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Greetings from Mammoth Lakes, California

My wife and I are on vacation until Friday, July 25th; a road trip through the backroads of the states east of California. I anticipate late-night solving and posting, with acknowledgement of comments and emails suffering. Please, don't be offended at my silence as I prioritize the writing of posts! Today's hike was in Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest where we passed a tree over 4,750 years old. Getting close to home ...

Bill

0825-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 25 Aug 13, Sunday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Victor Barocas
THEME: Capital L’s … there are eight US state capitals in today’s grid, which aren’t clued and which have six letters each. The names of the capitals are split into two parts and are revealed by combining two L-shaped answers, an across- and a down- answer that take a right-angled turn in the grid. The eight state capitals are:
27A: TOP-EKA (from TOP/DOGS & EUR/EKA)
35A: DEN-VER (from DEN/OUNCE & CLEA/VER)
37A: JUN-EAU (from JUN/IPER & THOR/EAU)
71A: BOS-TON (from BOS/S HOGG & SHEL/TON)
73A: AUS-TIN (from AUS/TERE & TINAC/TIN)
104A: ALB-ANY (from ALB/ERTS & TIFF/ANY)
106A: HEL-ENA (from HEL/OISE & MACAR/ENA)
116A: PIE-RRE (from PIE/TAS & LE CA/RRE)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 07s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Auto parts giant : NAPA
The National Automotive Parts Association (NAPA) is a retailers’ cooperative that supplies replacement parts for cars and trucks.

14. Peyote and saguaro : CACTI
The peyote is a small spineless cactus that is native to southwestern Texas and Mexico. When ingested, the peyote is known to have a psychoactive effect. One of the psychoactive alkaloids in peyote is mescaline, a drug of choice for the likes Aldous Huxley and Pablo Picasso.

The saguaro is a beautiful cactus, native to the Sonoran Desert in Arizona and in Sonora, Mexico. If you ever get a chance to visit the Saguaro National Park in southern Arizona, I thoroughly recommend it.

19. Rossini's William Tell and others : BARITONES
“Guillaume Tell” is an opera by Gioachino Rossini based on the legend of William Tell. It is actually Rossini’s last opera, and is certainly the Rossini opera with the most recognizable overture. The whole of the overture is superb, but the driving finale is widely recognized as the theme from the television show “The Lone Ranger”.

21. Lump in one's throat : UVULA
The uvula is that conical fleshy projection hanging down at the back of the soft palate. The uvula plays an important role in human speech, particularly in the making of "guttural" sounds. The Latin word for "grape" is "uva", so "uvula" is a "little grape".

22. First acrylic fiber : ORLON
Orlon is the brand name used by the DuPont Corporation for the acrylic fibers the company developed in 1941.

23. Superlative for Sirius : BRIGHTEST
When you look up at the night sky, the brightest star you can see is Sirius. Sirius appears so bright to us because it is relatively close to the Earth. Sirius is commonly known as the "Dog Star" because it can be seen in the constellation Canis Major, the "Big Dog".

24. Rush job? : ROCK CONCERT
Rush is a rock band from Toronto, Ontario.

27. Big kahunas : TOP DOGS
Like many words in Hawaiian, the term “kahuna” has several English translations, everything from a priest to an expert in some profession. The expression “the Big Kahuna” comes from the movie “Gidget”, released in 1959. The Big Kahuna was the leader of one of the surfing gangs in the film, and was played by Cliff Robertson.

31. Log : RECORD
“To log” some piece of information is to record it, especially into a logbook. The word "logbook" dates back to the days when the captain of a ship kept a daily record of the vessel's speed, progress etc. using a "log". A log was a wooden float on a knotted line that was dropped overboard to measure speed through the water.

33. Abbr. on a lawyer's stationery : ESQ
The title "esquire" is of British origin and is used differently today depending on whether one is in the US or the UK. Here in America the term is usually reserved for those practicing the law (both male and female). In the UK, "esquire" is a term of gentle respect reserved for a male who has no other title that one can use. So a mere commoner like me might receive a letter from the bank say, addressed to W. E. Butler Esq.

37. Berry used to make gin : JUNIPER
The spirit known as gin gets its unique flavor mainly from juniper berries. The name “gin” comes into English from the translation of “juniper” from either French (genièvre), Dutch (jenever) or Italian (ginepro).

