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Vacation Alert

I am currently on vacation in Ireland, returning on October 9th. I am hoping to complete a blog post each evening, even if it is only the basics (solved grid and clues, plus explanation of theme). I apologize in advance if I am late in posting.

Bill

0526-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 May 13, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Joon Pahk & Jeremy Horwitz
THEME: Made-For-TV Movies … each of today’s themed answers is a melding of the titles of a TV show and a movie:
23A. TV movie about ... where I can easily get a cab? : TAXI STAND BY ME (“Taxi” & “Stand by Me”)
30A. ... where to go in Togo? : OUTHOUSE OF AFRICA (“House” & “Out of Africa”)
47A. ... a Hispanic "hip hip hooray"? : THREE CHEERS, AMIGOS (“Cheers” & “Three Amigos”)
62A. ... trying to get a friar to violate his vow of silence? : SAY ANYTHING, MONK (“Monk” & “Say Anything”)
83A. ... a singing group that meets for bacon and eggs? : BREAKFAST GLEE CLUB (“Glee” & “[The] Breakfast Club”)
97A. ... Skywalker's trendy hygiene products? : COOL HAND SOAP, LUKE (“Soap” & “Cool Hand Luke”)
111A. ... giving a pipsqueak the brush-off? : GET LOST, SHORTY (“Lost” & “Get Shorty”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: Not recorded
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. Baroque French dance : GAVOTTE
The gavotte was originally a folk dance that came from southeastern France where it was was named for the Gavot people who performed the dance. The gavotte became more mainstream in the Baroque period in the French court and so composers such as Johann Sebastian Bach began including gavottes in their instrumental suites.

22. Alma mater of Eli Manning : OLE MISS
Ole Miss is the nickname for the University of Mississippi. The name "Ole Miss" dates back to 1897, the first year a student yearbook was published. The graduating class held a competition to name the yearbook and "Ole Miss" emerged as the winner. The name stuck to the yearbook, and also as a nickname for the school itself.

Eli Manning plays as quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning is quarterback for the Denver Broncos. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, and Archie as also a successful NFL quarterback.

23. TV movie about ... where I can easily get a cab? : TAXI STAND BY ME (“Taxi” & “Stand by Me”)
“Taxi” is a sitcom that aired in the late seventies and early eighties. “Taxi” was the big break for a host of great comic actors including Judd Hirsch, Jeff Conaway, Danny DeVito, Marilu Henner, Tony Danza, Christopher Lloyd and Andy Kaufman.

“Stand by Me” is 1986 film directed by Rob Reiner that is based on a Stephen King novella called “The Body”. The title of the movie comes from the wonderful Ben E. King song of the same name.

27. Kind of pressure involved in water filtration : OSMOTIC
Osmosis is the movement of a solvent (often just water) across a semipermeable membrane. In the process of osmosis, the solvent tends to flow from an area of less concentration to an area of higher concentration. This sense of "absorbing" water effortlessly gives rise to the expression "learning by osmosis".

29. French word with two accents : ETE
One might spend the summer (été) under the sun (le soleil) in France.

30. ... where to go in Togo? : OUTHOUSE OF AFRICA (“House” & “Out of Africa”)
I think that “House” is one of the best shows made by Fox television. It is fun for me to see English actor Hugh Laurie in the title role as coming from the other side of the Atlantic I have been watching him in various comedic roles for decades. Famously he played Bertie Wooster opposite Stephen Fry in P.G. Wodehouse’s “Jeeves & Wooster”, as well as one of the bumbling “bad guys” in “101 Dalmatians” (the version starring Glenn Close).

“Out of Africa” is a Sydney Pollack film released in 1985, starring Robert Redford and Meryl Streep. The storyline is based on the autobiographical book of the same name by Karen Blixen (written under the pen name Isak Dinesen).

Togo is a country on the West African coast, located between Ghana to the west and Benin to the east.

40. Arriviste : UPSTART
An arriviste is a pushy, ambitious person. The word "arriviste" is French, from the verb "arriver" meaning "to arrive". The idea is that an arriviste is an upstart, someone intent on "arriving" in society.

41. Greek vowels : IOTAS
Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet. We use the word "iota" to portray something very small as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

42. Network with the slogan "Not Reality. Actuality" : TRUTV
truTV is a Turner Broadcasting cable network, launched in 1991 as Court TV. The name was changed to truTV in 2008.

