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Greetings from Mammoth Lakes, California

My wife and I are on vacation until Friday, July 25th; a road trip through the backroads of the states east of California. I anticipate late-night solving and posting, with acknowledgement of comments and emails suffering. Please, don't be offended at my silence as I prioritize the writing of posts! Today's hike was in Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest where we passed a tree over 4,750 years old. Getting close to home ...

Bill

0324-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 24 Mar 13, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Schoenholz
THEME: You’ll Know it When You See It … each of today’s themed answers is itself an answer, a famous response the question “What is art?”
67A. Classic question answered six times in this puzzle : WHAT IS ART?

24A. Answer to 67-Across, per John F. Kennedy : THE GREAT DEMOCRAT
32A. Answer to 67-Across, per Yeats : BUT A VISION OF REALITY
49A. Answer to 67-Across, per Malraux : A REVOLT AGAINST FATE
88A. Answer to 67-Across, per Beethoven : SELFISH AND PERVERSE
107A. Answer to 67-Across, per Nietzsche : THE PROPER TASK OF LIFE
116A. Answer to 67-Across, per Emerson : A JEALOUS MISTRESS
COMPLETION TIME: 37m 28s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … NOVO (Nuvo), TROTH (truth!!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Tolstoy and O'Neill heroines : ANNAS
I have to admit to not having read Tolstoy's novel "Anna Karenina", but I did see the excellent 1977 British television adaptation starring Nicola Pagett. Most regard the 1935 film starring Greta Garbo in the title role as the definitive big screen adaptation of the novel. I also went to see the 2012 version starring Keira Knightley. I went with some trepidation as I've been to a couple of Tom Stoppard plays and hated them. Sure enough, this Tom Stoppard screenplay irritated me and ruined the story for me. However, the cinematography was sensational, with beautiful and vibrant images from start to finish …

Eugene O'Neill won a Pulitzer for his play "Anna Christie".

The playwright Eugene O’Neill was born in a New York City hotel room in what is now called Times Square, in 1888. That building no longer exists and there is a Starbucks on the site today, but you can go take a look at the commemorative plaque at the Northeast corner of 43rd and Broadway. O’Neill died in 1953, in room 401 of the Sheraton Hotel on Bay State Road in Boston. His last words were, “I knew it. I knew it. Born in a hotel room, and God damn it, died in a hotel room."

10. Original state of the universe, in myth : CHAOS
In Greek mythology, Chaos was the first of the primeval gods born at the creation of the universe. Following Chaos came:
- Gaia, the primordial goddess of the Earth
- Tartaros, the primordial god of the Underworld
- Eros, the primordial god of Love
- Nyx, the primordial goddess of the Night
- Erebus, the primordial god of Darkness
- Aither, the primordial god of Light
- Hemera, the primordial goddess of the Day

15. When Macbeth dies : ACT V
There is a superstition in the theatrical world that uttering the name “Macbeth” in a theater will bring disaster of some sort. To avoid this, the euphemism “the Scottish Play” is used instead.

19. Baja vacation spot, familiarly : CABO
Cabo San Lucas is a major tourist destination at the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula in Mexico. “Cabo” is sometimes referred to as the “Fort Lauderdale of Mexico”.

20. Vessel opener : STENT
In the world of medicine and surgery, a stent is an artificial tube inserted inside a vessel in the body, say an artery, so that it reduces the effects of a local restriction in the body's conduit.

21. Islamic denomination : SUNNI
The Islamic sects of Sunni and Shia Muslims differ in the belief of who should have taken over leadership of the Muslim faithful after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Followers of the Sunni tradition agree with the decision that the Prophet Muhammad’s confidante Abu Bakr was the right choice to become the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. Followers of the Shia tradition believe that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet Muhammad’s own family.

24. Answer to 67-Across, per John F. Kennedy : THE GREAT DEMOCRAT
President John F. Kennedy said:
Art is the great democrat, calling forth creative genius from every sector of society, disregarding race or religion or wealth or color.