42. In ___ : UTERO
"In utero" is a Latin term meaning "in the uterus". The Latin "uterus" translates as both "womb" and "belly". The Latin word was derived from the Greek "hystera" also meaning womb, which gives us the words "hysterectomy", and "hysterical".

44. ___-pedi : MANI
Manicure and pedicure (mani-pedi)

51. Bosch's "The Garden of Earthly Delights," for one : TRIPTYCH
A triptych is a work of art divided into three panels. The word “triptych” comes from the Greek adjective for “three-fold”.

Hieronymus Bosch was a Dutch painter who worked late 15th and early 16th centuries. Perhaps his most recognized work is his triptych titled "The Garden of Earthly Delights".

53. Lustrous fabric : SATEEN
Sateen is a cotton fabric, with a weave that is "four over, one under" meaning that most of the threads come to the surface giving it a softer feel.

57. Massive ref. : OED
The "Oxford English Dictionary" (OED) contains over 300,000 "main" entries and 59 million words in total. It is said it would take a single person 120 years to type it out in full. The longest entry for one word in the second edition of the OED is the verb "set". When the third edition was published in 2007, the longest entry for a single word became the verb "put". Perhaps not surprisingly, the most-quoted author in the OED is William Shakespeare, with his most quoted work being “Hamlet”. The most-quoted female author is George Eliot (aka Mary Ann Evans).

71. White-suited "Dukes of Hazzard" villain : BOSS HOGG
Boss Hogg was the villain in the white suit and the white cowboy hat who was always puffing away on a cigar in the TV show “The Dukes of Hazzard”. Boss Hogg was played by actor Sorrell Booke.

73. Spartan : AUSTERE
Sparta was a city-state in ancient Greece, famous for her military might. Spartan children had a tough upbringing, and newborn babies were bathed in wine to see if the child was strong enough to survive. Every child was presented to a council of elders that decided if the baby was suitable for rearing. Those children deemed too puny were executed by tossing them into a chasm. We’ve been using the term “spartan” to describe something self-disciplined or austere since the 1600s.

80. Court judgment : LET
A “let” is a shot that must be replayed in the sport of tennis.

82. Barrett of gossip : RONA
Rona Barrett is a gossip columnist originally from New York City but who plies her trade in Southern California. Barrett started out as with a gossip column that was syndicated in newspapers but then made a successful transition to television. She made regular appearances in news broadcasts and on her entertainment shows in the sixties and seventies.

85. ___ Moines : DES
The city of Des Moines is the capital of Iowa, and takes its name from the Des Moines River. The river in turn takes its name from the French "Riviere des Moines" meaning "River of the Monks". It looks like there isn't any "monkish" connection to the city's name per se. "Des Moines" was just the name given by French traders who corrupted "Moingona", the name of a group of Illinois Native Americans who lived by the river. However, others do contend that French Trappist monks, who lived a full 200 miles from the river, somehow influenced the name.

91. Apple line : IMACS
The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an "all-in-one" design, with the computer console and monitor integrated.

97. Darwin stopping point, with "the" : GALAPAGOS
The Galápagos Islands lie over 500 miles west of Ecuador. The Galápagos owe their celebrity to the voyage of HMS Beagle which landed there in 1835, with Charles Darwin on board. It was Darwin’s study of various species on the islands that inspired him to postulate his Theory of Evolution.

99. Founder of the Missionaries of Charity : TERESA
Mother Teresa was born in 1910 in the city that is now called Skopje, the capital of Macedonia. At birth she was given the names Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu ("Gonxha" means "little flower" in Albanian). She left home at the age of 18 and joined the Sisters of Loreto, and headed to Loreto Abbey in Rathfarnham in Dublin, Ireland in order to learn English. Her goal was to teach in India, and English was the language used there for instruction by the nuns. After Mother Teresa passed away in 1997 she was beatified by Pope John Paul II, a step on the road to canonization. In order for her to be beatified there had to be documented evidence of a miracle that was performed due to her intercession. The miracle in question was the healing of a tumor in the abdomen of a woman due to the application of a locket containing a picture of Mother Teresa. Documentation of a second miracle is required for her to be declared a saint.

101. Epitome of cool, with "the" : FONZ
Fonzie is a character in the sitcom “Happy Days” that was originally aired from 1974 to 1984. The Fonz was written as a secondary character, but eventually took over the show. Fonzie is of course played by Henry Winkler.

