Pale Blue Dot" author : SAGAN
Carl Sagan was a brilliant astrophysicist and a great communicator. Sagan was famous for presenting obscure concepts about the cosmos in such a way that we mere mortals could appreciate. He also wrote the novel "Contact" which was adapted into a fascinating 1997 film of the same name starring Jodie Foster.

“Pale Blue Dot” is a book about the cosmos by Carl Sagan. The title of the book is taken from the famous “Pale Blue Dot” photograph taken by the Voyager 1 spacecraft from almost 4 million miles from the Earth. In the photo, our planet appears as a tiny “pale blue dot”. NASA had Voyager 1 take the photograph, at the request of Carl Sagan.

Down
1. Dull : JEJUNE
The adjective “jejune” means “dull in the mind”. The term comes from the Latin “ieiunus” meaning “dry, barren”.

2. Like bars that are often near horses : UNEVEN
The uneven bars and vaulting horse are pieces of equipment used in women’s gymnastics.

4. Night to watch "The Office": Abbr. : THU
The excellent sitcom "The Office" is set in a branch of a paper company in Scranton, Pennsylvania. If you haven't seen the original UK version starring Ricky Gervais, I do recommend you check it out. Having said that, the US cast has taken the show to a whole new level. Great television …

7. Clinton, Bush or Cheney : YALIE
Yale University has educated quite a few of our recent US Presidents, including George H. W. Bush (#41), Bill Clinton (#42) and George W. Bush (#43).

10. Dog show org. : AKC
The American Kennel Club (AKC) is the organization that handles registration of purebred dogs The AKC also promotes dog shows around the country including the famous Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

25. Assistant : ACOLYTE
The word "acolyte" comes from the Greek "akolouthos" meaning "companion, attendant, helper". In the Christian tradition, an acolyte is an individual who assists some way in a ceremony, by lighting candles for example. In more general terms, an acolyte is a devoted follower or attendant.

28. Most Atari-playing kids : GEN-XERS
The term Generation X originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful publication "Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture". By the latest accepted definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

At one point,  the electronics and video game manufacturer Atari was the fastest growing company in US history. However, Atari never really recovered from the video game industry crash of 1983.

30. Ancient meeting place : AGORA
In early Greece the "agora" was a place of assembly. Often the assemblies held there were quite formal, perhaps for the reading of a proclamation. Later in Greek history, things became less formal as the agora evolved into a market place. Our contemporary word "agoraphobia" comes from these agorae, in the sense that an agoraphobe has a fear of open spaces, a fear of "public meeting places".

35. Brandy alternative : SCHNAPPS
"Schnapps" isn't actually a German word, but is our English spelling of the German "Schnaps" (note the "pp" versus "p"). Germans use the word Schnaps to describe any strong alcoholic drink. We tend to use Schnapps to mean a liqueur, usually a sweet beverage flavored with fruit. "Schnaps" is a Low German noun meaning "swallow".

36. Theme of "The Tell-Tale Heart" : PARANOIA
Edgar Allen Poe's story "The Tell-Tale Heart", is arguably one of his most disturbing works. It is a story of cold-blooded and premeditated murder, with some dismemberment thrown in for good measure.

38. Hard-to-block jumper, in hoops : FADEAWAY
Apparently a “fadeaway” is a jump shot in basketball, one in which the shooter is jumping backwards away from the basket, in order to distance himself or herself from an opponent trying to block the ball.

42. Grp. interested in long drives : PGA
The Professional Golfers' Association (PGA) was founded in 1916 and today has its headquarters (unsurprisingly) in Florida, where so many golfers live. Back in 1916, the association was based in New York City.

47. Form 1040 info : INCOME
Form 1040 was originally created just for tax returns from 1913, 1914 and 1915, but it's a form that just will not go away ...

48. Certain volleyball player : SETTER
In volleyball, the "set" is the second contact made by a team, the contact that is meant to “set up” an attacking shot.

59. Twain boy : TOM
Tom Sawyer is of course a favorite character created by Mark Twain. He turns up in four of Twain's books:
- "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer"
- "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"
- "Tom Sawyer Abroad"
- "Tom Sawyer, Detective"

But that's not all, as he appears in at least three works that Twain left unfinished:
- "Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer Among the Indians" (a sequel to "Huckleberry Finn")
- "Schoolhouse Hill"
- "Tom Sawyer's Conspiracy" (a sequel to "Tom Sawyer, Detective")

60. Listerine bottle abbr. : ADA
The American Dental Association (ADA) is the largest and oldest national dental association in the world. Today the ADA is based in Chicago, but the association was founded in Niagara Falls, New York in 1859. The ADA started out as a group of 26 dentists and now has more than 152,000 members.

