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0714-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 14 Jul 13, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Daniel A. Finan
THEME: Show Me the Money … six squares in today’s grid contain symbols, three have the “dollar” symbol and three have the “cent” symbol. The dollar symbol is made up an “S” with an “I” superimposed, and the cent symbol is “C” with an “I” superimposed. So, the “dollar” symbol reads “S” in one direction and “I” in the other. The “cent” symbol reads “C” in one direction and “I” in the other. If that isn’t complicated enough, with my keyboard I could use “$” for the dollar symbol in the grid, but had to opt for “%” as a make-do cent symbol. Also, the answers containing the dollar and cent symbols all pertain to money:
65A. Money ... or a hint to how six crossings in this puzzle are to be represented, superimposing one letter over another : DOLLARS AND CENTS

23A. Investing in a growth company : GOING LONG
25A. High-risk investments : PENNY STOCKS
110A. Quotation sources, once : TICKER TAPES
112A. Unrecoverable investment expenses : SUNK COSTS
3D. Some liquid assets : CASH ON HAND
16D. Spot on a demand curve : PRICE POINT
62D. With 58-Down, financial topic of 2012-13 : FISCAL
58D. See 62-Down : CLIFF
70D. Key business figure : BOTTOM LINE
73D. AA or AAA, maybe : BOND RATING
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 35m 36s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. City south of West Palm : BOCA
The name of the city of Boca Raton in Florida translates from Spanish as “Mouse Mouth”. There doesn’t seem to be a definitive etymology of the name but one plausible explanation is a nautical one. “Boca”, as well as meaning “mouth” can mean “inlet”. “Ratón”, as well as meaning “mouse” was also used to describe rocks that chewed away at a ship’s anchor cable. So possibly Boca Raton was named for a rocky inlet.

13. Heckle or Jeckle of cartoons : MAGPIE
Heckle and Jeckle are two animated magpies who star in a series of Terrytoons cartoon shorts that were made from 1946 right up to 1981.

19. Stoker who created Dracula : BRAM
Bram Stoker was an irish author whose real given name was Abraham (shortened to “Bram”). Stoker is most famous for his Gothic novel “Dracula”, first published in 1897.

20. Womb, jocularly : OVEN
There might be a bun in the oven, a baby in the womb.

29. Ltd., in Lille : CIE
"Cie." is an abbreviation used in French. It is short for "compagnie", the French word for "company", and is used as we would use "Co."

31. Like one trying to hit a piñata, often : DIZZY
Piñatas originated in Mexico, probably among the Aztecs or Mayans. Today piñatas are usually made from cardboard that is brightly decorated with papier-mâché. Traditionally a piñata was made out of a clay pot, adorned with feathers and ribbons and filled with small treasures. During religious ceremonies the clay pots would be suspended and broken open so that the contents would spill out onto the ground at the feet of a god as an offering.

34. Norwegian P.M. Stoltenberg : JENS
Jens Stoltenberg is the leader of the Norwegian Labour Party and has been Prime Minister of Norway since 2005. Stoltenberg was first elected prime minister in 2000, and served a first term that lasted almost two years.

35. Vardalos of "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" : NIA
Not only is the delightful Nia Vardalos the star of the 2002 hit movie "My Big Fat Greek Wedding", she also wrote the screenplay. The film never made it to number one at the box office, but it still pulled in more money than any other movie in history that didn't make it to number one. That record I think reflects the fact that the film wasn't a blockbuster but rather a so-called "sleeper hit", a movie that people went to see based on referrals from friends. The big fat mistake came when a spin-off TV show was launched, "My Big Fat Greek Life". It ran for only 7 episodes.

37. Big picture: Abbr. : ENL
Enlargement (enl.)

42. Bolognese bride : SPOSA
In Italian, a “sposa” is a bride.

Bologna is a city in northern Italy.

45. Sprint, e.g. : TELECOM
The modern Sprint Corporation, a giant in the telecommunications industry, can trace its roots back to the Brown Telephone Company which was founded in 1899. C.L. and Jacob Brown created their company to provide a telephone service to the rural parts around the city of Abilene, Kansas.

48. It should have no effect : PLACEBO
A “placebo” is a medical treatment that is ineffective, but that is deliberated formulated to deceive the patient into thinking it is real. Placebos can be given as control treatments in trials, and so the level of deception can be relatively low, as the patients are aware of the possibility of being given an ineffective treatment. The term “placebo” is the Latin word for “I shall please”. The idea is that the treatment is given more to please than to benefit the patient.