102. Lead singer on "Octopus's Garden" : RINGO
“Octopus’s Garden” is a song released by the Beatles in 1969, one that was written and performed by drummer Ringo Starr. This was only Ringo’s second musical composition and he gets sole credit for the writing, even though it is well established that George Harrison gave him quite a bit of "help". The idea for the song came to Ringo while he was on holiday with his family in Sardinia. The captain of the boat on which they were staying told Ringo that an octopus would spend its time traveling the seabed collecting shiny objects with which to make itself a garden. I don’t know how true that is, but Ringo seemed to find it inspiring.

103. Singer Peniston : CECE
CeCe Peniston is a recording artist noted for the prevalence of her music in dance clubs. Her most successful song is “Finally”, released in 1991. Supposedly Peniston wrote the lyrics for “Finally” while she was still at school, during a chemistry class!

104. Einstein and Camus : ALBERTS
After Albert Einstein moved to the US in 1933, he became quite a celebrity and his face was readily recognizable. Einstein was frequently stopped in the street by people who would naively ask him if he could explain what "that theory" (i.e. the theory of relativity) was all about. Growing tired of this, he finally learned to tell people that he was sorry, but folks were constantly mistaking him for Albert Einstein!

Albert Camus was a French author, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957. Sadly, Camus died in a car accident just two years after he received the prize, at only 46 years of age.

106. Hint-giving columnist : HELOISE
Today we read the second generation of the "Hints from Heloise" advice column. The current author is Poncé Kiah Marchelle Heloise Cruse Evans (would you believe?). She took over the column when her mother passed away in 1977. The original column was started back in 1959 by Heloise Bowles. It first appeared in the "Honolulu Advertiser" under the name "Readers Exchange".

111. Postwar prime minister : ATTLEE
Clement Attlee served as leader of Britain's Labour Party and as Deputy Prime Minister in the coalition government during the war years under the leadership of Winston Churchill, a Conservative. Attlee swept into power right after WWII in a landslide victory over Churchill and was responsible for major changes not only in Britain but around the waning British Empire. It was under Attlee that former British colonies like India, Pakistan, Burma, Sri Lanka and Jordan became independent. Also, the Palestine Mandate was terminated in 1948, while he was in office, with the state of Israel being declared the very next day.

113. Simpson case judge : ITO
Judge Lance Ito came in for a lot of criticism for his handling of the O.J. Simpson murder trial. The lead prosecutor in that trial was Marcia Clark, you might recall. I read the book that's Clark wrote about the trial called "Without a Doubt", and she pointed out one trait of Judge Ito that I think is quite telling. Ito would almost always refer to the prosecutor as "Marcia", while addressing the men on both sides of the case as "Mister".

114. 11th-century hero, with "El" : CID
Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar was known as El Cid Campeador, which translates as "The Champion" or perhaps "The Lord, Master of Military Arts". El Cid was a soldier who fought under the rule of King Alfonso VI of Spain (among others). However, he was sent into exile by the King in 1080, after acting beyond his authorization in battle. El Cid then offered his services to his former foes, the Moorish kings, After a number of years building a reputation with the Moors, he was recalled from exile by Alfonso. By this time El Cid was very much his own man. Nominally under the orders of Alfonso, he led a combined army of Spanish and Moorish troops and took the city of Valencia on the Mediterranean coast, making it is headquarters and home. He died there, quite peacefully in 1099.

116. Religious art figures : PIETAS
The Pietà is a representation of the Virgin Mary holding in her arms the dead body of her son Jesus. The most famous Pietà is probably the sculpted rendition by Michelangelo which is located in St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City. In some depictions of Mary with Jesus in her arms, mother and son are surrounded by other figures from the New Testament. These depictions are known as “Lamentations”.

118. Country crooner Randy : TRAVIS
Randy Travis is a country singer, and since the mid-nineties, a sometime actor. Starting in 1999, Travis’s recording focus has been gospel music.

123. Emergency Broadcast System opening : THIS IS A TEST
The Emergency Broadcast System (EBS) actually doesn’t exist anymore. It was an emergency warning system that was in use in the US from 1963 to 1997. It started out as a system for the use of the US President, so that he (or she, one day let’s hope!) could address the nation in time of crisis. Towards the end of its life it was also used by state and local authorities. Thankfully, the EBS never had to be used for a national emergency. It was replaced in 1997 by the Emergency Alert System (EAS), which is still in place today.

