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0203-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 3 Feb 13, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Schoenholz
THEME: A Whiff of Cologne … there’s the distinct smell of Cologne, Germany in today’s puzzle as several answers are terms that we imported into English from German:
21A. Alternative to white : PUMPERNICKEL
102A. Low grade? : KINDERGARTEN
15D. Novel that focuses on character growth : BILDUNGSROMAN
26D. Practical approach to diplomacy : REALPOLITIK
30D. It's a blessing : GESUNDHEIT
44D. Rapper? : POLTERGEIST
46D. Forceful advance : BLITZKRIEG
50D. Informal social gathering : KAFFEEKLATSCH
COMPLETION TIME: 32m 14s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Pop-___ : TARTS
Pop-Tart is the most successful brand for the Kellogg company, as millions are sold every year. The US Military bought quite a few in 2001, and dropped 2.4 million Pop-Tarts into Afghanistan during the invasion after 9/11.

6. División of a house : SALA
A room (sala) is a division (división) of a house (casa), in Spanish.

17. Sun, in Verdun : SOLEIL
Verdun-sur-Meuse is a city in northeastern France. The WWI Battle of Verdun took place just north of the city, and lasted for almost the whole of the year 1916. The battle was fought between the French and Germans, with loss of life being about equal between the two factions, the total death toll being about 700,000 men. The Battle of Verdun was primarily an artillery engagement, and some of those overlapping artillery craters are still visible today.

21. Alternative to white : PUMPERNICKEL
The lovely bread known as pumpernickel is made with a recipe that originates in the Westphalia region of Germany. The version of the bread that we eat in North America has been adapted over the years from the original recipe, largely to produce a cheaper product. If you taste the European version beside the American version, it’s hard to believe they have the same origins. The etymology and literal translation of “pumpernickel” seems to be unclear, although there are some interesting suggestions given that I won’t repeat here, especially as they have to do with “the devil’s flatulence!”

25. Like St. Louis vis-à-vis New Orleans : UPRIVER
St. Louis is way upriver from New Orleans, on the Mississippi.

28. End to end? : DEE
There is a letter D (dee) at the end of the word “end”.

34. "How I Met Your Mother" narrator : TED
“How I Met Your Mother” is a sitcom that CBS has been airing since 2005. The main character is Ted Mosby, played by Josh Radnor. Mosby is also the narrator for the show looking back from the year 2030 (the live action is set in the present). As narrator, the older Mosby character is voiced by Bob Saget.

36. Who said "Familiarity breeds contempt - and children" : TWAIN
Samuel Langhorne Clemens was the real name of the author Mark Twain. Twain wasn’t the only pen name used by Clemens. Early in his career he signed some sketches as “Josh”, and signed some humorous letters that he wrote under the name “Thomas Jefferson Snodgrass”. The name of Mark Twain came from the days when Clemens was working on riverboats on the Mississippi. A riverboatman would call out “by the mark twain” when measuring the depth of water. This meant that on the sounding line, according to the “mark” on the line, the depth was two (“twain”) fathoms, and so it was safe for the riverboat to proceed.

37. Like Virginia among states to ratify the Constitution : TENTH
Article VII of the US Constitution deals with its ratification. Article VII called for nine states to ratify the wording of the Constitution before it would take effect.

38. Booth, e.g. : ASSASSIN
“Our American Cousin” is a play by Englishman Tom Taylor. The play is a farce, and used to be very popular. There is a line in Act III that always gets the biggest laugh:
"Don't know the manners of good society, eh? Well, I guess I know enough to turn you inside out, old gal — you sockdologizing old man-trap."
It was when the audience were laughing at this line in Ford’s Theater in Washington in 1865 that John Wilkes Booth shot President Abraham Lincoln. It is thought that Booth hoped the sound of the laughter would drown out the sound of the gunshot.

43. PC component : CPU
The Central Processing Unit (CPU) is the main component on the "motherboard" of a computer. The CPU is the part of the computer that carries out most of the functions required by a program. Nowadays you can get CPUs in everything from cars to telephones.

44. Target of minor surgery : POLYP
A polyp is a growth that projects from the surface of a mucous membrane. Polyps can be found in the colon or nose for example.

