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0728-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Jul 13, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Andrew Reynolds
THEME: Fast Work … Henry Ford provides our theme today, with lots of themed clues that refer back to his career. Also, we build ourselves a Ford MODEL T using the letters circled in the grid. We start with an M and then add a letter every fourth line, moving the starting M to the left by one letter each time we add something to the end of the word, finally arriving at MODEL T:
62A. Like the 116-Across : MASS-PRODUCED
116A. 5-Down unit : MODEL T
5D. Business titan born July 30, 1863 : HENRY FORD
16D. Feature of a 57-Down : CONVEYOR BELT
57D. 5-Down innovation : ASSEMBLY LINE
78D. 116-Across, colloquially : TIN LIZZIE
85D. Where 5-Down's company gets an "F"? : NYSE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. "30 Rock" or "3rd Rock From the Sun" : SITCOM
“30 Rock” is a sitcom on NBC that was created by the show’s star Tina Fey. Fey is an ex-performer and writer from “Saturday Night Live” and uses her experiences on that show as a basis for the “30 Rock” storyline. “30 Rock” aired its last episode in early 2013.

19. P.G.A. event played on Father's Day : US OPEN
Golf’s US Open Championship is held on the third Sunday of every June, which happens to be Father’s Day. The first US Open was held in 1894, over 36 holes played over one day on a 9-hole course in Newport, Rhode Island.

20. Company in a 2001 merger with Chevron : TEXACO
Texaco gets its name from "The TEXA-s CO-mpany". Today's it's just a brand name owned by Chevron, but it used to be its own operation, founded as the Texas Fuel Company in 1901.

21. Old TV component : TRIODE
A triode is like a diode, in that it had a cathode from which electrons flow to an anode. However, there is a third terminal called a grid, between the cathode and anode. By applying a potential to the grid, the flow of electrons can be regulated.

27. Wordsworth's "___ to Duty" : ODE
William Wordsworth wrote his poem “Ode to Duty” in 1805. In the poem, Wordsworth uses the term “duty” to mean a devotion to things such as childhood hope and an alignment with natural world. I guess the message is “leave the rat race behind”.

29. ___ Peninsula : MALAY
The Malay Peninsula is that long, thin land mass that forms the southern-most part of the Asian mainland. On the peninsula are the countries of Malaysia, Thailand, Burma (Myanmar) and Singapore (an island nation off the southern tip of the peninsula). People of the Malay ethnic group are mainly found on the Malay peninsula.

35. Suffix with green or bean : -ERY
A beanery is an inexpensive restaurant.

42. Cobra's foe : MONGOOSE
The mongoose has no relationship with the "goose" as such, as "mongoose" is derived from "mangus", an Indian name for the beast. The mongoose does indeed eat snakes as part of its diet, along with other small creatures. However, it usually avoids the dangerous cobra, although humans have used the mongoose to fight cobras for sport and entertainment. The mongoose fares well against poisonous snakes because the it is agile and wily, and has a thick skin, literally.

Our word “melee” comes from the French “mêlée”. In both languages the word means a "confused fight".

50. GMC truck : SIERRA
The GMC Sierra truck is also sold as the Chevrolet Silverado.

51. GPS lines: Abbr. : RDS
GPS stands for Global Positioning System. The modern GPS system that we use today was built by the US military who received the massive funding needed because of fears during the Cold War of the use of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles. We civilians all round the world owe a lot to President Ronald Reagan because he directed the military to make GPS technology available to the public for the common good. President Reagan was moved to do so after the Soviet Union shot down KAL flight 007 carrying 269 people, just because the plane strayed accidentally into Soviet airspace.

52. Texas athletic site : ALAMODOME
The Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas opened for business in 1993. The Alamodome was home to the San Antonio Spurs basketball from 1993 to 2002.Today the facility hosts many sporting events, including football and ice hockey games. It is also used as a convention center.

54. Dive, maybe : BAR
The use of the term “dive” to mean a “disreputable bar” dates back to the late 1800s. It is suggested that the term arose because such bars tended to be located in basements and so one had had to “dive” below street level to enter such an establishment.