129. Poet/dramatist Federico García ___ : LORCA
Garcia Lorca was a Spanish poet and dramatist. Lorca is as famous for his poems and his plays as he is for the circumstances of his death. Although it has never been irrefutably proven, many believe that he was shot and killed while in the custody of Nationalist militia, one month after the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War.

130. Pixar movie between "Toy Story" and "Toy Story 2" : A BUG'S LIFE
“A Bug's Life” is a 1998 animated feature film from Pixar. The storyline is based on the film “The Seven Samurai” and the fable of “The Ant and the Grasshopper”.

131. Verse-writing : POESY
“Poesy” is an alternative name for poetry, often used to mean the “art of poetry”.

133. Some screens, for short : LCDS
Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) are the screens that are found in most laptops today, and in flat panel computer screens and some televisions. LCD monitors basically replaced Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) screens, the old television technology.

Down
3. Girl's name that's also a place name : ERIN
"Éire" is the Irish word for "Ireland". "Erin" is an anglicized version of "Éire" and actually corresponds to "Éirinn", the dative case of "Éire".

6. Hydrocarbon suffix : -ANE
Alkanes are organic compounds. The “smaller” alkanes are gases and are quite combustible. Methane (CH4) is the main component of natural gas with ethane (C2H6) being the second largest component. Propane (C3H8) is another component of natural gas and is heavy enough to be readily turned into a liquid by compression for ease of transportation and storage. Butane (C4H10) is also easily liquefied under pressure and can be used as the fuel in cigarette lighters or as the propellant in aerosol sprays. The heavier alkanes are not gases, and instead are liquids and solids at room temperature.

7. Basil sauce : PESTO
The term “pesto” applies to anything made by pounding. What we tend to know as “pesto” sauce is more properly called “pesto alla genovese”, pesto from Genoa in northern Italy.

8. One end of New York's Triborough Bridge : ASTORIA
Astoria is a neighborhood in the borough of Queens, New York. The area sits on the East River, and was originally called Hallet's Cove after the first landowner, William Hallet, who settled there in 1659. The area was renamed Astoria in a deal to get John Jacob Astor, then the wealthiest man in the country, to invest $2,000 in the neighborhood. Astor only put up $500 in the end, but the name stuck.

The Robert F. Kennedy Bridge in New York City is often referred to as the “Triboro”, recognition of the structure’s original name “The Triborough Bridge”. This name was given as the Triboro is actually a complex of three bridges that connects the boroughs of Manhattan, Queens and The Bronx. Built in 1936, the official name was changed to the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge in 2008.

9. Cry of epiphany : EUREKA
Eureka translates from Greek as "I have found it". The word is usually associated with Archimedes, uttered as he stepped into his bath one day. His discovery was that the volume of water that was displaced was equal to that of the object (presumably his foot) that had been submerged. He used this fact to determine the volume of a crown, something he needed in order to determine if it was made of pure gold or was a forgery.

11. Director George : LUCAS
The producer and director George Lucas has amassed an incredibly large fortune, primarily due to the phenomenal success of his movie franchises “Star Wars” and “Indiana Jones”. Worth about $3 billion, Lucas has gone the way of Bill Gates and Warren Buffett, agreeing to give half of his fortune to charity as part of "The Giving Pledge".

12. Bull or cow : ELK
Male elk are called “bulls” and female elk are called “cows”.

The elk (also known as the wapiti) is the one of the largest species of deer in the world, with only the moose being bigger. Early European settlers were familiar with the smaller red deer back in their homelands, so when they saw the "huge" wapiti they assumed it was a moose, and incorrectly gave it the European name for a moose, namely "elk". The more correct name for the beast is "wapiti", which means "white rump" in Shawnee. It's all very confusing ...

17. Layered dessert : TORTE
A torte is a type of cake made primarily with eggs, sugar and ground nuts (but no flour).

18. Head of state? : INTER-
The US Interstate System is more correctly known as the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, a nod to President Eisenhower who championed the construction. The President had come to recognise the value of the German autobahn system in his experiences during WWII, and resolved to give the US a similar infrastructure. In real terms, the US Interstate construction project is said to have been the largest public works project since the Pyramids of Egypt.

20. He wrote "It is life near the bone where it is sweetest" : THOREAU
Henry David Thoreau is a personal hero of mine. Thoreau is best known for his book called “Walden” published in 1854. The book outlines his philosophy of life and details his experiences living in a cabin near Walden Pond near Concord, Massachusetts.

