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0818-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 18 Aug 13, Sunday





QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Elizabeth C. Gorski
THEME: Edginess … the answers around the edge of the grid all need the word LINE to complete them:
69A. Gray areas, maybe ... or a hint to 12 incomplete answers in this puzzle : BORDERLINES
38D. With 56-Down, where to find this puzzle's 12 theme answers : AROUND THE
56D. See 38-Down : PERIMETER

1A. It may come down in a storm : TELEPHONE LINE
10A. Divider in a musical score : BAR LINE
13A. Hang-out locale? : CLOTHES LINE
123A. Supermarket time-saver : EXPRESS LINE
124A. Draw a mark through for cancellation : REDLINE
125A. Means of one-to-one communication : DEDICATED LINE
1D. Movie theater sight : TICKET LINE
19D. Hobby activity : SIDELINE
42D. Court stripe : FREE-THROW LINE
50D. Quarterback protectors : OFFENSIVE LINE
100D. Bottom of a contract : DOTTED LINE
107D. Locale for finished works that haven't yet appeared : PIPELINE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 21:18
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

21. Montréal street : RUE
The original name of Montreal was Ville-Marie, meaning the City of Mary. Ville-Marie is now the name of a borough in the city, the borough which includes the downtown area and "Old Montreal". The present-day city covers most of the Island of Montreal (in French, Île de Montréal) that is located where the Saint Lawrence and Ottawa Rivers meet. The name Montreal comes from the three-headed hill that dominates the island and is called Mount Royal.

22. Chef Boyardee offering : RAVIOLI
The Chef Boyardee brand of canned food products was named after Ettore Boiardi who introduced the product line in the twenties. Boiardi was an Italian immigrant who owned an Italian restaurant in Cleveland, Ohio. He started the line of canned recipes based on the demand for samples of his dishes from satisfied customers at his restaurant.

26. China's Chiang ___-shek : KAI
Chiang Kai-Shek was the leader of the Nationalist Movement in China right through to the end of WWII. The Nationalists lost out in a Civil War to the Communists backed by the Soviet Union after war, and Chiang Kai-Shek and his government were forced to flee to Taiwan. Chiang Kai-shek claimed rule over China from Taiwan until his death in 1975.

31. Loop transports : ELS
The Chicago "L" is the second largest rapid transit system in the US, with the New York City Subway being the largest. The "L" is also the second oldest, again with the New York City Subway system having the honor of being around the longest. Note that the official nickname for the system is the "L" (originally short for "elevated railroad"), although the term "El" is also in common use (especially in crosswords as "ELS"). The L is managed by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA).

The historic commercial center of Chicago is known as the Loop. One theory is that the “loop” got its name from the cable loops in the city’s old cable car system.

32. "There ___ there there" : IS NO
Gertrude Stein wrote the phrase "There is no there there" in her 1937 book “Everybody’s Autobiography”. Stein was prompted to write the words when she heard that the neighborhood in which she grew up in Oakland, California had been torn down to make way for an industrial park. Over time, “there is no there there” has come to be used to describe Oakland in general. The city has responded by placing a statue titled “There” in downtown Oakland.

37. A Bobbsey twin : NAN
The “Bobbsey Twins” series of children’s novels was first written by Edward Stratemeyer in 1904. Stratemeyer used the pseudonym Laura Lee Hope, as did subsequent authors who wrote 72 books in the series between 1904 and 1979. The title characters were two sets of fraternal twins, one called Bert and Nan (who were 12) and the other called Flossie and Freddie (who were 6).

43. "Malice N Wonderland" rapper Snoop ___ : DOGG
The rap star Snoop Dogg's real name is Cordozar Calvin Broadus. He is the most famous protege of the notorious rapper Dr. Dre. Sadly, Snoop Dogg has had numerous run-ins with police all round the world, even after he started to live the good life that came with his fame.

48. "Tootsie" Oscar nominee : TERI GARR
The lovely Teri Garr had a whole host of minor roles in her youth, including appearances in nine Elvis movies. Garr's big break came with the role of Inga in "Young Frankenstein", and her supporting role in "Tootsie" earned Garr an Academy Award nomination. Sadly, Teri Garr suffers from multiple sclerosis. She is a National Ambassador for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

“Tootsie” is a 1982 comedy film starring Dustin Hoffman, directed and produced by Sydney Pollack.

