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Vacation Alert

I am currently on vacation in Ireland, returning on October 9th. I am hoping to complete a blog post each evening, even if it is only the basics (solved grid and clues, plus explanation of theme). I apologize in advance if I am late in posting.

Bill

0929-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Sep 13, Sunday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Norm Guggenbiller
THEME: Overheard in New England … all of today’s themed answers sound like common phrases stated with a New England accent:
24A. A "Star Trek" officer and a physician are going to board a plane? : SPOCKS WILL FLY (sounds like “sparks will fly”)
36A. Atlantic fishery auditors? : COD COUNTERS (sounds like “card counters”)
59A. Work agreeably in a greenhouse? : POT ON GOOD TERMS (sounds like “part on good terms”)
76A. "Happy Birthday" on a cake, e.g.? : GOBBLED MESSAGE (sounds like “garbled message”)
95A. Sexy operators? : HOT SURGEONS (sounds like “heart surgeon”)
112A. Where frogs shop? : HOPPERS’ BAZAAR (sounds like “Harper’s Bazaar”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 31m 07s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. Hidden : CACHED
A “cache” is a secret supply. We imported the term into English from French Canadian trappers in the 17th century. Back then, “cache” was as slang term for a “hiding place for stores”, derived from the French verb “cacher” meaning “to hide”.

14. Astronomer Halley : EDMOND
Edmond Halley was an English astronomer who lived at the turn of 17th and 18th centuries. In 1705 he declared that comet sightings recorded in 1456, 1531, 1607 and 1682 were in fact observations of the same comet returning to fly by Earth at regular intervals. He predicted that this comet would return in 1758, and he was right, and so the comet was named after him: Halley’s Comet. Sadly, Halley didn't live long enough to see his prediction come true.

23. Clan garb : TARTANS
Tartan is sometimes called "plaid" over here in the US, a word not used in the same sense outside of this country. In Scotland a "plaid" is a blanket or a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder.

24. A "Star Trek" officer and a physician are going to board a plane? : SPOCKS WILL FLY (sounds like “sparks will fly”)
Leonard Nimoy played the logical Mr. Spock in the original "Star Trek" television series. Spock has to be the most popular character on the show, and he keeps popping up in "Star Trek" spin offs to this day. Nimoy first worked alongside William Shatner (Captain Kirk) in an episode of "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (I loved that show!), with Nimoy playing a bad guy and Shatner playing an U.N.C.L.E. recruit.

Dr. Benjamin Spock owes his fame to his 1946 best-selling book “Baby and Child Care”. For over fifty years, “Baby and Child Care” sold more books than any other, except for the Bible.

27. Cracker topper : PATE
Pâté is a rich spreadable paste made up of a mixture of ground meat and fat, to which various vegetables, herbs and spices may be added. The most famous version is pâté de foie gras, made from the fattened livers of geese ("foie gras" means "fat liver" in French).

29. German Dadaist Hannah : HOCH
Hannah Hoch was a Dada artist from Gotha in Germany. Famously, Hoch was one of the pioneers of the artform that came to be known as “photomontage”.

Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

30. Makes stronger? : LACES
We've used the word "lace" to mean a net or a string since the 1300s, and in the mid-16th century it started to describe an ornamental net pattern. In the mid-17th century, one used "to lace" one's coffee or tea with sugar, the idea being that one was "ornamenting or trimming" the beverage. It wasn't long before "lacing" became reserved for the addition of alcohol to an otherwise "tame" drink.

36. Atlantic fishery auditors? : COD COUNTERS (sounds like “card counters”)
In the British Isles, the most common fish that is used in traditional “fish and chips” is Atlantic cod. Cod has been overfished all over the world, and is now considered to be an endangered species by many international bodies.

39. "Galatea of the Spheres" and others : DALIS
Salvador Dali’s 1952 painting called "Galatea of the Spheres" is a portrait of his wife, Gala. Gala’s image is depicted in a series of spheres that are meant to represent individual atoms. Dali had become interested in nuclear physics after the first atomic bombs were detonated in 1945.

41. Comcast media holding : NBC
Comcast is the largest cable company in the United States. Comcast was founded in 1963 as American Cable systems.

62. It's opposite julio on a calendario : ENERO
In Spanish, January (enero) might appear opposite July (julio) on a calendar (calendario).