27. Spam, e.g. : BOTHER
Apparently the term "SPAM", used for unwanted email, is taken from a "Monty Python" sketch. In the sketch (which I've seen) the dialog is taken over by the word SPAM, a play on the glut of canned meat in the markets of Britain after WWII. So "SPAM" is used for the glut of emails that takes over online communication. I can just imagine nerdy Internet types (like me) adopting something from a "Monty Python" sketch to describe an online phenomenon ...

29. New Look designer : DIOR
Christian Dior was a French fashion designer. As WWII approached, Dior was called up by the French military, imposing a temporary halt to his career in fashion. He left the army in 1942 and for the duration of the war designed clothes for wives of Nazi officers and French collaborators. After the war his designs became so popular that he helped reestablish Paris as the fashion center of the world.

31. Real estate abbr. : RMS
Rooms (rms.)

32. Answer to 67-Across, per Yeats : BUT A VISION OF REALITY
Irish poet and dramatist William Butler Yeats won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1923 for "inspired poetry" that gave "expression to a whole nation". Yeats was Ireland's first Nobel laureate.

37. One of over 100 on a table : ELEMENT
Dmitri Mendeleev was a Russian chemist. When Mendeleev classified elements according to their chemical properties, he noticed patterns and was able to group elements into his famous 1869 Periodic Table. So powerful was his table that he actually predicted the properties of some elements that had not even been discovered in 1869. Element number 101 is mendelevium and was named after Mendeleev.

38. River of Phoenix : GILA
The Gila River is a tributary of the Colorado and flows through New Mexico and Arizona. From 1848 to 1853 the Gila marked part of the border between the US and Mexico.

46. Water-into-wine site : CANA
According to the Christian Bible, Cana is the place where Jesus performed his first public miracle. Jesus was attending a wedding feast with his mother when the party ran out of wine. Jesus turned water into wine, wine that was judged to be the best served at the feast.

48. "Star Wars" biped : EWOK
The Ewoks are creatures who live on the moon of Endor, first appearing in "Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi". They're the cute and cuddly little guys that look like teddy bears.

49. Answer to 67-Across, per Malraux : A REVOLT AGAINST FATE
André Malraux was a French author. Malraux fought extensively during WWII, and after the war was made Minister for Information by President Charles de Gaulle.

60. 1994 film based on an "S.N.L." skit : IT'S PAT
The androgynous character known as “Pat” on “Saturday Night Live” was played by the comedienne Julia Sweeney. Pat appeared in a 1994 movie called “It’s Pat”, which is one of the worst films of all time, I am told ...

61. Porto-___ (capital of Benin) : NOVO
Porto-Novo is the capital city of Benin in West Africa. Porto-Novo may be the capital of the country but it isn’t the biggest city, and it isn’t even the most economically important. That honor goes to the city of Cotonou.

80. Fiver : ABE
The US five-dollar bill is often called an “Abe”, as President Lincoln’s portrait is on the front. An Abe is also referred to as a “fin”, a term that has been used for a five-pound note in Britain since 1868.

83. KNO3, in Britain : NITRE
The chemical name for saltpeter (also called “niter”) is potassium nitrate. The exact origin of the name "saltpeter" isn't clear, but it may have come from the Latin "sal petrae" meaning "stone salt". The main use for potassium nitrate is as a fertilizer, a source of potassium and nitrogen. As it is a powerful oxidizing agent, it is also used in amateur rocket propellants. Anyone who has ignited one of those "engines" would have noticed the lilac-colored flame, indicating the presence of potassium.

88. Answer to 67-Across, per Beethoven : SELFISH AND PERVERSE
The great composer Ludwig van Beethoven said:
The world is a king, and like a king, desires flattery in return for favor; but true art is selfish and perverse — it will not submit to the mold of flattery.

92. "___ Said" (Neil Diamond hit) : I AM... I
“I Am... I Said” is a song written and performed by Neil Diamond, first released in 1971. “I Am... I Said” earned Diamond his first ever Grammy nomination.

I saw Neil Diamond in concert about 15 years ago, and I must say he does put on a great show. His voice is cracking a bit, but that didn't seem to spoil anyone's enjoyment. I've also seen Diamond interviewed a few times on television, and I wouldn't say he has the most scintillating of personalities.

