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0721-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 21 Jul 13, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Tracy Bennett
THEME: Artful Thinking … each of today’s is a well-known phrase with the last part changed to an artist’s name that sounds similar to that changed part of the phrase:
23A. Artist's favorite spiritual? : WADE IN THE WATTEAU (wade in the water)
43A. Christmas song line from an artist? : ‘TIS THE CEZANNE (‘tis the season)
68A. Artist's favorite Broadway musical? : HELLO, DALI! (“Hello, Dolly!”)
89A. Artist's expression for "Such is life"? : QUE SERA, SEURAT (que sera sera)
112A. How the expert artist passed her exam? : WITH FLYING KAHLOS (with flying colors)
15D. Artist's line of weary resignation? : HERE WE GAUGUIN (here we go again)
41D. What the tipsy artist had at the bar? : ONE TOO MANET (one too many)
56D. What the artist confused people with? : SMOKE AND MIROS (smoke and mirrors)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 27m 46s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … SHAKA (Sheka), SALMA (Selma)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Where les enfants might play : PARC
In France, the children (les enfants) might play in the park (parc).

15. Female lobsters : HENS
A male lobster is called a cock, and a female a hen. A lobster weighing less than a pound is called a chicken.

19. Every which way : AMOK
The phrase "to run amok" (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for "attacking furiously", "amuk". The word "amok" was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were "frenzied". Given Malaya's troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy ...

20. Subject for a mariachi band : AMOR
“Amor” is the Spanish word for “love”.

The name "mariachi", used for a typically Mexican popular band, is said to be a corruption of the French word for "marriage" (i.e. "mariage"). This perhaps dates back to the times of Napoleon II when France had political and cultural influence over Spain.

22. Like Voldemort : EVIL
Voldemort is the main “bad guy” in the “Harry Potter” series of books. I heard J. K. Rowling, the author of the books, on the radio the other day and she tells us that “Voldemort” is supposed to be pronounced with a silent “t” on the end, so it sounds kind of French. But when the movies came out the actors went with the hard “t”, and that’s the pronunciation that seems to prevail now.

23. Artist's favorite spiritual? : WADE IN THE WATTEAU (wade in the water)
Jean-Antoine Watteau was a French painter whose work spanned the Baroque and Rococo periods.

26. Ablution, e.g. : RITE
“Ablution” is the cleansing of the body, especially as part of a religious rite.

28. Summer Olympics host after London : RIO
Even though the 2016 Olympic Games is a “summer” competition, it will be held in Rio de Janeiro in the winter. As Rio is in the southern hemisphere, the planned date of the opening of 5th August 2016 falls in the local season of winter. The 2016 games will also be first to be held in South America, and the first to be hosted by a Portuguese-speaking country.

29. ___ vu : DEJA
“Déjà vu” is French for “already seen”.

32. Prescription pain medication : PERCOCET
Percocet is a trade name for the drug combination of oxycodone with paracetamol.

38. Several, in Seville : UNOS
The city of Seville is the capital of Andalusia in southern Spain. Seville is a favored setting for many operas including "The Barber of Seville" by Rossini, "Fidelio" by Beethoven and Mozart's "Don Giovanni" and "The Marriage of Figaro".

43. Christmas song line from an artist? : ‘TIS THE CEZANNE (‘tis the season)
Paul Cézanne was a Post-Impressionist artist who was born and worked in the beautiful city of Aix-en-Provence in the South of France. Cézanne has the reputation of being the artist who bridged the late 19th century Impressionist movement with the early 20th century Cubist movement. Both Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso are quoted as saying that Cézanne “is the father of us all”.

“‘Tis the season to be jolly” is a line from the traditional Yuletide carol “Deck the Halls”. The tune itself is Welsh in origin, dating back to the 16th century. However, the lyrics are American and from the 19th century. Also, Mozart used the tune as a theme for a delightful violin and piano duet.

47. Batman villain : PENGUIN
The Penguin is an enemy of Batman in the comic book series and its spinoffs. The villain first appeared in 1941 and was inspired by the advertising mascot of Kool cigarettes at that time, a penguin with a hat and cane. Famously, the Penguin was played by Burgess Meredith in “Batman” TV series in the 1960s. The character was also portrayed by Danny DeVito in the 1992 film “Batman Returns”.