32. Kaley of "The Big Bang Theory" : CUOCO
Kaley Cuoco is an actress from Camarillo, California who is best known for playing Penny, the female lead on the sitcom “The Big Bang Theory”. Cuoco’s love interest in the show is played by Johnny Galecki, and the two were romantically involved in real life for a couple of years. Cuoco is also getting a lot of exposure playing William Shatner’s daughter on priceline.com ads, and playing a genie in Toyota RAV$ commercials.

37. Pantry lineup : JARS
The word "pantry" dates back to 1300 when it came into English from the Old French "panetrie" meaning a "bread room". Bread is "pain" in French, and "panis" in Latin.

41. Author Zora ___ Hurston : NEALE
Zora Neale Hurston was an American author, most famous for her 1937 novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God". Like the author, the main character in the novel is an African American woman, a part played by Halle Berry in a television movie adaptation that first aired in 2005.

43. Athlete's foot treatment : TINACTIN
Tolnaftate is an antifungal agent, sold under the Merck brand name "Tinactin", as well as others. Tolnaftate can be purchased over the counter, and is found to be effective against jock itch, athlete's foot and ringworm.

44. Where Charlie may ride forever, in song : MTA
"M.T.A." was a 1958 hit for the Kingston Trio. The song tells of a man called Charlie who is stuck on board an MTA subway car in Boston. His problem is that "exit fares" had been introduced on the system to supplement "entrance fares" (true story!), and the man didn't have the extra nickel needed to get off the train.

46. Connecticut city : SHELTON
The city of Shelton, Connecticut was originally part of the neighboring town of Stratford that was founded by Puritans in 1639.

47. Carom : REBOUND
A carom is a ricochet, the bouncing of some projectile off a surface. Carom has come to mean the banking of a billiard ball, the bouncing of the ball off the side of the table.

48. Words of explanation : ID EST
i.e. = id est = that is, in Latin.

50. Hollywood's Davis : GEENA
As well as being a successful Hollywood actress, Geena Davis is an accomplished archer and came close to qualifying for the US archery team for the 2000 Summer Olympics. Davis is also a member of American Mensa. She is quite the lady ...

52. Crow, e.g. : TRIBE
The Crow Nation historically lived in the Yellowstone River valley in Wyoming, Montana and North Dakota. Most of the Crow people today live on a reservation south of Billings, Montana.

63. Dummy : DODO
A dodo is a foolish person, and dodo is word that comes into English from the Portuguese "doudo". "Doudo" was a slang term used by Portuguese sailors for the extinct bird that we now know as the dodo.

68. Rosemary piece : SPRIG
69. Rosemary feature : AROMA
The name of the herb called rosemary comes from the Latin “ros marinus” which means “dew of the sea”. The idea is that rosemary can in fact grow in some locations with only the moisture that is carried by a sea breeze.

77. 1990s craze : MACARENA
“Macarena” is a dance song in Spanish that was a huge hit wordlwide for Los Del Río in 1995-1996.

79. Related on the mother's side : ENATE
Something that is enate is growing outward, and "enate" is used to describe ancestors related on the mother's side. Something that is agnate comes from a common source, and "agnate" is used to describe relatives on the father's side of the family tree.

81. Renowned jeweler : TIFFANY
The Tiffany’s jewelry company is headquartered in New York City. The flagship Tiffany’s store is located at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 57th Street in Manhattan, and of course featured in the delightful Audrey Hepburn movie “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”.

86. Rug fiber : SISAL
I suppose it is telling that whenever I hear mention of agave plants, I think of tequila. The sisal plant is an agave, but as far as I can tell its flesh is not used in making the Mexican liquor. Sisal is grown instead for the fibers that run the length of its leaves. The fiber is used extensively for twine, rope, carpeting, wall coverings etc. My favorite application though, is in the construction of dartboards. Sisal takes its name from the port of Sisal in Yucatan, Mexico, once a major shipping point for sisal plants.

88. Jeff Bridges sci-fi classic : TRON
Released in 1982, "Tron" was one of the first mainstream films to make extensive use of computer graphics. The main role in the movie is played by Jeff Bridges.

The first major role for Jeff Bridges was in the wonderful 1971 movie, "The Last Picture Show". My favorite Bridges movie though is 1984's "Starman" in which he played a very charming alien opposite Karen Allen. As an amateur photographer myself, I also appreciate Jeff Bridges' photographic work. I own his book of fabulous images called "Pictures: Photographs by Jeff Bridges".