45. Dick ___, co-creator of "Saturday Night Live" : EBERSOL
Dick Ebersol was the co-creator, along with Lorne Michaels, of NBC’s hit show “Saturday Night Live”. Years later, Ebersol was appointed president of NBC Sports, in 1989. He is married to actress Susan Saint James.

56. "A Clockwork Orange" hooligan : ALEX
"A Clockwork Orange" is a novella by Anthony Burgess, first published in 1962. The story is about a young teenager named Alex, who leads a small gang on violent rampages each night. The story has been adapted for the big and small screens, most famously in a 1971 film by Stanley Kubrick. It's way too violent for me ...

57. Actress Loughlin of "90210" : LORI
Lori Loughlin played Rebecca Donaldson-Katsopolis on the sitcom “Full House”. Apparently you can see her now in a spinoff of the TV show “Beverly Hills, 90210” called, inventively enough, “90210”.

60. Skater Midori : ITO
Midori Ito is a Japanese figure skater. Ito was the first woman to land a triple/triple jump and a triple axel in competition. In fact she landed her first triple jump in training, when she was only 8 years old ...

62. Roosevelt's successor : TRUMAN
Harry Truman wanted to go to West Point having served with the Missouri Army National Guard on active duty in WWI, but he couldn't get in because of his poor eyesight. Young Truman didn't have the money to pay for college anywhere else. He did manage to study for two years towards a law degree at the Kansas City Law School in the twenties, but he never finished his schooling. So, Harry S. Truman was the last US President (out of a list of ten) who did not have a college degree.

64. Roosevelt's successor : TAFT
William Howard Taft may have been the 27th President of the United States, but his lifelong ambition was to be Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. President Taft was able to realize that dream in 1921, eight years after losing his bid for re-election as president. As Chief Justice, this former US President swore in two new presidents: Calvin Coolidge (in 1925) and Herbert Hoover (in 1929).

68. 1952 Brando title role : ZAPATA
“Viva Zapata!” is a 1952 film directed by Elia Kazan, with Marlon Brando playing the title role. The film is based on the life the Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata, and has a screenplay written by John Steinbeck.

69. Enzyme ending : -ASE
Enzymes are basically catalysts, chemicals that act to increase the rate of a particular chemical reaction. For example starches will break down into sugars over time, especially under the right conditions, but in the presence of the enzyme amylase that is found in saliva, this production of sugar happens very, very quickly.

70. Fairbanks Daily News-___ : MINER
The “Fairbanks Daily News-Miner” has the distinction of being the farthest north (location of publication) daily newspaper in the United States.

71. Geraint's wife, in Arthurian legend : ENID
"Idylls of the King" is a cycle of twelve poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson that retells the tale of King Arthur. One of the "idylls" is the story of Geraint and Enid. Tennyson’s Enid gave her name to the city of Enid, Oklahoma.

72. European coin with a hole in it : KRONE
"Krone" translates into English as "crown", and was the name given to coins that bore the image of the monarch. Today, the krone is the name given to the currency of Norway and of Denmark. Some of the Norwegian and Danish kroner have holes in the middle, giving them a "doughnut" or "torus" shape.

73. Sex partner? : THE CITY
The HBO show “Sex and the City” is based on a book of the same name by Candace Bushnell. Bushnell created the book by compiling columns that she wrote for the “New York Observer”. The lead character called Carrie Bradshaw is really Bushnell’s alter ego (note that the initials CB apply both to author and character).

78. Actress Dennings of "The 40-Year-Old Virgin" : KAT
Kat Dennings is the stage name of actress Katherine Litwack, noted today for her co-starring role on CBS’s sitcom “2 Broke Girls”. Dennings is an avid blogger, and you can check out her video blog on YouTube.

Much as I love to watch Steve Carell perform, I have never managed to convince myself to watch the 2005 comedy film "The 40-Year-Old Virgin". It's a tale of a middle-aged man who has yet to lose his virginity, and his quest for romance and sexual intercourse. Not my cup of tea ...

80. Insect's opening for air : SPIRACLE
Spiracles are tiny opening on the outer surface of some animals that give access to the respiratory system. For example, many insects have spiracles on their exoskeletons through which they "breathe".

85. Puppet of old TV : OLLIE
“Kukla, Fran and Ollie” is an early television show that aired from 1947-1957. Kukla and Ollie (Oliver J. Dragon) were puppets and Fran was Fran Allison, usually the only human on the show.

