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Greetings from Louisburgh, County Mayo in Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland, and have extended my stay until October 24th. I am focused on getting the puzzle solved and at least a basic post up each day. It's proving to be difficult to do much more than that due to pressure of time, which I am sure you can understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

0106-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 6 Jan 13, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Feyer & Andrea Carla Michaels
THEME: Puzzle Envy … each of today’s themed answers has the initials NV (sounds like “envy”):
23A. What some goggles provide : NIGHT VISION
36A. Onetime enemy : NORTH VIETNAMESE
65A. Wine taster's destination : NAPA VALLEY
70A. Bad sign for a traveler? : NO VACANCY
74A. 1942 Bette Davis film : NOW, VOYAGER
99A. Home of the world's largest naval base : NORFOLK, VIRGINIA
118A. "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" writer and star : NIA VARDALOS
16D. 3.14159..., for pi : NUMERICAL VALUE
47D. Hit 1944 film starring a 12-year-old actress : NATIONAL VELVET
COMPLETION TIME: 40m 40s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 5 ... NYRO (Nyre), ODOM (Edom), XFL (CFL), ECLOGUE (edlogue), PLAXICO (Placido)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

16. A Bobbsey twin : NAN
The “Bobbsey Twins” series of children’s novels was first written by Edward Stratemeyer in 1904. Stratemeyer used the pseudonym Laura Lee Hope, as did subsequent authors who wrote 72 books in the series between 1904 and 1979.

19. Constellation near Scorpius : ARA
The constellation of Ara takes its name from the Latin word for "altar".

21. W.W. II marine threat : E-BOAT
In WWII, the German Navy's Motor Torpedo Boats were similar to American PT boats and were called S-boots, short for Schnellboot ("fast craft"). The Allied forces referred to them as E-boats, with the "E" possibly standing for "enemy" or "Eilboot" ("hurry boat").

22. Israeli weapon : UZI
The first Uzi submachine gun was designed in the late 1940s by Major Uziel Gal of the Israel Defense Forces who gave his name to the gun.

25. 10,000,000 ergs : JOULE
James Joule was an English physicist who spent much of his life working in the family brewing business. Joule used his work in the brewery to study the relationship between heat and mechanical work. In honor of his achievements, his name is used for the unit of energy in the International System of Units (i.e. the joule).

26. U.S.A. neighbor : MEX
The official name of the US’s neighbor to the south is the United Mexican States. The country is named after its capital, Mexico City, and not the other way round.

29. It may be tightly coiled : BURNER
I think the idea is that the electric element in a stovetop burner might be tightly coiled, so as to get the heat concentrated into a small area.

30. "Let us part, ___ the season of passion forget us": Yeats : ERE
“The Falling of the Leaves” is a poem by Irish poet William Butler Yeats:
Autumn is over the long leaves that love us,
And over the mice in the barley sheaves;
Yellow the leaves of the rowan above us,
And yellow the wet wild-strawberry leaves.
The hour of the waning of love has beset us,
And weary and worn are our sad souls now;
Let us part, ere the season of passion forget us,
With a kiss and a tear on thy drooping brow.

31. Designer Mizrahi : ISAAC
Isaac Mizrahi is a fashion designer from Brooklyn, New York.

34. Like pulp fiction : LURID
"Pulp fiction" was the name given to cheap fiction magazines that were popular from the late 1890s up to the 1950s. The name comes from the inexpensive wood pulp paper that was used for the publications. The upmarket equivalent was printed on fine glossy paper.

36. Onetime enemy : NORTH VIETNAMESE
North Vietnam was more correctly known as the Democratic Republic of Vietnam. It was the communist state ruling the northern part of Vietnam from 1954 until the end of the Vietnam War in 1975.

38. Reggae's ___ Kamoze : INI
Ini Kamoze is the stage name of Jamaican reggae singer Cecil Campbell. His best known song (though not by me!) is "Here Comes the Hotstepper" released in 1994.