51. What Mississippi cheerleaders ask for a lot : AN I
There are a lot of letters “I” in “MIssissippi”.

53. Cagney or Lacey: Abbr. : DET
On the eighties police drama "Cagney & Lacey" Christine Cagney was played by Sharon Gless. A few years after "Cagney & Lacey" ended its run, Gless married the show's executive producer, Barney Rosenzweig.

Tyne Daly really came into the public eye playing Detective Lacey in the TV police drama "Cagney and Lacey". More recently Daly played the mother of the title character in "Judging Amy".

54. Daughter of James II : ANNE
Anne, Queen of Great Britain ruled England, Scotland and Ireland from 1702 to 1707. Anne was the daughter of James II of England. It was during Queen Anne’s reign that the kingdom of England and Scotland were united, forming the sovereign state of Great Britain. Anne passed away without having an heir, despite seventeen pregnancies! That made Anne the last monarch of the House of Stuart.

55. Where there's Wi-Fi availability : HOTSPOTS
"Wi-Fi" is nothing more than a trademark, a trademark registered by an association of manufacturers of equipment that use wireless LAN (Local Area Network) technology. A device labeled with "Wi-Fi" has to meet certain defined technical standards, basically meaning that the devices can talk to each other. The name “Wi-Fi” suggests “Wireless Fidelity”, although apparently the term was never intended to mean anything at all.

60. Former six-term senator from Indiana : LUGAR
Richard "Dick" Lugar served as Republican Senator representing Indiana in the US Congress from 1977 to 2013. He was the ranking member on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and is noted for his work to dismantle existing weapons of mass destruction all around the world.

61. More yang than yin: Abbr. : MASC
The yin and the yang can be explained using many different metaphors. In one, as the sun shines on a mountain, the side in the shade is the yin and the side in the light is the yang. The yin is also regarded as the feminine side, and the yang the masculine. The yin can also be associated with the moon, while the yang is associated with the sun.

62. Monetary bribes, in slang : BOODLES
“Boodle” is a slang term for money accepted as a bride, or money that is counterfeit.

65. N.R.A. piece?: Abbr. : ASSOC
National Rifle Association (NRA)

68. Artist's favorite Broadway musical? : HELLO, DALI! (“Hello, Dolly!”)
The famous surrealist painter Salvador Dalí was born in Figueres, Spain. I had the privilege of visiting the Dalí Museum in Figueres some years ago, just north of Barcelona. If you ever get the chance, it's a “must see” as it really is a quite magnificent building with a fascinating collection.

“Hello, Dolly!” is a Broadway musical first produced in 1964, adapted into a hugely successful movie in 1969. The title role of Dolly Levi was of course played by Barbra Streisand in the film, with Gene Kelly directing and a leading part for a young Michael Crawford.

71. ___ Zulu (warrior dubbed Africa's Napoleon) : SHAKA
Shaka was a leader in the Zulu Kingdom of Africa in the early 19th century. Shaka Zulu was noted for uniting several African tribes in order to resist European oppression.

72. Atlantean superhero of DC Comics : AQUAMAN
Aquaman is a comic book superhero who first appeared in 1941. Aquaman was inspired by a character in a Russian science-fiction novel called Amphibian Man.

73. ___ Field : CITI
Citi Field is the relatively new baseball stadium used by the New York Mets. It sits right next door to Shea stadium, where the Mets had played for decades. And the name of course comes from sponsor Citigroup.

75. Defrocked villain on "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" : CALEB
Joss Whedon was pretty pleased when he managed to get his script for "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" made into a movie in 1992, but the film pretty much bombed. Five years later he was able to get it adapted for television, and it developed a cult following that kept it alive on the small screen from 1997-2003.

76. Vista opener? : BUENA
Buena Vista is a brand name used a lot in the past by the Walt Disney Company. The name was chosen as the main Walt Disney offices are located on Buena Vista Street in Burbank, California.

77. Roman of film : POLANSKI
Roman Polanski is a Polish film director, and an Oscar winner for directing the 2002 movie "The Pianist". Polanski has had an eventful life. His pregnant wife, Sharon Tate, was murdered by the Manson family in 1969. In 1977, Polanski was arrested in Los Angeles for sexual assault of 13-year-old girl, and pleaded guilty to having sex with a minor. He fled the country to avoid sentencing, and is now awaiting extradition to the US from Switzerland after the US requested his transfer in 2009.

81. Michigan college : ALMA
Alma College in Alma, Michigan was founded by Michigan Presbyterians in 1886. The school has a Scottish heritage of which it is very proud. Alma has its own Scottish marching band, a Scottish dance troupe and even its own design of tartan.