87. French Champagne city : REIMS
The city of Reims is the de facto capital of the Champagne region of France, being the biggest city in the area. Reims was badly damaged during both world wars, including extensive damage to the much loved cathedral during WWI by German bombardment. It's perhaps fitting that Reims was the location where the German forces surrendered to General Eisenhower on the 7 May 1945, ending the war in Europe.

89. Mason's trough : HOD
A hod is 3-sided box on the the end of a long handle used for carrying bricks (and sometimes mortar) at a construction site, usually up and down ladders.

91. Group of bright stars? : MENSA
If you ever had to learn Latin, as did I, "mensa" was probably taught to you in Lesson One as it's the word commonly used as an example of a first declension noun. Mensa means "table". The Mensa organization for folks with high IQs was set up in Oxford, England back in 1946. To become a member, one is required to have an IQ that is in the top 2% of the population.

92. Baseball commissioner Bud : SELIG
Bud Selig is the current commissioner of Major League Baseball. Selig became acting commissioner in 1992 after the resignation of Fay Vincent. The team owners searched for a new commissioner for six years, and finally gave the permanent job to Selig in 1998.

94. Bushel or barrel: Abbr. : AMT
In the imperial system of weights and measures, a bushel is a unit of dry volume made up of 4 pecks. In the US system, a bushel is a dry volume of 8 gallons.

The volume of one oil barrel is equivalent to 42 US gallons. A barrel is correctly abbreviated to "bbl". Barrels aren't really used for transporting crude oil anymore. Instead, oil moves in bulk through pipelines and in tankers. "Barrel" is just a quantity these days.

98. Language related to Tahitian : MAORI
The Māori are the indigenous people of New Zealand. The Māori are eastern Polynesian in origin and began arriving in New Zealand relatively recently, starting sometime in the late 13th century. The word "māori" simply means "normal", distinguishing the mortal human being from spiritual entities.

102. Low grade? : KINDERGARTEN
"Kindergarten" is of course a German term, literally meaning “children’s garden”. The term was coined by the German education authority Friedrich Fröbel in 1837, when he used it as the name for his play and activity institute that he created for young children to use before they headed off to school. His thought was that children should be nourished educationally, like plants in a garden.

105. Playwright Joe who wrote "What the Butler Saw" : ORTON
Joe Orton was an English playwright who was active in the 1960s and who was noted for penning outrageous black comedies. Orton’s career was cut short as he was bludgeoned to death by his lover, when Orton was only 24 years old.

106. Tessellation : TILING
In the world of tiling, a tessellation is a collection of shaped tiles (usually all the same shape) that fill a space with no gaps. Some of the shapes can be quite complex, but clever use of geometry allows them to fit together seamlessly. A simple example of a tessellated design is a collection of hexagons, in a honeycomb pattern.

Down
5. Camera type, briefly : SLR
SLR stands for "single lens reflex". Usually cameras with changeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

7. Alan of "Argo" : ARKIN
The actor Alan Arkin won his only Oscar (Best Supporting Actor) for his role in "Little Miss Sunshine" from 2006, a movie I just did not understand ...

“Argo” is a 2012 movie that is based on the true story of the rescue of six diplomats hiding out during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. The film was directed by and stars Ben Affleck and is produced by Grant Heslov and George Clooney, the same pair who produced the excellent “Good Night, and Good Luck”. I saw “Argo” recently and recommend it highly, although I found the scenes of religious fervor pretty frightening …

8. Schreiber who won a Tony for "Glengarry Glen Ross" : LIEV
Liev Schreiber is highly regarded as a stage actor, and has many classical roles under his belt. He won a Tony in 2005 for his Broadway performance in "Glengarry Glen Ross", and earned excellent reviews for his performance in Shakespeare's "Cymbeline".

9. Place for a Dumpster : ALLEYWAY
"Dumpster" is one of those words that we use generically that is actually a brand name. The original "Dumpster" was patented by the Dempster Brothers of Knoxville, Tennessee. "Dumpster" is derived from "dump" and "Dempster".

10. Vaudeville singer's prop : BOA
The Vire is a river that flows through Normandy in France. The poets of the Vire valley were known as the "Vau de Vire", a term that some say gave rise to our word "Vaudeville".

