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0811-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 11 Aug 13, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Schoenholz
THEME: Added Satisfaction … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase but with an added “AH” inserted:
26A. Where most things rank in importance to a Muslim? : AFTER ALLAH (“after all” plus “ah”)
42A. Webster's directive to the overly formal? : JUST SAY NOAH (“just say ‘no’” plus “ah”)
62A. Equipment list for a hashish-smoking fisherman? : HOOKAH, LINE AND SINKER (“hook, line and sinker” plus “ah”)
86A. Departed from Manama, maybe? : LEFT BAHRAIN (“left brain” plus “ah”)
102A. Niece's polite interruption? : AUNTIE, AHEM (“Auntie Em” plus “ah”)
25D. Welcome look from a Bedouin? : SAHARA SMILE (“Sara Smile” plus “ah”)
52D. What many Bay Area skiers do on winter weekends? : HEAD TO TAHOE (“head to toe” plus “ah”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 34m 18s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. 1977 double-platinum Steely Dan album : AJA
Steely Dan's heyday was in the seventies when they toured for a couple of years, although the group mainly focused on studio work. The band was formed in 1972 and broke up in 1981. The core of the band reunited in 1993 and they are still going strong today.

13. Capacitance measure : FARAD
A body is said to have a certain capacitance when it can store an electrical charge. The SI unit of capacitance is the farad, a unit that is named after the physicist Michael Faraday.

18. Newfoundland explorer : CABOT
Giovanni Caboto (known in English as “John Cabot”) was an Italian explorer. Cabot is believed to have been the first European to visit North America since the Vikings landed here in the 11th century. Many say that he landed in Newfoundland in 1497.

22. Vaquero's rope : RIATA
"Riata" is another name for a lariat or a lasso. "Riata" comes from "reata", the Spanish word for lasso.

"Vaquero" is the Spanish word for a "cowboy".

26. Where most things rank in importance to a Muslim? : AFTER ALLAH (“after all” plus “ah”)
The term “Allah” comes from the Arabic “al-” and “ilah”, meaning “the” and “deity”. So “Allah” translates as “God”.

28. Foe of Frodo : ORC
According to Tolkien, Orcs are small humanoids that live in his fantasy world of Middle-earth (also called “Mordor”). They are very ugly and dirty, and are fond of eating human flesh.

Frodo Baggins is a principal character in J. R. R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings". Frodo is a Hobbit, and was charged with the quest of destroying Sauron's Ring in the fires of Mount Doom.

30. Fannie ___ : MAE
The Federal National Mortgage Association is commonly called Fannie Mae, a play on the acronym FNMA.

42. Webster's directive to the overly formal? : JUST SAY NOAH (“just say ‘no’” plus “ah”)
Not only is Noah Webster's name inextricably linked with his series of dictionaries, but he is also renowned as an advocate for English spelling reform. He argued that "traditional" English is hard to learn, and that it should be simplified and standardized. He published spelling books that were used in schools, and from edition to edition he changed the spelling of words in order to simplify the language. Examples are the use of "s" over "c" in words like "defense" (In Ireland we have defence and defense depending on usage), "-re" became "-er" as in center instead of centre (reversing the influence of French), and he dropped one of the Ls in words like traveler (I learned "traveller"). Mind you, he also spelled "tongue" as "tung", but he didn't get very far with that one.

47. Folder's declaration : I'M OUT
In poker, say, a player can say “I fold, I’m out”.

49. Upper ___ : VOLTA
Burkina Faso is an inland country in western Africa. The country used to be called the Republic of Upper Volta and was renamed in 1984 to Burkina Faso meaning “the land of upright people”.

51. Madam : BAWD
A madam is the female equivalent of a pimp, someone who lives off the earnings of prostitutes. Usually a madam is associated with a brothel.

55. Series of measures : STANZA
"Stanza" is the Italian word for a "verse of a poem".

57. Burns books? : POESY
“Poesy” is an alternative name for poetry, often used to mean the “art of poetry”.

Robert Burns is a cultural icon in Scotland and for Scots around the world. As a poet, Burns was a pioneer in the Romantic movement in the second half of the 18th century. One of his most famous works is the poem “Auld Lang Syne”, which has been set to the tune of a traditional Scottish folk song and is used to celebrate the New Year in the English-speaking world.