44. "Me and Bobby ___" (posthumous Janis Joplin #1) : MCGEE
Janis Joplin recorded the song “Me and Bobby McGee” just a few days before she died in 1970. The song was released anyway, and it became Joplin’s only number one single. There have been just two posthumous number one singles, Joplin's “Me and Bobby McGee”, and Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ on) the Dock of the Bay”.

47. ... a Hispanic "hip hip hooray"? : THREE CHEERS, AMIGOS (“Cheers” & “Three Amigos”)
The wonderful sitcom "Cheers" ran for eleven seasons on NBC, from 1982 to 1993. "Cheers" spawned an equally successful spin-off show called "Frasier", which also ran for eleven seasons and often featured guest appearances of characters from the original "Cheers". The Cheers bar was styled on the Bull & Finch Pub in Boston (in which I've had a pint of Guinness two!). The owner of the Bill & Finch cleverly agreed to the initial interior and exterior shots, charging only one dollar. Since then he has made millions from selling "Cheers" memorabilia, and also from increased trade.

“Three Amigos” is a 1986 comedy film starring Steve Martin, Chevy Chase and Martin Short as three silent movie stars who are mistaken for real western heroes by a Mexican village, a parody on the storylines in “Seven Samurai” and “The Magnificent Seven”.

53. Cousin ___ : ITT
In the television sitcom "The Addams Family", the family had a frequent visitor called Cousin Itt. Itt is a short man with long hair that runs from his head to the floor. Cousin Itt was played by Italian actor Felix Silla.

54. Nikkei unit : YEN
The Nikkei is a stock market index for the Tokyo Stock Exchange that has been published by the “Nikkei” newspaper since 1950.

57. Janis's cartoon husband : ARLO
The comic strip "Arlo and Janis" is written by Jimmy Johnson. It was first published in 1985. The lead characters are named after the musicians Arlo Guthrie and Janis Joplin.

58. NBC newsman Holt : LESTER
Lester Holt is a television journalist. Holt is anchor for the weekend editions of the shows “Today” and “Nightly News” on NBC.

61. Specter of the Senate, once : ARLEN
Arlen Specter was the US Senator for Pennsylvania, famous for switching from the Republican to the Democratic Party in 2009. In 2010 he lost the Democratic primary and his seat went to Pat Toomey, a Republican. Spector developed a reputation for himself of being hard to work with over the years, earning the nickname "Snarlin' Arlen".

62. ... trying to get a friar to violate his vow of silence? : SAY ANYTHING, MONK (“Monk” & “Say Anything”)
“Monk” is a comedy cop show in which the title character is an ex-San Francisco Police Department detective who is recovering from a nervous breakdown.

“Say Anything...” is a much-respected 1989 film high-school romantic comedy/drama film starring John Cusack and Ione Skye.

68. Trade talk : ARGOT
"Argot" is a French term, the name given in the 17th century to "the jargon of the Paris underworld". Nowadays argot is the set of idioms used by any particular group, the "lingo" of that group.

72. Farfalle and orzo : PASTAS
“Farfalle” is commonly referred to as “bow-tie pasta”. The name comes from the Italian “farfalla” meaning “butterfly”.

Orzo is pasta that has been formed into granular shapes, much like barley. And indeed, "orzo" is the Italian word for "barley".

76. Old French line : ROIS
There was a line of kings (rois) in France.

77. Comment that might get the response "de rien" : MERCI
"Rien" is the French word for "nothing". "De rien" translates literally from the French as "of nothing", and is used to mean "you're welcome" or "don't mention it". The Spanish have the same expression "de nada", also translating to "of nothing" and used the same way.

82. Livy's "I love" : AMO
Titus Livius (aka Livy) was a Roman historian who lived from 59 BC to AD 17. Livy wrote the definitive history of Rome at that time.

83. ... a singing group that meets for bacon and eggs? : BREAKFAST GLEE CLUB (“Glee” & “[The] Breakfast Club”)
A glee club is a choir group, usually of males, that sings short songs known as “glees”. A glee is a song scored for three or more voices that is performed unaccompanied.

The TV show called "Glee" has proven to be very popular. The storyline focuses on a high school glee club in Lima, Ohio.