58. Robed ruler : EMIR
An emir is a prince or chieftain, most notably in the Middle East. In English, “emir” can also be written as “amir” and “ameer” (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

59. Seminary subj. : REL
Originally, a seminary was where plants were raised from seeds, as “semen” is the Latin word “seed”. The first schools labelled as seminaries were established in the late 1500s. Those first schools were more likely to be academies for young ladies back then, rather than for trainee priests.

60. New newt : EFT
Newts wouldn't be my favorite animals. They are found all over the world living on land or in water depending on the species, but always associated with water even if it is only for breeding. Newts metamorphose through three distinct developmental stages during their lives. They start off as larvae in water, fertilized eggs that often cling to aquatic plants. The eggs hatch into tadpoles, the first developmental form of the newt. After living some months as tadpoles swimming around in the water, they undergo another metamorphosis, sprouting legs and replacing their external gills with lungs. At this juvenile stage they are known as efts, and leave the water to live on land. A more gradual transition takes place then, as the eft takes on the lizard-like appearance of the adult newt.

61. Cons : HAS
To “have” someone is to “con” him or her.

67. Common pg. size : LTR
Like so many things it seems, our paper sizes here in North America don't conform with the standards in the rest of the world. ISO standard sizes used elsewhere have some logic behind them in that the ratio of width to length is usually one to the square root of two. This mathematical relationship means that when you cut a piece of paper in two each half preserves the aspect ratio of the original, which can be useful in making reduced or enlarged copies of documents. Our standard size of "letter" (8.5 x 11 inches) was determined in 1980 by the Reagan administration to be the official paper size for the US government. Prior to this, the "legal" size (8.5 x 14 inches) had been the standard, since 1921.

69. Auto safety feature, for short : ABS
The first anti-lock braking system (ABS) was actually developed for use on aircraft, in 1929. The system reduced braking distances for aircraft by 30% because pilots were able to apply a full braking force immediately on landing instead of applying gradual pressure to avoid skidding.

77. Seventh letter : ETA
Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character "H".

82. Strong-smelling cheese : STILTON
Stilton is a lovely village in Cambridgeshire in England, and is the original home of the delicious blue cheese called Stilton.

88. How many Playboy bunnies dress : SCANTILY
Playboy Bunnies are waitresses at a Playboy Club. Playboy Bunnies wear costumes that are reminiscent of the Playboy rabbit mascot, with a collar, cuffs and a fluffy tail.

92. "No ___!" : MAS
"No mas!" translates from Spanish as "no more!".

95. N.F.L. owner who moved the Cleveland Browns to Baltimore in 1996 : ART MODELL
Art Modell was the team owner for the Cleveland Browns from 1961-1995 and for the Baltimore Raven from 1996-2004.

97. She outwitted Sherlock : IRENE
The character Irene Adler only appeared in one of the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In that story, “A Scandal in Bohemia”, Holmes expresses remarkable admiration for Adler as a woman and as a foe. As a result, derivative works in the Holmes genre often feature Adler as something of a romantic interest for Sherlock.

102. Versailles resident : ROI
Versailles is a city located just 10 miles from the center of Paris. It is famous of course as home to the magnificent Palace of Versailles.

105. Polo ground? : ORIENT
Marco Polo was a merchant from Venice and a famous traveler throughout Asia. Polo journeyed with his father and uncle on an epic tour of Central Asia and China that lasted 24 years. Marco tends to be the member of the party we remember today though, because it was he who documented their travels in a book called "Il Milione".

106. Gargoyle features, often : SPOUTS
Gargoyles are fabulous carvings placed on the side of a building. The gargoyle includes an internal spout which is designed to convey water collected on the roof away from the walls of the building. The term “gargoyle” comes from the French “gargouille” which can mean “throat, gullet”.

109. Showy shrub : AZALEA
Azaleas are very toxic to horses, sheep and goats, but strangely enough cause no problem for cats or dogs. And if you go to Korea you might come across "Tug Yonju", which is azalea wine made from the plant's blossoms.

114. "Feeling Good" chanteuse : SIMONE
Nina Simone was the stage name of Eunice Waymon. Simone was very much associated with jazz music, although she really wanted to be a classical musician early in her career, inspired by a love for the music of Bach.