Listerine is an antiseptic mouthwash. The brand takes its name from Joseph Lister, the British surgeon and promoter of antiseptic surgery.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Opinion add-on : JUST SAYIN’
10. It can go from liquid to frozen : ASSET
15. Taqueria treat : ENCHILADA
16. Critter with humanlike fingerprints : KOALA
17. Natalie Portman's birthplace : JERUSALEM
18. It gets a chick's attention : CLUCK
19. Where R.F.K. and his brother Teddy went to law school : UVA
20. 10/15, e.g. : IDES
22. Really long : ACHE
23. Trendsetting : NEW WAVE
27. Steps on a scale : DEGREES
29. Intertangle : ENLACE
30. Sabre ou pistolet : ARME
31. Square for a roll : PAT
32. With 46-Down, a bit below so-so : NOT
33. Flipping out : GOING APE
35. Opening pitch : SPIEL
38. Many an ascot wearer : FOP
39. It's a gas : XENON
40. One coming from Mars? : CANDY BAR
42. Apt rhyme for 26-Down : PET
43. Letters for a princess : HRH
44. Cry that's often sung : TADA!
45. Complimentary : GRATIS
49. Unworldliness : NAIVETE
51. Flimflam : FAST ONE
52. "... ___ can't get up!" : AND I
53. "A failure of imagination," per Graham Greene : HATE
55. Part of 10/15: Abbr. : OCT
56. Factor in a beauty contest : POISE
58. Wowed basketball announcer's cry : WHAT A SHOT!
62. Old car with ignition trouble? : PINTO
63. Spitfire landing locale : AERODROME
64. "Pale Blue Dot" author : SAGAN
65. Snide reply to being given a chore : YES, MASTER

Down
1. Dull : JEJUNE
2. Like bars that are often near horses : UNEVEN
3. Impenetrable script : SCRAWL
4. Night to watch "The Office": Abbr. : THU
5. Family moniker : SIS
6. Like : A LA
7. Clinton, Bush or Cheney : YALIE
8. Like many perps in lineups : IDED
9. Try to impress by association : NAME DROP
10. Dog show org. : AKC
11. Like panels on some racecars : SOLAR
12. It's handled on the range : SAUCEPAN
13. Tightwad : EL CHEAPO
14. Chills briefly : TAKES TEN
21. Pro beginner? : SEMI-
24. Dropped off : WANED
25. Assistant : ACOLYTE
26. Cur curer : VET
28. Most Atari-playing kids : GEN-XERS
30. Ancient meeting place : AGORA
34. Intimate : GET AT
35. Brandy alternative : SCHNAPPS
36. Theme of "The Tell-Tale Heart" : PARANOIA
37. Holed up : IN HIDING
38. Hard-to-block jumper, in hoops : FADEAWAY
41. Smallish room : BATH
42. Grp. interested in long drives : PGA
46. See 32-Across : TOO HOT
47. Form 1040 info : INCOME
48. Certain volleyball player : SETTER
50. Prospect : VISTA
51. Quaker makers? : FEARS
54. Quaker pronoun : THEE
57. Long time : EON
59. Twain boy : TOM
60. Listerine bottle abbr. : ADA
61. Educ. higher-ups? : SRS

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1227-12 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Dec12, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Julian Lim
THEME: Bits of Words … today’s themed answers are in the format “bit of word”, and the “bit of” each “word” is given as the clue:
17A. SON : HALF NEL(SON)
26A. TIN : PIECE OF WRI(TIN)G
42A. LIP : PARTIAL EC(LIP)SE
55A. FIN : SEMI(FIN)ALS
COMPLETION TIME: 19m 01s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. French ___ : KISS
What we call a “French kiss” is known as a “baiser amoureux” (lover’s kiss) in France.

15. XC60, XC70 or XC90 : VOLVO
Volvo is a Swedish manufacturers of cars, trucks and construction equipment. The Volvo name was chosen as “volvo” is Latin for “I roll”.

16. "The Hurt Locker" setting : IRAQ
The 2008 movie "The Hurt Locker" is a disturbing drama about a US Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) team on the front lines during the Iraq War. The film appears to be very realistic, and was filmed in Jordan just a few miles from the Iraqi border. The screenplay was written by Mark Boal, a journalist who was embedded with an EOD team in 2004. "The Hurt Locker" won six Academy Awards, including Best Director for Kathryn Bigelow, the first woman to be so honored.