54. Without : SANS
“Sans” is the French word for “without”, and is a word we’ve absorbed into English.

57. One-third of Neapolitan ice cream: Abbr. : CHOC
Neapolitan ice cream is made up of blocks of strawberry, vanilla and chocolate ice cream. Neapolitan ice cream is assumed to be of Italian origin, from the city of Naples. Duh!

59. Like the right third of Ireland's flag : ORANGE
I got this one pretty quickly ... One interpretation of the colors of the tricolor are that the green represent the Irish Nationalist movement striving for independence from Britain, and the Orange movement concentrated in the north of the country (now Northern Ireland) that favors British rule. The white is a hopeful representation of peace between the two ideals. The flag's design dates back to 1848 when it was presented to Irish Nationalist Thomas Francis Meagher by a small group of sympathetic French women. It was likely inspired by the French tricolor, although it might also have derived from the Newfoundland Tricolour, as Meagher's father was born there.

60. Announcer Hall : EDD
Edd Hall is most famous as a former announcer for Jay Leno on “The Tonight Show”.

61. Mrs. Capp and others : FLOS
“Andy Capp” is a comic strip from Britain that is syndicated internationally. The strip was created by Reg Smythe in 1957 and is still going strong, despite the fact that Smythe passed away in 1998. Andy Capp and his wife Florrie (also “Flo”) are working class characters who live in the northeast of England. Andy is unemployed and Flo works as a charwoman. “Andy Capp” was my favorite comic strip growing up ...

64. "Cómo ___?" : ESTAS
“Cómo estas?” is Spanish for “how are you?”

68. Ora pro ___ : NOBIS
"Ora pro nobis" translates from Latin as "pray for us". It is a common term used in the Roman Catholic tradition and is often shortened to "OPN".

72. Places for picks, informally : FROS
Someone with an afro hairdo might use a pick instead of a comb.

78. Gospel singer Winans : CECE
CeCe Winans (real name Priscilla) is a Gospel music singer. She is part of a duo with her brother, BeBe Winans (real name Benjamin).

89. Astronomical distances: Abbr. : LT YRS
A light-year is a measure of distance, not time. It is the distance that light travels in a vacuum in one year. The accepted abbreviation for a light-year is “ly”.

93. Faunus's Greek counterpart : PAN
In Roman mythology, Faunus was the horned god of the forest. The Greek equivalent to Faunus was Pan.

95. Beef : KICK
“To beef” and ”to kick” are both slang terms meaning “to complain”.

97. Ukr., e.g., once : SSR
Ukraine is a large country in Eastern Europe, a Soviet Republic before the dissolution of the USSR. In English we often call the country “the" Ukraine, but I am told that we should just say "Ukraine".

98. Certain lap dogs, informally : POMS
The Pomeranian is a breed of small dog, named for the Pomerania region of Europe (part of eastern Germany and northern Poland). The breed was much loved by the royalty of Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries. In the 19th century, Queen Victoria owned a particularly small Pomeranian. Due to the notoriety of the monarch's pet, the Pomeranian was bred for small size, so that during the Queen's admittedly long reign, the size of the average "pom" was reduced by 50% ...

101. French film award : CESAR
The César Award is the national film award of France. The first César was awarded in 1975, named after the French sculptor César Baldaccini. The awards themselves are reproductions of an actual Baldaccini sculpture.

102. The shortest one has only two verses : PSALM
The shortest psalm in the Bible is Psalm 117:
1. O praise the Lord, all ye nations: praise him all ye people.
2. For his merciful kindness is great toward us, and the truth of the Lord endureth forever. Praise ye the Lord.

105. It appears at the top of a page : URL
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

106. Instruments played with mallets : MARIMBAS
A marimba is a musical instrument somewhat like a large xylophone.

110. Quotation sources, once : TICKER TAPES
Stock price information used to be transmitted over telegraph lines by “stock tickers” that produced the famous “ticker tape”, a paper tape with stock symbols and prices printed on it. The “ticker” got its name from the noise it created when it was printing. Even though ticker tape is no longer used, the concept lives on in the scrolling electronic tickers that stream across the bottom of a television screen when there’s a financial program airing.