116. 5-Down unit : MODEL T
The Ford Model T was the first really affordable car that was offered for sale, and it was produced from 1908 to 1927. It was the Model T that ushered in the era of assembly line production, which greatly cut down the cost of manufacture. The Model T's engine was designed to run on petrol, kerosene or ethanol.

117. Consumer Reports employee : TESTER
“Consumer Reports” is a monthly magazine that has been published by Consumers Union since 1936. Consumers Union was established as a non-profit organization with the mission to “test products, inform the public, and protect customers.”

Down
2. Bear, in Baja : OSO
Baja California is both the most northern, and the most western, of the Mexican states.

3. 2012 Emmy winner for Outstanding Drama Series : HOMELAND
“Homeland” is a psychological drama shown on Showtime about a CIA officer who is convinced that a certain US Marine is a threat to the security of the United States. The show is based on a series from Israeli television called “Hatufim” (Prisoners of War”). I watched the first season of “Homeland” not too long ago, and recommend it …

4. "L'Africaine," e.g. : OPERA
"L'Africaine" (“The African Woman” in English) is a grand opera by German composer Giacomo Meyerbeer. The opera deals with fictitious events in the life of explorer Vasco da Gama.

5. Business titan born July 30, 1863 : HENRY FORD
The industrialist Henry Ford was born in Michigan, and was the son of an Irish immigrant from County Cork. Ford’s most famous vehicle was the one that revolutionized the industry: the Model T. Ford’s goal with the Model T was to build a car that was simple to drive and and easy and cheap to purchase and repair. The Model T cost $825 in 1908, which isn’t much over $20,000 in today’s money.

7. Grp. that rarely meets during the summer : PTA
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

10. Light show light : LASER BEAM
The term “laser” comes from an acronym, “Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation” (LASER). It has been pointed out that a more precise name for laser technology is “Light Oscillation by Stimulated Emission of Radiation”, but the resulting acronym isn't quite so appealing, namely LOSER …

12. Hip-hop's ___ Def : MOS
Mos Def is the stage name of actor and rapper Dante Terrell Smith-Bay. Mos Def is one of the few rap stars who is really making a name for himself in the world of movies. He received critical acclaim for roles in 2003's "The Italian Job" , 2005's "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy", and a featured role in an episode of television's "House".

13. Blasted : STEWED
Blasted, stewed, very drunk …

14. "Garfield" waitress : IRMA
“Garfield” is a comic strip drawn by Jim Davis since 1978. Garfield is an orange tabby cat. Davis named his hero Garfield after his own grandfather.

26. Genetic enzyme : RNASE
RNase is short for Ribonuclease. In general, enzyme names usually end with the suffix -ase, with the prefix indicating what the enzyme acts on. In the case, RNase is an enzyme that breaks down RNA, an important clean up operation in cells removing RNA that is no longer needed.

28. Fictional character with steel pincers for hands : DR NO
"Dr. No" may have been the first film in the wildly successful James Bond franchise, but it was the sixth novel in the series of books penned by Ian Fleming. Fleming was inspired to write the story after reading the Fu Manchu tales by Sax Rohmer. If you've read the Rohmer books or seen the films, you'll recognize the similarities between the characters Dr. No and Fu Manchu.

41. Tobiko, in Japanese cuisine : ROE
Tobiko is the Japanese name for the roe of flying fish. We sometimes come across tobiko in California rolls.

44. A Beatle : STARR
Ringo Starr's real name is Richard Starkey. Before he joined the Beatles (replacing drummer Pete Best), Starkey played with the Raving Texans. It was with the Raving Texans that he adopted the name "Ringo Starr", because he wore a lot of rings and he thought it sounded "cowboyish". Back then his drum solos were billed as "Starr Time".

47. He wrote "I exist, that is all, and I find it nauseating" : SARTRE
John-Paul Sartre was a leading French philosopher, as well as a writer and political activist. Sartre was one of the few people to have been awarded a Nobel Prize and to have then refused to accept it. He was named winner of the prize for Literature in 1964, for his first novel "Nausea". Before his win, Sartre knew that his name was on the list of nominees so he wrote to the Nobel Institute and asked to be withdrawn from consideration. The letter somehow went unread, so he found himself having to refuse the award after he had been selected.