“The Breakfast Club” is a fabulous teen drama film (a genre which I usually avoid like the plague) released in 1985. It is directed by John Hughes, and stars Judd Nelson, Emilio Estevez, Anthony Michael Hall, Molly Ringwald and Ally Sheedy as the students at a Saturday school detention class.

89. Russians, e.g. : SLAVS
The Slavic peoples are in the majority in communities covering over half of Europe. This large ethnic group is traditionally broken down into three smaller groups:
- the West Slavic (including Czechs and Poles)
- the East Slavic (including Russians and Ukrainians)
- the South Slavic (including Bulgarians and Serbs)

90. "Stoutly-built" Dickens villain : SIKES
Bill Sikes is the nasty criminal associate of Fagin in the Charles Dicken’s novel “Oliver Twist”.

"Oliver Twist" is of course a novel by Charles Dickens. It is a popular tale for adaptation to the big screen. There are two silent film versions, released in 1909 and 1922, and the first talkie version was released in 1933 with many to follow. The latest "Oliver" for the big screen is a 2005 Roman Polanski production.

91. Concave object of reflection? : INNIE
One might reflect on one’s navel or belly button, which might be an innie or an outie …

97. ... Skywalker's trendy hygiene products? : COOL HAND SOAP, LUKE (“Soap” & “Cool Hand Luke”)
“Soap” is a sitcom from the late seventies and early eighties that parodied daytime soap operas. At the time, “Soap” was quite a controversial show. It was condemned by several religious bodies for what were regarded as violent and perverted storylines.

“Cool Hand Luke” is a prison drama from 1967 starring Paul Newman in the title role. The film was an adaptation of Donn Pearce’s novel of the same name. One of the most quoted lines from any movie comes from “Cool Hand Luke”, namely: “What we’ve got here is a failure to communicate …”

101. Boxer, e.g., in brief : DEM
Barbara Boxer has been a US Senator representing California since 1993. When elected in 1992, she broke the record for the most popular votes in a US Senate election, receiving almost 7 million votes.

104. Drinks served in flutes : MIMOSAS
Where I come from, the cocktail known in North America as a mimosa is called a Buck's Fizz, named after the club where it was introduced in 1921. The mimosa came along a few years later, apparently first being served in the Paris Ritz. If you want to make a mimosa, it's a 50-50 mix of champagne and orange juice, and it is very tasty ...

105. Parliament constituent? : NICOTINE
The Parliament brand of cigarettes has been produced by Philip Morris, since 1931.

111. ... giving a pipsqueak the brush-off? : GET LOST, SHORTY (“Lost” & “Get Shorty”)
“Lost” is a television drama that ran for six seasons, finishing up in 2010. The show followed the adventures of survivors of a plane crash who get stranded on what seem to be a deserted tropical island. Things then get a bit weird, I hear. I didn’t watch “Lost”, but it seems to be one of those shows that folks really love or really hate …

“Get Shorty” is a 1995 crime-comedy with a great cast that includes John Travolta, Gene Hackman, Rene Russo and Danny DeVito. That said, the storyline is a little too zany for me so I didn’t really enjoy it …

115. Yasir Arafat, by birth : CAIRENE
Yasser (also Yasir) Arafat was born in Cairo in 1929, the son of two Palestinians and the second-youngest of seven children. Arafat was beaten by his father as a child and so did not have a good relationship with him. Arafat did not attend his father's funeral, nor did he visit his grave. The beatings were apparently administered because the young Arafat was repeatedly attending religious services in the Jewish quarter of Cairo. Arafat's explanation was that he wanted to "study the mentality" of the Jewish people.

117. Archbishop of Canterbury's headdress : MITRE
The Archbishop of Canterbury is the leader of the Church of England.

118. Fabulously rich ancient king : CROESUS
Croesus was the king of Lydia from 560 to 547 BC. He was noted for his fabulous wealth. As a result, the name “Croesus” entered the English language as a synonym for a wealthy man in expressions such as “rich as Croesus” and “richer than Croesus”.

119. White Castle offerings : SLIDERS
White Castle is a chain of fast food hamburger restaurants. White Castle is famous for its small hamburgers called “sliders”. From 1929, when the chain was founded, until 1941, sliders were sold for five cents. They go for something more like eighty cents these days, I am told ...

Down
4. Pennsylvania's Flagship City : ERIE
Erie is a city in the very north of Pennsylvania, right on the southern shore of Lake Erie. The city takes its name from the Erie Native American tribe that resided in the area.