64. "Dat ___" (classic jazz song) : DERE
“Dat Dere” is a jazz song by Bobby Timmons and Oscar Brown, Jr. that was first recorded in 1960, by Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers. The song tells the story of a young boy visiting a zoo with his father.

67. Dead-doornail connection : AS A
“As dead as a doornail” is one of older expressions, and dates back at least to the 14th century. You might have seen very old doors in castles or old houses that have large studs all over the front in a regular pattern. The studs are the heads of nails driven through the door, originally for strength, but later for decoration. They are “doornails”.

72. Moon feature : MARE
A “mare” is a large dark area on the moon. “Mare” is the Latin for “sea. Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the Mare Tranquillitatis, the “Sea of Tranquility”.

75. Bacteriologist Julius : PETRI
Julius Richard Petri was a German bacteriologist and was the man after whom the Petri dish is named. The petri dish can have an agar gel on the bottom which acts a nutrient source for the specimen being grown and studied, in which case the dish plus agar is referred to as an "agar plate".

81. Reproductive parts of flowers : OVULES
As we all remember from botany class, an "ovule" is a small structure in many plants that develops into the seed after fertilization. We do remember, don't we?

82. Folk rocker DiFranco : ANI
Ani DiFranco is a folk-rock singer and songwriter. DiFranco has also been labeled a "feminist icon", and in 2006 won the "Woman of Courage Award" from National Organization of Women.

83. Ball game : BOCCE
The Italian bowling game of “bocce” (anglicized as “bocci”) is based on a game played in Ancient Rome. “Bocce” is the plural of the Italian word "boccia" meaning "bowl".

86. Buster Brown's dog, in old comics : TIGE
"Buster Brown" was a comic strip created in 1902 by Felton Outcault. Outcault took his name Buster from the very popular film star at the time, Buster Keaton. Buster's dog Tige, was an American Pit Bull Terrier. Apparently when Tige started to "talk" in the strip, he became the first talking pet in American comics.

87. Verizon competitor : SPRINT
The modern Sprint Corporation, a giant in the telecommunications industry, can trace its roots back to the Brown Telephone Company which was founded in 1899. C.L. and Jacob Brown created their company to provide a telephone service to the rural parts around the city of Abilene, Kansas.

93. Wood-shaping tool : ADZ
An adze (also adz) is similar to an axe, but is different in that the blade of an adze is set at right angles to the tool's shaft. An axe's blade is set in line with the shaft.

94. Reagan attorney general : MEESE
Ed Meese was born in Oakland, California just down the road here and spent 24 years in the office of the Treasurer of Alameda County, the county in which I live. After military service, Meese earned himself a law degree at UC Berkeley. Later, as Chief of Staff for President Reagan, he was instrumental in a famous decision to crack down on student protesters at Berkeley which resulted in one protester dying and a two-week occupation of the city by the California National Guard.

99. Cell part : ANODE
The two terminals of a battery are called the anode and the cathode. Electrons travel from the anode to the cathode creating an electric current.

101. Femmes fatales : MAN-EATERS
A “femme fatale” is a dangerously seductive woman. “Femme fatale” is French for “deadly woman”.

104. Lion portrayer : LAHR
Bert Lahr's most famous role was that of the cowardly lion in "The Wizard of Oz". Lahr had a long career in burlesque, vaudeville and on Broadway. Remember the catch phrase made famous by the cartoon character Snagglepuss, "Heavens to Murgatroyd!"? Snagglepuss stole that line from a 1944 movie called, "Meet the People" in which it was first uttered by none other than Bert Lahr.

112. Where frogs shop? : HOPPERS’ BAZAAR (sounds like “Harper’s Bazaar”)
“Harper’s Bazaar” was first published in 1867, making it the first women’s fashion magazine to hit the newsstands.

115. Religious recluse : EREMITE
The Greek word for "uninhabited" is eremos, which is the root for “eremia” meaning both "desert" and "solitude". The Greek word eremites then means "a person of the desert". This was absorbed into Latin as “ermita”, meaning someone who lived in solitude or in an uninhabited area. We use "eremite" to mean the same thing, although the derivative term "hermit" is more common.

119. Medication for a narcoleptic : RITALIN
Ritalin is a trade name for the drug methylphenidate that is used for treatment of ADHD and narcolepsy. Methylphenidate has a similar structure and similar properties to the drug cocaine, although it is less potent.

120. Cabernet Sauvignon alternative : MERLOT
Merlot is one of the main grapes used to make Bordeaux wines, along with Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot.