17. SON : HALF NEL(SON)
The full nelson and half nelson are wrestling holds in which one wrestler secures an opponent by encircling the opponent's arms under the armpits and around the neck. Some say the hold is named after Admiral Nelson, who was renowned for using encircling tactics in battle.

19. Junior of the N.F.L. : SEAU
Junior Seau is a retired NFL linebacker, first playing for the San Diego Chargers and then the Miami Dolphins and the New England Patriots.

20. U.S./Canadian sporting grp. since 1936 : AHL
The American Hockey League (AHL) is the so-called development circuit for the National Hockey League (NHL), the equivalent of the minors in professional baseball. The AHL’s playoff trophy is called the Calder Cup, which is named for Frank Calder who was the first president of the NHL.

22. To love, to Livy : AMARE
Titus Livius (aka Livy) was a Roman historian who lived from 59 BC to AD 17. Livy wrote the definitive history of Rome at that time.

23. Output from an old printer : WOODCUT
Woodcut is an old technique for creating artistic prints that has been used since the early 1400s. A woodcut is made by cutting an image into one surface of a block of wood, then inking that surface and transferring the resulting image to paper.

25. 2001 French film nominated for five Academy Awards : AMELIE
“Amélie” is a French film, a romantic comedy about a shy waitress in Montmartre, Paris played by Audrey Tatou. The movie was originally released under the French title, “Le Fabuleux Destin d’Amélie Poulain” (“The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain”).

29. Latin abbr. meaning "he speaks" : LOQ
“Loq” is an abbreviation for the Latin “loquitur” which means “he speaks”. “Loq” is used as a stage direction.

31. #26 of 26 : ZEE
The letter named "zed" has been around since about 1400, and derives from the Greek letter zeta. The spelling and pronunciation of "zee" used in America today first popped up in the 1670s.

32. Subject of four Sports Illustrated covers between 1966 and 1993 : ASHE
Arthur Ashe was a professional tennis player from Richmond, Virginia. In his youth, Ashe found himself having to travel great distances to play against Caucasian opponents due to the segregation that still existed in his home state. He was rewarded for his dedication by being selected for the 1963 US Davis Cup team, the first African American player to be so honored. Ashe continued to run into trouble because of his ethnicity though, and in 1968 was denied entry into South Africa to play in the South African Open. In 1979 Ashe suffered a heart attack and had bypass surgery, with follow-up surgery four years later during which he contracted HIV from blood transfusions. Ashe passed away in 1993 due to complications from AIDS. Shortly afterwards, Ashe was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton.

35. Chicken ___ : POX
Chickenpox is a viral infection, a classic disease of childhood most commonly caught by 4-10 year olds. There is a complication that can arise later in life as the virus sometimes reactivates to cause shingles.

36. Rare goose : NENE
The bird called a nene is a native of Hawaii, and is also known as the Hawaiian goose. The name "nene" is imitative of its call. When Captain Cook landed on the islands in 1778, there were 25,000 nene living there. By 1950, the number was reduced by hunting to just 30 birds. Conservation efforts in recent years have been somewhat successful.

37. Balneotherapy locale : SPA
Balneotherapy is similar to hydrotherapy and is the treatment of a disease using baths. Mineral baths and water massages would be considered part of balneotherapy.

38. Tito's surname : BROZ
Marshal Josip Broz Tito led the Yugoslav resistance during WWII, and after the war led the country as Prime Minister and then President.

40. Rapper behind the 2012 "Gangnam Style" YouTube sensation : PSY
PSY is the stage name of South Korean rapper Park Jae-sang. PSY became an international star when his 2102 music video “Gangnam Style” went viral on YouTube. That video had over 1 billion views on YouTube in about six months, making it the most viewed YouTube video clip of all time. I am not one of the one million ...

48. Stone Age artifact : HAND AXE
Ancient societies can be classified by the "three-age system", which depends on the prevalence of materials used to make tools. The three ages are:
- The Stone Age
- The Iron Age
- The Bronze Age
The actual dates defined by each age depend on the society, as the timing of the transition from the use of one material to another varied around the globe.

50. Oenophile's installation : RACKS
In Greek mythology, Oeno was the goddess of wine, giving us "oen-" as a prefix meaning "wine". For example, oenology is the study of wine and an oenophile is a wine-lover.