40. Kazakhstan, once: Abbr. : SSR
The Republic of Kazakhstan in Central Asia is the world’s largest landlocked country. Kazakhstan was the last of the former Soviet Republics to declare itself independent from Russia.

45. Mrs. Mitt Romney : ANN
Ann Davies knew Mitt Romney way back in elementary school, and the pair started dating when Ann was 16 and were married in 1968 when she was 19 years old. Ann Romney was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1998, and she has been very active with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

54. Greenish creature : IGUANA
An iguana is a lizard, and as such is cold-blooded. There are times when pet iguanas need heat from a UV lamp to maintain body temperature.

57. Wastage : DROSS
When metals are smelted, there is a scum made up of impurities that floats on the surface of the molten metal. This scum is called "dross" and is drawn off and discarded. The term "dross" then came to mean any waste or impure matter.

60. Bit of negativity? : ANION
As we all recall from science class, a positive ion is called a cation and a negative ion is an anion. The names "cation" and "anion" come from Greek, with "kation" meaning "going down" and "anion" meaning "going up".

65. Wine taster's destination : NAPA VALLEY
Apparently the name "Napa" comes from the Native American Patwin word "napo" meaning “house”.

68. Beetles, briefly : VWS
Porsche was founded in 1931 in Stuttgart, Germany by Professor Ferdinand Porsche. The company didn't produce cars at first, but worked on design and development. The first big job awarded to the company was from the German government, to design a car for the people, and they came up with the Volkswagen Beetle. Yep, the Beetle is a Porsche design.

71. Land of Zion? : UTAH
To me, the most spectacular feature of Zion National Park, in southwestern Utah, is the magnificent Zion Canyon. The canyon cuts through red Navajo sandstone and is a truly beautiful sight.

74. 1942 Bette Davis film : NOW, VOYAGER
The 1942 movie “Now, Voyager” stars Bette Davis, Paul Henreid and Claude Rains. The film is based on a novel of the same name by Olive Higgins Prouty. Prouty got the title of her book from the Walt Whitman poem “The Untold Want”:
The untold want by life and land ne'er granted,
Now, voyager, sail thou forth, to seek and find.

76. Go downhill, in a way : SLALOM
Slalom is an anglicized version of the Norwegian word "slalam", meaning "skiing race".

83. Hornswoggle : DUPE
“To hornswoggle” is to cheat, to deceive, to bamboozle.

86. Singer/songwriter Laura : NYRO
Laura Nyro was a singer-songwriter from the Bronx, New York. Nyro had success with her own recordings, but her songs were even more successful when recorded by other big names. Two of Nyro’s compositions were “Eli’s Coming” recorded by Three Dog Night, and “Stoney End” by Barbra Streisand.

90. Northern California's ___ River : EEL
The Eel River in California was named in 1850 by an explorer Josiah Gregg after he made a trade with some Native Americans, swapping a frying pan for a large catch of eels.

96. Chicago's county : COOK
Cook County, Illinois, home to the city of Chicago, is the second largest county in the country in terms of population, after Los Angeles County. The county was named after Daniel Cook, the US Representative for Illinois and the state’s first Attorney General.

99. Home of the world's largest naval base : NORFOLK, VIRGINIA
Norfolk, Virginia is home to the largest naval base in the world (Norfolk Naval Base). Norfolk is also home to NATO’s Allied Command Transformation.

109. Head of London : LORD MAYOR
The Lord Mayor of London is more correctly called the Lord Mayor of the City of London. This title is used to differentiate the Lord Mayor of London from the Mayor of London who governs the larger area of Greater London. The Lord Mayor of London presides over the much smaller (one square mile) City of London.

111. NetZero competitor : AOL
Founded as Quantum Computer Services in 1983, the company changed its name in 1989 to America Online. As America Online went international, the acronym AOL was used in order to shake off the "America-centric" sound to the name. During the heady days of AOL's success the company could not keep up with the growing number of subscribers, so people trying to connect often encountered busy signals. That's when users referred to AOL as "Always Off-Line".

