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Greetings from Mammoth Lakes, California

My wife and I are on vacation until Friday, July 25th; a road trip through the backroads of the states east of California. I anticipate late-night solving and posting, with acknowledgement of comments and emails suffering. Please, don't be offended at my silence as I prioritize the writing of posts! We had probably the last hike of our trip this morning (strenuous, past beautiful alpine lakes), and then opted for vegging out by the pool for a change this afternoon. Almost home ...

Bill

1020-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 20 Oct 13, Sunday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Elizabeth C. Gorski
THEME: Country Road … the circled letters give a string of abbreviated state names that snake across the grid, imitating the path of the Lincoln Highway as it progresses from COAST TO COAST:
25A. Nickname for the 122-/124-Across : MAIN STREET ACROSS AMERICA

40A. With 105-Across, historical significance of the 122-/124-Across : THE FIRST MAJOR MEMORIAL TO
105A. 122-Across : THE SIXTEENTH US PRESIDENT

122A. With 124-Across, dedicated in October 1913, project represented by the 13 pairs of circled letters : LINCOLN
124A. See 122-Across : HIGHWAY

148A. Follows the east-west route of the 122-/124-Across? : TSAOC OT TSAOC MORF SLEVART (“travels from coast to coast” in reverse)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 28m 43s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

25. Nickname for the 122-/124-Across : MAIN STREET ACROSS AMERICA
The Lincoln Highway was dedicated in 1913, and stretched from Times Square in New York City to Lincoln Park in San Francisco. The highway stretched 3,389 miles through 13 states. In the days when the automobile was coming into its own, the Lincoln Highway brought prosperity to the hundreds of cities through which it passed, earning it the nickname “the Main Street Across America”.

28. Stops: Abbr. : STAS
Stations (stas.)

29. Jazz/blues singer Cassidy : EVA
Eva Cassidy was a singer and guitarist who sang many genres of music including jazz, blues, gospel, country and pop. Cassidy was from the East Coast of the US, but was extremely popular in the UK and Ireland. Sadly, she passed away in 1996 when she was just 33 years old.

33. ___ Bell (Anne Brontë pseudonym) : ACTON
Anne was the youngest of the three sisters in the literary Brontë family. Her older sisters wrote novels that are more recognized, but Anne's two novels do have a following. "Agnes Grey" is based on her own experiences working as a governess. Her other novel, "The Tenant of Wildfell Hall" is written as a long letter from a young man describing the events leading up to his first meeting with his wife-to-be. Anne Brontë's writing career was cut short in 1849, when she died of pulmonary tuberculosis, at only 29 years of age.

37. Class for some immigrants, for short : ESL
English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

40. With 105-Across, historical significance of the 122-/124-Across : THE FIRST MAJOR MEMORIAL TO
105. 122-Across : THE SIXTEENTH US PRESIDENT
Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of the US, elected in 1860 as the first president from the Republican Party. Lincoln’s electoral support came almost exclusively from the north and west of the country, winning only two out 996 counties in the Southern slave states. Lincoln led the country through Civil War, and then was assassinated in 1865 just a few days after Robert E. Lee surrendered his army of Northern Virginia. President Lincoln was succeeded in office by Vice President Andrew Johnson.

48. It's ENE of Fiji : SAMOA
The official name for the South Pacific country formerly known as Western Samoa is the Independent State of Samoa. "Samoa" is the western part of the island group, with American Samoa lying to the southeast. The whole group of islands used to be known as Navigators Island, a name given by European explorers in recognition of the seafaring skills of the native Samoans.

58. Part of a page of Google results : AD SPACE
The search engine "Google" was originally called "BackRub" would you believe? The name was eventually changed to Google, an intentional misspelling of the word "googol". A googol is a pretty big number, 10 to the power of 100. That would be the digit 1 followed by 100 zeros.