5. Mtg. : SESS
A meeting (mtg.) is a session (sess.).

6. Whale of an exhibition : SHAMU
Shamu was the name of the third orca, or killer whale, ever to be featured in a public exhibition. Shamu starred in a popular SeaWorld show in San Diego in the sixties. After she died in 1971, her name lived on as the name "Shamu" is still used by SeaWorld for its killer whale shows. That original Shamu was retired after she grabbed and refused to let go of the leg of one of her trainers.

7. Miles Davis ___ (cool jazz group) : NONET
When Miles Davis introduced his nine-man group (nonet) in 1948, he chose a relatively unusual lineup that included a French horn and a tuba.

10. With 69-Down, 1990s-2000s sitcom star : RAY
(69. See 10-Down : ROMANO)
Ray Romano is a comic actor and standup comedian from Queens, New York. Romano is perhaps best-known as the star of the sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond”.

12. Santiago's milieu in a Hemingway novel : THE SEA
If you've read Ernest Hemingway's "The Old Man And The Sea" (probably first at school, like me) you'll likely remember it as a quick read as it is a novella, although it might be better described as a "long short story". It was first published in 1952, the last major work that Hemingway had published in his lifetime. That first publication was as a story in "Life Magazine", and it was such a hit that the magazine sold 5 million copies in the first two days. "The Old Man and the Sea" won a Pulitzer in 1952 and two years later the title was cited when Hemingway was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

14. Prince Valiant's love : ALETA
Aleta is the the wife of Prince Valiant in the long-running comic strip. Edward, Duke of Windsor, called the "Prince Valiant" comic strip the "greatest contribution to English Literature in the past one hundred years". I'm not so sure ...

16. Original opening to Homer's "Odyssey"? : OMICRON
The first letter in the “Odyssey”, if written in Greek, would by “omicron”. The name of the Greek letter “omicron” translates as “little O” (o-micron). This compares with the Greek letter “omega” which translates as “big O” (o-mega).

17. Hermano del padre o de la madre : TIO
In Spanish, an uncle (tio) is the brother of the father or the mother (hermano del padre o de la madre).

18. The Tigers of the Ohio Valley Conf. : TSU
The Tigers and Lady Tigers are the athletic teams of Tennessee State University (TSU) in Nashville.

19. Ogee's shape : ESS
An ogee is like an s-curve. Specifically it is a figure consisting of two arcs that curve in opposite directions (like an S) but both ends of the curve end up parallel to each other (which is not necessarily true for an S).

28. Neighbor of Alg. : MOR
The country of Morocco is located in North Africa, but lies just nine miles south of Spain. The two continents are separated by the Mediterranean Sea at the Straits of Gibraltar.

34. Nickname for Clara Bow : IT GIRL
Clara Bow was a fabulous star of silent film, with her most famous movie being "It" from 1927. Clara Bow's performance was so celebrated in the movie that she was forever to be known as the "It-girl". The term "it" was a euphemism for "sex appeal", and that is what Clara Bow was known to "exude". Bow applied her red lipstick in the shape of a heart, and women who copied this style were said to put on a "Clara Bow".

35. Jerseys and such : CATTLE
Jersey cattle were originally bred on the island of Jersey in the Channel Islands, off the coast of France. If you've seen Elsie the Cow, the mascot of Borden in the US, then you've seen a Jersey cow.

36. Actor Kutcher : ASHTON
Ashton Kutcher played the character Michael Kelso on Fox’s “That ‘70s Show”. Kelso was Kutcher’s breakthrough acting role. Kutcher is now appearing on the sitcom “Two and a Half Men”, having replaced the “disgraced” Charlie Sheen. In 2009, Kutcher became the first user on Twitter to get over 1 million followers. I wasn’t one of them ...

42. Texter's ta-ta : TTYL
Talk To You Later (TTYL)

43. Syngman of South Korea : RHEE
Syngman Rhee was born in Korea, but received much of his education in the US, including a Ph.D. from Princeton. The very much westernized Rhee returned to Korea in 1910, a Korea that by then had been annexed by Japan. Soon after he found himself President of a Provisional Government of Korea based in Shanghai, but was eventually ousted for misuse of power. After WWII, Rhee was installed as President, heavily backed by the United States. However, Rhee's rule proved to be more like tyranny and during the Korean War his relationship with the US Government became very strained. He stayed in power until 1960 when student revolts became popular enough to force him out of office. The CIA flew him out of the country and he went into exile in Hawaii, where a few years later he died of a stroke.