93. Pop singer Brickell : EDIE
Edie Brickell is a singer-songwriter from Dallas, Texas. Brickell has been married to fellow singer Paul Simon since 1991.

94. Cutty ___ (clipper ship) : SARK
A clipper was a sailing ship, commonly crossing the seas in the 19th century. Clippers were built for speed, so were narrow and had less room for carrying freight than many vessels used in trade. They were developed largely due to the demand for speedy delivery of fresh tea from China to Europe. The name comes from the term "to clip" meaning to move swiftly (as in "at a clip"). Perhaps the most famous clipper ship is the Cutty Sark built in 1869, the last clipper to be built as a merchant vessel. The Cutty Sark owes her fame to the fact that she is on display as a museum ship in a dry dock in Greenwich in London.

102. Some, in Sevilla : UNAS
The city of Seville is the capital of Andalusia in southern Spain. Seville is a favored setting for many operas including "The Barber of Seville" by Rossini, "Fidelio" by Beethoven and Mozart's "Don Giovanni" and "The Marriage of Figaro".

107. Answer to 67-Across, per Nietzsche : THE PROPER TASK OF LIFE
Friedrich Nietzsche was a German philosopher. Not my cup of tea ...

114. Property encumbrance : LIEN
A lien is the right that one has to retain or secure someone's property until a debt is paid.

116. Answer to 67-Across, per Emerson : A JEALOUS MISTRESS
The American essayist Ralph Waldo Emerson said:
Art is a jealous mistress, and if a man have a genius for painting, poetry, music, architecture or philosophy, he makes a bad husband and an ill provider, and should be wise in season and not fetter himself with duties which will embitter his days and spoil him for his proper work.

122. Iona College athlete : GAEL
Iona College is a Roman Catholic school run by Christian Brothers in New Rochelle, New York.

124. Whoopi's role in "The Color Purple" : CELIE
Whoopi Goldberg played Celie Harris Johnson in Steven Spielberg's "The Color Purple", the 1985 screen adaptation of the novel of the same name by Alice Walker.

125. Rock and Roll Hall-of-Famer James : ETTA
Etta James was best known for her beautiful rendition of the song "At Last". Sadly, as she disclosed in her autobiography, James lived a life that was ravaged by drug addiction leading to numerous legal and health problems. Ms. James passed away in January 2012 having suffered from leukemia.

Down
1. Crossed a picket line : SCABBED
We first started calling strikebreakers "scabs" in the early 1800s, and before that a scab was a person who refused to join a trade union (back as early 1777). The word probably comes from the use of "scab" as a skin disease, and so is a term that is meant to insult.

2. Mediterranean salad with bulgur wheat, chopped tomatoes and parsley : TABOULI
Tabouleh is one my my favorite dishes. It is usually made from bulgur, tomato, cucumber, parsley, mint, onion, garlic, olive oil and lemon juice. Just writing that list of ingredients gets my mouth watering …

3. Gave a hand where one shouldn't? : ABETTED
The word "abet" comes into English from the Old French "abeter" meaning "to bait" or "to harass with dogs" (it literally means "to make bite"). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of "abet" meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

4. Hillary, once : RODHAM
HIllary Rodham was born in Chicago, Illinois to Hugh Rodham (a businessman in the textile industry) and Dorothy Howell (a homemaker). Hillary was raised in a conservative home, and she campaigned for Republican candidate Barry Goldwater in the 1964 US presidential election. The following year, she served as president of the Young Republicans at Wellesley College. Our former First Lady left the Republican Party for good expressing disappointment at what she witnessed at the 1968 Republican National Convention in Miami, citing “veiled” racist messages prevalent at that time.

8. Hospital procedure, for short : ANGIO
Angioplasty is a mechanical widening of a narrowed artery. In the surgical procedure, a balloon catheter is inflated at the point of the obstruction to open up the artery. A stent may then be inserted to make sure the vessel remains open.

10. Davis's domain: Abbr. : CSA
The Confederate States of America (CSA) set up government in 1861 just before Abraham Lincoln took office. Jefferson Davis was selected as President of the CSA at its formation and retained the post for the life of the government.