82. ___ generis : SUI
"Sui generis" is a Latin expression meaning "of its own kind". The term can be used in a number of fields, and in philosophy it refers to an idea which cannot be included in a wider concept, and idea of its own kind.

87. Parts of an orrery : PLANETS
An orrery is an ingenious mechanical device that shows the relative motion and relative positions of the planets in our solar system. The first “modern” orrery was produced in 1704 and was presented to the Irish peer known as the Earl of Orrery, from whence the name “orrery” comes.

89. Artist's expression for "Such is life"? : QUE SERA, SEURAT (que sera sera)
Georges Seurat was a French Post-Impressionist. His most famous work, in the pointillist style, can be viewed in the Art Institute of Chicago, "A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte - 1884". If you've seen the movie "Ferris Bueller's Day Off", it features quite prominently in a wonderful, wonderful scene shot at the gallery.

As Doris Day told us, “que sera sera” is Spanish for "whatever will be, will be".

103. "Zero Dark Thirty" locale : PAKISTAN
“Zero Dark Thirty” is a film directed by Kathryn Bigelow that tells of the long but ultimately successful hunt for Osama bin Laden. I found one aspect of this film to be particularly uplifting, namely the central role played by a remarkable CIA officer who was a woman operating against the odds in a man’s world.

108. Sedona maker : KIA
Kia Motors is the second largest manufacturer of cars in South Korea, behind Hyundai. In recent years, Kia has focused on sales into Europe and has been remarkably successful.

111. The Roman way : ITER
“Iter” is the Latin for “road”.

112. How the expert artist passed her exam? : WITH FLYING KAHLOS (with flying colors)
Frida Kahlo was a Mexican painter, famous for her self-portraits. She was married to the equally famous artist Diego Rivera. Kahlo was portrayed by the actress Salma Hayek in a film about her colorful life called “Frida” released in 2002.

116. "The Cosby Show" boy : THEO
Malcolm-Jamal Warner was the child actor who played Theo Huxtable on “The Cosby Show”. You can see the grown-up Warner today playing Dr. Alex Reed on the BET sitcom “Reed Between the Lines”.

117. Last word in the Torah : ISRAEL
The word "Torah" best translates as "teaching", I am told.

118. Rain man? : NOAH
Genesis 6:19-20 states that Noah was instructed to take two animals of every kind into the ark. Later, in Genesis 7:2-3 Noah was instructed to take on board "every clean animal by sevens ... male and female, to keep offspring alive on the face of all the earth". Apparently "extras" (7 rather than 2) were needed for ritual sacrifice.

120. ___ Club : SAM’S
Sam’s Club is owned and operated by Walmart and is named after the company’s founder, Sam Walton.

121. River that "sweats oil and tar" in T. S. Eliot's "The Waste Land" : THAMES
Eliot wrote his poem called "The Waste Land" in 1922. “The Waste Land” opens with the famous line, "April is the cruelest month ...".

T. S. Eliot was born in New England but grew up in St. Louis, Missouri. Much of Eliot's college education was at Oxford, and clearly he became comfortable with life in England. In 1927 he became a British citizen and lived the rest of life in the UK.

122. Predoctoral tests, for short : GRES
Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

Down
1. Tatooine race in the "Star Wars" saga : JAWA
In the “Star Wars” universe, the Jawa are a race of rodent-like pygmies who live on the desert planet called Tatooine.

2. What's big at the movies? : IMAX
The IMAX Corporation, which is behind the IMAX film format, is a Canadian company. The impetus for developing the system came after Expo '67 in Montreal. Back then large format screenings were accomplished using multiple projectors with multiple screens, with images basically stitched together. The team behind the IMAX technology set out to simplify things, and developed a single-camera, single-projector system.

4. Certain Jaguar : XKE
Jaguar started out as a manufacturer of sidecars for motorcycles back in 1922, when the company was known as the Swallow Sidecar Company (SS for short). The company changed its name to Jaguar after WWII, because of the unfortunate connotations of the letters "SS" at that time.

7. South Korea's ___ Tae Woo : ROH
Roh Tae Woo was the President of South Korea from 1988 to 1993. Although Roh had a military pedigree and basically forced his way into office, his rule is noted for advancing the cause of democracy in the country. However, after his term was up, Roh was convicted of treason, mutiny and corruption and was sentenced to 22½ years in jail. He was later pardoned by President Kim Young-sam.