NetZero was launched in 1998 and was the first free Internet Service Provider. NetZero’s idea was to provide targeted advertising to users, based on what users liked to view online. It’s a little like Google’s business model, providing advertising based on Internet surfing patterns.

114. Sports org. of the early 2000s : XFL
The XFL was an American Football league that only survived for one season. The intention of the league was to provide football fans with something to watch in the off-season, but the fans didn't bother. There was discussion when the league was founded that "XFL" would stand for “Extreme” Football League, but the decision was made to let the “X” stand for nothing at all.

117. Solitaire unit : CARAT
The carat is a unit of mass used in measuring gemstones and is equal to 200 mg.

118. "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" writer and star : NIA VARDALOS
Not only is the delightful Nia Vardalos the star of the 2002 hit movie "My Big Fat Greek Wedding", she also wrote the screenplay. The film never made it to number one at the box office, but it still pulled in more money than any other movie in history that didn't make it to number one. That record I think reflects the fact that the film wasn't a blockbuster but rather a so-called "sleeper hit", a movie that people went to see based on referrals from friends. The big fat mistake came when a spin-off TV show was launched called "My Big Fat Greek Life". It ran for only 7 episodes.

121. Quarter back? : EAGLE
The American quarter is a little unusual in the world of decimal currency if you think about it. Most currencies have a "20-cent" coin, easier to work with mathematically. The US went for the quarter in deference to the practice of dividing Spanish Milled Dollars into eight wedge-shaped "bits". That's also why the quarter is sometimes referred to as "two bits". State quarters were introduced in 1999, but prior to that the quarter had an eagle on its reverse.

122. Pastoral poem : ECLOGUE
An eclogue is a pastoral poem traditionally formatted as a dialogue between shepherds.

123. Mich. neighbor : ONT
The Canadian province of Ontario takes its name from the Great Lake. In turn, Lake Ontario's name is thought to be derived from "Ontari:io", a Huron word meaning "great lake". Ontario is home to the nation's capital of Ottawa as well as Toronto, Canada's most populous city (and capital of the province).

125. Slammin' Sammy : SNEAD
Sam Snead was probably the most successful golfer never to win a US Open title, as he won a record 82 PGA Tour events. Snead did win seven majors, but never the US Open. He was also quite the showman. He once hit the scoreboard at Wrigley Field stadium with a golf ball by teeing off from home plate.

127. Miss identification? : NEE
"Née" is the French word for "born" when referring to a female. The male equivalent is "né".

Down
1. 1978 Bob Fosse Broadway revue : DANCIN’
The 1978 musical revue “Dancin’” was Bob Fosse’s answer to the hit 1975 music “A Chorus Line”.

Bob Fosse won more Tony Awards for choreography than anyone else, a grand total of eight. He also won an Oscar for Best Director for his 1972 movie "Cabaret", even beating out the formidable Francis Ford Coppola who was nominated that same year for "The Godfather".

2. Melodious : ARIOSO
An arioso (plural “ariosi”) is part of an opera with an arioso's structure lying somewhere between that of a full-blown aria and speech-like recitative.

3. Blond bombshell of '50s TV : DAGMAR
Dagmar was the stage name of American actress Virginia Egnor. Dagmar did a lot of sketch comedy on television during the fifties on the likes of “Milton Berle’s Texaco Star Theater” and “The Bob Hope Show”. She even recorded a novelty song called “Mama Will Bark” with Frank Sinatra. Dagmar was a busty young lady and as a result she lent her name to the chrome bulges on the front bumpers of some cars in the fifties.

4. Lawyers' cases, maybe : ATTACHES
Attaché is a French term which literally means "attached", and is used for a person who is assigned to the administrative staff of some agency or other service. The term is most recognized as it applies to someone assigned to an Ambassador's staff at an embassy. The word was extended to “attaché case” at the beginning of the twentieth century, meaning a leather case used for carrying papers, perhaps by an attaché at an embassy.

6. Mumbai title : SRI
“Sri” is a title of respect for a male in India.

Mumbai is the most populous city in India, and the second most populous city in the world (after Shanghai). The name of the city was changed from Bombay to Mumbai in 1995.