53. Main hood in "Little Caesar," 1931 : RICO
“Little Caesar” is a gangster movie released in 1931. The film was the big break for Edward G. Robinson, who played the title character Caesar “Rico” Bandello.

55. Without face value, as stock : NO-PAR
In days gone by, when companies first issued a stock, each share would be given a face value (called "par value"). In effect, the company was making a commitment not to issue any more stock under that par value, giving investors confidence that there was no better deal to be had. Nowadays, most stock is issued without such a "guarantee" and is called "no-par stock".

58. Two-Face and the Riddler, to Batman : FOES
In the Batman storyline, Harvey Dent was the squeaky-clean District Attorney of Gotham City. Dent worked alongside Batman to fight the city’s crime. However, during a trial of a mob boss, the defendant throws acid at him and scars the left side of Dent’s face. Dent loses his mind and becomes a criminal, calling himself “Two-Face” because of his unfortunate facial features. Two-Face decides whether to do good or evil deeds by flipping a coin.

The Riddler is a supervillain from the Batman universe. He first appeared in “Detective Comics” in 1948. The Riddler’s real name is Edward Nigma, who became obsessed with solving puzzles and winning prizes by cheating at school. He uses his puzzle-solving skills to cheat customers at a carnival, and eventually dons the guise of the Riddler to take on Batman.

59. French children's song : ALOUETTE
The French-Canadian children's song starts with, "Alouette, gentille alouette ..." "Alouette" is the French word for a bird, the "lark". The song is actually pretty gruesome, even though it was used to teach children the names of body parts. The origin of the song lies in the French colonists penchant for eating larks, which they considered to be game birds. So in the song, the singer tells the lark that he/she will pluck off one-by-one the lark's head, nose, eyes, wings and tail.

61. "You Gotta Be" singer, 1994 : DES'REE
Des’ree is an R&B singer from London, England. One of Des'ree's biggest hits is the song “Kissing You”, which was used in the 1996 film adaption of Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes.

62. Allen of "Candid Camera" : FUNT
The hidden-camera prank show called "Candid Camera" was created and produced by Allen Funt, and first aired on television in 1948. The show actually started as "Candid Microphone", a radio series that was broadcast from 1947 until it was eclipsed by the television version.

63. Sister of literature : BRONTE
The Brontë family lived in the lovely village of Haworth in Yorkshire, England. The three daughters all became recognised authors. The first to achieve success was Charlotte Brontë when she published “Jane Eyre”. Then came Emily with “Wuthering Heights” and Anne with “The Tenant of Wildfell Hall”.

68. Sea eagle : ERNE
The ern (also erne) is also called the white-tailed eagle, and the sea-eagle.

71. Kind of lab : METH
“Meth” is a street name used for the drug methamphetamine, also called “crank” and “crystal meth”.

72. Cpl., for one : NCO
An NCO is a non-commissioned officer in the armed forces. Usually such an officer is one who has earned his or her rank by promotion through the enlisted ranks. A good example would be a sergeant.

74. Island group in the Bahamas : BIMINI
Bimini is the western part of the Bahamas, and the closest point to the mainland United States. Bimini was home to Ernest Hemingway from 1935-37, and while there he saw an Atlantic blue marlin captured that weighed about 500 pounds. This catch was the apparent inspiration for his story "The Old Man and the Sea". More recently, in 1987 Senator Gary Hart's political career was derailed when photos of him with model Donna Rice surfaced. The pictures were taken on the yacht "Monkey Business" while docked in Bimini.

75. Province of Saudi Arabia : ‘ASIR
'Asir is a province found in the southwest of Saudi Arabia.

76. Susan who wrote "The Volcano Lover" : SONTAG
Susan Sontag was a writer and political activist from New York City. Sontag wrote extensively on a number of subjects, including photography. She spent the last decade of her life in a relationship with renowned photographer Annie Leibovitz.

"The Volcano Lover" is a novel by Susan Sontag first published in 1992. "The Volcano Lover" in the title is Sir William Hamilton, husband of Emma Hamilton who had a famous affair with Lord Nelson. The novel is set in Naples, which lies in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius.

82. Designer Geoffrey : BEENE
Geoffrey Beene was an American fashion designer. He had an impressive list of clients that included First Ladies Lady Bird Johnson, Pat Nixon and Nancy Reagan.

84. Head of une école? : TETE
"Tête" is the French word for "head".

In French, one might learn a lesson (une leçon) in a school (une école).