50. Hook's hand : SMEE
In J. M. Barrie's play and novel about Peter Pan, Smee is one of Captain Hook's pirates and is Hook's right-hand man. Smee is described by Barrie as being "Irish" and "a man who stabbed without offence". Nice guy!

52. Wake-up times, for short : AMS
The 12-hour clock has been around a long time, and was even used in sundial format in Ancient Egypt. Our use of AM and PM dates back to Roman times, with AM standing for Ante Meridiem (before noon) and PM standing for Post Meridiem (after noon). However, the Romans originally used the AM concept a little differently, by counting backwards from noon. So, 2AM to the Romans would be two hours before noon, or 10AM as we would call it today.

53. Tolkien creatures : ORCS
According to the author Tolkien, Orcs are small humanoids that live in his fantasy world of Middle-earth (also called “Mordor”). They are very ugly and dirty, and are fond of eating human flesh.

56. Many a Dream Act beneficiary : LATINO
The DREAM Act is proposed legislation that has been floating Washington around since 2001. The bill provides permanent residency to some immigrants who are deemed to be of good character and who have fulfilled certain conditions mainly related to education or to public service. The acronym DREAM stands for “Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors”.

58. Latin 101 verb : ESSE
“Esse” is the Latin for “to be”. “Sum” means “I am” and “erat” means “he, she was”.

64. Northeast university town : ORONO
The town of Orono is home to the University of Maine, founded in 1862. The college is actually located on an island (Marsh island) lying between the Penobscot and Stillwater rivers. The town of Orono is named after Joseph Orono, a chief of the Penobscot Nation.

65. Getup : DUDS
“Duds” is an informal word for clothing, coming from the word “dudde” that was used around 1300 as the name for a cloak.

66. Pac-12 player : UTE
The Runnin' Utes are the basketball team of the University of Utah. The team was given the nickname the Runnin' Redskins back when Jack Gardner was the head coach from 1953 to 1971. The "Runnin'" part of the name was chosen because Gardner was famous for playing quick offenses. The "Redskins" name was later dropped in favor of the less controversial "Utes".

75. Ending with cyto- : PLASM
The word "protoplasm" comes from the Greek, meaning first (protos) thing formed (plasma). It is the name given to the cell contents, everything that is surrounded by the plasma membrane. The protoplasm in most cells is divided into two parts, the cytoplasm which surrounds the nucleus, and the nucleoplasm found within the nucleus.

76. Space rock, maybe : METEOROID
A shooting star is what we call the visible path of a meteoroid as is it enters the earth’s atmosphere. Almost all meteoroids burn up, but if one is large enough to survive and reach the ground, we call it a meteorite. The word “meteor” comes from the Greek “meteōros” meaning “high in the air”.

78. 116-Across, colloquially : TIN LIZZIE
“Tin LIzzie” was a familiar name used for the Ford Model T.

84. Pearl Buck heroine : O-LAN
Pearl S. Buck's novel "The Good Earth" won a Pulitzer in 1932, and helped Buck win the Nobel Prize for literature a few years later. The story tells of life in a Chinese village and follows the fortunes of Wang Lung and his wife O-Lan. Although "The Good Earth" has been around for decades, it hit the bestseller list again in 2004 when it was a pick for Oprah's Book Club.

85. Where 5-Down's company gets an "F"? : NYSE
The Ford Motor Company is denoted on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) by the later “F”.

88. Casting source for some H'wood comedies : SNL
NBC first aired a form of "Saturday Night Live" (SNL) in 1975 under the title "NBC's Saturday Night". The show was actually created to give Johnny Carson some time off from "The Tonight Show". Back then "The Tonight Show" had a weekend episode, and Carson convinced NBC to pull the Saturday or Sunday recordings off the air and hold them for subsequent weeknights in which Carson needed a break. NBC turned to Lorne Michaels and asked him to put together a variety show to fill the vacant slot, and he came up with what we now call "Saturday Night Live".