8. Downsized uprights : SPINETS
A spinet is the name given to a smaller version of keyboard instruments, such as thje harpsichord, piano or organ. They were developed, and are still made today, as smaller, cheaper versions of full-size instruments.

9. "Les ___" (Berlioz opera based on the "Aeneid") : TROYENS
“Les Troyens” (The Trojans) is a grand opera by Hector Berlioz based on Virgil’s epic poem the “Aeneid”. “Les Troyens” was Berlioz’s magnum opus, although sadly, he never got to see it performed.

11. Immature : JEJUNE
The adjective “jejune” means “dull in the mind”. The term comes from the Latin “ieiunus” meaning “dry, barren”.

14. Moolah : KALE
Lettuce, cabbage, kale, dough and moola (also moolah) are all slang terms for money.

16. 3.14159..., for pi : NUMERICAL VALUE
If you divide the circumference of any circle by its diameter, then the resulting number is always the same, and is denoted by the Greek letter “pi”. It is approximately equal to 22/7, or 3.14159.

17. Baku resident : AZERI
An Azeri is someone from the country of Azerbaijan.

Baku is the capital city of Azerbaijan and sits on the Caspian Sea. It’s thought that the name “Baku” comes from the Persian “Bad-kube” meaning “wind-pounded city”.

24. Qualifiers : HEATS
The term "heat", meaning a qualifying race, dates back to the 1660s. Originally a heat was a run given to a horse to prepare it for a race, to "heat" it up.

32. Ralph in the Baseball Hall of Fame : KINER
Ralph Kiner is a former Major League Baseball player. He has for decades been calling the games for the New York Mets from the broadcast booth.

37. Where springboks graze : VELDT
Also known as Veld, Veldt is the name given to large rural spaces in southern Africa. We might use the term "boondocks" for the same thing. The word comes from the German for "field".

Springboks are brown and white gazelles native to southwestern Africa. The name “springbok” comes from the Afrikaans for “jump goat”.

43. Subtitle of "Star Wars Episode IV" : A NEW HOPE
“Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope” was actually the first film in the “Star Wars” series of films, and so usually is referred to simply as “Star Wars”. “Star Wars” cost just $11 million to produce, and raked in over $450 million at the box office in the US and over $300 million overseas.

45. '60s prez : ABE
Abraham Lincoln was born in a one-room log cabin in Hardin County, Kentucky making him the first president born in the West. His formal education was limited to a year and a half of schooling, but fortunately for us, Lincoln was an avid reader and educated himself over the years. Even though he was from a rural area, he avoided hunting and fishing because he did not like to kill animals even for food.

46. Late '60s and early '70s, politically : NIXON ERA
President Richard Milhous Nixon used “Milhous” in his name in honor of his mother Hannah Milhous. Richard was born in a house in Yorba Linda, California. You can visit that house today as it is on the grounds of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library. It’s a really interesting way to spend a few hours if you ever get to Yorba Linda …

47. Hit 1944 film starring a 12-year-old actress : NATIONAL VELVET
“National Velvet” is a novel by Enid Bagnold, first published in 1935. The story is one of a 14-year-old girl, Velvet Brown, who rides her own horse to victory in the most celebrated of English horse races, the Grand National steeplechase. A famous film adaptation of the story was released in 1944, starring a young Mickey Rooney and 12-year old Elizabeth Taylor in the title role. After the filming was completed, Taylor was given the horse that she rode as a gift for her birthday.

49. One-named pop singer : DONOVAN
Donovan is the stage name of Scottish folk and pop singer Donovan Leitch.

53. Paragraph symbol : PILCROW
“Pilcrow” is another name for a paragraph mark, a character that looks like a backward-facing P.

56. Fifth tone : SOL
The solfa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

61. West Coast beer, familiarly : OLY
The Olympia Brewing Company was founded in the town of Tumwater, Washington in 1896, by a German immigrant.