90. Being, to Claudius : ESSE
“Esse” is the Latin for “to be”. “Sum” means “I am” and “erat” means “he, she was”.

I find Claudius to be the most fascinating of all the Roman Emperors. Claudius had a lot going against him as he walked with a limp and was slightly deaf. He was put in office by the Praetorian Guard (the emperor’s bodyguards) after Caligula was assassinated. Claudius had very little experience and yet proved to be very forward-thinking and capable.

93. Primitive drive : LIBIDO
"Libido" is a term first popularized by Sigmund Freud. Freud's usage was more general than is understood today, as he used "libido" to describe all instinctive energy that arose in the subconscious. He believed that we humans are driven by two desires, the desire for life (the libido, or Eros) and the desire for death (Thanatos). Personally, I don't agree ...

101. Hide : ENSCONCE
To ensconce oneself, one settles securely or comfortably somewhere. Back in the late 1500s, “to ensconse” meant “to cover with a fort” as a “sconse” is a small defensive fort or earthwork.

103. Virginie, e.g. : ETAT
In French, Virginia (Virginie) is a state (état).

106. Ski-___ : DOO
Ski-Doo is a brand name of snowmobile produced by the Canadian company, Bombardier Recreational Products. The first Ski-Doo went on sale in 1959 and was intended to be named a "Ski-Dog" as the marketing concept was that the personal snowmobile would replace the dogsleds used by hunters and trappers. A painter misread instructions and wrote "Ski-Doo" on the side of the vehicle instead of Ski-Dog, and the name stuck.

107. Type units : PICAS
A pica is a unit of measure used in typography. One pica is equivalent to 1/72 of a foot, or 1/6 of an inch. Each pica unit contains 12 "points".

111. Honor at graduation? : LAUDE
When an academic degree is awarded, a level of distinction can be noted depending on the degree of success achieved by the student. There are three types of honor, each with a Latin name:
- cum laude: meaning "with honor" (literally "with praise")
- magna cum laude: meaning "with great honor"
- summa cum laude: meaning "with highest honor"

113. Old TV's Cousin ___ : ITT
In the television sitcom "The Addams Family", the family had a frequent visitor called Cousin Itt. Itt is a short man with long hair that runs from his head to the floor. Cousin Itt was played by Italian actor Felix Silla.

121. Suffix with morph- : -EME
“Morpheme” is a term used in linguistics. A morpheme is a language’s smallest grammatical unit. A word may have several morphemes. A prefix such as “un-” is an example of a morpheme in English, as is the letter “s” added at the end of a word to make a plural.

Down
4. Figures in Astounding Stories, for short : ETS
The science fiction magazine called “Astounding Stories” was first published in 1930. It has been renamed a few times but is still around today, issued under the title “Analog Science Fiction and Fact”.

7. Old-time announcer Johnny : OLSON
Johnny Olson was the announcer on "The Price is Right" from day one in 1972, until he passed away in 1985.

8. "Kinsey" star, 2004 : NEESON
Irish actor Liam Neeson got his big break when he played Oskar Schindler in the Spielberg epic, "Schindler's List". Neeson was in the news a few years ago when he lost his wife, actress Natasha Richardson, in a tragic skiing accident in 2009.

Alfred Kinsey sure did create a stir with his work and publications. He founded the Institute for Sex Research in 1947, and published the famous “Kinsey Reports” in 1948 and 1953. I enjoyed the 2004 biopic "Kinsey", starring Irish actor, Liam Neeson in the title role.

9. Little sucker? : EDDY
I suppose an eddy, a small whirlpool, might be described as a “little sucker”.

13. More curmudgeonly : CRUSTIER
Curmudgeon is one of my wife's favorite terms to describe me. A curmudgeon is a bad-tempered person full of resentment and stubborn notions. I am sure she means it very affectionately ...

14. Office PC hookup : LAN
You may have a Local Area Network (LAN) in your house. If you've got a PC and a router or switch, likely attached to some modem, then you have a LAN.

17. Masonry containers : HODS
A hod is a 3-sided box on the the end of a long handle used for carrying bricks (and sometimes mortar) at a construction site, usually up and down ladders.

18. Gen. Robert ___ : E LEE
Robert E. Lee is of course renowned as a southern officer in the Civil War. Lee was a somewhat reluctant participant in the war in that he opposed the secession of his home state of Virginia from the Union. At the beginning of the war, President Lincoln invited Lee to take command of the whole Union Army but he declined, choosing instead to stay loyal to his home state.

