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Greetings from Dundalk, County Louth in Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland, and have extended my stay until October 24th. I am focused on getting the puzzle solved and at least a basic post up each day. It's proving to be difficult to do much more than that due to pressure of time, which I am sure you can understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

1011-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 11 Oct 13, Friday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Peter A. Collins
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 28m 33s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Forest newcomer : FAWN
A fawn is a young deer, often less than a year old.

5. Group whose last Top 40 hit was "When All Is Said and Done" : ABBA
I am an unapologetic fan of ABBA's music. ABBA was of course the Swedish group who topped the charts in the seventies and eighties. The name ABBA is an acronym formed from the first letters of the given names of each of the band members, namely: Agnetha, Benny, Bjorn and Anni-Frid.

16. Nobel winner Joliot-Curie : IRENE
Along with her husband, Frederick, Irene Joliot-Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935 for their discovery of artificial radioactivity. Irene was the daughter of Marie and Pierre Curie, who also won Nobel Prizes. Irene died when she was 58 years old, suffering from leukemia brought on her exposure to high doses of radiation. Her mother, Marie, died from aplastic anemia, also caused by high exposure to radiation. To this day, Marie's personal papers are kept preserved in lead-lined boxes as they are highly radioactive, even her personal cookbook.

20. "Everybody Is ___" (1970 hit) : A STAR
"Everybody Is a Star" is a 1970 hit for Sly & the Family Stone.

Sly and the Family Stone are a rock, funk and soul band from San Francisco that's still performing today, although their heyday was from 1966 to 1983. They were one of the first rock bands to have a racially integrated lineup, as well as representatives of both sexes.

22. Old co. with overlapping globes in its logo : TWA
Trans World Airlines (TWA) was a big carrier in the US, but was perhaps even more recognized for its extensive presence in Europe and the Middle East. For many years, especially after the collapse of Pan-Am, TWA was considered the unofficial flag carrier for the US. The company started in 1930, the product of a forced merger of Transcontinental Air Transport and Western Air Express. The Transcontinental and Western Air that resulted (the original meaning of the acronym TWA) was what the Postmaster General wanted, a bigger airline to which the Postal Service could award airmail contracts.

23. 1960s civil rights leader ___ Brown : H RAP
H. Rap Brown was a civil rights leader in the sixties, chairman of the Student Nonviolent coordinating Committee. Brown was convicted of the murder of a police officer in the year 2000, and is now serving a life sentence in Federal prison.

25. Katey who portrayed TV's Peg Bundy : SAGAL
Katey Sagal played Peggy Bundy on "Married ... with Children". Later she took over as star of the show "8 Simple Rules" in the middle of its run, when John Ritter passed away unexpectedly in 2003. More recently, Sagal has been appearing on the FX drama “Sons of Anarchy”. In 2004, she married Kurt Sutter who created the “Sons of Anarchy” series.

34. Bobby's follower? : SOXER
Bobby socks (or “bobby sox”) are so called because they are shorter than knee socks, they are “bobbed”, shortened, as in a bob haircut.

35. Fibonacci, notably : PISAN
Leonardo of Pisa was a famous and respected Italian mathematician, also known as simply “Fibonacci”. He is remembered for writing about a number sequence (although he didn’t "discover” it) that later was given the name “Fibonacci sequence”. He wrote about the series of numbers in his book called “Liber Abaci”, a celebrated work that introduced Arabic numerals (i.e. 0-9) to the Western world.

36. Hockey Hall of Fame nickname : ESPO
Phil "Espo" Esposito is a former professional hockey player who played for the Chicago Blackhawks, Boston Bruins and New York Rangers.

38. Alternative to ZzzQuil : NYTOL
Nytol is a brand name for the drug diphenhydramine which is primarily used as an antihistamine. The drug also has a strong hypnotic effect and is used by some people as a non-prescription sleep aid.

40. Stat. for Re, La or Ti : AT NO
The atomic number of an element is also called the proton number, and is the number of protons found in the nucleus of each atom of the element.

Each chemical element has its own symbol. For example:
- Rhenium ... Re
- Lanthanum ... La
- Titanium ... Ti

43. Papa ___ (Northeast pizza chain) : GINO’S
Papa Gino’s is a chain of American-style pizza restaurants in the northeast. The company is headquartered in Dedham, Massachusetts and was founded in Boston in 1961.

51. Whse. sight : CTN
One might find a carton (ctn.) in a warehouse (whse.).

53. "Philosophy will clip an angel's wings" writer : KEATS
"Philosophy will clip an angel's wings" is a line from the narrative poem “Lamia” by John Keats.