12. Composer Previn : ANDRE
André Previn is pianist, conductor and composer who was born in Berlin, Germany but who grew up in Los Angeles. Previn has won four Oscars for his work on the musical scores of “Gigi” (1958), “Porgy & Bess” (1959), “Irma la Douce” (1963) and “My Fair Lady” (1964). Previn was married five time, most famously probably to actress Mia Farrow.

13. Like most Bluetooth headsets : ONE-EAR
Bluetooth is a standard for wireless technology that was introduced by Swedish telecom vendor Ericsson in 1994. The name was chosen in honor of Harald Bluetooth, a medieval King of Denmark and Norway. Harald is said to have earned his name because of his love of blueberries, which stained his teeth. Harald was said to have a gift for convincing diverse factions to talk to one another, so Ericsson’s communication protocol was given Harald’s name.

18. Some November paraders, for short : VETS
Veterans Day used to be known as Armistice Day, and is observed on November 11th each year. This particular date was chosen as the Armistice that ended WWI was signed on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918.

25. 1804 symphony that includes a funeral march : EROICA
Beethoven originally dedicated his Symphony No. 3 to Napoleon Bonaparte. Beethoven admired the principles of the French Revolution and as such respected Bonaparte who was "born" out of the uprising. When Napoleon declared himself Emperor, Beethoven (and much of Europe) saw this as a betrayal to the ideals of the revolution so he changed the name of his new symphony from "Bonaparte" to "Eroica", meaning "heroic" or "valiant".

28. Notable mother of estranged brothers : EVE
Adam and Eve’s children were Cain and Abel, two estranged brothers …

33. Barrel part : STAVE
The word "stave" was originally the plural of "staff", a wooden rod. To "stave off" originated with the concept of holding off with a staff. In the world of barrel-making, a stave is a narrow strip of wood that forms part of a barrel’s sides.

36. Not kosher : TREF
According to Jewish dietary law, "kosher" food is "fit" to eat, and food that is not kosher is called "treif" (or tref).

40. ___ d'Ivoire : COTE
The Republic of Côte d'Ivoire is located in West Africa on the Gulf of Guinea. The country is often, mistakenly, referred to as the Ivory Coast, the direct translation from the French. The official language of the country is French, as for many years it was a French colony.

41. Squeezes (out) : EKES
To "eke out" means to "make something go further or last longer". For example, you could eke out your income by cutting back on expenses. I always have a problem with the commonly cited definition of “eke out” as “barely get by”. Close but no cigar, I say ...

44. U.S.S.R. part: Abbr. : SOV
The former Soviet Union (USSR) was created in 1922, not long after the Russian Revolution of 1917 that overthrew the Tsar. Geographically, the new Soviet Union was roughly equivalent to the old Russian Empire, and was comprised of fifteen Soviet Socialist Republics (SSRs).

45. Legislative assemblies : PLENA
"Plenum" is the name given to a complete legislative assembly under the parliamentary system, with the associated term of "quorum" being the minimum number of members required to be present to conduct business.

47. NBC vis-à-vis "Meet the Press" : AIRER
NBC’s news/interview show “Meet the Press” was first aired in 1947. That’s a long time ago, and so “Meet the Press” is the longest-running television series in US broadcasting history.

50. Narrow inlet : RIA
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

51. Fidelity : TROTH
There's a phrase used in some traditional wedding vows that goes "... and thereto I plight thee my troth". "I plight" is an obsolete way of saying "I pledge". "Troth" is an old variant of the word truth, and meant "truth" but also "loyalty". So, "I plight thee my troth" means, "I promise to be loyal to you". I am sure all of us who uttered those words knew what we were saying ...

54. Dungeons & Dragons co. : TSR
Dungeons & Dragons is a complex role-playing game first published in 1974, by Tactical Studies Rules Incorporated (TSR). Dungeons & Dragons was probably the first of the modern role-playing games to be developed, and the most successful. It is still played by lots of people today, including my nerdy son ...