64. Rembrandt van ___ : RYN
The celebrated Dutch painter's full name was Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (sometimes Ryn). He is perhaps most appreciated for his portraits, and left the world a remarkable collection of self-portraits.

66. Here, in Juárez : ACA
The Mexican city sitting across the border from El Paso is more correctly called Ciudad Juarez. Juarez used to be called El Paso del Norte (the North Pass). It was to be the younger settlement on the northern side of the Rio Grande which would retain the "El Paso" name.

67. Brynner of "Taras Bulba" : YUL
Yul Brynner was a Russian-born actor. Brynner was well known for his great performances, but also for his shaved head and his deep rich voice. He first adopted the "hairstyle" while playing the King of Siam in the stage version of "The King and I", and he stuck with it.

“Taras Bulba” is a film released in 1962 that is based on the short novel of the same name by Nikolai Gogol. The leading roles are played by Yul Brynner and Tony Curtis.

70. Its capital is Yellowknife: Abbr. : NWT
Canada is made up of ten provinces and three territories. The three territories lie to the north of the country, and are Yukon, Northwest Territories (NWT) and Nunavut. Territories differ from Provinces in that they only have governmental powers that are delegated to them by the federal government, whereas the provinces have constitutional powers in their own right.

72. Smidgen : TAD
Our word “smidgen”, meaning a small amount, might come from the Scots word “smitch” that means the same thing or "a small insignificant person".

73. Choices of time : AM/PM
The 12-hour clock has been around a long time, and was even used in sundial format in Ancient Egypt. Our use of AM and PM dates back to Roman times, with AM standing for Ante Meridiem (before noon) and PM standing for Post Meridiem (after noon). However, the Romans originally used the AM concept a little differently, by counting backwards from noon. So, 2AM to the Romans would be two hours before noon, or 10AM as we would call it today.

77. Gibson of "The Beaver" : MEL
The 2011 film “The Beaver” stars Mel Gibson and Jodie Foster, with Foster also directing. Gibson’s character suffers from depression and develops an alternate personality represented by a beaver hand puppet. Not really my kind of film …

79. "Norwegian Wood" strings : SITAR
“Norwegian Wood” is a Beatles song from 1965. “Norwegian Wood” is somewhat groundbreaking in that George Harrison is playing a sitar, the first time the sitar was used by a rock band on a record. And, if you like to waltz around the dance floor, this is one of the few Beatles records that is in triple time.

87. Kardashian spouse Lamar ___ : ODOM
Lamar Odom is a basketball forward playing for the LA Lakers. Apparently Odom loves candy, and that's how he earned his nickname, "The Candy Man". Odom is married to Khloé Kardashian, and the couple’s wedding featured on an episode of the reality show “Keeping Up with the Kardashians”. Not a show that I have ever seen …

94. The N.F.L.'s ___ Burress : PLAXICO
Plaxico Burress is an American footballer who plays for the Pittsburgh Steelers, and who also played for the New York Giants and New York Jets. In 2008 Burress accidentally shot himself with a Glock pistol that he was carrying in the waistband of his pants. That incident took place in the LQ nightclub in New York City.

95. James Bond's childhood home : SKYFALL
I have not been a fan of Daniel Craig as James Bond (preferring Sean Connery and Pierce Brosnan in the role). However, I saw “Skyfall” not too long ago and have been won over. “Skyfall” is one of the best Bond films so far, in my humble opinion …

101. Like "Knocked Up" and "The Hangover" : R-RATED
“Knocked Up” is a 2007 romantic comedy written and directed by Judd Apatow.

“The Hangover” is a comedy film released in 2009. The action revolves around a bachelor party in Las Vegas. The critics liked this one, although I didn’t really enjoy it too much.

102. Subj. of the 2008 biography "Traitor to His Class" : FDR
Franklin Delano Roosevelt was the only child of Sara Delano and James Roosevelt Sr. The Delano family history in America goes back to the pilgrim Philippe de Lannoy, an immigrant of Flemish descent who arrived at Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1621. The family name "de Lannoy" was anglicized here in the US, to "Delano".