44. VHF unit : MHZ
Megahertz (MHz)

VHF radio frequencies are divided into a number of “channels” in the US. Channel 16 is reserved as the international distress, safety and calling channel. Someone wishing to communicate via VHF radio with another party uses channel 16 to make immediate contact and to determine which other channel the parties will use to continue the conversation. In other words, they use channel 16 as briefly as possible and then clear it for any potential emergency traffic.

45. Jobs's job, once : CEO
Steve Jobs certainly was a business icon in Silicon Valley. I don't think it is too surprising to learn that the brilliant Jobs didn't even finish his college education, dropping out of Reed College in Oregon after only one semester. Steve Jobs co-founded Apple in 1976, but in 1985 he was basically fired from his own company during the computer sales slump of the mid-eighties. Jobs then founded NeXT Computer, a company focused on supplying workstations to the higher education and business markets. Apple purchased NeXT in 1996, and that's how Jobs found himself back with his original company.

48. Grant for filmmaking? : CARY
Cary Grant was an actor from England who made it big, really big in Hollywood. “Cary Grant” is a stage name, chosen by Archibald Leach. There’s a great moment in the film “His Girl Friday” when Grant says the line “I never had so much fun since Archie Leach died”, an inside joke.

49. Start to matter? : ANTI-
In the world of particle physics, antimatter is made up of particles that have the same mass as particles of ordinary matter, but with the opposite charge and quantum spin. Mixing matter and antimatter causes the annihilation of both, with a release of energy equal to the mass of the particles according to Einstein’s equation E=mc2.

52. Hellhound of Norse mythology : GARM
In Norse mythology, Garmr (also “Garm”) is a blood-stained watchdog that is guarding Hel’s gate.

57. Torah holders : ARKS
The Torah ark is found in a synagogue, and is the ornamental container in which are stored the Torah scrolls.

59. General ___ chicken : TSO’S
General Tso's chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

61. Standard part of a limerick : ANAPEST
Anapest is the name given to a metrical foot in poetry, which has two short syllables followed by one long syllable. Indeed, the name "anapest" is a good example, when pronounced an-a-pest. Here is a better example of a verse using anapest, so let's all say it out loud together! "'Twas the night before Christmas and all through the house".

No one knows for sure how the verse known as a limerick got its name, although there does seem to be agreement that the name does indeed come from the city or county of Limerick in Ireland.

63. James who died three years before winning a Pulitzer : AGEE
James Agee was a noted American film critic and screenwriter. Agee wrote an autobiographical novel "A Death in the Family" that won him his Pulitzer in 1958, albeit posthumously. He was also one of the screenwriters for the 1951 classic movie “The African Queen”.

64. "A Doll's House" wife : NORA
"A Doll's House" is probably the most famous play by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. The play deals with the feminist awakening of the lead character, Nora Helmer. "A Doll's House" is sometimes referred to as the "first true feminist play".

66. Worker's weekend whoop : TGIF
"Thank God It's Friday" (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies.

67. Anthony's partner in radio : OPIE
“The Opie & Anthony Show” is a talk show broadcast on XM and Sirius satellite radio. Hosts of the show are Opie Hughes and Anthony Cumia. I’ve turned into a bit of grouch in my old age, and I must admit that I find broadcasts like “The Opie & Anthony Show” very puerile and offensive. Past features in the show include “Whip ‘em Out Wednesdays”, “Voyeur Bus” and “T&A with O&A”. You get the idea …

70. Day, to da Vinci : GIORNO
In Italian, an hour (ora) is 1/24 of a day (un giorno).

Leonardo da Vinci was perhaps the most diversely talented person who ever contributed to society. He was a gifted painter, sculptor, architect, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer and writer. Da Vinci’s mural “The Last Supper” is the most reproduced work of art in the world.

77. ___ Piggle-Wiggle (children's character) : MRS
“Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle” is a series of children’s book by Betty MacDonald. MacDonald also wrote a famous and humorous memoir called “The Egg and I” which described her adventures as a young wife on a chicken farm.

79. French high-speed rail inits. : TGV
The TGV is France’s high-speed rail service. The acronym “TGV” stands for “Train à Grande Vitesse” or “High-Speed Train”).