55. Director Wenders : WIM
Wim Wenders is a German movie director and producer. Wenders has served as the president of the European Film Academy in Berlin since 1996.

57. W.W. II transport: Abbr. : LST
LST stands for Landing Ship, Tank. LSTs were the large vessels used mainly in WWII that had doors at either ends through which tanks and other vehicles could roll off and onto beaches. The design concept persists to this day in the huge fleet of commercial roll-on/roll-off car ferries, all inspired by the LST.

63. Traditional enemies of the Kiowa : OSAGE
The Osage Nation originated in the Ohio River valley in what we now call Kentucky. They were forced to migrate west of the Mississippi by the invading Iroquois tribe. Most of the tribe members now live in Osage County, Oklahoma.

The Kiowa Native American tribe are presently located in Southwestern Oklahoma, but originated in the Northern Plains. Back in 1790, the Kiowa made peace with the Comanche people, and entered into a pact of mutual cooperation that benefited both tribes. They made that pact in a place that today we call Las Vegas, Nevada.

65. Like good water for snorkeling : AZURE
The word "azure" came into English from Persian via Old French. The French word "l'azur" was taken from the Persian name for a place in northeastern Afghanistan called "Lazhward" which was the main source of the semi-precious stone lapis lazuli. The stone has a vivid blue color, and "azure" has been describing this color since the 14th century.

68. Greek goddesses of the seasons : HORAE
The Horae of Greek mythology were the goddesses of the seasons. There were several Horae, many of them associated with natural portions of time. There were ten (later twelve) Horae, or “Hours”, associated with the times of the day. For example, Auge was the goddess of first light, Gymnastika was the goddess of the morning hour for exercise, and Dysis was the goddess of sunset.

71. Fancy tie : OBI
The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied in what is called a butterfly knot.

72. Christiansen who founded Lego : OLE
Lego is manufactured by Lego Group, a privately held company headquartered in Billund, Denmark. The company was founded by a carpenter called Ole Kirk Christiansen in 1934 and the now-famous plastic interlocking blocks were introduced in 1949. The blocks were originally sold under the name "Automatic Binding Bricks" but I think "Lego" is easier to remember! The name "Lego" comes from the Danish term "leg godt" meaning "play well".

75. Lead-in to -tard : UNI-
A unitard is like a leotard, except that it has long legs and sometime long sleeves. It wouldn’t be a good look for me ...

76. Slam : DIS
“Dis” is a slang term meaning “insult” that originated in the eighties, and is a shortened form of "disrespect” or "dismiss".

81. Bridges of note : BEAU
The actor Beau Bridges is the son of actor Lloyd Bridges, and brother of actor Jeff Bridges. Beau’s best-known role is perhaps for playing one of “The Fabulous Bakker Boys” alongside brother Jeff.

82. Nightmarish thoroughfare? : ELM STREET
“A Nightmare on Elm Street” is a Wes Craven slasher-horror film, released in 1984. As I don’t do “slasher” nor “horror” I only learned recently that Johnny Depp was in the movie, making his feature film debut.

86. Tellico Dam agcy. : TVA
The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has to be one of America's great success stories when it comes to economic development. Created in 1933, the TVA spearheaded economic development in the Tennessee Valley at the height of the Great Depression. Central to the success was the federally-funded construction of flood-control and electricity-generation facilities.

Tellico Dam is located on the Little Tennessee River, and forms the Tellico Reservoir.

87. Pfizer competitor : MERCK
Merck & Co., Inc. is a US company, once a subsidiary of the German company known today as Merck KGaA. The US subsidiary of the German firm was confiscated in 1917 during WWI, and set up as a an independent company that grew into the giant it is today.

97. Certain Ukrainian : ODESSAN
The city of Odessa in Ukraine was founded relatively recently, in 1794 by Catherine the Great. The city was originally meant to be called Odessos after an ancient Greek city believed to have been located nearby. Catherine liked the way the locals pronounced the name as "Odessa" and so went with the less Greek-sounding name.

99. Carillon sound : PEAL
A carillon is musical instrument usually found in a belfry. A carillon is a collection of bells that is connected to a keyboard.