103. Some Swedish models : VOLVOS
Volvo is a Swedish manufacturers of cars, trucks and construction equipment. The Volvo name was chosen as “volvo” is Latin for “I roll”.

104. Kevin of "Weeds" : NEALON
Off screen, Kevin Nealon is friends with fellow "Saturday Night Live" alumna Dana Carvey. When Carvey landed a spot on SNL, he recommended Nealon to the show's producers and both stand-up comedians joined the cast in the same year, 1986.

“Weeds” is a Showtime television series that originally aired from 2005 to 2012. “Weeds” is a comedy-drama about a mother of two who has to turn to growing and selling marijuana to support her family after her husband dies.

106. Carol starter : ADESTE
The lovely hymn "Adeste Fideles" (aka "O Come, All Ye Faithful") was written by one John Francis Wade in the 13th century. Well, he wrote the original four verses, with four more verses being added over time.

113. Scott of "Hawaii Five-0" : CAAN
Scott Caan is the actor playing “Danno” on the remake of “Hawaii Five-0”. Scott is the son of Hollywood actor James Caan.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Pop : DAD
4. Court statistic : ASSISTS
11. Kid's game with a ball : JACKS
16. A Bobbsey twin : NAN
19. Constellation near Scorpius : ARA
20. Start to make a living from something : TURN PRO
21. W.W. II marine threat : E-BOAT
22. Israeli weapon : UZI
23. What some goggles provide : NIGHT VISION
25. 10,000,000 ergs : JOULE
26. U.S.A. neighbor : MEX
27. Represent at a costume party : COME AS
28. ___ minute : ANY
29. It may be tightly coiled : BURNER
30. "Let us part, ___ the season of passion forget us": Yeats : ERE
31. Designer Mizrahi : ISAAC
32. Old lad's wear : KNEE PANTS
34. Like pulp fiction : LURID
36. Onetime enemy : NORTH VIETNAMESE
38. Reggae's ___ Kamoze : INI
39. Exposed : SEEN
40. Kazakhstan, once: Abbr. : SSR
41. Shot blocker : LENS CAP
45. Mrs. Mitt Romney : ANN
48. Place for runners : SLED
50. Far-out experience : TRIP
54. Greenish creature : IGUANA
55. Diagonal : BIAS
57. Wastage : DROSS
60. Bit of negativity? : ANION
62. Flubbed : BLEW
63. Squeeze for dough : EXTORT
65. Wine taster's destination : NAPA VALLEY
68. Beetles, briefly : VWS
69. Slick : OILY
70. Bad sign for a traveler? : NO VACANCY
71. Land of Zion? : UTAH
73. "That's ___-brainer" : A NO
74. 1942 Bette Davis film : NOW, VOYAGER
76. Go downhill, in a way : SLALOM
78. Department store department : MEN’S
80. Fix one's eyes : STARE
81. Chip away at : ERODE
83. Hornswoggle : DUPE
84. Huzzahs : PRAISE
86. Singer/songwriter Laura : NYRO
88. Make, as one's way : WEND
90. Northern California's ___ River : EEL
91. Breed of cat or dog : MALTESE
93. Baseball "twin killings," for short : DPS
96. Chicago's county : COOK
98. Alternative to a bus : VAN
99. Home of the world's largest naval base : NORFOLK, VIRGINIA
107. "Done, O.K.?!" : THERE
109. Head of London : LORD MAYOR
110. Seemingly forever : ON END
111. NetZero competitor : AOL
112. Ladderlike in arrangement : SCALAR
114. Sports org. of the early 2000s : XFL
115. Until now : TO DATE
116. Statehouse resident, informally : GUV
117. Solitaire unit : CARAT
118. "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" writer and star : NIA VARDALOS
120. Purpose : USE
121. Quarter back? : EAGLE
122. Pastoral poem : ECLOGUE
123. Mich. neighbor : ONT
124. Stroke : PET
125. Slammin' Sammy : SNEAD
126. Prop up : BOLSTER
127. Miss identification? : NEE