80. Literary inits. : RLS
Robert Louis Stevenson was a Scottish author, famous for his novels “Treasure Island”, “Kidnapped” and “The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde”.

83. Retro dos : BEEHIVES
That distinctive "beehive" hairstyle is also called a B-52, because the round beehive-shape also resembles the bulbous nose of a B-52 bomber! The style originated in 1958 and is credited to Margaret Vinci Heldt, the owner of a hair salon in downtown Chicago. I'm not a fan of the beehive, but I do have to say that Audrey Hepburn carried it off in "Breakfast at Tiffany's", as did Dusty Springfield in her heyday.

86. "Homeland" org. : CIA
“Homeland” is a psychological drama shown on Showtime about a CIA officer who is convinced that a certain US Marine is a threat to the security of the United States. The show is based on a series from Israeli television called “Hatufim” (Prisoners of War”). I’m going to have to check this one out ...

88. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Artis : GILMORE
Artis Gilmore is a former basketball player, who played in both the ABA and NBA. Gilmore is nicknamed "The A-Train".

92. Positive ends : ANODES
The two terminals of a battery are called the anode and the cathode. Electrons travel from the anode to the cathode creating an electric current.

93. '60s activist org. : SDS
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) was an activist group in the sixties. The SDS organized the largest student strike in the history of the United States on 26 April 1968, with about a million students staying away from class that day. The “Students for a Democratic Society” name was revived in 2006 with the foundation of a new US-based student organization with left wing beliefs. Today’s SDS was founded by a pair of high school students from Greenwich Village, New York.

94. Oklahoma Indians : OSAGES
The Osage Nation originated in the Ohio River valley in what we now call Kentucky. They were forced to migrate west of the Mississippi by the invading Iroquois tribe. Most of the tribe members now live in Osage County, Oklahoma.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Friends in a pub : MATES
6. Openly disdain : SNEER AT
13. Baroque French dance : GAVOTTE
20. Cognizant : AWARE
21. Relaxing soak : HOT BATH
22. Alma mater of Eli Manning : OLE MISS
23. TV movie about ... where I can easily get a cab? : TAXI STAND BY ME (“Taxi” & “Stand by Me”)
25. "I'm not kidding" : SERIOUS
26. Mind-numbing : TIRESOME
27. Kind of pressure involved in water filtration : OSMOTIC
29. French word with two accents : ETE
30. ... where to go in Togo? : OUTHOUSE OF AFRICA (“House” & “Out of Africa”)
37. Home run pace : TROT
40. Arriviste : UPSTART
41. Greek vowels : IOTAS
42. Network with the slogan "Not Reality. Actuality" : TRUTV
44. "Me and Bobby ___" (posthumous Janis Joplin #1) : MCGEE
46. Pants measure : LENGTH
47. ... a Hispanic "hip hip hooray"? : THREE CHEERS, AMIGOS (“Cheers” & “Three Amigos”)
53. Cousin ___ : ITT
54. Nikkei unit : YEN
55. Epitome of thinness : RAZOR
56. Greet silently : NOD AT
57. Janis's cartoon husband : ARLO
58. NBC newsman Holt : LESTER
60. Step : STAIR
61. Specter of the Senate, once : ARLEN
62. ... trying to get a friar to violate his vow of silence? : SAY ANYTHING, MONK (“Monk” & “Say Anything”)
68. Trade talk : ARGOT
71. Soak : GOUGE
72. Farfalle and orzo : PASTAS
76. Old French line : ROIS
77. Comment that might get the response "de rien" : MERCI
78. Follower of Las Vegas or New York : STRIP
81. Back : AGO
82. Livy's "I love" : AMO
83. ... a singing group that meets for bacon and eggs? : BREAKFAST GLEE CLUB (“Glee” & “[The] Breakfast Club”)
87. Bursts (in) : BARGES
89. Russians, e.g. : SLAVS
90. "Stoutly-built" Dickens villain : SIKES
91. Concave object of reflection? : INNIE
92. Not mixing well? : ASOCIAL
96. School orgs. : PTAS
97. ... Skywalker's trendy hygiene products? : COOL HAND SOAP, LUKE (“Soap” & “Cool Hand Luke”)
101. Boxer, e.g., in brief : DEM
104. Drinks served in flutes : MIMOSAS
105. Parliament constituent? : NICOTINE
108. "How touching" : I’M MOVED
111. ... giving a pipsqueak the brush-off? : GET LOST, SHORTY (“Lost” & “Get Shorty”)
115. Yasir Arafat, by birth : CAIRENE
116. State symbol of Massachusetts : ELM TREE
117. Archbishop of Canterbury's headdress : MITRE
118. Fabulously rich ancient king : CROESUS
119. White Castle offerings : SLIDERS
120. Comparatively foxy : SLYER