106. Wheat protein : GLUTEN
Gluten is a protein mixture found in foods processed mainly from wheat. The sticky properties of gluten are used in making bread, giving dough its elasticity and making the final product very chewy. “Gluten” is the Latin word for “glue”.

108. Two-time Olympic ice-skating medalist Brian : ORSER
Brian Orser is a retired Canadian figure skater. Orser was one of the “combatants” in the Battle of the Brians, the name given to the rivalry between Brian Orser and US skater Brian Boitano.

109. Word on mail from Spain : AEREO
“Aereo” is the Spanish for “air”.

110. Angler's line : SNELL
A snell is a length of thin line that connects a fishhook to heavier line.

112. Prince in "Troilus and Cressida" : AJAX
William Shakespeare wrote his tragedy "Troilus and Cressida" in 1602. The play was inspired by "The Iliad", and is a retelling of events during the Trojan War leading up to the death of Hector.

117. Green and Gore : ALS
Al Green is a gospel and soul music singer. Green was born in Arkansas, where he started out as a gospel singer and moved into R&B. In 1974, he was assaulted by a girlfriend who burned him badly on much of his body by pouring boiling grits over him (and then she committed suicide). The incident changed Green's life and he turned to the church, becoming a pastor in Memphis in 1976. He continued to record music, but never really enjoyed the same success that he had in the early seventies with hits like "Let's Stay Together" and "I'm Still In Love With You".

Al Gore was born in Washington DC, the son of Al Gore, Sr., then a US Representative for the state of Tennessee. After deferring his military service in order to attend Harvard, the younger Gore became eligible for the draft on graduation. Many of his classmates found ways of avoiding the draft, but Gore decided to serve and even took the "tougher" option of joining the army as an enlisted man. Actor Tommy Lee Jones shared a house with Gore in college and says that his buddy told him that even if he could find a way around the draft, someone with less options than him would have to go in his place and that was just wrong.

119. Returns letters? : IRS
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) was set up during the Civil War to raise money to cover war expenses. Prior to the introduction of income tax in 1862, the government was funded by levies on trade and property.

120. German pronoun : SIE
"Sprechen Sie Deutsch?" is the German for "Do you speak German?"

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Map symbol : STAR
5. Tolstoy and O'Neill heroines : ANNAS
10. Original state of the universe, in myth : CHAOS
15. When Macbeth dies : ACT V
19. Baja vacation spot, familiarly : CABO
20. Vessel opener : STENT
21. Islamic denomination : SUNNI
22. Expose : BARE
23. Lying, maybe : ABED
24. Answer to 67-Across, per John F. Kennedy : THE GREAT DEMOCRAT
27. Spam, e.g. : BOTHER
29. New Look designer : DIOR
30. Pull (in) : REIN
31. Real estate abbr. : RMS
32. Answer to 67-Across, per Yeats : BUT A VISION OF REALITY
37. One of over 100 on a table : ELEMENT
38. River of Phoenix : GILA
39. Go back over : RETRACE
42. Accomplished : DID
43. [Shocking!] : [GASP!]
46. Water-into-wine site : CANA
48. "Star Wars" biped : EWOK
49. Answer to 67-Across, per Malraux : A REVOLT AGAINST FATE
55. Indignant reply : WELL I NEVER!
58. Oranges and lemons : TREES
59. Cry with a fist pump : YES
60. 1994 film based on an "S.N.L." skit : IT'S PAT
61. Porto-___ (capital of Benin) : NOVO
64. Terrestrial opening? : EXTRA-
66. What's nothing but problems? : MATH
67. Classic question answered six times in this puzzle : WHAT IS ART?
70. Camera shop item, informally : ZOOM
74. Certain feed : AUDIO
77. Rustbucket : HEAP
78. Stiff drink, maybe : DOUBLE
80. Fiver : ABE
83. KNO3, in Britain : NITRE
85. End an engagement? : GET MARRIED
88. Answer to 67-Across, per Beethoven : SELFISH AND PERVERSE
92. "___ Said" (Neil Diamond hit) : I AM... I
93. Pop singer Brickell : EDIE
94. Cutty ___ (clipper ship) : SARK
95. Kerfuffle : ADO
98. Particular sort : FUSSPOT
102. Some, in Sevilla : UNAS
104. Moved along, as an old train : CHUGGED
107. Answer to 67-Across, per Nietzsche : THE PROPER TASK OF LIFE
111. See 111-Down : WAR
113. On ___ with : A PAR
114. Property encumbrance : LIEN
115. Courses : ROUTES
116. Answer to 67-Across, per Emerson : A JEALOUS MISTRESS
121. Besmirches : TARS
122. Iona College athlete : GAEL
123. Defame : SMEAR
124. Whoopi's role in "The Color Purple" : CELIE
125. Rock and Roll Hall-of-Famer James : ETTA
126. Office nos. : EXTS
127. Pulls in : EARNS
128. What darners darn : HOLES
129. Like many highlighter colors : NEON