8. Buffet cabinet : CREDENZA
In modern terms, a credenza can be a wooden sideboard in a dining room from which buffet meals can be served. Back in 16th century Italy, the act of “credenza” was the tasting of food and drink by by a servant to test for poison.

9. Key of Schubert's "Trout" Quintet: Abbr. : A-MAJ
Schubert’s famous “Trout Quintet” is named for an earlier Schubert Lied called “The Trout”, variations of which were used in the fourth movement.

15. Artist's line of weary resignation? : HERE WE GAUGUIN (here we go again)
Paul Gauguin was a French artist in the Post-Impressionist period. Gauguin was a great friend of Vincent van Gogh, and indeed was staying with him in Arles when van Gogh famously cut off his ear.

16. "On This Night of a Thousand Stars" musical : EVITA
"Evita" was the follow up musical to "Jesus Christ Superstar" for Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. Both of these works were originally released as album musicals, and very successful ones at that (I remember buying them when they first came out). “Evita” was made into a film in 1996, with Madonna playing the title role and Welsh actor Jonathan Pryce playing her husband Juan Perón.

17. Capone's top henchman : NITTI
Frank Nitti was one of the top henchmen working for Al Capone. Unlike American-born Capone, Nitti was actually from Italy and was born near the city of Salerno. When Capone was eventually put away for 11 years for tax evasion, Nitti was convicted of the same crime. Nitti was only imprisoned for 18 months, and when released he was labelled as the new head of Capone's Chicago Outfit. However the truth seems to be that he was just a frontman, with others making the decisions.

18. Wintry mix : SLEET
Apparently "sleet" is a term used to describe two weather conditions. One is a shower of ice pellets, smaller than hail, and the second is a mixture of rain and snow, with the snow melting as it falls. It's the second definition that I have always used ...

24. Flawed, as mdse. : IRR
Irregular (irr.)

33. "Laborare ___ orare" (Freemasons' motto) : EST
:Laborare est orare: translates from Latin as “to work is to pray”.

34. What Morehouse College lacks : COEDS
Morehouse College in Georgia is one of only three men’s liberal arts colleges left in the US. The other two are Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia and Wabash College in Indiana.

38. Home of Kings Peak : UTAH
The Uinta Mountains are a subrange of the Rocky Mountains located mainly in northeastern Utah, approximately 100 miles east of Salt Lake City. The highest point in the Uintas is Kings Peak, the highest point in Utah.

39. Little muchacho : NINO
In Spanish a boy is a niño or a muchacho. One can call also an adult male a muchacho, "one of the boys", but not a niño, as that would be an insult.

41. What the tipsy artist had at the bar? : ONE TOO MANET (one too many)
The French painter Édouard Manet is responsible for many great works including "Le déjeuner sur l'herbe" (The Luncheon on the Grass") , a work you can see in the Musée d'Orsay in Paris.

42. Liz of "Garfield," e.g. : VET
Odie is Garfield's best friend and is a slobbery beagle, a character in Jim Davis’s comic strip that goes by the name of “Garfield”.

45. First chimp to orbit Earth : ENOS
Enos was a chimpanzee that was launched into Earth orbit in 1961 by NASA on a Mercury Atlas 4 rocket. Enos’s flight was a rehearsal for the first orbital flight made by an American, astronaut John Glenn. Enos returned from his mission safely, but died the following year from dysentery.

47. Pop icon? : PEPSI COLA
The Pepsi-Cola formulation was developed by one Caleb Bradham who made the drink at home and sold it as “Brad’s Drink”. Bradham's aim was to provide a drink that was pleasant to taste, that would aid digestion and boost energy. Included in the formula were pepsin (a digestive enzyme) and kola nuts. These two ingredients inspired the Pepsi Cola brand name that is used today.

48. "The Odd Couple" role : UNGER
In the Neil Simon play “The Odd Couple”, the character Felix has the family name “Ungar”. This spelling “Ungar” persists in the film adaptation but somehow morphed into “Unger” for the long-running television series.

"The Odd Couple" is a play by the wonderfully talented Neil Simon first performed on Broadway, in 1965. This great play was adapted for the big screen in 1968, famously starring Jack Lemmon (as Felix Unger) and Walter Matthau (as Oscar Madison). The success of the play and the film gave rise to an excellent television sitcom that ran from 1970-1975, starring Tony Randall and Jack Klugman. In 1985, Neil Simon even went so far as to adapt the play for an all-female cast, renaming it "The Female Odd Couple". I'd like to see that one …

50. "Phooey!" : NERTS
“Nerts” is a slang term, a corruption of "nuts!" and has the same meaning.