53. Transportation Dept. agency : FAA
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was set up in 1958 (as the Federal Aviation Agency). The agency was established at that particular time largely in response to an increasing number of midair collisions. The worst of these disasters had taken place two years earlier over the Grand Canyon, a crash between two commercial passenger airplanes that resulted in 128 fatalities.

58. ___ Systems (computer networking company) : CISCO
Cisco is a company that I really admire. Headquartered in San Jose, California, Cisco develops and sells products and services in the communications sector. The name "Cisco" was taken from the name of the city San Francisco.

59. Aéroport d'___ : ORLY
Orly is on the outskirts of Paris, to the south of the city. It is home of course to the Paris-Orly Airport, the second busiest international airport for the city after the more recently built Charles de Gaulle Airport. That said, Orly is home to more domestic flights than Charles de Gaulle.

60. Quarters in Québec? : ETES
I think the idea is that “été”, the French for “summer”, takes up one quarter of a year.

Down
3. Hoi ___ : POLLOI
"Hoi polloi" is a Greek term, literally meaning "the majority, the many". In English it has come to mean "the masses" and is often used in a derogatory sense.

4. Personal ad abbr. : SWF
Single White Female (SWF).

5. Hit Broadway musical with the song "I'm Not Wearing Underwear Today" : AVENUE Q
"Avenue Q" is a musical inspired by "Sesame Street", with puppets being used for all the characters on the stage. It's an adult-oriented production, but a parody on the children's show. Some of the characters are clearly knock-offs of "Sesame Street" favorites e.g. Rod and Nicky (Bert and Ernie) and Trekkie Monster (Cookie Monster).

8. "The Dancing Years" composer Novello : IVOR
Ivor Novello was one of the most popular entertainers in Britain in the early 20th century. Novello was a Welsh composer, singer and actor. On top of his success on the stage and in front of the camera, he even wrote the dialogue for the 1932 movie "Tarzan the Ape Man" starring Johnny Weissmuller.

10. What's in the stars : KISMET
Kismet is a Turkish word, meaning fate or fortune, one's lot.

12. Designer of the Tulip chair : SAARINEN
Eero Saarinen was a Finnish American architect, renowned in this country for his unique designs for public buildings such as Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Dulles International Airport Terminal, and the TWA building at JFK.

The Tulip chair was designed by Finnish American architect Eero Saarinen in the mid-fifties. The sleek plastic design is now considered a classic. The most famous use of the Tulip chair in the sixties was on the bridge of the Starship Enterprise in the TV series “Star Trek”.

13. Tool with a blade : SQUEEGEE
The first squeegee was known as a “squilgee”, and was used to wash fish blood and scales off the decks of fishing vessels.

18. Clark Bar company : NECCO
Necco Wafers are the best known product line of the candy manufacturer called the New England Confectionery Company. The firm's name is abbreviated to NECCO, an acronym that became synonymous with the wafers.

The Clark Bar is a candy bar made by NECCO. The Clark Bar is named for its inventor, David L. Clark, who created the confection way back in 1917.

24. Edit out : DELE
"Dele" is the editorial instruction to delete something from a document, and is often written in red.

32. Say "hey," say : ASPIRATE
“To aspirate” is to pronounce a letter or word with an initial release of the breath, as in the word “hey”.

33. Tony winner after 5-Down : SPAMALOT
The hit musical “Spamalot” is a show derived from the 1974 movie “Monty Python and the Holy Grail”. In typical Monty Python style, the action starts just before the curtain goes up with an announcement recorded by the great John Cleese:
(You can) let your cellphones and pagers ring willy-nilly … (but) be aware there are heavily armed knights on stage that may drag you on stage and impale you.

35. Professional runner : POL
A politician (pol) usually runs for a seat.

36. Org. in 1997's "Cop Land" : NYPD
“Cop Land” is a 1997 police drama starring Sylvester Stallone. The movie is set in New Jersey, in a town just across the Hudson River from New York City. The cast of “Cop Land” includes several actors in supporting roles who would later star in the great HBO TV drama “The Sopranos”. Included are Edie Falco, Tony Sirico, John Ventimiglia and Frank Vincent.

39. Singer Carly ___ Jepsen : RAE
Carly Rae Jepsen is a singer/songwriter from Mission, British Columbia. Jepsen got her start on TV's “Canadian Idol” when she placed third in the show’s fifth season.