56. French class setting : LYCEE
The “lycée” is the last stage of secondary education in France.

62. Uncle Sam, say : TAXER
The Uncle Sam personification of the United States was first used during the War of 1812. The “Uncle Sam” term was so widely accepted that even the Germans used it during WWII, choosing the code word "Samland" for "America" in intelligence communiques.

63. One featuring a Maltese cross : EURO
Euro coins are issued by all the participating European states. The reverse side is a common design used by all countries, whereas the obverse is a design specific to each nation. For example, the one euro coin issued by Malta features the Maltese Cross. That Maltese euro is legal tender right across the eurozone.

64. Turkic word for "island" : ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad ...

66. Couldn't discard in crazy eights, say : DREW
The card game called Crazy Eights originated in the 1940s. The game’s name comes from the term “Section 8”, which was a category of discharge from the US military used when a person was deemed mentally unfit for service.

67. Court suspensions : NETS
Basketball is truly an American sport. It was created in 1891 by a James Naismith at the YMCA in Springfield, Massachusetts. His goal was to create something active and interesting for his students in the gym. The first "hoops" were actually peach baskets, with the bottoms of the baskets intact. When a player got the ball into the "net", someone had to clamber up and get the ball back out again in order to continue the game!

Down
1. Relief provider, for short : FEMA
Federal emergency management has been structured for over 200 years, but what we know today as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) was created in 1979 in an Executive Order issued by President Jimmy Carter.

4. Sealing worker : NOTARY
A notary public is a public officer licensed to perform specific legal actions in non-contentious legal matters. The main duties are to administer oaths, take affidavits and witness the execution of documents.

7. Alfred H. ___ Jr., founding director of MoMA : BARR
Alfred H. Barr, Jr. was the first director of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City, serving from 1929 to 1943.

8. Like G.I.'s, per recruiting ads : ARMY STRONG
The current recruiting slogan used by the US Army is "Army Strong", replacing "Army of One" in 2006. Prior to that "Be All You Can Be" had been the army's slogan for more than twenty years.

13. They may be used in veins : SERA
Blood serum is the clear, yellowish part of blood i.e. that part which is neither a blood cell or a clotting factor. Included in blood serum are antibodies, the proteins that are central to our immune system. Blood serum from animals that have immunity to some disease can be transferred to another individual, hence providing that second individual with some level of immunity. Blood serum used to pass on immunity can be called “antiserum”.

18. They may be used around veins : TRAMS
The railcars used for transportation of ore in mines are called trams.

19. All-Star Infante : OMAR
Omar Infante is professional baseball player from Venezuela who plays with the Detroit Tigers.

24. Drone : PEON
A peon is a lowly worker with no real control over his/her working conditions. The word comes into English from Spanish where it has the same meaning.

26. 1998 hit from the album "Surfacing" : ADIA
Apparently the song "Adia", co-written by Sarah McLachlan, was intended as an apology to her best friend ... for stealing her ex-boyfriend and then marrying him!

29. Like some hemoglobin : OXYGENATED
Hemoglobin is the key protein in red blood cells. Hemoglobin transports oxygen around the body, and also carbon dioxide.

30. ___-A : RETIN
Retin-A is a brand name for the drug Tretinoin, the acid form of vitamin A that is used to treat acne.

44. Revolving feature : STILE
A stile is a structure allowing people to pass over or through a fence, while at the same time preventing livestock from escaping.

47. Revolving features? : VEES
The are two letters V (vees) featured in the word “revolving”.

51. 1/20 tons: Abbr. : CWTS
In the very sensible country of America, a hundredweight is 100 pounds. In the UK, of course a hundredweight has to be 112 pounds. The hundredweight is also called a centum weight, which explains the abbreviation used: cwt.

52. Whence the word "bong" : THAI
A “bong” is a smaller and more portable version of a “hookah”, with both being filtration devices for smoking especially tobacco and cannabis. The term “bong” comes from the Thai word “baung” that is used for a wooden pope cut from bamboo.

55. Wizened up : SERE
"Wizen" is such a lovely word, I think. It means to “dry up”, especially with age.

57. Indiana, e.g., to Lafayette : ETAT
In French, a state (état) is a political division (division politique).

The Marquis de Lafayette was a French military officer who fought in the American Revolutionary War, as well as having a notable career back in France. But, his links to America were strong, so that when he died in 1834, he was buried in Paris under soil transported from the Revolutionary War battlefield at Bunker Hill.

58. Some use electric organs : EELS
Electrophorus electricus is the biological name for the electric eel. Despite its name, the electric "eel" isn't an eel at all, but rather what is called a knifefish, a fish with an elongated body that is related to the catfish. The electric eel has three pairs of organs along its abdomen, each capable of generating an electric discharge. The shock can go as high as 500 volts with 1 ampere of current (that's 500 watts), and that could perhaps kill a human.