91. Harvey of "Taxi Driver" : KEITEL
Harvey Keitel is an actor from New York City who grew up in Brighton Beach. He is best known for playing “tough guy” roles, as he did in “Reservoir Dogs”, “Pulp Fiction” and “Taxi Driver”.

"Taxi Driver" is a remarkable 1976 movie directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Robert De Niro. The film is remarkable for some great performances, but also for sparking an attempt on the life of President Ronald Reagan. Would-be assassin John Hinkley, Jr. tried to kill the President in order to impress Jodie Foster, with whom he had been obsessed since seeing her performance in the film as child prostitute Iris Steensma.

94. "The Big Bang Theory" co-creator Chuck : LORRE
Chuck Lorre created many great sitcoms that have stood the test of time. Included in the list of his shows are “Grace Under Fire”, “Cybil”, “Dharma & Greg”, “Two and a Half Men” and “The Big Bang Theory”. Lorre is famous for the “vanity cards” that appear for a few seconds at the end of his shows. The cards include a message directly from Lorre, perhaps an observation on life, and maybe something quite controversial. CBS has had to censor several of Lorre’s vanity cards, but you can read the uncensored versions on his website.

98. Lots : REAMS
A ream is 500 sheets of paper. As there were 24 sheets in a quire, and 20 quires made up a ream, there used to be 480 sheets in a ream. Ever since that standard was changed to 500, a 480-sheet packet of paper has been called a "short ream".

101. Status quo ___ : ANTE
"Status quo ante" is a Latin term meaning “the way things were before”. The phrase is used in the Law to describe the returning of a situation to the state in which it previously existed.

104. Brewery fixture : OAST
An oast is a kiln used for drying hops as part of the brewing process. Such a structure might also be called an "oast house".

106. Cooke of soul : SAM
Sam Cooke was a soul singer from Clarksdale, Mississippi. Cooke is considered by many to have been one of the founders of the soul genre. Cooke’s impressive list of hits includes “You Send Me”, Chain Gang” and “Twistin’ the Night Away”. Cooke was only 33 years old when he died. He was shot after a drunken brawl by a motel manager in what was deemed by the courts to be a justifiable homicide.

108. Bygone flier : SST
The most famous supersonic transport (SST) is the retired Concorde. Concorde was developed and produced under an Anglo-French treaty by France’s Aérospatiale and the UK’s British Aircraft Corporation (BAC).

111. ___ Lingus : AER
Aer Lingus is my favorite airline! Well, the service isn't that great, but when I get on board an Aer Lingus plane I feel like I am back in Ireland. Aer Lingus is the national airline of Ireland, with "Aer Lingus" being a phonetic spelling of the Irish "aer-loingeas" meaning "air fleet". These days Aer Lingus can only lay claim to the title of Ireland's oldest airline as it is no longer the biggest. That honor goes to the controversial budget airline called Ryanair.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Holiday cheer : HO HO HO
7. Early round : PRELIM
13. "30 Rock" or "3rd Rock From the Sun" : SITCOM
19. P.G.A. event played on Father's Day : US OPEN
20. Company in a 2001 merger with Chevron : TEXACO
21. Old TV component : TRIODE
22. See 36-Across : MOMENT
23. Tickles : AMUSES
24. Corrects : EMENDS
25. Bobble : ERROR
27. Wordsworth's "___ to Duty" : ODE
28. Short race? : DWARVES
29. ___ Peninsula : MALAY
31. Opposite of eternally : NEVERMORE
35. Suffix with green or bean : -ERY
36. With 22-Across, shortly : IN A
37. Accident marker : FLARE
39. Subject of many a war : BOUNDARY
42. Cobra's foe : MONGOOSE
44. Melee : SET-TO
45. Whole ___ : FOODS
48. Stamp, perhaps : ENDORSE
49. Express : STATE
50. GMC truck : SIERRA
51. GPS lines: Abbr. : RDS
52. Texas athletic site : ALAMODOME
54. Dive, maybe : BAR
55. Molding material : CLAY
58. Robed ruler : EMIR
59. Seminary subj. : REL
60. New newt : EFT
61. Cons : HAS
62. Like the 116-Across : MASS-PRODUCED
67. Common pg. size : LTR
68. "___ magic" : IT’S
69. Auto safety feature, for short : ABS
70. Dead-end jobs, perhaps : RUTS
71. Eye affliction : STYE
72. Pizza order : PIE
73. A computer may be in it : SLEEP MODE
77. Seventh letter : ETA
79. Con : INMATE
81. Narrow valleys : GLENS
82. Strong-smelling cheese : STILTON
86. Lord or lady : NOBLE
87. "Nifty!" : NEATO!
88. How many Playboy bunnies dress : SCANTILY
89. Generosity : LARGESSE
91. Rise : KNOLL
92. "No ___!" : MAS
93. Furtive : SLY
95. N.F.L. owner who moved the Cleveland Browns to Baltimore in 1996 : ART MODELL
97. She outwitted Sherlock : IRENE
99. ___ greens : COLLARD
102. Versailles resident : ROI
103. Is a poor night watchman, say : DOZES
105. Polo ground? : ORIENT
106. Gargoyle features, often : SPOUTS
109. Showy shrub : AZALEA
112. Showy : ORNATE
113. Greets the day : ARISES
114. "Feeling Good" chanteuse : SIMONE
115. Hide-and-seek cheater : PEEKER
116. 5-Down unit : MODEL T
117. Consumer Reports employee : TESTER