11. "In the American West" photographer : AVEDON
Richard Avedon was an American photographer. Avedon was the inspiration for the character "Dick Avery" played by Fred Astaire in the wonderful film "Funny Face" starring Audrey Hepburn. Avedon's most famous portrait is in fact a close-up of Audrey Hepburn, whom Avedon referred to as his muse.

13. Old New York paper, for short : TRIB
The “New-York Tribune” was published from 1841 to 1924, at which time it was merged with the New York Herald to form the New York Herald Tribune. The New York Tribune building that housed the paper’s operations no longer exists. The site is now occupied by One Pace Plaza, which is part of Pace University’s New York campus.

14. Actress Gardner : AVA
Ava Gardner is noted for her association with some big movies, but also for her association with some big names when it came to the men in her life. In the world of film, she appeared in the likes of "Mogambo" (1953), "On the Beach" (1959), "The Night of the Iguana" (1964) and "Earthquake" (1974). The men in her life included husbands Mickey Rooney, Artie Shaw and Frank Sinatra. After her marriages had failed (and perhaps before!) she had long term relationships with Howard Hughes and bullfighter Luis Miguel Dominguin whom she met through her friend Ernest Hemingway.

15. Novel that focuses on character growth : BILDUNGSROMAN
A “Bildungsroman” is a genre of literature that might be called “coming of age” literature. Central to the plot of such a novel is the development of the main character’s growth from a youth to an adult. Examples might be “Sons and Lovers” by D. H. Lawrence, “The Catcher in the Rye” by J. D. Salinger and more recently “The Kite Runner” by Khaled Hosseini. The term “Bildungsroman” can be translated as “formation novel”.

17. Peloponnesian War winner : SPARTA
Sparta was a city-state in ancient Greece, famous for her military might. Sparta and Athens fought the Peloponnesian War from 431 to 404 BC, with Sparta eventually emerging victorious.

20. "Christina's World" painter Andrew : WYETH
Andrew Wyeth was known as a realist painter and "the painter of the people" in recognition of his popularity with the man in the street. His neighbor, Helga Testorf, posed for a total of 247 paintings over a 14 year period, a series known as "The Helga Pictures". The remarkable thing is that neither Wyeth's wife nor Testorf's husband knew anything about the portrait sessions or the paintings.

22. Paavo ___, 1920s Finnish Olympic hero : NURMI
Paavo Nurmi was one of a group of Finnish runners to earn the nickname “the Flying Finn”. Nurmi dominated middle and long distance running in the 1920s. He was the most successful athlete at the 1924 Paris Olympics, winning five gold medals.

26. Practical approach to diplomacy : REALPOLITIK
The term “Realpolitik” translates from German as “practical politics” and is used to describe diplomacy that is rooted in practical factors and consideration rather ideological premises.

30. It's a blessing : GESUNDHEIT
“Gesundheit” is the German word for “health”, and is used in response to a sneeze in Germany, as indeed it is here in the US.

32. Customizable character in a computer game : SIM
"SimCity" is a very clever computer game. Players build and grow cities and societies by creating the conditions necessary for people (the Sims) to move in and thrive. "SimCity" was launched in 1989, and to this day it is consistently ranked as one of the greatest computer games of all time.

36. E-mail forerunner : TELEX
Telex grew out of the world of the telegraph. What Telex brought to telegraphy was the ability to route messages. Instead of instructing an operator at the other end to route a particular message to the intended party, the operator of a telex could route the message directly to another telex machine by using a rotary dial, very similar to that on a telephone.

37. Los ___ mosqueteros : TRES
“Los tres mosqueteros” is the Spanish translation for “The Three Musketeers”.

The "Three Musketeers" were Athos, Porthos and Aramis, and their young protégé was D'Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, Alexandre Dumas' "Three Musketeers" really didn't use their muskets and were better known for their prowess with their swords.

40. Some "Bourne" film characters : SPIES
"The Bourne Identity" is a great spy novel written by Robert Ludlum, first published in 1980. It has been ranked as the second best spy novel of all time, just behind the even more enjoyable "The Spy Who Came in from the Cold" by John le Carre. Ludlum wrote two sequels, and all three parts of "The Bourne Trilogy" have been made into very successful movies. Ludlum died before he could write more than three novels featuring Jason Bourne, but five more titles in the series have been published, written by Eric Van Lustbader. I must check them out ...