29. '90s commerce pact : NAFTA
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is between Canada, Mexico and the United States. When NAFTA came into force in 1994 it set up the largest free trade zone in the world.

32. Skater Midori : ITO
Midori Ito is a Japanese figure skater. Ito was the first woman to land a triple/triple jump and a triple axel in competition. In fact she landed her first triple jump in training, when she was only 8 years old ...

33. ___ polymerase : RNA
Polymerase is an enzyme found in the body. It has the task of making new RNA and DNA.

36. Carol starter : ADESTE
The lovely hymn "Adeste Fideles" (aka "O Come, All Ye Faithful") was written by one John Francis Wade in the 13th century. Well, he wrote the original four verses, with four more verses being added over time.

41. Pope Francis' birthplace : ARGENTINA
Pope Francis was elected on 13 March 2013 as the 266th Bishop of Rome and leader of the Roman Catholic church. The new pope appears to be taking a much simpler approach to the office, as he has done with his life back in Argentina. He is the first pope since 1903 not to reside in the papal residence, choosing to live instead to live in the less lavish Vatican guesthouse.

45. "Michael Clayton" director Tony : GILROY
As well as directing "Michael Clayton" (a good film, starring George Clooney), Tony Gilroy wrote the screenplays for the “Bourne” series of films.

51. Like some printing : FOUR-COLOR
Four-color printing uses four different color inks: cyan, magenta, yellow and black. The black ink is also known as the “key”. The first letters of the colors (with black being”key”) give the more common name for four-color printing, namely CMYK.

52. Amish relative : MENNONITE
The Mennonites are a group of religious sects that originated in the Friesland region of the Low Countries. The various denominations are named for Menno Simons who was a contemporary of the Protestant Reformers who followed Martin Luther.

The Amish are a group of Christian churches, a sub-group of the Mennonite churches. The Amish church originated in Switzerland and Alsace in 1693 when it was founded by Jakob Ammann. It was Ammann who gave the name to the Amish people. Many Amish people came to Pennsylvania in the 18th century.

54. ___ Light : COORS
Adolph Coors founded the Coors brewing company in 1873, in Golden, Colorado. Coors was originally from the Rhine Province in Prussia, and worked in various brewers around what is today Germany before immigrating to the US in 1868. Despite all of his success as a brewer here in America, Coors ended up taking his own life in 1929, by jumping to his death out of a hotel window.

60. Tour de France season : ETE
One might spend the summer (été) under the sun (le soleil) in France.

Back in the late 1800s, long-distance cycle races were used as promotional events, traditionally to help boost sales of newspapers. These races usually took place around tracks, but in 1902 the backers of the struggling sports publication "L'Auto" decided to stage a race that would take the competitors all around France. That first Tour de France took place in 1903, starting in Paris and passing through Lyon, Marseilles, Bordeaux, Nantes and then back to Paris.

66. Galactic ___ ("Star Wars" setting) : SENATE
In the “Star Wars” universe, the Galactic Senate is the governing body of the Galactic Republic, the entity that is defended by the Jedi Order of knights.

70. Fleur-de-___ : LIS
"Lys" (also “lis”) is the French word for "lily", as in "fleur-de-lys", the heraldic symbol often associated with the French monarchy.

71. Part of a nativity scene : MANGER
A manger is an open box in which feed is placed for livestock. The term comes from the French word “manger” meaning “to eat”.

79. Feature of St. Basil's Cathedral : ONION DOME
The onion dome is a common form for church domes in Russia and Orthodox churches across the globe.

St. Basil's is the anglicized name for the Cathedral of the Protection of Most Holy Theotokos on the Moat, the magnificent church that sits on Red Square in Moscow. St. Basil's was confiscated by the state from the Russian Orthodox community in 1928. The church still belongs to the federal government of the Russian Federation, and serves as the State Historical Museum.

82. Olympic racers : BOBSLEDS
“Bobsleds” are so called because competitors in the sport originally would bob in and out of the sled in order to increase its speed.

83. "Fanny" author Jong : ERICA
The author Erica Jong’s most famous work is her first: “Fear of Flying”, a novel published in 1973. Over twenty years later she wrote “Fear of Fifty: a midlife memoir”, published in 1994.

89. New Guinea port from which Amelia Earhart left on her last flight : LAE
Lae is the second largest city in Papua New-Guinea (after the capital, Port Moresby). It was from the airport at Lae that Amelia Earhart departed in 1937, never to be seen again.