The Cabernet Sauvignon grape has been around since the 17th century. It is the result of a chance crossing in southwestern France of the Cabernet franc and Sauvignon blanc grapes.

Down
1. They're probably close: Abbr. : ESTS
Estimates (ests.)

3. Large sport fish : CERO
The cero is a large fish in the mackerel family that typically grow to about 10 lb in weight. The cero is found in relative abundance in the Florida Keys and the West Indies.

5. Hotel amenity : SHAMPOO
Back in the 1760s, the verb “shampoo” was an Anglo-Indian word meaning “to massage”. A century later we started to shampoo our hair.

7. Hitchcock genre : SUSPENSE
Alfred Hitchcock makes a cameo appearance in 39 of his 52 movies. My favorite, and perhaps the most innovative, is in the movie "Lifeboat". In the film, there is a limited cast, just the people in a lifeboat and no extras. Hitchcock managed to make his appearance in a print ad in a newspaper read by one of the survivors in the boat.

10. Grp. in a 1955 merger : CIO
The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was founded in 1886, making it one of the first federations of unions in the country. Over time the AFL became dominated by craft unions, unions representing skilled workers of particular disciplines. In the early thirties, John L. Lewis led a movement within the AFL to organize workers by industry, believing this would be more effective for the members. But the craft unions refused to budge, so Lewis set up a rival federation of unions in 1932 called the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO). The two federations became bitter rivals for over two decades until finally merging in 1955 to form the AFL-CIO.

11. "Wag the Dog" actress : HECHE
My favorite movie starring the actress Anne Heche is "Six Days Seven Nights", a romantic comedy in which she plays opposite Harrison Ford. Heche is noted for her difficult private life. She wrote that her father had molested her as a child and gave her a sexually transmitted disease (he later revealed that he was homosexual, and died of AIDS). Heche dated comedian Steve Martin for two years, and then lived with comedian Ellen DeGeneres for three. Soon after breaking up with DeGeneres, she started exhibiting eccentric behavior for a while, claiming that she was the daughter of God, and that she would take everyone back to heaven in her spaceship. Happily, I think things have calmed down for her in recent years.

The 1997 movie "Wag the Dog" is a black comedy starring Dustin Hoffman and Robert De Niro. It tells the story of a fake war that is manufactured by a Washington spin doctor in order to distract the American electorate. It is based on the novel "American Hero" by Larry Beinhart. In the movie the war is fictitious and the president goes unnamed. In the novel, Beinhart uses Desert Storm as the war in his storyline, and George H. W. Bush as the President.

12. Fashion designer Marc : ECKO
Marc Ecko is a fashion designer from New Jersey. Marc was born Marc Milecofsky. In college he became a fan of graffiti and used the name “Ecko” to tag his drawings.

13. Family tree listing: Abbr. : DESC
Descendant (desc.)

14. Prefix with dermis : EPI-
The epidermis is the outermost layer of the skin. The thickest piece of epidermal tissue in humans is on the soles of the feet and the palms, measuring about 1.5 mm. The thinnest measures 0.1 mm, and that would be the human eyelid.

15. Longtime home of the Cotton Bowl : DALLAS
The Cotton Bowl college football game was played from its inception in 1937 until 2009 in Dallas, originally at the Texas State Fair Grounds. The game was moved to Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas in 2010.

16. Reflective material : MYLAR
Mylar is a brand name for a polyester film with many uses, one of which is to make reflective surfaces. Mylar can be used to make reflective solar sails, which are a fascinating form of spacecraft propulsion. Believe it or not, reflecting photons of light each provide a small amount of thrust, and enough of them can propel an object in the vacuum of space.

18. Florida State player, casually : ‘NOLE
Florida State University (FSU) is located in Tallahassee, the state capital of Florida. The school’s athletic teams are known as the Seminoles (sometimes “the ‘Noles”). The team name was chosen in 1947 by the students in a vote, and alludes to the Seminole people who originally lived in the state. Most of the Seminole now live in Oklahoma, after their forced relocation by the US government in the 1840s.

19. Prohibitionists : DRYS
There were concerted efforts to ban the sale of alcoholic beverages in the US from the 1840s right up until the lobbyists achieved success with ratification of the Eighteenth Amendment to the US Constitution in 1919. While there were several factors that influenced legislators at that time, one was the perceived need to take political power away from German-based brewing industry during WWI.