113. More swanky : TONIER
Something described as “tony” is elegant or exclusive. “Tony” is derived from the word “tone”.

114. Confab : CHAT
“Confab”, meaning “chat” is a shortened form of “confabulation”. The word “confabulation” derives from the Latin from “com” (together) and “fabula” (a tale). “Fabula” is also the root of our word “fable”.

115. Robert of "The Sopranos" : ILER
The actor Robert Iler's most famous role was A.J., son of mob leader Tony Soprano in HBO's "The Sopranos". Apparently Iler's screen persona has spilled over into his personal life, as he was arrested for armed robbery of two tourists in 2001 (and pleaded guilty to a lesser charge).

116. Draft status : ONE-A
The US government maintains information on all males who are potentially subject to military conscription, using what is called the Selective Service System(SS). In the event that a draft was held, men registered would be classified into groups to determine eligibility for service. Class 1-A registrants are those available for unrestricted military service. Other classes are 1-A-O (conscientious objector available for noncombatant service), 4-A (registrant who has completed military service) and 4-D (Minister of religion).

119. Beef : CARP
The word "carp" used to mean simply "talk" back in the 13th century, with its roots in the Old Norwegian "karpa" meaning "to brag". A century later the Latin word "carpere" meaning "to slander" influenced the use of "carp" so that it came to mean "find fault with".

Down
1. Pellet propeller : BB GUN
A BB gun is an air pistol or rifle that shoots birdshot known as BBs. Birdshot comes in a number of different sizes, from size 9 (0.080" in diameter) to size FF (.23"). 0.180" diameter birdshot is size BB, which gives the airgun its name.

2. University town named after a Penobscot chief : ORONO
The town of Orono is home to the University of Maine, founded in 1862. The college is actually located on an island (Marsh island) lying between the Penobscot and Stillwater rivers. The town of Orono is named after Joseph Orono, a chief of the Penobscot Nation.

5. Lacoste offering : POLO
René Lacoste was a French tennis player known for being very tenacious on court. This tenacity earned him the nickname “the Crocodile”. When he went into the clothing business, specializing in tennis apparel, his Lacoste brand became famous for its green crocodile logo.

7. #2s, e.g. : PENCILS
I grew up with the HB method of grading pencils, from “hardness” to “blackness”. Here in the US we sometimes use a numerical grading system, with #2 being the equivalent of HB. The numerical system was introduced in the US by one John Thoreau, father of famed author and hero of mine, Henry David Thoreau.

8. Director Lee : ANG
Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as "Sense & Sensibility" (my personal favorite), "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon", "Hulk", "Brokeback Mountain" and "Life of Pi".

10. Wilson of "The Internship" : OWEN
The actor Owen Wilson was nominated for an Oscar, but not for his acting. He was nominated for co-writing the screenplay for “The Royal Tenenbaums” along with Wes Anderson.

"The Internship" is a 2013 comedy film starring Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson as two “older” interns at Google. Haven’t seen it yet, but it sounds like a clever premise for a movie.

11. Small role in "Austin Powers" movies : MINI-ME
The actor Verne Troyer is best known for playing the character Mini-Me in the “Austin Powers" series of films. Troyer suffers from a form of dwarfism, and at a height of only 2 ft 8 in is one of the shortest men in the world.

13. En ___ : MASSE
"En masse" is of course a French term, which is best translated as "as a group".

14. Source of the line "Thy money perish with thee" : ACTS
The Acts of the Apostles is the fifth book of the New Testament. It is believed that the author of the Gospel of Luke was the same person who wrote “Acts”.

16. Spot on a demand curve : PRICE POINT
The theory is that demand for a product does not drop linearly with increasing price. Instead, the are certain “price points” where demand will actually stay relatively high. A classic price point is 99 cents. People view 99 cents as relatively cheap but when the price hits $1 then demand falls away.

18. Half-kiss? : ESSES
Half of the word “kiss” is made up of letters S (esses).

24. Musical with the song "Summer Nights" : GREASE
"Grease" was, and still is, a very successful stage musical with a blockbuster film version released in 1978. “Summer Nights” is a song from the musical that was a huge hit for John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John.

26. "Old ___" : YELLER
We all know the 1957 film "Old Yeller", but the movie is actually made from a book of the same name written by Fred Gipson.

28. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees from Texas : ZZ TOP
In the blues rock band ZZ Top, the hairy guitar players are Billy F. Gibbons and Dusty Hill. The relatively clean-shaven drummer is … wait for it … Frank Beard …

39. Church section : APSE
The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

40. Song classic "___ to Be Unhappy" : GLAD
"Glad to Be Unhappy" is a song from the Rodgers and Hart 1936 musical, "On Your Toes". "On Your Toes" was remarkable in that it was the first Broadway musical to classical dance as part of the choreography (ballet features in the storyline), and it was the first to use jazz as part of the score.

46. Head across the Atlantic : LOO
When I was growing up in Ireland, a "bathroom" was a room that had a bath and no toilet. The separate room with the commode was called "the toilet" or sometimes the W.C. (the water closet). Apparently the term closet was used because in the 1800s when homeowners started installing toilets indoors they often displaced clothes and linens in a "closet", as a closet was the right size to take the commode. It has been suggested that the British term "loo" comes from Waterloo (water-closet ... water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure. Another suggestion is that the term comes from the card game of "lanterloo" in which the pot was called the loo!

In old sailing ships the toilet area for the regular sailors was located in the forward part (the head) of the ship, hence the term "head" that has been used since then for any toilet on board a boat.

49. Ancient Greek coins : OBOLS
An obol is also known as an obolus. The obol was a silver coin used in Greece that was worth one sixth of a drachma.

53. It's a legal thing : RES
"Res" is the Latin for "thing". "Res" is used in a lot of phrases in the law, including "res ipsa loquitur". The literal translation of "res ipsa loquitur" is "the thing speaks for itself". It refers to situations when there is an injury, and the nature of the injury is such that one can assume that negligence had to have taken place.

56. Designer Mizrahi : ISAAC
Isaac Mizrahi is a fashion designer from Brooklyn, New York.

61. Australian beer brand : FOSTER’S
Foster’s Lager is an extremely popular Australian beer consumed all over the world. Foster’s sells well everywhere it seems, except in Australia …

62. With 58-Down, financial topic of 2012-13 : FISCAL
(58D. See 62-Down : CLIFF)
Don’t get me started …

63. Feudal figures : SERFS
A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. "Serf" comes from the Latin "servus", meaning "slave".

66. Bar selections : RYES
For whiskey to be labelled as “rye” in the US, it has to be distilled from at least 51% rye grain. In Canada however, a drink called rye whiskey sometimes contains no rye at all.

68. Texans are part of it, in brief : NFL
The Houston Texans football team has been in the NFL since 2002. Houston had been home to the Oilers football team, but that franchise moved to Nashville in 1997 to become the Tennessee Titans.

70. Key business figure : BOTTOM LINE
In a statement of accounts, gross profit is the difference between revenue from sales and the cost of making goods or providing a service. So-called fixed costs, of overhead, payroll, taxes and interest payments are not included in gross profits. When these fixed costs have been deducted, what is left is called the net profit, also known as "the bottom line".

77. South of 79-Down? : SUD
79. See 77-Down : PARIS
"Sud" is the French word for "south".

82. Warhol's specialty : POP ART
An artistic work in the Pop Art style includes images taken from popular culture, perhaps from the news or an advertisement. The pop art movement started in the mid-fifties in Britain and emerged in the late-fifties in the US.

Andy Warhol went through a period of painting iconic American products, including Coca-Cola bottles and Campbell's tomato soup cans. In 1964 he participated in a gallery show called "The American Supermarket". Along with other pop artists he contributed works including a painting of a can of Campbell's tomato soup. He priced the painting at $1,500, and sold autographed cans of soup for $6 a piece.

84. Squirts : TYKES
"Tyke" has been used playfully to describe a young child since at least 1902, but for centuries before that a tyke was a cur or mongrel, or perhaps a lazy or lower-class man.

90. Shoulder bone : SCAPULA
The scapula is the shoulder blade. It is thought that the term comes from the Greek “skaptein” meaning “to dig”. The assumption is that the shoulder blade resembles a trowel or a small shovel, hence the name “scapula”.

94. Lead-in to 88-Down : NYMPHO-
Hypersexuality in humans is termed “satyriasis” in males and “nymphomania” in females.

The satyrs of Greek mythology came with a very high sex drive. They are the "rude" male subjects drawn on the side of old Greek vases. The nubile maidens known as nymphs were often an object of attention for the satyrs.