Down
1. Run smoothly : HUM
2. Bear, in Baja : OSO
3. 2012 Emmy winner for Outstanding Drama Series : HOMELAND
4. "L'Africaine," e.g. : OPERA
5. Business titan born July 30, 1863 : HENRY FORD
6. Not conned by : ONTO
7. Grp. that rarely meets during the summer : PTA
8. Take off : REMOVE
9. Give off : EXUDE
10. Light show light : LASER BEAM
11. Put away : ICE
12. Hip-hop's ___ Def : MOS
13. Blasted : STEWED
14. "Garfield" waitress : IRMA
15. Balcony, e.g. : TIER
16. Feature of a 57-Down : CONVEYOR BELT
17. More curious : ODDER
18. Unkempt : MESSY
26. Genetic enzyme : RNASE
28. Fictional character with steel pincers for hands : DR NO
29. Give the silent treatment? : MIME
30. Before long, poetically : ANON
32. Before, poetically : ERE
33. Words to live by : MOTTO
34. Exposed : OUTED
38. Failed investment : LOSS
40. Off course : AFIELD
41. Tobiko, in Japanese cuisine : ROE
43. Bloody : GORY
44. A Beatle : STARR
46. Poorly insulated, say : DRAFTY
47. He wrote "I exist, that is all, and I find it nauseating" : SARTRE
49. Bobble : SLIP
50. Hook's hand : SMEE
52. Wake-up times, for short : AMS
53. Tolkien creatures : ORCS
55. Impressive golf shot : CHIP IN
56. Many a Dream Act beneficiary : LATINO
57. 5-Down innovation : ASSEMBLY LINE
58. Latin 101 verb : ESSE
62. Get down pat : MASTER
63. Up to the task : ABLE
64. Northeast university town : ORONO
65. Getup : DUDS
66. Pac-12 player : UTE
71. Winter sprinkle : SALT
74. Discharge : EGEST
75. Ending with cyto- : PLASM
76. Space rock, maybe : METEOROID
77. List ender : ET AL
78. 116-Across, colloquially : TIN LIZZIE
80. Like : A LA
82. Shrew : SCOLD
83. Bit of TV real estate : TIMESLOT
84. Pearl Buck heroine : O-LAN
85. Where 5-Down's company gets an "F"? : NYSE
87. Bookworm, maybe : NERD
88. Casting source for some H'wood comedies : SNL
90. Hose holder : GARTER
91. Harvey of "Taxi Driver" : KEITEL
93. Cone filler : SCOOP
94. "The Big Bang Theory" co-creator Chuck : LORRE
96. Extinguish : DOUSE
98. Lots : REAMS
100. Tip for a reporter, maybe : LEAK
101. Status quo ___ : ANTE
104. Brewery fixture : OAST
106. Cooke of soul : SAM
107. For : PRO
108. Bygone flier : SST
110. Phoenix-to-Albuquerque dir. : ENE
111. ___ Lingus : AER


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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