Down
1. Crossed a picket line : SCABBED
2. Mediterranean salad with bulgur wheat, chopped tomatoes and parsley : TABOULI
3. Gave a hand where one shouldn't? : ABETTED
4. Hillary, once : RODHAM
5. Harsh : ASTRINGENT
6. Advanced degree? : NTH
7. "___ say more?" : NEED I
8. Hospital procedure, for short : ANGIO
9. Undiluted : STRONG
10. Davis's domain: Abbr. : CSA
11. Hardly a mansion : HUT
12. Composer Previn : ANDRE
13. Like most Bluetooth headsets : ONE-EAR
14. As easy as pie, say : SIMILE
15. As easy as ___ : ABC
16. Haul off : CARRY AWAY
17. Chairlift alternative : TRAM
18. Some November paraders, for short : VETS
25. 1804 symphony that includes a funeral march : EROICA
26. "Get ___!" : ON IT
28. Notable mother of estranged brothers : EVE
33. Barrel part : STAVE
34. Wane : FLAG
35. Barreled toward : RAN AT
36. Not kosher : TREF
40. ___ d'Ivoire : COTE
41. Squeezes (out) : EKES
44. U.S.S.R. part: Abbr. : SOV
45. Legislative assemblies : PLENA
47. NBC vis-à-vis "Meet the Press" : AIRER
49. Greek vowel : ALPHA
50. Narrow inlet : RIA
51. Fidelity : TROTH
52. Service call? : NEXT!
53. Match part : SET
54. Dungeons & Dragons co. : TSR
55. Director Wenders : WIM
56. Greek vowel : ETA
57. W.W. II transport: Abbr. : LST
62. Compete : VIE
63. Traditional enemies of the Kiowa : OSAGE
65. Like good water for snorkeling : AZURE
67. Beside : WITH
68. Greek goddesses of the seasons : HORAE
69. Mimics : APERS
71. Fancy tie : OBI
72. Christiansen who founded Lego : OLE
73. What a dispensary dispenses, for short : MED
75. Lead-in to -tard : UNI-
76. Slam : DIS
78. Those not favored : DARK HORSES
79. Hosp. areas : ORS
80. "Yeah, right!" : AS IF
81. Bridges of note : BEAU
82. Nightmarish thoroughfare? : ELM STREET
84. Reach, with "at" : END UP
86. Tellico Dam agcy. : TVA
87. Pfizer competitor : MERCK
89. Menu heading : FISH
90. Eat by candlelight, say : DINE
91. Necklace makeup, maybe : PEARLS
95. Roil : AGITATE
96. Not challenge : DEFER TO
97. Certain Ukrainian : ODESSAN
99. Carillon sound : PEAL
100. Challenge : OPPOSE
101. Big shock : TRAUMA
103. Funny sort : STITCH
105. Sky light, for short? : UFO
106. Wheat protein : GLUTEN
108. Two-time Olympic ice-skating medalist Brian : ORSER
109. Word on mail from Spain : AEREO
110. Angler's line : SNELL
111. With 111-Across, do battle : WAGE
112. Prince in "Troilus and Cressida" : AJAX
117. Green and Gore : ALS
118. "Golly gee!" : MAN
119. Returns letters? : IRS
120. German pronoun : SIE


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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