96. Danish bread : KRONER
"Krone" translates into English as "crown", and was the name given to coins that bore the image of the monarch. Today, the krone is the name given to the currency of Norway and of Denmark. Some of the Norwegian and Danish kroner have holes in the middle, giving them a "doughnut" or "torus" shape.

99. Constellation next to Taurus : ORION
The very recognizable constellation of Orion is of course named after the Greek God Orion, the Hunter. If you take a look at the star in Orion's "right shoulder", the second brightest star in the constellation, you might notice that it is quite red in color. This is the famous star called Betelgeuse, a red supergiant, a huge star that is on its way out. Betelgeuse is expected to explode into a supernova within the next thousand years or so. You don't want to miss that ...

101. Social level : CASTE
Many creatures organize themselves into a social structure, a phenomenon known as "eusociality". Examples of such creatures would be ants, bees and wasps, where there are queens, workers and soldiers. The groups within such a hierarchical structure are known as castes. The word "caste" was borrowed from the class divisions in Indian society (although the word "caste" and hierarchical concept was actually introduced by the Portuguese).

104. Arizona sights : MESAS
"Mesa" is the Spanish for "table" and is of course is how we get the term "mesa" that describes a geographic feature. "What's the difference between a butte and a mesa?" I hear you cry! Both are hills with flat tops, but a mesa has a top that is wider than it is tall. A butte is a much narrower formation, taller than it is wide.

109. Radio station on TV : WKRP
The sitcom "WKRP in Cincinnati" was produced by MTM, the production company established by Mary Tyler Moore and her husband for the "The Mary Tyler Moore Show". "WKRP" was a successful enough show when it originally aired, but then became a blockbuster in syndication. It became MTM's most-watched program, even outstripping the original "The Mary Tyler Moore Show".

111. Automaker since 1974 : KIA
Kia Motors is the second largest manufacturer of cars in South Korea, behind Hyundai (and Hyundai is a part owner in Kia now). In recent years, Kia has focused on sales into Europe, and has been remarkably successful.

112. [as written] : SIC
"Sic" indicates that a quotation is written as originally found, perhaps including a typo. "Sic" is Latin for "thus, like this".


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. City south of West Palm : BOCA
5. Old man : PAPA
9. Give for free, slangily : COMP
13. Heckle or Jeckle of cartoons : MAGPIE
19. Stoker who created Dracula : BRAM
20. Womb, jocularly : OVEN
21. Painful boo-boo : OWIE
22. Winter stash, of a sort : ACORNS
23. Investing in a growth company : GOING LONG
25. High-risk investments : PENNY STOCKS
27. Hardly parade-worthy, say : UNHEROIC
28. Antics : ZANINESS
29. Ltd., in Lille : CIE
30. Hanging piece : NOOSE
31. Like one trying to hit a piñata, often : DIZZY
33. Pronged, as an electrical plug : MALE
34. Norwegian P.M. Stoltenberg : JENS
35. Vardalos of "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" : NIA
36. Buttonhole, e.g. : SLIT
37. Big picture: Abbr. : ENL
38. Con target : SAP
39. Shocked : AGHAST
42. Bolognese bride : SPOSA
45. Sprint, e.g. : TELECOM
48. It should have no effect : PLACEBO
50. "No bid" : I PASS
52. Not so smooth : ROCKIER
54. Without : SANS
55. Somewhat : A BIT
57. One-third of Neapolitan ice cream: Abbr. : CHOC
59. Like the right third of Ireland's flag : ORANGE
60. Announcer Hall : EDD
61. Mrs. Capp and others : FLOS
62. Add-on features : FRILLS
64. "Cómo ___?" : ESTAS
65. Money ... or a hint to how six crossings in this puzzle are to be represented, superimposing one letter over another : DOLLARS AND CENTS
68. Ora pro ___ : NOBIS
71. Bully's coercive comeback : SAYS ME
72. Places for picks, informally : FROS
73. Admonishment to a puppy : BAD
76. Ticks off : FROSTS
78. Gospel singer Winans : CECE
79. "That's nuthin'!" : PFFT!
80. Bead maker? : PORE
81. Request from a guest over an apartment intercom : LET ME UP
83. Holiday attraction at a mall : SANTA
85. Inaugurated : SWORN IN
87. Fame : STARDOM
89. Astronomical distances: Abbr. : LT YRS
91. Eventually : ONE DAY
92. Yiddish laments : OYS
93. Faunus's Greek counterpart : PAN
95. Beef : KICK
97. Ukr., e.g., once : SSR
98. Certain lap dogs, informally : POMS
100. ___ moons : MANY
101. French film award : CESAR
102. The shortest one has only two verses : PSALM
105. It appears at the top of a page : URL
106. Instruments played with mallets : MARIMBAS
108. Bit of corporate attire : POWER TIE
110. Quotation sources, once : TICKER TAPES
112. Unrecoverable investment expenses : SUNK COSTS
113. More swanky : TONIER
114. Confab : CHAT
115. Robert of "The Sopranos" : ILER
116. Draft status : ONE-A
117. Trying to pull a fast one : SNEAKY
118. Certain : SOME
119. Beef : CARP
120. Corp. V.I.P.'s : MGRS