28. Model Carol : ALT
Carol Alt is a model from Queens, New York. Alt’s big break came when was featured on the cover of the 1982 “Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue”.

35. Stronghold : CITADEL
A citadel is a fortress built to protect a town or a city. Both the words “city” and “citadel” come from the Latin word “civis” meaning “citizen”.

36. Tortile : COILED
“Tortile” is a very rarely used term meaning “twisted, coiled”, from Latin “tortilus” meaning “winding”.

37. Italian princely family name : ORSINI
The Orisinis were a very influential Italian noble family in medieval and renaissance times. Included in the Orsini line were three popes: Celestine III (1191-1198), Nicholas III (1277-1280) and Benedict XIII (1724-1730).

40. Bygone Chevrolet : AVEO
The Chevrolet Aveo is a subcompact that has been around since 2002. The Aveo is manufactured by GM Daewoo, the GM subsidiary in South Korea. Although the Aveo name is still used in some markets, here in North America the Aveo has been sold as the Chevrolet Sonic since 2012. By the way, GM Daewoo is the third largest manufacturer of automobiles in South Korea, after Hyundai and Kia.

43. Engine specification: Abbr. : CYLS
Cylinders (cyls.)

50. Footless creature : APOD
Something described as “apod” has no feet. An example of an apod animal would be a snake.

55. Chevron : STRIPE
A chevron is a band that is shaped like an inverted “V”. One example of a chevron is the insignia that indicates rank on a military uniform.

61. 1960s-'70s pitcher Blue Moon : ODOM
Blue Moon Odom’s real name was Johnny Lee Odom, and he was a pitcher for the Oakland Athletics. With the A’s, Odom won three consecutive World Series, from 1972 to 1974.

68. One 60-trillionth of a min. : PSEC
A picosecond is one trillionth of a second, and is correctly abbreviated to “ps” in the SI system of measurements. I guess that's what “psec” is meant to be …

70. Dimwit : CRETIN
“Cretin” is a slang term meaning “idiot”, and is a term that I do not like at all. “Cretin” was a medical term in the 1900s that derived from Alpine French dialect. Congenital hypothyroidism was particularly associated with an area in the French Alps and manifested itself as impaired physical and mental development, a condition known as "cretinism".

71. Charmers : SIRENS
In Greek mythology, the Sirens were seductive bird-women who lured men to their deaths with their song. When Odysseus sailed closed to the island home of the Sirens he wanted to hear their voices, but in safety. He had his men plug their ears with beeswax and then ordered them to tie him to the mast and not to free him until they were safe. On hearing their song Odysseus begged to be let loose, but the sailors just tightened his bonds and and the whole crew sailed away unharmed.

73. Start of a choosing rhyme : EENIE
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

77. "Metamorphoses" poet : OVID
The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso is today known simply as Ovid. Ovid is usually listed alongside the two other great Roman poets: Horace and Virgil.

"The Metamorphoses" is a narrative poem by the Roman poet Ovid that deals with a lofty subject. It describes the history of the world from creation until the "present day", that is Ovid’s “present day”, the era of Julius Caesar. A lot of the storyline makes use of Greek mythology (rather than Roman).

79. Setting of the 2012 film "John Carter" : MARS
"John Carter" is a science fiction film that Disney released in 2012. The movie is based on the Edgar Rice Burroughs novel “A Princess of Mars”. Burroughs wrote a whole series of “Barsoom” novels that featured the character John Carter who was transported from Earth to a dying Mars.

80. Combine name : DEERE
John Deere invented the first commercially successful steel plow in 1837. Prior to Deere's invention, farmers used an iron or wooden plow that constantly had to be cleaned as rich soil stuck to its surfaces. The cast-steel plow was revolutionary as its smooth sides solved the problem of "stickiness".

92. "WKRP in Cincinnati" news director Les ___ : NESSMAN
Les Nessman is a character in the sitcom “WKRP in Cincinatti”. Nessman is the shy balding guy who always wears a bow tie.

The sitcom "WKRP in Cincinnati" was produced by MTM, the production company established by Mary Tyler Moore and her husband for the "The Mary Tyler Moore Show". "WKRP" was a successful enough show when it originally aired, but then became a blockbuster in syndication. It became MTM's most-watched program, even outstripping the original "The Mary Tyler Moore Show".

98. Baseball's Bando : SAL
Sal Bando is a former Major League Baseball player and baseball executive. After retiring as a player, Bando worked for while as a color analyst for NBC, working alongside Bob Costas.