89. Start of a count-off : EENY
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

92. TV show on which Charlie Sheen replaced Michael J. Fox : SPIN CITY
The sitcom “Spin City” originally aired from 1996 to 2002. Star of the show was Michael J. Fox, who announced in 1998 that he was suffering from Parkinson’s Disease. As a result, Heather Locklear was added to the cast, to share some of the load being carried by Fox. However, he eventually did have to leave the show, and so Charlie Sheen was brought on as a replacement lead character. The ratings for “Spin City” started to fall off and the show was cancelled after two seasons with Sheen leading the cast.

94. Best-selling author who once worked for Britain's MI6 : LE CARRE
John Le Carré is the pen name of David Cornwell, an English author famous for his spy novels. Cornwell worked for British Intelligence during the fifties and sixties, even as he was writing his spy thrillers. He left MI6 in 1963 soon after his most famous novel, "The Spy Who Came in from the Cold", became such a great success.

98. Author Nin : ANAIS
Anaïs Nin was a French author, famous for her journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. Nin also wrote highly regarded erotica and cited D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration. Nin was married to banker and artist Hugh Parker Guiler in 1923. Decades later in 1955, Nin married former actor Rupert Pole, even though she was still married to Guiler. Nin and Pole had their marriage annulled in 1966, but just for legal reasons, and they continued to live together as husband and wife until Nin passed away in 1977.

103. It's been shortening for over 100 years : CRISCO
The Crisco brand of shortening was the first shortening to be made entirely from vegetable oil. Although that sounds like a good thing, it's actually made by hydrogenating vegetable oil so that it has physical properties similar to the animal shortening it was designed to replace. This hydrogenation turns good fats into bad fats, so medical professionals suggest limited intake.

107. Prefix with musicology : ETHNO-
Ethnomusicology is the comparative study of music from different cultures.

112. Year the emperor Claudius was born : TEN BC
I find Claudius to be the most fascinating of all the Roman Emperors. Claudius had a lot going against him as he walked with a limp and was slightly deaf. He was put in office by the Praetorian Guard (the emperor’s bodyguards) after Caligula was assassinated. Claudius had very little political experience and yet proved to be very forward-thinking and capable.

115. 1991 P.G.A. champion John : DALY
John Daly is a golfer with the nickname "Long John", as he really knows how to get distance off the tee. He has the reputation of a wild man on the circuit, and perhaps that's why he has a drink named after him. A "John Daly" is the same as the non-alcoholic "Arnold Palmer", with lemonade and iced tea, but the "Daly" has vodka added.

121. Skinny : INFO
The use of the word "skinny" meaning information, comes from WWII military slang for "the truth", probably a derivative of the expression "the naked truth" (and skinny-dipping).

124. French possessive : SES
“Ses” is the French word for “his”, “her” or “its”, when referring to a group of items.

127. British dessert, for short : PUD
Pudding (pud.)


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Item whose name is derived from the Latin "aquarius" : EWER
5. Auto parts giant : NAPA
9. Pot user, maybe : EELER
14. Peyote and saguaro : CACTI
19. Rossini's William Tell and others : BARITONES
21. Lump in one's throat : UVULA
22. First acrylic fiber : ORLON
23. Superlative for Sirius : BRIGHTEST
24. Rush job? : ROCK CONCERT
26. Home security system component : SENSOR
27. Big kahunas : TOP DOGS
29. Stationery item: Abbr. : ENV
30. Had : ATE
31. Log : RECORD
33. Abbr. on a lawyer's stationery : ESQ
35. Censure : DENOUNCE
37. Berry used to make gin : JUNIPER
40. They have pluses and minuses : IONS
42. In ___ : UTERO
44. ___-pedi : MANI
45. Medicine label info : DOSAGE
47. Putting out on an anniversary, maybe : REISSUING
51. Bosch's "The Garden of Earthly Delights," for one : TRIPTYCH
53. Lustrous fabric : SATEEN
55. Provide with a quality : ENDUE
56. Daisylike bloom : ASTER
57. Massive ref. : OED
59. Maze explorer : LAB RAT
61. Turn over : CEDE
62. Disencumber : RID
64. Not beat : LOSE TO
66. Collapses : CAVES IN
68. Drain : SAP
71. White-suited "Dukes of Hazzard" villain : BOSS HOGG
73. Spartan : AUSTERE
75. ___ Party : TEA
76. Some bio majors : PRE-MEDS
78. Fails to : DOESN’T
80. Court judgment : LET
82. Barrett of gossip : RONA
83. "Phooey!" : OH DARN!
85. ___ Moines : DES
87. Mentions : CITES
91. Apple line : IMACS
93. Experience you might want to forget : ORDEAL
95. Guaranteed : RISK-FREE
97. Darwin stopping point, with "the" : GALAPAGOS
99. Founder of the Missionaries of Charity : TERESA
101. Epitome of cool, with "the" : FONZ
102. Lead singer on "Octopus's Garden" : RINGO
103. Singer Peniston : CECE
104. Einstein and Camus : ALBERTS
106. Hint-giving columnist : HELOISE
109. Three, for a short hole : PAR
111. Postwar prime minister : ATTLEE
113. Simpson case judge : ITO
114. 11th-century hero, with "El" : CID
116. Religious art figures : PIETAS
118. Country crooner Randy : TRAVIS
123. Emergency Broadcast System opening : THIS IS A TEST
126. Kind of treatment : IN-PATIENT
128. Still goopy, as concrete : UNSET
129. Poet/dramatist Federico García ___ : LORCA
130. Pixar movie between "Toy Story" and "Toy Story 2" : A BUG'S LIFE
131. Verse-writing : POESY
132. Jerks : YO-YOS
133. Some screens, for short : LCDS
134. Glacial : SLOW