41. Ring event : RODEO
"Rodeo” is a Spanish word, which is usually translated as “round up”.

44. Rapper? : POLTERGEIST
A poltergeist is a spirit or ghost that makes its presence known by making noises or by moving objects. The term "poltergeist" is German, coming from "poltern" meaning "to rumble" or "to make a noise", and "Geist", the German for "ghost" or "spirit".

46. Forceful advance : BLITZKRIEG
The blitzkrieg was a tactic used by Germany running up to and during WWII. In the original German blitzkrieg, the army and air-force threw everything into a rapid penetration of enemy lines without stopping to reinforce its flanks. The word "blitz" means "lightning" and "krieg" means "war".

47. Depressed at the poles : OBLATE
Something that is described as having an "oblate" shape is spherical, slightly depressed at top and bottom, just like the Earth for example. A more extreme example of an oblate shape is an M&M.

48. Jungle vine : LIANA
Liana is the name give to vines that generally grow in moist areas such as rain forests. They grow using the trees in the forest as structural support. My bet is that Tarzan swung from tree to tree on liana vines ...

50. Informal social gathering : KAFFEEKLATSCH
A "klatch" (also "klatsch") is a casual gathering, particularly for conversation. "Klatch" comes from the German "klatschen" meaning "to gossip". If we add a few mugs of coffee then we have a Kaffeeklatsch.

58. St. Peter's Basilica feature : CUPOLA
A cupola is a small dome-like structure on the top of a building. “Cupola” comes from the Latin “cupula” meaning “small cup”.

The Basilica of St. Peter in Rome was built during the late Renaissance and has the largest interior of any Christian church in the world, capable of holding 60,000 people. There is a popular misconception that St. Peter's is the cathedral of Rome, but actually it isn't, and instead is a papal basilica. The Basilica of St. John Lateran is the cathedral church of Rome.

61. Snookums : HONEY
The term of endearment "snookums" comes from the family name "Snooks". Snooks was a name used in Britain in the 1800s for some hypothetical unknown individual (as we would use the name "Joe Blow" perhaps).

74. Mark of ___ : CAIN
According to the Book of Genesis, the “mark of Cain” is a mark that was placed on Cain by God after he murdered his brother. The mark was placed as a sign to warn off anyone wishing to do harm to Cain. God also gave the murdering brother the curse of Cain, so that he was doomed to wander the Earth as a fugitive and could not cultivate the land.

79. Big ___ : BEN
Big Ben is the name commonly used for the large bell in the Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster (aka the Houses of Parliament). Big Ben's official name is the Great Bell, and there is some debate about the origins of the nickname. It may be named after Sir Benjamin Hall who oversaw the bell's installation, or perhaps the English heavyweight champion of the day, Benjamin Caunt.

85. Time's second African-American Person of the Year : OBAMA
The first African American to be named as “Time” magazine’s Person of the Year was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., for 1963. The second was President Barack Obama, for 2012.

“Time” magazine started naming a “Man of the Year” in 1927, only changing the concept to “Person of the Year” in 1999. Prior to 1999, the magazine did recognize four females as “Woman of the Year”: Wallis Simpson (1936), Soong May-ling a.k.a. Madame Chiang Kai-shek (1937), Queen Elizabeth II (1952) and Corazon Aquino (1986). “Time” named Albert Einstein as Person of the Century in 1999, with Franklin D. Roosevelt and Mahatma Gandhi as runners-up.

86. Primates with tails : LEMURS
Lemurs are the most unusual looking creatures, native to the island of Madagascar off the east coast of Africa. With their white fur and dark eyes that are very reflective at night, they have a "ghostly" appearance. Indeed, the animals takes their name from Roman mythology in which "lemures" were spirits of the restless dead.

91. Conductor Kurt : MASUR
Kurt Masur succeeded Zubin Mehta as music director of the New York Philharmonic in 1991. Despite being highly regarded by the public, Masur stepped down from the post in 2002 apparently due to differences with the Executive Director of the Philharmonic at that time.