61. Exchange news? : MERGER
A merger of two companies would be news on a stock exchange.

62. Equipment list for a hashish-smoking fisherman? : HOOKAH, LINE AND SINKER (“hook, line and sinker” plus “ah”)
A hookah is a waterpipe, a device for smoking tobacco in which the smoke is passed through a water basin before it is inhaled.

78. Way, in Pompeii : ITER
“Iter” is the Latin for “road”.

The ancient city of Pompeii is situated close to Naples in Italy. Pompeii was destroyed in AD 79 by the eruption of the volcano Vesuvius. The city was completely lost from that time, and was only rediscovered in 1748. Excavations have uncovered the remarkably well-preserved buildings and roads, and Pompeii now attracts over 2 million visitors annually.

79. Berlin Olympics hero : OWENS
Jesse Owens is of course famous for winning four gold medals at the Berlin Olympic Games in 1936, much to the chagrin of Adolph Hitler. Jesse's real name was James Cleveland Owens, and he went by "JC" as a child. However, his Alabama accent was misconstrued at school when his family moved to Cleveland, so teachers and classmates called him "Jesse" instead of "JC", and the name stuck.

82. Word on either side of "à" : VIS
We use the French phrase "vis-a-vis" to mean "with regard to" or "in relation to". The literal translation from the French is "face to face". When we imported the phrase into English in the mid-1700s, it had two other meanings that were more faithful to the original. Firstly, it could be a "face to face" meeting (not so today), and secondly, it was a type of carriage in which the occupants faced each other.

84. ___ Plaines : DES
Des Plaines, Illinois is a suburb of Chicago that is located next to O’Hare International Airport. The city is named for the Des Plaines river that runs through the suburb.

85. 1986 rock autobiography : I, TINA
"I, Tina" is the 1986 autobiography of Tina Turner. The book was so successful it was adapted into a movie called "What's Love Got to Do With It?" The film version was released in 1993 and starring Angela Bassett as Tina Turner.

86. Departed from Manama, maybe? : LEFT BAHRAIN (“left brain” plus “ah”)
Bahrain is an island nation located off the coast of Saudi Arabia in the Persian Gulf. Bahrain is connected to Saudi Arabia by a series of causeways and bridges constructed in the eighties.

Manama is the capital of Bahrain.

90. Hand for a mariachi band? : MANO
The name "mariachi", used for a typically Mexican popular band, is said to be a corruption of the French word for "marriage" (i.e. "mariage"). This perhaps dates back to the times of Napoleon II when France had political and cultural influence over Spain.

95. The South, once: Abbr. : CSA
The Confederate States of America (CSA) set up government in 1861 just before Abraham Lincoln took office. Jefferson Davis was selected as President of the CSA at its formation and retained the post for the life of the government.

98. Número of countries bordering Guatemala : CUATRO
In Spanish, the number (número) of countries bordering Guatemala is four (cuatro). Those bordering countries are Mexico, Belize, Honduras and El Salvador.

Guatemala in Central America became independent from Spain in 1821, first becoming part of the Mexican Empire and then, two years later, completely independent.

102. Niece's polite interruption? : AUNTIE, AHEM (“Auntie Em” plus “ah”)
In “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”, Dorothy lives with her Aunt Em and Uncle Henry.

108. Antiknock additive : ETHYL
The Ethyl Corporation produced the controversial anti-knock fuel additive known as Ethyl, actually tetra-ethyl lead (and we are still living with the consequences).

109. Caustic : ACERB
“Acerb” is a variant of “acerbic”, meaning sour or bitter-tasting, acidic.

113. Part of a barrel : STAVE
The word "stave" was originally the plural of "staff", a wooden rod. To "stave off" originated with the concept of holding off with a staff. In the world of barrel-making, a stave is a narrow strip of wood that forms part of a barrel’s sides.

Down
1. "Skedaddle!" : SCRAM
"Skedaddle " is a slang term meaning "run away" that dates back to the Civil War.

2. Eastern Mediterranean port : HAIFA
Haifa is the third-largest city in Israel and the largest city in the north of the country. Haifa is built on the slopes of Mount Carmel, and is a Mediterranean seaport.

4. Speck : MOTE
"Mote" is just another word for a speck of dust.

7. Moon goddess : LUNA
“Luna” is the Latin word for “moon”, and is the name given to the Roman moon goddess. The Greek equivalent of Luna was Selene. Luna had a temple on the Aventine Hill in Rome but it was destroyed during the Great Fire that raged during the reign of Nero.