56. What the artist confused people with? : SMOKE AND MIROS (smoke and mirrors)
Joan Miro was a Spanish artist. Miro immersed himself in Surrealism, so much so that Andre Breton, the founder of the movement, said that Miro was "the most Surrealist of us all". Miro painted "The Tilled Field" in 1923-24, a work that is regarded as Miro's first Surrealist masterpiece.

58. Norse source for Loki lore : EDDA
The Poetic Edda and Prose Edda are two ancient works that are the source for much of Norse mythology. Both Eddas were written in the 13th century, in Iceland.

Loki is a god appearing in Norse mythology. In one story about Loki, he was punished by other gods for having caused the death of Baldr, the god of light and beauty. Loki was bound to a sharp rock using the entrails of one of his sons. A serpent drips venom which is collected in a bowl, and then Loki's wife must empty the venom onto her husband when the bowl is full. The venom causes Loki great pain, and his writhing causes the earthquakes that we poor humans have to endure.

59. Dash : ELAN
Our word "élan" was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours i.e "style" or "flair".

60. Dairy consumer's enzyme : LACTASE
Lactase is an enzyme produced in the digestive system of all infant humans. Lactase breaks down lactose, the complex sugar in milk. Lactase is produced by some adult humans, mainly those of European descent. Anyone lacking the ability to produce lactase is said to be “lactose intolerant”.

63. Good wife in "The Good Earth" : O-LAN
Pearl S. Buck's novel "The Good Earth" won a Pulitzer in 1932, and helped Buck win the Nobel Prize for literature a few years later. The story tells of life in a Chinese village and follows the fortunes of Wang Lung and his wife O-Lan. Although "The Good Earth" has been around for decades, it hit the bestseller list again in 2004 when it was a pick for Oprah's Book Club.

65. Org. protecting music copyrights : ASCAP
ASCAP (the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers) collects licence fees for musicians and distributes royalties to composers whose works have been performed. BMI (Broadcast Music Incorporated) provides the same service.

66. "Congress ___ make no law ..." : SHALL
“Congress shall make no law …” is a phrase that appears several times in the US Constitution.

67. Actress Hayek : SALMA
Salma Hayek is a Mexican actress, the first Mexican national to be nominated for a Best Actress Oscar, for her portrayal of painter Frida Kahlo in the 2002 movie "Frida".

69. Prefix with poise : EQUI-
“Equipoise” is equality in the distribution of weight, or perhaps of emotional forces.

77. "Gay" capital : PAREE
"Who Said Gay Paree?" is a song from the Cole Porter musical "Can-Can".

The Cole Porter musical "Can-Can" was first produced on Broadway, in 1953, where it ran for two years. There was a very successful film adaptation (which I saw recently ... it's good stuff) released in 1960, starring Shirley MacLaine, Frank Sinatra and Maurice Chevalier. During filming, the Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev visited the set as part of a tour of 20th Century Fox studios. He made a big splash in the media at the time describing what he saw as "depraved" and "pornographic".

79. New Jersey's ___ University : KEAN
Kean University is university in Union and Hillside, New Jersey. Kean University was founded in 1855 in Newark, and relocated in 1958.

80. QB mistakes: Abbr. : INTS
In American football, a QB (quarterback) mistake could lead to an interception (int.).

82. Holy mlle. : STE
Sainte (Ste.)

Señorita (srta.) is Spanish and mademoiselle (mlle.) is French for “miss”.

85. Apiarist's woe : BEE STING
Some apiarists (beekeepers) can be seen wearing thousands of bees on the face, forming a bee beard as a form of entertainment for an audience.

89. Holy city of Iran : QUM
Qom (also Qum) is a city in Iran located about 100 miles southwest of Tehran. Qom is a holy city in the Shi’a Islam tradition, and a pilgrimage destination.

93. Words to live by : MANTRA
A “mantra” is a word that is used as a focus for the mind while meditating.

96. ___ yoga : HATHA
Hatha yoga is a yoga system developed in 15th century India. Traditional Hatha yoga is a more “complete” practice than often encountered in the west, involving not just exercise but also meditation and relaxation.