100. Mountainous land : NEPAL
Nepal lies to the northeast of India. Today, the state is known as the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal. In 2008, the Communist Party of Nepal won the country's general election. Soon after, the Assembly voted to change the form of government, moving away from a monarchy and creating a secular republic.

101. Postal symbol, once : MR ZIP
Mr. ZIP is a mascot that was used by the US Post Office in the sixties and seventies. Mr. ZIP’s mission was to encourage the public to use ZIP codes when mailing letters and packages.

105. Uncle of Enoch : ABEL
Enoch was the great-grandfather of Noah, and the great-grandson of Adam. Cain was Enoch’s father and Abel was his uncle.

110. ___ & Carla (1960s duo) : OTIS
The 1960s duo Otis & Carla was made up of Otis Redding and Carla Thomas. The duo’s most celebrated album is 1967’s “King & Queen”.

Otis Redding is often referred to as the "King of Soul", and what a voice he had. Like so many of the greats in the world of popular music it seems, Redding was killed in a plane crash, in 1967 when he was just 26 years old. Just three days earlier he had recorded what was to be his biggest hit, "(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay".

Carla Thomas is a singer from Memphis, Tennessee who is referred to as the Queen of Memphis Soul. Carla’s father was R&B singer Rufus Thomas.

116. Birthplace of the bossa nova : RIO
Rio de Janeiro is the second largest city in Brazil (after São Paulo). “Rio de Janeiro” translates as "January River". The name reflects the discovery of the bay on which Rio sits, on New Years Day in 1502.

Bossa Nova is a style of music from Brazil that evolved from samba. The most famous piece of bossa nova is the song "The Girl from Ipanema".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Boxes up : ENCASES
8. Hidden : CACHED
14. Astronomer Halley : EDMOND
20. Sheer, informally : SEE-THRU
21. Individually : APIECE
22. Not get gratis : PAY FOR
23. Clan garb : TARTANS
24. A "Star Trek" officer and a physician are going to board a plane? : SPOCKS WILL FLY (sounds like “sparks will fly”)
26. Attack, as ramparts : STORM
27. Cracker topper : PATE
29. German Dadaist Hannah : HOCH
30. Makes stronger? : LACES
31. Kind of court : APPELLATE
34. Without ___ in the world : A CARE
36. Atlantic fishery auditors? : COD COUNTERS (sounds like “card counters”)
39. "Galatea of the Spheres" and others : DALIS
41. Comcast media holding : NBC
44. Ones giving their addresses : ORATORS
45. Hedge shrub : PRIVET
47. Dog command : STAY
48. Non-Eur. U.S. ally : ISR
49. Baseball features : SEAMS
53. French article : UNE
54. To boot : AS WELL
56. Minute : LITTLE
59. Work agreeably in a greenhouse? : POT ON GOOD TERMS (sounds like “part on good terms”)
62. It's opposite julio on a calendario : ENERO
63. "No challenge at all" : TOO EASY
64. "Dat ___" (classic jazz song) : DERE
65. Called the shots : DIRECTED
67. Dead-doornail connection : AS A
68. Delicate first-date topic : POLITICS
72. Moon feature : MARE
73. Aristocratic practice : ELITISM
75. Bacteriologist Julius : PETRI
76. "Happy Birthday" on a cake, e.g.? : GOBBLED MESSAGE (sounds like “garbled message”)
80. Naysayer : DENIER
81. Reproductive parts of flowers : OVULES
82. Folk rocker DiFranco : ANI
83. Ball game : BOCCE
85. Québec place name starter : STE
86. Buster Brown's dog, in old comics : TIGE
87. Verizon competitor : SPRINT
90. Positions oneself to hear better, say : LEANS IN
93. Wood-shaping tool : ADZ
94. Reagan attorney general : MEESE
95. Sexy operators? : HOT SURGEONS (sounds like “heart surgeon”)
99. Cell part : ANODE
101. Femmes fatales : MAN-EATERS
102. Bank heist, e.g. : CAPER
104. Lion portrayer : LAHR
107. Word with sea or seasoned : SALT
108. Bar, legally : ESTOP
112. Where frogs shop? : HOPPERS’ BAZAAR (sounds like “Harper’s Bazaar”)
115. Religious recluse : EREMITE
117. Consternation : UNEASE
118. O.K. to serve : EDIBLE
119. Medication for a narcoleptic : RITALIN
120. Cabernet Sauvignon alternative : MERLOT
121. Ran out : LAPSED
122. Immediately : SOONEST