8. "Whole" thing : ENCHILADA
“Enchilada” is the past participle of the Spanish word “enchilar” meaning “to add chile pepper to”. An enchilada is a basically a corn tortilla rolled around some filling and then covered in chili pepper sauce.

10. Actress Woodard : ALFRE
Alfre Woodard is an actress from Tulsa, Oklahoma. Woodard was nominated for an Oscar for her performance in the 1983 film “Cross Creek”. Off the stage and screen she is very active in the Democratic Party.

11. Old ad figure with a big nose : JOE CAMEL
The advertising mascot for Camel cigarettes was officially known as "Old Joe", but was popularly known as "Joe Camel". Joe originated in the seventies, in an advertising campaign that ran only in Europe where sometimes he was depicted wearing a French Foreign Legion cap. He was imported to the US in 1988 on the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the Camel brand. The big controversy surrounding the use of the camel character was that a 1991 study found that 5-6 year old children could recognize Joe Camel more readily than either Mickey Mouse or Fred Flintstone. Also, soon after Old Joe was introduced in the US, the Camel brand's share of the illegal market to underage smokers went up from 1% to just under 33%.

12. Turkish big shot : AGA
"Aga" (also "agha") is a title that was used by both civil and military officials in the Ottoman Empire.

19. Organized society : POLITY
A polity is the form of government of a nation, or perhaps a state, church or organization. Another term for polity might be "body politic".

25. Welcome look from a Bedouin? : SAHARA SMILE (“Sara Smile” plus “ah”)
“Sara Smile” was the first US Top 10 hit for the duo Hall & Oates.

Bedouin tribes are Arab ethnic groups that predominantly live in the Middle East, in desert areas. Bedouin tribes tend to be nomadic, not settling permanently in one location.

27. Jessica of "Valentine's Day" : ALBA
Actress Jessica Alba got her big break when she was cast in the Fox science fiction show “Dark Angel”. Alba had a tough life growing up as she spent a lot of time in hospital and so found it difficult to develop friendships. As a youngster she twice had a collapsed lung, frequently caught pneumonia, suffered from asthma, had a ruptured appendix and a tonsular cyst. On top of all that she acknowledges that she suffered from obsessive-compulsive disorder as a child. It seems that she has really turned her life around ...

33. Not so hot : MEH
“Meh!” is one of those terms unfamiliar to me outside of crosswords. It is a modern colloquialism meaning “I’m not great, but not bad”. A friendly reader of this blog tells me that the usage of the term increased dramatically after it started to appear regularly in "The Simpsons" starting in the early nineties.

35. Game for those who don't like to draw : STUD POKER
Stud poker is the name given to many variants of the card game, all characterized by the dealer giving each player a mix of cards face-down and face-up. The cards facing downwards are called "hole cards", cards only visible to the individual who holds that particular hand. That gives rise to the phrase "ace in the hole", a valuable holding of which only that player is aware.

40. German W.W. II tank : PANZER
“Panzer” is a German word meaning “tank” or “armor”. We use the term in English as a familiar name for models of German tank, in particular the Panzerkampfwagen IV that was used extensively in WWII.

42. Foresail : JIB
A jib is a triangular sail that is set at the bow of a sailboat.

43. Thurman of "Kill Bill" : UMA
Robert Thurman was the first westerner to be ordained a Tibetan Buddhist monk. Robert raised his children in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition and called his daughter "Uma" as it is a phonetic spelling of the Buddhist name "Dbuma".

“Kill Bill” is a 3-part Quentin Tarantino movie (so I haven’t seen it!). “Kill Bill” started off as one film, but as the running time was over four hours, it was split into two “volumes”, released several months apart in 2003 and 2004. There are now plans to make “Kill Bill: Volume 3”.

45. 1953 A.L. M.V.P. Al : ROSEN
Al Rosen is a former Major League baseball player who played his whole career with the Cleveland Indians. As one of the best all-time players of the game with a Jewish heritage, his fans gave him the nickname "the Hebrew Hammer".

49. Ancient Hindu scripture : VEDA
The Vedas are a body of ancient Indian texts, the oldest Hindu scriptures. The word “véda” is Sanskrit, and means “knowledge, wisdom”.