97. Arabic name meaning "wise" : AKEEM
“Akeem” is an Arabic name meaning “wise”, and is a variation of “Hakeem” that is common in Africa.

98. J. Carrol ___, Oscar nominee for "Sahara" : NAISH
J. Carrol Naish was an actor from New York, known for playing supporting roles in many films as well as playing the title role on the radio show “Life with Luigi” in the late forties and early fifties. "Life with Luigi" was even more popular than Bob Hope’s regular broadcasts!

The 1943 war movie called “Sahara” stars Humphrey Bogart. Bogart plays an American tank commander in Libya who gets separated from his unit, along with his crew, as Rommel’s forces make a rapid advance. I’ve seen this one a couple of times and I recommend it. It is of course pretty one-sided given that it was made in the middle of WWII, but still is a good film.

100. Phycologist's study : ALGAE
Phycology is the study of algae, and is a term derived from “phykos”, the Greek for “seaweed”.

101. Some templegoers : SIKHS
Sikhism is a religion that was founded in the 15th century in the Punjab region, which straddles the India-Pakistan border. Even though Sikhism was established relatively recently, it is now the fifth-largest organized religion in the world.

104. Birdbrain : TWIT
"Twit" is a word not used very often here in America. It's a slang term that was quite common in England where is was used for "someone foolish and idiotic".

109. Discoveries of Michael Faraday : IONS
Michael Faraday was a scientist from England who discovered electromagnetic induction among other things. It was Faraday who first observed that a conductor carrying an electric current has an associated magnetic field. Amazingly, the sum total of Faraday’s formal education was little more than a seven-year apprenticeship as a bookbinder and bookseller.

115. "Boardwalk Empire" network : HBO
“Boardwalk Empire” is an HBO drama series set in Atlantic City, New Jersey. The storyline is set in the 1920s and 1930s during the Prohibition Era. The star of the show is Steve Buscemi.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Whammy : JINX
5. Where les enfants might play : PARC
9. Rendered speechless : AGHAST
15. Female lobsters : HENS
19. Every which way : AMOK
20. Subject for a mariachi band : AMOR
21. Insubstantial : MEAGER
22. Like Voldemort : EVIL
23. Artist's favorite spiritual? : WADE IN THE WATTEAU (wade in the water)
26. Ablution, e.g. : RITE
27. Firefighter's need, maybe : AXE
28. Summer Olympics host after London : RIO
29. ___ vu : DEJA
30. Food item a cook might flip : OMELETTE
32. Prescription pain medication : PERCOCET
35. Nos. in a directory : TELS
37. Look for : AWAIT
38. Several, in Seville : UNOS
40. Cool with what others are doing : ON BOARD
42. Go (for) : VIE
43. Christmas song line from an artist? : ‘TIS THE CEZANNE (‘tis the season)
47. Batman villain : PENGUIN
51. What Mississippi cheerleaders ask for a lot : AN I
52. How you might do something gross : ON A DARE
53. Cagney or Lacey: Abbr. : DET
54. Daughter of James II : ANNE
55. Where there's Wi-Fi availability : HOTSPOTS
57. Get ready to drive : TEE UP
60. Former six-term senator from Indiana : LUGAR
61. More yang than yin: Abbr. : MASC
62. Monetary bribes, in slang : BOODLES
64. What a star probably has : AGENT
65. N.R.A. piece?: Abbr. : ASSOC
68. Artist's favorite Broadway musical? : HELLO, DALI! (“Hello, Dolly!”)
70. Revival meeting miracles : CURES
71. ___ Zulu (warrior dubbed Africa's Napoleon) : SHAKA
72. Atlantean superhero of DC Comics : AQUAMAN
73. ___ Field : CITI
75. Defrocked villain on "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" : CALEB
76. Vista opener? : BUENA
77. Roman of film : POLANSKI
81. Michigan college : ALMA
82. ___ generis : SUI
83. Part of an umpire's count : NO BALLS
86. Put in writing : PEN
87. Parts of an orrery : PLANETS
89. Artist's expression for "Such is life"? : QUE SERA, SEURAT (que sera sera)
92. Easter purchase : DYE
93. Worth all the hype, as a film : MUST-SEE
94. Snorkeling aids : FINS
95. "Tsk!" : SHAME!
98. Finger : NAME
99. Cuts some slack : IS EASY ON
103. "Zero Dark Thirty" locale : PAKISTAN
105. Castaway's construction : RAFT
107. Rough position? : LIE
108. Sedona maker : KIA
111. The Roman way : ITER
112. How the expert artist passed her exam? : WITH FLYING KAHLOS (with flying colors)
116. "The Cosby Show" boy : THEO
117. Last word in the Torah : ISRAEL
118. Rain man? : NOAH
119. Inclination : BENT
120. ___ Club : SAM’S
121. River that "sweats oil and tar" in T. S. Eliot's "The Waste Land" : THAMES
122. Predoctoral tests, for short : GRES
123. Approximately : OR SO