Down
1. 1978 Bob Fosse Broadway revue : DANCIN’
2. Melodious : ARIOSO
3. Blond bombshell of '50s TV : DAGMAR
4. Lawyers' cases, maybe : ATTACHES
5. Yukon and Tahoe, for short : SUVS
6. Mumbai title : SRI
7. Moonstruck : INSANE
8. Downsized uprights : SPINETS
9. "Les ___" (Berlioz opera based on the "Aeneid") : TROYENS
10. Heir, maybe, but not an heiress : SON
11. Immature : JEJUNE
12. Cancels : ABORTS
13. One at a sidebar : COUNSEL
14. Moolah : KALE
15. Unblemished : STERLING
16. 3.14159..., for pi : NUMERICAL VALUE
17. Baku resident : AZERI
18. Gave the thumbs-down : NIXED
24. Qualifiers : HEATS
29. "Just like that!" : BAM
32. Ralph in the Baseball Hall of Fame : KINER
33. Cameo, for one : PART
35. Remove from a mailing list, informally : UNSUB
37. Where springboks graze : VELDT
42. One of Mozart's? : EINE
43. Subtitle of "Star Wars Episode IV" : A NEW HOPE
44. Cat's dogs? : PAWS
45. '60s prez : ABE
46. Late '60s and early '70s, politically : NIXON ERA
47. Hit 1944 film starring a 12-year-old actress : NATIONAL VELVET
49. One-named pop singer : DONOVAN
51. Wreak havoc on : RAVAGE
52. More ridiculous : INANER
53. Paragraph symbol : PILCROW
56. Fifth tone : SOL
58. Mouth-watering : SAVORY
59. Vet, at times : SPAYER
61. West Coast beer, familiarly : OLY
64. Rembrandt van ___ : RYN
66. Here, in Juárez : ACA
67. Brynner of "Taras Bulba" : YUL
70. Its capital is Yellowknife: Abbr. : NWT
72. Smidgen : TAD
73. Choices of time : AM/PM
75. Ending with psych- : -OSES
76. Sir abroad : SENOR
77. Gibson of "The Beaver" : MEL
79. "Norwegian Wood" strings : SITAR
82. To say, in Spanish : DECIR
85. Grows old : SENESCES
87. Kardashian spouse Lamar ___ : ODOM
89. Well-intentioned activist : DO-GOODER
92. Supersize, say : ENLARGE
94. The N.F.L.'s ___ Burress : PLAXICO
95. James Bond's childhood home : SKYFALL
97. Somewhat, informally : KINDA
100. "Bee-you-tiful!" : OO LA LA!
101. Like "Knocked Up" and "The Hangover" : R-RATED
102. Subj. of the 2008 biography "Traitor to His Class" : FDR
103. Some Swedish models : VOLVOS
104. Kevin of "Weeds" : NEALON
105. Cantillate : INTONE
106. Carol starter : ADESTE
107. Advice to a base runner : TAG UP
108. Provide a place to stay : HOUSE
113. Scott of "Hawaii Five-0" : CAAN
115. "How ___!" : TRUE
118. It's S. of S. Dak. : NEB
119. 15%-er: Abbr. : AGT

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

4 comments :

andrea carla michaels said...

what? You are in SF???!!! write to me andreacarla.michaels@gmail.com pls and tell me which hotel!!! I'm in Berkeley all day Sunday for a Scrabble tourney but back home in SF by 7pm...shall we meet up? What Garrison Keillor live show?

Bill Butler said...

Hi Andrea,

Thanks for another great puzzle. You and Dan had me baffled at the end with this one, and I made a couple of very poor guesses as a result. It's good to be humbled every now and then :)

I will send you an email ...

Bill

scottie said...

For 29 across (It may be tightly coiled : BURNER), how about an electric burner?

Bill Butler said...

Hi Scottie,

Yes, you are right about the electic burner. I am only used to the term "burner" for a gas heating element, but I see that it is indeed used for electric heating elements on a stove as well.

Thanks for watching my back! I made the change.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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