Down
1. They're probably close: Abbr. : ESTS
2. Undiluted : NEAT
3. Large sport fish : CERO
4. Draw : ATTRACT
5. Hotel amenity : SHAMPOO
6. Directional suffix : -ERN
7. Hitchcock genre : SUSPENSE
8. Common aquarium feature : CASTLE
9. Show up : APPEAR
10. Grp. in a 1955 merger : CIO
11. "Wag the Dog" actress : HECHE
12. Fashion designer Marc : ECKO
13. Family tree listing: Abbr. : DESC
14. Prefix with dermis : EPI-
15. Longtime home of the Cotton Bowl : DALLAS
16. Reflective material : MYLAR
17. Unbalanced : OFF-CENTER
18. Florida State player, casually : ‘NOLE
19. Prohibitionists : DRYS
25. Oil source : WHALE
28. Model Carol : ALT
32. Clutch, e.g. : PURSE
33. Recipe amt. : TSP
35. Stronghold : CITADEL
36. Tortile : COILED
37. Italian princely family name : ORSINI
38. Sand ___ (perchlike fish) : DARTER
39. Drab-looking : DINGY
40. Bygone Chevrolet : AVEO
42. Salve : BALM
43. Engine specification: Abbr. : CYLS
46. Drinks now, pays later : RUNS A TAB
47. Make more enticing : SWEETEN
50. Footless creature : APOD
51. Barnyard sound : MOO
52. Enters furtively : STEALS IN
55. Chevron : STRIPE
57. Exhibit fear, in a way : TREMBLE
58. Quarter : LOCALE
60. Green spot : OASIS
61. 1960s-'70s pitcher Blue Moon : ODOM
63. Ticked (off) : TEED
66. Locked? : TRESSED
68. One 60-trillionth of a min. : PSEC
69. "True" : IT IS SO
70. Dimwit : CRETIN
71. Charmers : SIRENS
73. Start of a choosing rhyme : EENIE
74. "Can ___ now?" : I GO
76. "___ light?" : GOT A
77. "Metamorphoses" poet : OVID
78. Sight at many a barbecue : BUG ZAPPER
79. Setting of the 2012 film "John Carter" : MARS
80. Combine name : DEERE
84. Hoarders' problems : CLUTTERS
88. Rinds : PEELS
89. Fourth Arabic letter : THA
91. Go along with : AGREE TO
92. "WKRP in Cincinnati" news director Les ___ : NESSMAN
94. To a greater extent : MORE SO
96. Reduced : ON SALE
97. Got emotional, with "up" : TEARED
98. Baseball's Bando : SAL
100. Mountainous land : NEPAL
101. Postal symbol, once : MR ZIP
102. Bud : CHUM
103. Super-duper : A-ONE
105. Uncle of Enoch : ABEL
106. "I ___ thought" : HAD A
109. Part of a space shuttle's exterior : TILE
110. ___ & Carla (1960s duo) : OTIS
111. Cooped (up) : PENT
113. No longer playing: Abbr. : RET
114. They may improve in crunch time : ABS
116. Birthplace of the bossa nova : RIO


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6 comments :

Kurthunk said...

Our power went out the other night. Couldnt watch the last episode of Breaking BAd but did havethis puzze downloaded on Ipad with battery charged! This puzzle proved especially difficult without electricity -- because with no Internet connection I couldnt't cheat!! Had lots of fun today filling in the blanks from this blogs answers.

Didn't quite get the theme until reading your explanations, despite having gone to school in Boston for 3 years. Now on to look up the names of some more Dahli's.

- kurthunk

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, Kurthunk.

I always cringe when I notice that a puzzle involves a "sounds like" theme. Our accents are so varied, so inevitably someone will say "that's not how it sounds".

Thanks for stopping by.

Kurthunk said...

Well, at least I now know how to pronounce sauna, thanks to your wife. :)

Bill Butler said...

You're better off listening to my wife's pronunciation of many words, rather than my confused Irish/American-accented mouthings :)

Anonymous said...

44-59 across defs are missing.

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, anonymous visitor.

The explanations are "missing" as I chose to exclude them. I don't have time to write about every answer, especially for a Sunday puzzle. So, I have to pick and choose.

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The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

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Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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