Down
1. Tatooine race in the "Star Wars" saga : JAWA
2. What's big at the movies? : IMAX
3. Like old unrecyclable bottles : NO-DEPOSIT
4. Certain Jaguar : XKE
5. Pre-exam feeling, maybe : PANIC
6. Playground retort : AM TOO!
7. South Korea's ___ Tae Woo : ROH
8. Buffet cabinet : CREDENZA
9. Key of Schubert's "Trout" Quintet: Abbr. : A-MAJ
10. Bronze : GET A TAN
11. Topper : HAT
12. Ancient : AGE-OLD
13. Patchwork quilts have lots of them : SEAMS
14. "Good point" : TRUE
15. Artist's line of weary resignation? : HERE WE GAUGUIN (here we go again)
16. "On This Night of a Thousand Stars" musical : EVITA
17. Capone's top henchman : NITTI
18. Wintry mix : SLEET
24. Flawed, as mdse. : IRR
25. Party host's convenience : WET BAR
31. Reposed : LAIN
33. "Laborare ___ orare" (Freemasons' motto) : EST
34. What Morehouse College lacks : COEDS
36. Before, poetically : ERE
38. Home of Kings Peak : UTAH
39. Little muchacho : NINO
41. What the tipsy artist had at the bar? : ONE TOO MANET (one too many)
42. Liz of "Garfield," e.g. : VET
44. Pay to cross town, maybe : HOP A CAB
45. First chimp to orbit Earth : ENOS
46. Pay to cross town, maybe : CATCH A BUS
47. Pop icon? : PEPSI COLA
48. "The Odd Couple" role : UNGER
49. Daft : INANE
50. "Phooey!" : NERTS
53. Gauntlet thrower's challenge : DUEL
56. What the artist confused people with? : SMOKE AND MIROS (smoke and mirrors)
58. Norse source for Loki lore : EDDA
59. Dash : ELAN
60. Dairy consumer's enzyme : LACTASE
62. Erotic : BLUE
63. Good wife in "The Good Earth" : O-LAN
65. Org. protecting music copyrights : ASCAP
66. "Congress ___ make no law ..." : SHALL
67. Actress Hayek : SALMA
69. Prefix with poise : EQUI-
74. Pain and suffering : ILLS
77. "Gay" capital : PAREE
78. Summer lawn sight : SPRINKLER
79. New Jersey's ___ University : KEAN
80. QB mistakes: Abbr. : INTS
82. Holy mlle. : STE
84. Turn to bone : OSSIFY
85. Apiarist's woe : BEE STING
88. Watchful ones? : EYES
89. Holy city of Iran : QUM
90. Access charge, of a sort : USER FEE
91. Debatable sighting : UFO
93. Words to live by : MANTRA
95. Blurts (out) : SPITS
96. ___ yoga : HATHA
97. Arabic name meaning "wise" : AKEEM
98. J. Carrol ___, Oscar nominee for "Sahara" : NAISH
100. Phycologist's study : ALGAE
101. Some templegoers : SIKHS
102. Pro vote : YEA
104. Birdbrain : TWIT
106. "___ fair ..." : ALL’S
109. Discoveries of Michael Faraday : IONS
110. Regarding : AS TO
113. Easter purchase : HAM
114. ___'easter : NOR
115. "Boardwalk Empire" network : HBO


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

3 comments :

BruceB said...

30:47, no errors. Originally entered NO RETURNS in 3D, slowed me down a bit.

Glenn said...

No errors. Very clean grid, very consistent theme.

Anonymous said...

Interesting. My local paper published this puzzle, which isn't in the same logical sequence that Bill mentioned. I thought the puzzle should have been the one published on 19 Jun 2016, not 21 Jul 2013. Guess my paper wasn't the only one doing this, unless the syndication rules for the Sunday version changed again.

I do note that the weekday NYT crossword apparently still follows convention as it's the 23 May edition.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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