Amelia Earhart is as famous today as she was during her lifetime. When she became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic she was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross by Congress, and the Cross of Knight of the Legion of Honor by the French government. She made two attempts to circumnavigate the globe by air (not solo). Her first attempt in March 1937 had to be abandoned when her aircraft was damaged during takeoff. The second attempt in June/July of the same year ended when Earhart and her navigator disappeared flying from Lae, New Guinea to Howland Island in the Central Pacific.

105. Counters : ABACI
The abacus was used as a counting frame long before man had invented a numbering system. It is a remarkable invention, particularly when one notes that abaci are still widely used today across Africa and Asia.

108. Big-screen format : IMAX
The IMAX Corporation, which is behind the IMAX film format, is a Canadian company. The impetus for developing the system came after Expo '67 in Montreal. Back then large format screenings were accomplished using multiple projectors with multiple screens, with images basically stitched together. The team behind the IMAX technology set out to simplify things, and developed a single-camera, single-projector system.

109. Dogpatch creator : CAPP
The cartoonist Al Capp set his classic comic strip "Li'l Abner" in the fictional community of "Dogpatch". According to one of the "Li'l Abner" strips, Dogpatch was located somewhere in the state of Kentucky.

110. A, e.g. : ALER
The Oakland Athletics baseball franchise was founded back in 1901 as the Philadelphia Athletics. The team became the Kansas City Athletics in 1955 and moved to Oakland in 1968.

112. Org. in "Monk" : SFPD
The San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) is the 11th largest police department in the country. The SFPD dates back to the days of the Gold Rush, being founded in 1849 as a force of 35 officers. SFPD has featured a lot in movies and on television. The most famous films are probably "Bullitt", the "Dirty Harry" series and "48 Hrs." On television there was "Ironside", "The Streets of San Francisco" and now "Monk".

“Monk” is a comedy cop show in which the title character is an ex-San Francisco Police Department detective who is recovering from a nervous breakdown.

115. Super ___ (old video game console) : NES
The Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) was sold in North America from 1985 to to 1995. The NES was the biggest selling gaming console of the era.

119. Superfund org. : EPA
The 1980 law called the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is more usually referred to as “Superfund”. Superfund gives the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the authority to compel polluters to clean up contaminated sites.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. It may come down in a storm : TELEPHONE LINE
10. Divider in a musical score : BAR LINE
13. Hang-out locale? : CLOTHES LINE
20. Wrote a couple of letters? : INITIALED
21. Montréal street : RUE
22. Chef Boyardee offering : RAVIOLI
23. Called on the carpet : CHASTISED
24. N. Amer./Afr. separator : ATL
25. Not finished : UNENDED
26. China's Chiang ___-shek : KAI
27. Optimistic : ROSY
28. Change : COINS
30. Visit anew : RESEE
31. Loop transports : ELS
32. "There ___ there there" : IS NO
33. Like choruses : REPEATED
35. Ready-___ : TO-EAT
37. A Bobbsey twin : NAN
39. Less certain : IFFIER
40. Half-___ (coffee request) : CAF
43. "Malice N Wonderland" rapper Snoop ___ : DOGG
46. Trains : RAIL
48. "Tootsie" Oscar nominee : TERI GARR
50. "You want a piece ___?" : OF ME
53. Main hood in "Little Caesar," 1931 : RICO
55. Without face value, as stock : NO-PAR
57. Brink : VERGE
58. Two-Face and the Riddler, to Batman : FOES
59. French children's song : ALOUETTE
61. "You Gotta Be" singer, 1994 : DES'REE
62. Allen of "Candid Camera" : FUNT
63. Sister of literature : BRONTE
64. Originates : RISES
67. Bank statement abbr. : INT
68. Sea eagle : ERNE
69. Gray areas, maybe ... or a hint to 12 incomplete answers in this puzzle : BORDERLINES
71. Kind of lab : METH
72. Cpl., for one : NCO
73. "What ___ thou?" : SAY’ST
74. Island group in the Bahamas : BIMINI
75. Province of Saudi Arabia : ‘ASIR
76. Susan who wrote "The Volcano Lover" : SONTAG
78. Old-fashioned street conveyance : HORSECAR
80. Texting while driving, e.g. : NO-NO
81. Comment often followed by "So sue me" : I LIED
82. Designer Geoffrey : BEENE
84. Head of une école? : TETE
85. Act like a rat, say : GNAW
86. Supported, as a ballot measure : VOTED FOR
88. Nothing doing? : IDLE
90. Being, to Claudius : ESSE
92. Before, in sonnets : ERE
93. Primitive drive : LIBIDO
95. Airport info: Abbr. : ARR
97. Monotonous routine : GRIND
101. Hide : ENSCONCE
103. Virginie, e.g. : ETAT
106. Ski-___ : DOO
107. Type units : PICAS
111. Honor at graduation? : LAUDE
112. Checkbook record : STUB
113. Old TV's Cousin ___ : ITT
114. "You can talk to me privately" : I’M ALONE
116. Ground cover : SOD
117. Last chance to strike out? : FINAL EDIT
120. Whitewashed, with "over" : PAPERED
121. Suffix with morph- : -EME
122. Jumping-off point : PRECIPICE
123. Supermarket time-saver : EXPRESS LINE
124. Draw a mark through for cancellation : REDLINE
125. Means of one-to-one communication : DEDICATED LINE