41. Area of decades-long conflict : SINAI
The Sinai Peninsula is in the eastern part of Egypt, the triangular peninsula bounded by the Mediterranean to the north and the Red Sea to the south. It is the only part of Egypt that lies in Asia as opposed to Africa. The eastern land border of the peninsula is shared with Israel, and Israel occupied the Sinai during the 1956 Suez Crisis and the Six Day War of 1967.

45. Theodore Roosevelt was on one in 1909 : SAFARI
President Theodore Roosevelt left office in March 1909, and a few days later headed off on an African safari. If you’d like a firsthand account of Roosevelt’s adventures on the trip, you can read "African Game Trails" written by the President after he returned to the US.

51. Hippie celebration : BE-IN
Just before 1967’s Summer of Love in the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco, a Human Be-In was held in the city’s Golden Gate Park. The Be-In is described as a “happening”, a gathering triggered by a new state law banning the use of LSD. The name “Human Be-In” is a play on “humanist sit-in”.

52. City west of Novosibirsk : OMSK
Omsk is a city in southwest Siberia. It is located over 1400 miles from Moscow and was chosen as the destination for many internal exiles in the mid-1900s. Perhaps the most famous of these exiles was the author Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

56. Japanese drama : NOH
Noh is a form of musical drama in Japan that has been around since the 14th century. Many of the Noh performers are masked, allowing all the roles to be played by men, both male and female parts.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. One of the folks : POPS
5. Bit the bullet, say : ATE IT
10. French ___ : KISS
14. Shoveler's target : SNOW
15. XC60, XC70 or XC90 : VOLVO
16. "The Hurt Locker" setting : IRAQ
17. SON : HALF NEL(SON)
19. Junior of the N.F.L. : SEAU
20. U.S./Canadian sporting grp. since 1936 : AHL
21. Rear-___ : ENDER
22. To love, to Livy : AMARE
23. Output from an old printer : WOODCUT
25. 2001 French film nominated for five Academy Awards : AMELIE
26. TIN : PIECE OF WRI(TIN)G
29. Latin abbr. meaning "he speaks" : LOQ
30. Bust : RAID
31. #26 of 26 : ZEE
32. Subject of four Sports Illustrated covers between 1966 and 1993 : ASHE
35. Chicken ___ : POX
36. Rare goose : NENE
37. Balneotherapy locale : SPA
38. Tito's surname : BROZ
40. Rapper behind the 2012 "Gangnam Style" YouTube sensation : PSY
42. LIP : PARTIAL EC(LIP)SE
47. "That's it for me" : I'M DONE
48. Stone Age artifact : HAND AXE
50. Oenophile's installation : RACKS
51. "Hell, yeah!" : BOO-YA
53. Transportation Dept. agency : FAA
54. An emollient : ALOE
55. FIN : SEMI(FIN)ALS
57. Of two minds : TORN
58. ___ Systems (computer networking company) : CISCO
59. Aéroport d'___ : ORLY
60. Quarters in Québec? : ETES
61. One working on some panels : INKER
62. "Wassup" : HIYA

Down
1. "Fie!" : PSHAW
2. How some balls are fielded : ON A HOP
3. Hoi ___ : POLLOI
4. Personal ad abbr. : SWF
5. Hit Broadway musical with the song "I'm Not Wearing Underwear Today" : AVENUE Q
6. Shared with, as a story : TOLD TO
7. If not : ELSE
8. "The Dancing Years" composer Novello : IVOR
9. Heap : TON
10. What's in the stars : KISMET
11. "It's clear to me ..." : I REALIZE
12. Designer of the Tulip chair : SAARINEN
13. Tool with a blade : SQUEEGEE
18. Clark Bar company : NECCO
22. In : AMID
24. Edit out : DELE
25. Male name that spells another male name backward : ARI
27. Was paralyzed with fear, say : FROZE
28. Ski shop supply : WAX
32. Say "hey," say : ASPIRATE
33. Tony winner after 5-Down : SPAMALOT
34. Dedicated : HARDCORE
35. Professional runner : POL
36. Org. in 1997's "Cop Land" : NYPD
38. Mail room sights : BINS
39. Singer Carly ___ Jepsen : RAE
40. Represent, in sports : PLAY FOR
41. Area of decades-long conflict : SINAI
43. Some board game equipment : TOKENS
44. Prime : CHOICE
45. Theodore Roosevelt was on one in 1909 : SAFARI
46. Friend no more : EX-ALLY
49. Course with no homework, say : EASY A
51. Hippie celebration : BE-IN
52. City west of Novosibirsk : OMSK
55. College dept. : SCI
56. Japanese drama : NOH

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This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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