60. River Shannon's Lough ___ : REE
Lough Ree is the second largest lake on the River Shannon in Ireland, with the largest being Lough Derg. “Lough” is the Irish word for “lake”.

61. Sudoku segment : ROW
"Sudoku" is a Japanese word meaning "single number". No doubt many of you are fans. I know I am ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Forest newcomer : FAWN
5. Group whose last Top 40 hit was "When All Is Said and Done" : ABBA
9. To-do list : TASKS
14. Sound after call waiting? : ECHO
15. Sense, as a 14-Across : HEAR
16. Nobel winner Joliot-Curie : IRENE
17. Turkey sticker : MEAT THERMOMETER
20. "Everybody Is ___" (1970 hit) : A STAR
21. Response to a threat : TRY ME
22. Old co. with overlapping globes in its logo : TWA
23. 1960s civil rights leader ___ Brown : H RAP
25. Katey who portrayed TV's Peg Bundy : SAGAL
27. Benchwarmer's plea : PLAY ME OR TRADE ME
33. Drain : SAP
34. Bobby's follower? : SOXER
35. Fibonacci, notably : PISAN
36. Hockey Hall of Fame nickname : ESPO
38. Alternative to ZzzQuil : NYTOL
40. Stat. for Re, La or Ti : AT NO
41. "___ needed" : USE AS
43. Papa ___ (Northeast pizza chain) : GINO’S
45. Now in : HOT
46. "That subject's off the table!" : DON'T EVEN GO THERE!
49. Luster : SHEEN
50. They have edible shells : PIES
51. Whse. sight : CTN
53. "Philosophy will clip an angel's wings" writer : KEATS
56. French class setting : LYCEE
59. Universal query? : WHERE'S THE REMOTE?
62. Uncle Sam, say : TAXER
63. One featuring a Maltese cross : EURO
64. Turkic word for "island" : ARAL
65. Browser history list : SITES
66. Couldn't discard in crazy eights, say : DREW
67. Court suspensions : NETS

Down
1. Relief provider, for short : FEMA
2. Blasts through : ACES
3. "And now?" : WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?
4. Sealing worker : NOTARY
5. "Per-r-rfect!" : AHH!
6. ___-red : BEET
7. Alfred H. ___ Jr., founding director of MoMA : BARR
8. Like G.I.'s, per recruiting ads : ARMY STRONG
9. Interval : TIME GAP
10. Were present? : ARE
11. Gets payback : SETTLES THE SCORE
12. Sensed : KNEW
13. They may be used in veins : SERA
18. They may be used around veins : TRAMS
19. All-Star Infante : OMAR
24. Drone : PEON
26. 1998 hit from the album "Surfacing" : ADIA
27. False start? : PSEUD-
28. Stockholder? : LASSO
29. Like some hemoglobin : OXYGENATED
30. ___-A : RETIN
31. Plantation habitation : MANOR
32. Cybermemo : E-NOTE
37. Something taken on the stand : OATH
39. Ring : LOOP
42. They're on hunts : SEEKERS
44. Revolving feature : STILE
47. Revolving features? : VEES
48. "Psst ... buddy" : HEY, MAN
51. 1/20 tons: Abbr. : CWTS
52. Whence the word "bong" : THAI
54. Day of the week of Jul. 4, 1776 : THUR
55. Wizened up : SERE
57. Indiana, e.g., to Lafayette : ETAT
58. Some use electric organs : EELS
60. River Shannon's Lough ___ : REE
61. Sudoku segment : ROW


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4 comments :

PETER said...

Hi Bill,

The clue for NETS (Court suspensions) was Will Shortz's, but I think it refers to basketball (at least in my mind), where two nets are suspended from the rims.

Then again, I was more of a basketball player than a tennis player ...

Thanks for the write-up!

- Pete Collins

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, Pete.

Thanks for stopping by, and for helping me out with that basketball clue. My flimsy knowledge of sports shines through again! I'll make the change right now.

Thanks for yet another great puzzle. Incredible use of crossing 15-letter answers, ones that seemed pretty fresh to me. It's always a good sign for me when I see the Pete Collins name above the grid.

Have a good weekend.

Anonymous said...

That "Court suspensions" clue, if you can call it a clue, is a good example of deliberately misleading and obfuscated editing (thanks again, Will Shorts, with the appropriate sarcasm). A good puzzle doesn't need that kind of trickery. I wonder what Peter's original clue for that was?

TAM said...

Are you all sure that Court suspensions have to do with basketball instead of tennis, where the nets are suspended across the court?

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This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

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Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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