Down
1. Movie theater sight : TICKET LINE
2. Represent as a saint, say : ENHALO
3. Act as a go-between : LIAISE
4. Figures in Astounding Stories, for short : ETS
5. Set (against) : PIT
6. Shavings, maybe : HAIRS
7. Old-time announcer Johnny : OLSON
8. "Kinsey" star, 2004 : NEESON
9. Little sucker? : EDDY
10. "___ yourself" : BRACE
11. Just going through the motions, after "on" : AUTOPILOT
12. Air-conditioning on a hot day, maybe : RELIEF
13. More curmudgeonly : CRUSTIER
14. Office PC hookup : LAN
15. Certain car gears : OVERDRIVES
16. Prong : TINE
17. Masonry containers : HODS
18. Gen. Robert ___ : E LEE
19. Hobby activity : SIDELINE
29. '90s commerce pact : NAFTA
32. Skater Midori : ITO
33. ___ polymerase : RNA
34. Convention closer? : -EER
36. Carol starter : ADESTE
38. With 56-Down, where to find this puzzle's 12 theme answers : AROUND THE
40. Rants and raves : CARRIES ON
41. Pope Francis' birthplace : ARGENTINA
42. Court stripe : FREE-THROW LINE
44. Mixture : GRAB BAG
45. "Michael Clayton" director Tony : GILROY
47. Hybridized : INTERBRED
49. Some fridges : GES
50. Quarterback protectors : OFFENSIVE LINE
51. Like some printing : FOUR-COLOR
52. Amish relative : MENNONITE
54. ___ Light : COORS
56. See 38-Down : PERIMETER
60. Tour de France season : ETE
61. Urges : DESIRES
65. How picnic drinks may be packed : IN ICE
66. Galactic ___ ("Star Wars" setting) : SENATE
70. Fleur-de-___ : LIS
71. Part of a nativity scene : MANGER
73. Real pain in the butt? : SADDLE SORE
77. Driving aid : TEE
79. Feature of St. Basil's Cathedral : ONION DOME
82. Olympic racers : BOBSLEDS
83. "Fanny" author Jong : ERICA
87. A swimmer might rightly be scared to see one : FIN
89. New Guinea port from which Amelia Earhart left on her last flight : LAE
91. Army fig. who knows the drill? : SGT
94. Fire extinguisher : DOUSER
96. Go to sleep : RETIRE
98. Cry of victory : I DID IT!
99. Posting, say : NOTICE
100. Bottom of a contract : DOTTED LINE
102. Gave up : CEDED
104. Listening, with "in" : TUNED
105. Counters : ABACI
107. Locale for finished works that haven't yet appeared : PIPELINE
108. Big-screen format : IMAX
109. Dogpatch creator : CAPP
110. A, e.g. : ALER
112. Org. in "Monk" : SFPD
115. Super ___ (old video game console) : NES
118. Driver's ID: Abbr. : LIC
119. Superfund org. : EPA


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2 comments :

Anonymous said...

Snoop Dogg changed his name to Snoop Lion, so, technically this crossword is incorrect.

Bill Butler said...

I'm no expert in the field of rap music, so I had to look this one up.

It seems that Snoop Dogg introduced his new stage name of "Snoop Lion" in the middle of 2012. The album "Malice n Wonderland" was released in 2009 when he was still going by the name Snoop Dogg, and indeed it's "Snoop Dogg" that appears on the cover.

So yes, Snoop Dogg is now Snoop Lion, but he was still Snoop Dogg at the time refered to in the clue.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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