50. Often-blue garden blooms : LARKSPURS
Larkspur is the common name for about 40 species of flowering plant. The sepals, or calyx, of the larkspur is spur-shaped, giving the plant its name.

52. What many Bay Area skiers do on winter weekends? : HEAD TO TAHOE (“head to toe” plus “ah”)
Lake Tahoe is up in the Sierra Nevada mountains, right on the border between California and Nevada. Lake Tahoe is the largest alpine lake in the country. It's also the second deepest lake, with only the beautiful Crater Lake in Oregon being deeper. Given its location, there are tall casinos that sit right on the shore on the Nevada side of the state line where gambling is legal.

53. ___Kosh B'Gosh : OSH-
OshKosh B'Gosh is a company that produces and sells children's clothes. The trademark OshKosh bib-overalls remind us of the company's roots, as it was originally a manufacturer of adult work clothes based in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

58. 1930s migrant : OKIE
“Okies” was a derogatory term used during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s for farming families who migrated from Oklahoma (hence the name), Arkansas, Kansas and Texas in search of agricultural jobs in California. The road used by many of these migrant families was Route 66, which is also called “Mother Road”.

63. Mate for Shrek : OGRESS
Before "Shrek" was a successful movie franchise and Broadway musical, it was a children's picture book called "Shrek!" authored and illustrated by William Steig. The title "Shrek!" came from the German/Yiddish word Schreck, meaning "fear" or "terror".

64. Trump, for one : IVANA
Ivana Winklmayr was born in Czechoslovakia. Winklmayr was an excellent skier, and was named as an alternate for the 1982 Czech Olympic Team. She was promoting the Montreal Olympics in New York in 1976 when she met Donald Trump. Ivana and Donald's marriage was very public and well-covered by the media, but not nearly so well as their very litigious divorce in 1990.

65. Birds' beaks : NEBS
"Nib" is a Scottish variant of the Old English word "neb", with both meaning the beak of a bird. This usage of "nib" as a beak dates back to the 14th century, with "nib" meaning the tip of a pen or quill coming a little later, in the early 1600s.

66. One who's all wet? : SOT
Our word "sot" comes from the Old English "sott", meaning a fool. The word "sot" started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

67. Queen's "We Will Rock You," to "We Are the Champions" : B-SIDE
Queen is an English rock band that was formed back in 1970. With the help of lead singer Freddie Mercury (now deceased), Queen has a long list of great hits, including “Bohemian Rhapsody”, “We Will Rock You” and “We Are the Champions”. “Bohemian Rhapsody” spent a total of nine weeks at number one in the UK.

73. Quaker cereal : LIFE
Life is a whole grain oat cereal that was introduced in 1961 by the Quaker Oats Company.

75. Determinant of when to do an airport run, for short : ETA
Expected time of arrival (ETA)

76. Hawaii's ___ Day : LEI
What’s known as May Day around the world is also called Lei Day in Hawaii. Lei Day started in the twenties and is a celebration of native Hawaiian culture.

77. Big or top follower : TEN
The Big Ten is the nation's oldest Division I college athletic conference and today is comprised of not ten, but twelve colleges mainly located in the Midwest. The conference was founded in 1896 and earned the name "Big Nine" in 1899 when Iowa and Indiana joined to bring the number of teams in the conference to nine. The conference name was changed to the Big Ten after Michigan rejoined in 1917. Right after WWII, the University of Chicago dropped out so the conference became known as the Big Nine again until 1949. The official designation of "Big Ten" was adopted in 1987 when the conference (once again with with a complement of ten teams) registered as a not-for-profit corporation. It was decided to keep the official name of Big Ten when Penn State joined in 1990 bringing the number of schools to the level of eleven, and even when the University of Nebraska-Lincoln joined in 2011 as the twelfth team.

81. Historic exhibit at Washington Dulles airport : ENOLA GAY
The Enola Gay was the B-29 that dropped the first atomic bomb, on Hiroshima in August 1945. Enola Gay was the name of the mother of pilot Col. Paul W. Tibbets, Jr.

86. "A ___ cannot live": Martin Luther King Jr. : LIE
Martin Luther King Jr's father was born Michael King. On a trip to Germany in 1934, Michael came to admire Protestant leader Martin Luther and changed his name to Martin Luther King on his return the United States. Famously, he passed on his new name to his son: Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

88. Jai ___ : ALAI
Even though jai alai is often said to be the fastest sport in the world because of the speed of the ball, in fact golf balls usually get going at a greater clip.