Down
1. Lacking shine : MATTE
2. Expect : AWAIT
3. Ones going to Washington? : TAX RETURNS
4. Pennsylvania's Flagship City : ERIE
5. Mtg. : SESS
6. Whale of an exhibition : SHAMU
7. Miles Davis ___ (cool jazz group) : NONET
8. Fig. on a terminal monitor : ETD
9. Die down : EBB
10. With 69-Down, 1990s-2000s sitcom star : RAY
11. Tops : AT MOST
12. Santiago's milieu in a Hemingway novel : THE SEA
13. Become lenient : GO SOFT
14. Prince Valiant's love : ALETA
15. Checks out : VERIFIES
16. Original opening to Homer's "Odyssey"? : OMICRON
17. Hermano del padre o de la madre : TIO
18. The Tigers of the Ohio Valley Conf. : TSU
19. Ogee's shape : ESS
24. Binge : TOOT
28. Neighbor of Alg. : MOR
31. Even more vast : HUGER
32. Phone abbr. : OPER
33. Exploits : USES
34. Nickname for Clara Bow : IT GIRL
35. Jerseys and such : CATTLE
36. Actor Kutcher : ASHTON
38. Numbered rd. : RTE
39. Binge : OVEREAT
42. Texter's ta-ta : TTYL
43. Syngman of South Korea : RHEE
44. VHF unit : MHZ
45. Jobs's job, once : CEO
46. You might choose something by it : LOT
48. Grant for filmmaking? : CARY
49. Start to matter? : ANTI-
50. Bellyache : MOAN
51. "Gotcha, man" : I DIG
52. Hellhound of Norse mythology : GARM
57. Torah holders : ARKS
59. General ___ chicken : TSO’S
60. ___-goat : SHE
61. Standard part of a limerick : ANAPEST
63. James who died three years before winning a Pulitzer : AGEE
64. "A Doll's House" wife : NORA
65. "Do not like" : YUCK
66. Worker's weekend whoop : TGIF
67. Anthony's partner in radio : OPIE
68. Language from which "cotton" and "candy" are derived : ARABIC
69. See 10-Down : ROMANO
70. Day, to da Vinci : GIORNO
73. Has an adult conversation? : TALKS DIRTY
74. Feverish fit : AGUE
75. Doesn't just tear up : SOBS
77. ___ Piggle-Wiggle (children's character) : MRS
78. Engine problem : STALL
79. French high-speed rail inits. : TGV
80. Literary inits. : RLS
83. Retro dos : BEEHIVES
84. Where the world's 100 tallest mountains are found : ASIA
85. It's an affront : SLAP
86. "Homeland" org. : CIA
88. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Artis : GILMORE
92. Positive ends : ANODES
93. '60s activist org. : SDS
94. Oklahoma Indians : OSAGES
95. "I Never Played the Game" memoirist : COSELL
96. Prominent beefcake features : PECS
98. "I'd like to see ___" : A MENU
99. Surname appearing nine times in a list of Indy 500 winners : UNSER
100. Long-tailed beach fliers : KITES
102. ___ nous : ENTRE
103. Urban ___, 2004 and 2012 undefeated college football coach : MEYER
106. ___ law : OHM’S
107. Sweat : TOIL
108. Former railroad regulatory agcy. : ICC
109. Blemish : MAR
110. Italian mine? : MIO
112. "I did NOT need to hear that" : TMI
113. Former Ford model : LTD
114. Cinnabar, e.g. : ORE


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

2 comments :

Anonymous said...

I struggled mightily with this blasted puzzle. It takes me a long time to cry "Uncle", but after a week working on it here and there I folded!

Bill Butler said...

Some of these Sunday puzzles can be really tough and really require one to work out the theme in order to get to the finish. I like tough, but I also like an eventual completion :)

Thanks for taking the time to leave a comment.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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