Down
1. Goes down : EBBS
2. Suffix with hard or soft : -WARE
3. Girl's name that's also a place name : ERIN
4. Semis : RIGS
5. Unprepared : NOT READY
6. Hydrocarbon suffix : -ANE
7. Basil sauce : PESTO
8. One end of New York's Triborough Bridge : ASTORIA
9. Cry of epiphany : EUREKA
10. Suggests : EVOKES
11. Director George : LUCAS
12. Bull or cow : ELK
13. Tear : RACE
14. Nike rival : CONVERSE
15. Parenthesis shape : ARC
16. Butcher's tool : CLEAVER
17. Layered dessert : TORTE
18. Head of state? : INTER-
20. He wrote "It is life near the bone where it is sweetest" : THOREAU
25. French waves : ONDES
32. Kaley of "The Big Bang Theory" : CUOCO
34. Eccentric : QUEER
37. Pantry lineup : JARS
38. Squad, e.g. : UNIT
41. Author Zora ___ Hurston : NEALE
43. Athlete's foot treatment : TINACTIN
44. Where Charlie may ride forever, in song : MTA
46. Connecticut city : SHELTON
47. Carom : REBOUND
48. Words of explanation : ID EST
49. Blue flick : NUDIE
50. Hollywood's Davis : GEENA
52. Crow, e.g. : TRIBE
54. Byes : TATAS
58. Thingamabobs : DOODADS
60. Cow's fly swatter : TAIL
63. Dummy : DODO
65. Bad thing for a roommate to do : SNORE
67. Sweater option : V-NECK
68. Rosemary piece : SPRIG
69. Rosemary feature : AROMA
70. Like some codes : PENAL
77. 1990s craze : MACARENA
79. Related on the mother's side : ENATE
81. Renowned jeweler : TIFFANY
84. Sag : DROOP
86. Rug fiber : SISAL
88. Jeff Bridges sci-fi classic : TRON
89. Start of a count-off : EENY
90. "___ who?" : SEZ
92. TV show on which Charlie Sheen replaced Michael J. Fox : SPIN CITY
94. Best-selling author who once worked for Britain's MI6 : LE CARRE
96. Markdown markers : SALE TAGS
98. Author Nin : ANAIS
100. New DNA evidence may lead to one : RETRIAL
103. It's been shortening for over 100 years : CRISCO
106. Ask for money : HIT UP
107. Prefix with musicology : ETHNO-
110. Imitation : APERY
112. Year the emperor Claudius was born : TEN BC
115. 1991 P.G.A. champion John : DALY
119. Is unwell : AILS
120. Obscure : VEIL
121. Skinny : INFO
122. Fuss : STEW
124. French possessive : SES
125. "___ cool!" : TOO
127. British dessert, for short : PUD


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

2 comments :

Anonymous said...

I've always used Rex Parker but find your blog to be easier to use, found what I needed more quickly.

Bill Butler said...

Hi there.

Thanks for the kind words. I hope that means you will come back and visit again soon!

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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