91. Blossoming business? : FTD
Back in 1910, fifteen florists from around America agreed to fulfill each other's orders using the telegraph system, setting up what they called the Florists' Telegraph Delivery. The concept grew so large that in 1965 the group started to offer international service, and changed its name to Florists' Transworld Delivery (FTD).

92. King Arthur's father : UTHER
According to legend, King Arthur was the son of Uther Pendragon. Uther magically disguised himself as his enemy Gorlois and slept with Gorlois’ wife Igerna, and the result of the union was Arthur.

95. Bamboozle : CHEAT
It's thought that the lovely word "bamboozle" came into English from the Scottish "bombaze" meaning "perplex". We've been using "bamboozle" since the very early 1700s.

97. Insect trapper : AMBER
Amber's technical name is "resinite", reflecting its composition and formation. Amber starts out life as soft sticky tree resin but then under high temperature and pressure from overlying layers of soil, it fossilizes. The sticky resin can trap organisms or other plant matter, and this material can sometimes remain virtually intact inside the amber fossil giving us a unique gift from the past.

98. Intimidates : COWS
The verb "to cow" means to intimidate, to scare. The exact etymology of the term seems unclear.

100. Italian bell town : ATRI
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote "The Sicilian's Tale; The Bell of Atri", a narrative poem set in the small town of Atri in the Abruzzo region of Italy.

104. "30 Rock" setting, briefly : NY, NY
“30 Rock” is a sitcom on NBC that was created by the show’s star Tina Fey. Fey is an ex-performer and writer from “Saturday Night Live” and uses her experiences on that show as a basis for the “30 Rock” storyline. “30 Rock” aired its last episode in early 2013.

105. When Stanley cries "Hey, Stella!" in "A Streetcar Named Desire" : ACT I
“Stella! Hey, Stella!” is a line cried out by Marlon Brando’s character as his wife Stella (played by Kim Hunter) leaves for the last time with her child, in the movie “A Streetcar Named Desire”.

Desire is the name of a neighborhood in New Orleans, a destination for a streetcar line. The name "Desire" appears on the front of streetcars bound for that neighborhood, hence the title, "A Streetcar Named Desire".

107. Beats by ___ (headphones brand) : DRE
Beats by Dre is a brand of audio products that was founded by rapper Dr. Dre.

Dr. Dre is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Phonies : SHAMS
6. Cat nipper? : FLEA
10. 1977 double-platinum Steely Dan album : AJA
13. Capacitance measure : FARAD
18. Newfoundland explorer : CABOT
19. 16 23-Acrosses : POUND
20. Input for a mill : LOG
21. Tolerate : ABIDE
22. Vaquero's rope : RIATA
23. See 19-Across : OUNCE
24. Eat heartily : FEAST UPON
26. Where most things rank in importance to a Muslim? : AFTER ALLAH (“after all” plus “ah”)
28. Foe of Frodo : ORC
29. Certify (to) : ATTEST
30. Fannie ___ : MAE
31. Mid sixth-century year : DLI
32. Casts doubt on : IMPEACHES
35. Low notes? : SUBTITLES
38. Haunted house sound : MOAN
39. Bathroom installation : SPA
42. Webster's directive to the overly formal? : JUST SAY NOAH (“just say ‘no’” plus “ah”)
45. Raises : REARS
46. ___ raise : PAY
47. Folder's declaration : I'M OUT
48. Plaintive : SAD
49. Upper ___ : VOLTA
50. Single : LONE
51. Madam : BAWD
52. Exciting matches? : HOT DATES
55. Series of measures : STANZA
57. Burns books? : POESY
59. Fancy : IDEA
61. Exchange news? : MERGER
62. Equipment list for a hashish-smoking fisherman? : HOOKAH, LINE AND SINKER (“hook, line and sinker” plus “ah”)
67. Baby no longer : BIG KID
68. "Do I ___!" : EVER
69. News of disasters, e.g. : JOLTS
70. One might be mean or cross : STREET
71. Total : ABSOLUTE
74. Hide : PELT
78. Way, in Pompeii : ITER
79. Berlin Olympics hero : OWENS
82. Word on either side of "à" : VIS
83. One getting special instruction : TUTEE
84. ___ Plaines : DES
85. 1986 rock autobiography : I, TINA
86. Departed from Manama, maybe? : LEFT BAHRAIN (“left brain” plus “ah”)
89. Sounds often edited out for radio : ERS
90. Hand for a mariachi band? : MANO
91. "Everything must go" events : FIRE SALES
92. Cover, in a way : UPHOLSTER
94. One may be kept running in a bar : TAB
95. The South, once: Abbr. : CSA
98. Número of countries bordering Guatemala : CUATRO
101. Subsidy : AID
102. Niece's polite interruption? : AUNTIE, AHEM (“Auntie Em” plus “ah”)
106. Close to losing it : ON THE EDGE
108. Antiknock additive : ETHYL
109. Caustic : ACERB
110. Current carriers : WIRES
111. Throwaway publication : RAG
112. Get the old gang together : REUNE
113. Part of a barrel : STAVE
114. Commotions : STIRS
115. Common symbol in hieroglyphics : EYE
116. Depleted of color : ASHY
117. Strength of a solution : TITER