Down
1. Pellet propeller : BB GUN
2. University town named after a Penobscot chief : ORONO
3. Some liquid assets : CASH ON HAND
4. Ones unlikely to write memoirs? : AMNESIACS
5. Lacoste offering : POLO
6. Gets around : AVOIDS
7. #2s, e.g. : PENCILS
8. Director Lee : ANG
9. Patient's liability : COPAY
10. Wilson of "The Internship" : OWEN
11. Small role in "Austin Powers" movies : MINI-ME
12. Ticket to the World Series : PENNANT
13. En ___ : MASSE
14. Source of the line "Thy money perish with thee" : ACTS
15. Melted Popsicle, e.g. : GOO
16. Spot on a demand curve : PRICE POINT
17. Fully blacken : INK IN
18. Half-kiss? : ESSES
24. Musical with the song "Summer Nights" : GREASE
26. "Old ___" : YELLER
28. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees from Texas : ZZ TOP
32. "Not a peep!" : ZIP IT!
34. Fool : JACKASS
38. What best friends keep : SECRETS
39. Church section : APSE
40. Song classic "___ to Be Unhappy" : GLAD
41. Kids' outdoor game : T-BALL
43. Baptism, e.g. : SACRAMENT
44. Glowing : ASHINE
46. Head across the Atlantic : LOO
47. Big, in ads : MEGA
49. Ancient Greek coins : OBOLS
51. Convinced : SOLD
53. It's a legal thing : RES
56. Designer Mizrahi : ISAAC
58. See 62-Down : CLIFF
61. Australian beer brand : FOSTER’S
62. With 58-Down, financial topic of 2012-13 : FISCAL
63. Feudal figures : SERFS
65. Horrifies : DISMAYS
66. Bar selections : RYES
67. ___ alike : NO TWO
68. Texans are part of it, in brief : NFL
69. Certain bank deposits : ORES
70. Key business figure : BOTTOM LINE
73. AA or AAA, maybe : BOND RATING
74. Opera part : ARIA
75. Disavow : DENY
77. South of 79-Down? : SUD
79. See 77-Down : PARIS
80. Briefing spot : PRESS ROOM
82. Warhol's specialty : POP ART
84. Squirts : TYKES
86. Without a contract : ON SPEC
88. Crazies : MANIACS
90. Shoulder bone : SCAPULA
94. Lead-in to 88-Down : NYMPHO-
96. Danish bread : KRONER
98. Plays miniature golf : PUTTS
99. Constellation next to Taurus : ORION
100. Unionize? : MARRY
101. Social level : CASTE
103. Bottle unit : LITER
104. Arizona sights : MESAS
106. Lamblike : MEEK
107. Ship's keel, e.g. : BEAM
109. Radio station on TV : WKRP
111. Automaker since 1974 : KIA
112. [as written] : SIC


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4 comments :

Anonymous said...

Hello. This is my first-ever comment/question, and I'm sorry that it's a lame one: I don't get SOME for 118A. Certain? SOME?? Am I being dense? Please shed some light. Thanks. I love your blog. Keep up the astonishing work!

Bill Butler said...

There's no such thing as a "lame question" around here, as far as I am concerned.

"Some" and "certain" can mean the same thing in a sentence like this:

Some students did really in the exam.

or:

Certain students did really well in the exam.

Hope that helps, and thanks so much for the kind words abou the blog.

Anonymous said...

Too,too around the bend to make $ense!

Bill Butler said...

Well, at least it wasn't non$en$e :)

You win some, you lose some ...

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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