92. Present-day personality? : SANTA
Saint Nicholas of Myra is the inspiration for Santa Claus. Nicholas was the Bishop of Myra (now in modern-day Turkey) during the 4th century AD, and was known for being generous to the poor. Centuries after he died, his remains were desecrated by Italian sailors and moved to Bari in Italy. One legend has it that the relics were moved again centuries later and reburied in the grounds of Jerpoint Abbey in Co. Kilkenny in Ireland, where you can visit the grave today. I choose to believe that Santa Claus’s relics are indeed buried in Ireland …

93. Alfalfa's love in "The Little Rascals" : DARLA
Alfalfa's love interest in "Our Gang" was Darla, whose real name was Darla Hood. Hood became quite a successful singer after she grew out of the "Our Gang" role.

Alfalfa's real name was Carl Switzer. He and his brother were quite the young performers around his hometown in Illinois, singing and playing instruments. On a trip to California, the Switzer family were touring the Hal Roach movie studio and were fooling around in the studio cafeteria, basically giving an impromptu performance. Hal Roach happened to be there at the time, and signed both brothers up for roles in "Our Gang". Carl was to play "Alfalfa", and brother Harold played "Slim" (aka "Deadpan").

95. Mother of Castor and Pollux : LEDA
In Greek mythology, Leda was the beautiful Queen of Sparta who was seduced by Zeus when he took the form of a swan. Leda produced two eggs from the union. One egg hatched into the beautiful Helen, later to be known as Helen of Troy and over whom the Trojan War was fought. The other egg hatched into the twins Castor and Pollux. Castor and Pollux had different fathers according to the myth. Pollux was the son of Zeus and was immortal, while Castor was the son of Leda's earthly husband, and so he was a mortal. William Butler Yeats wrote a famous sonnet called “Leda and the Swan” in 1924.

97. Gaelic ground : EIRE
"Éire", is the Irish word for "Ireland". "Erin" is an anglicized version of "Éire" and actually corresponds to "Éirinn", the dative case of "Éire".

100. Word missing twice in the Beatles' "___ Said ___ Said" : SHE
“She Said She Said” is a song attributed to Lennon-McCartney, although it was actually written by Lennon.  In fact, McCartney didn’t even play or sing in the original recording 1996 recording, a track on the "Revolver" album.

101. One on foot, informally : PED
Pedestrian (ped.).

103. Verizon forerunner : GTE
GTE was a rival to AT&T, the largest of the independent competitors to the Bell System. GTE merged with Bell Atlantic in 2000 to form the company that we know today as Verizon.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Pop-___ : TARTS
6. División of a house : SALA
10. They may be running in a saloon : BAR TABS
17. Sun, in Verdun : SOLEIL
18. Thin ice, e.g. : PERIL
19. Survey : OVERVIEW
21. Alternative to white : PUMPERNICKEL
23. How overhead photos may be taken : AERIALLY
24. "That's ___ excuse ..." : A POOR
25. Like St. Louis vis-à-vis New Orleans : UPRIVER
27. Name : DUB
28. End to end? : DEE
29. Torn : RENT
30. Inexperienced : GREEN
31. See 67-Across : YES ON
33. Kind of tape : DUCT
34. "How I Met Your Mother" narrator : TED
35. Put out : EMIT
36. Who said "Familiarity breeds contempt - and children" : TWAIN
37. Like Virginia among states to ratify the Constitution : TENTH
38. Booth, e.g. : ASSASSIN
41. Sphere : REALM
42. Suit size: Abbr. : REG
43. PC component : CPU
44. Target of minor surgery : POLYP
45. Dick ___, co-creator of "Saturday Night Live" : EBERSOL
49. Tangle : SKEIN
51. Either end of an edge, in graph theory : NODE
52. Ph.D. hurdles : ORALS
54. Diamond stat : RBI
55. Worked the soil, in a way : SPADED
56. "A Clockwork Orange" hooligan : ALEX
57. Actress Loughlin of "90210" : LORI
58. Soda fountain option : COLA
59. Spritelike : ELFISH
60. Skater Midori : ITO
61. Cool : HIP
62. Roosevelt's successor : TRUMAN
64. Roosevelt's successor : TAFT
65. Shade provider : EAVE
67. With 31-Across, favor, as a ballot measure : VOTE
68. 1952 Brando title role : ZAPATA
69. Enzyme ending : -ASE
70. Fairbanks Daily News-___ : MINER
71. Geraint's wife, in Arthurian legend : ENID
72. European coin with a hole in it : KRONE
73. Sex partner? : THE CITY
75. Fraternity member : GREEK
77. Theologian's subj. : REL
78. Actress Dennings of "The 40-Year-Old Virgin" : KAT
79. Like many a fraternity party : BEERY
80. Insect's opening for air : SPIRACLE
85. Puppet of old TV : OLLIE
87. French Champagne city : REIMS
88. Make a call : RULE
89. Mason's trough : HOD
90. Noodle : BEAN
91. Group of bright stars? : MENSA
92. Baseball commissioner Bud : SELIG
93. Homey : DAWG
94. Bushel or barrel: Abbr. : AMT
95. Chem ___ : LAB
96. Potter's pedal : TREADLE
98. Language related to Tahitian : MAORI
99. Tousles : MUSSES UP
102. Low grade? : KINDERGARTEN
104. Noble rank : ARCHDUKE
105. Playwright Joe who wrote "What the Butler Saw" : ORTON
106. Tessellation : TILING
107. Clipped : SHEARED
108. Cool : NEAT
109. Pass : ENACT