Down
1. "Skedaddle!" : SCRAM
2. Eastern Mediterranean port : HAIFA
3. Lessen : ABATE
4. Speck : MOTE
5. Space specks : STARDUST
6. Fair alternative : FOUL
7. Moon goddess : LUNA
8. "Whole" thing : ENCHILADA
9. Cooler : ADE
10. Actress Woodard : ALFRE
11. Old ad figure with a big nose : JOE CAMEL
12. Turkish big shot : AGA
13. Prepares to eat, perhaps : FATTENS
14. Is against : ABUTS
15. Ready (for) : RIPE
16. Commotions : ADOS
17. Bumper bummer : DENT
19. Organized society : POLITY
25. Welcome look from a Bedouin? : SAHARA SMILE (“Sara Smile” plus “ah”)
27. Jessica of "Valentine's Day" : ALBA
28. Special ___ : OPS
33. Not so hot : MEH
34. Slather : COAT
35. Game for those who don't like to draw : STUD POKER
36. Hip : IN STYLE
37. Contemptible one : TOAD
39. Mooch : SPONGE
40. German W.W. II tank : PANZER
41. Annually : A YEAR
42. Foresail : JIB
43. Thurman of "Kill Bill" : UMA
44. Miss piggy? : SOW
45. 1953 A.L. M.V.P. Al : ROSEN
49. Ancient Hindu scripture : VEDA
50. Often-blue garden blooms : LARKSPURS
52. What many Bay Area skiers do on winter weekends? : HEAD TO TAHOE (“head to toe” plus “ah”)
53. ___Kosh B'Gosh : OSH-
54. Levels : TIERS
56. Festival setup : TENT
58. 1930s migrant : OKIE
60. Tinkers with : ADJUSTS
62. Pitch recipient : HITTER
63. Mate for Shrek : OGRESS
64. Trump, for one : IVANA
65. Birds' beaks : NEBS
66. One who's all wet? : SOT
67. Queen's "We Will Rock You," to "We Are the Champions" : B-SIDE
72. Extends too much credit? : OVERRATES
73. Quaker cereal : LIFE
75. Determinant of when to do an airport run, for short : ETA
76. Hawaii's ___ Day : LEI
77. Big or top follower : TEN
80. One type of 66-Down : WINO
81. Historic exhibit at Washington Dulles airport : ENOLA GAY
83. Beauty's counterpart : THE BEAST
85. Blow away : IMPRESS
86. "A ___ cannot live": Martin Luther King Jr. : LIE
87. Clash : BATTLE
88. Jai ___ : ALAI
91. Blossoming business? : FTD
92. King Arthur's father : UTHER
93. Military blockade : SIEGE
95. Bamboozle : CHEAT
96. Dish (up) : SERVE
97. Insect trapper : AMBER
98. Intimidates : COWS
99. Battalion, e.g. : UNIT
100. Italian bell town : ATRI
103. "No way!" : UH-UH!
104. "30 Rock" setting, briefly : NY, NY
105. When Stanley cries "Hey, Stella!" in "A Streetcar Named Desire" : ACT I
107. Beats by ___ (headphones brand) : DRE
108. Historical period : ERA


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2 comments :

Anonymous said...

"Meh" is from the Simpsons. I understand you are not a big fan. It can refer to anything that does not impress.

Bill Butler said...

Ah, "The Simpsons". I knew about the "D'oh!" origins, but not the "meh". I will go add that to my comments.

Thank you! :)

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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