Down
1. Alternatives to comb-overs : TOUPEES
2. Ingredients in some candy bars : ALMONDS
3. Move, as a plant : REPOT
4. Level : TIER
5. Camera type, briefly : SLR
6. Hidden : SECRET
7. Alan of "Argo" : ARKIN
8. Schreiber who won a Tony for "Glengarry Glen Ross" : LIEV
9. Place for a Dumpster : ALLEYWAY
10. Vaudeville singer's prop : BOA
11. "In the American West" photographer : AVEDON
12. Show over : RERUN
13. Old New York paper, for short : TRIB
14. Actress Gardner : AVA
15. Novel that focuses on character growth : BILDUNGSROMAN
16. High-quality : SELECT
17. Peloponnesian War winner : SPARTA
18. Import, as water or music : PIPE IN
20. "Christina's World" painter Andrew : WYETH
22. Paavo ___, 1920s Finnish Olympic hero : NURMI
26. Practical approach to diplomacy : REALPOLITIK
30. It's a blessing : GESUNDHEIT
32. Customizable character in a computer game : SIM
33. Cougar's prey : DEER
36. E-mail forerunner : TELEX
37. Los ___ mosqueteros : TRES
39. Confident test-taker's cry : ACED IT!
40. Some "Bourne" film characters : SPIES
41. Ring event : RODEO
44. Rapper? : POLTERGEIST
45. Inner ___ : EAR
46. Forceful advance : BLITZKRIEG
47. Depressed at the poles : OBLATE
48. Jungle vine : LIANA
49. Big media to-do : SPLASH
50. Informal social gathering : KAFFEEKLATSCH
51. Inexperienced : NAIVE
53. Caught at a 41-Down : ROPED
55. Went after : SET AT
58. St. Peter's Basilica feature : CUPOLA
61. Snookums : HONEY
63. More pink, maybe : RARER
66. All's partner : ANY
67. Goes off on a tangent : VEERS
70. Small bit : MITE
74. Mark of ___ : CAIN
76. Discuss lightly : REMARK ON
79. Big ___ : BEN
80. Ill-humored : SULLEN
81. ___ set (tool assortment) : PLIER
82. Jumbled : CHAOTIC
83. Cheap, as housing : LOW-RENT
84. Trim : EDGING
85. Time's second African-American Person of the Year : OBAMA
86. Primates with tails : LEMURS
87. Scold : REBUKE
88. Mark of a rifle's laser sight : RED DOT
91. Conductor Kurt : MASUR
92. Present-day personality? : SANTA
93. Alfalfa's love in "The Little Rascals" : DARLA
95. Mother of Castor and Pollux : LEDA
97. Gaelic ground : EIRE
98. Principal : MAIN
100. Word missing twice in the Beatles' "___ Said ___ Said" : SHE
101. One on foot, informally : PED
103. Verizon forerunner : GTE

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

2 comments :

Anonymous said...

Hi,

I don't understand and you didn't explain #93 across "dawg". Is it a slang term?

travhaus@aol.com

Bill Butler said...

Yes, I probably should expanded on that one. I have a tendency to skip over slang terms (probably because they irritate me!).

"Homey" and "dawg" (from "dog") are slang terms for "friend".

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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