63. 1796 Napoleon battle site : LODI
The Battle of Lodi was fought in 1796 between the French and the Austrians at the town of Lodi in northern Italy. The French forces under General Napoleon Bonaparte emerged victorious, although most of the Austrian army were able to withdraw and escape. The victory bolstered Napoleon’s reputation and helped propel him to power in France.

64. Freight carrier: Abbr. : RWY
Railway (rwy.)

66. Young and Sedaka : NEILS
Neil Young is a singer and songwriter from Toronto, Ontario. Young is known for his solo work, as well as his earlier recordings with Buffalo Springfield and as the fourth member of Crosby, Stills & Nash. Young is also a successful movie director, although he uses the pseudonym “Bernard Shakey” for his movie work. Included in his filmography are “Human Highway” and “Greendale”.

Neil Sedaka has been performing and composing for well over 50 years. His list of hits includes classics such as “Stupid Cupid”, “Oh! Carol”, “Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen” and “Breaking Up Is Hard to Do”.

67. Italian possessive : MIO
“Mio” is Italian for “my”.

68. Von Furstenberg of fashion : EGON
Egon von Furstenberg was a Swiss fashion designer, with quite the bloodline. He belonged to the House of Furstenberg, a reigning family in Germany that dated back to the Holy Roman Empire. Having said that, he began his career as a buyer with Macy's.

71. European capital once behind the Iron Curtain : SOFIA
Sofia is the capital of Bulgaria. Natives pronounce the name "Sofia" with the emphasis on the "o", while the rest of us tend to stress the "i". Bulgarians do agree with us though when it comes to the girl's name "Sofia", then they stress the "i" like we do!

76. Item dropped by Wile E. Coyote : ANVIL
Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner are two, much-loved cartoon characters from Warner Bros. Wile E. Coyote was created first, and Road Runner was invented as someone for Wile E. to play off. I love this cartoon; definitely one of the best ...

77. Times Square flasher? : NEON
The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

79. Masked warrior : NINJA
The ninjas were around in Japan at the time of the samurai, but were a very different type of warrior. The ninjas were covert operatives, specializing in the use of stealth to accomplish their missions. As they were a secretive cadre they took on a mystical reputation with the public, who believed they had the ability to become invisible or perhaps walk on water.

83. Chemistry suffix : -ENE
An alkene is an organic compound made up of carbon and hydrogen atoms. It differs from an alkane in that it has at least one C=C double bond. The simplest alkene is the gas ethylene, a major raw material used in the manufacture of plastics (like polyethylene).

87. They really click : CASTANETS
Castanets are hand-held percussion instruments associated most notably with Spanish music. We tend to think of castanets being used in the flamenco style of dance, but in fact this is rarely the case. The name “castanets” comes from “castaña”, the Spanish word for “chestnut”, which they resemble.

98. Piece at the Met : ARIA
The Metropolitan Opera (the Met) of New York City is the largest classical music organization in the country, presenting about 220 performances each and every year. Founded in 1880, the Met is renowned for using technology to expand its audiences. Performances have been broadcast live on radio since 1931, and on television since 1977. And since 2006 you can go see a live performance from New York in high definition on the big screen, at a movie theater near you ...

99. El Al destination: Abbr. : ISR
El Al Israel Airlines is the flag carrier of Israel. The term “el al” translates from Hebrew as “to the skies”.

100. German cry : ACH!
The German exclamation "ach!" is usually translated into English as "oh!"

104. Italian writer Vittorini : ELIO
Elio Vittorini was a writer from Sicily. His best-known novel if “Conversations in Sicily” which was first published in 1941. The anti-fascist sentiments expressed in the work led to his imprisonment in 1942.

114. Comment before "Bitte schön" : DANKE
In German, a “thank you” (danke) is often met with a “bitte schön” (you’re welcome).

115. Components of fatty tissues : STEROLS
Sterols occur in nature in both plants and animals. The most famous of the animal sterols is cholesterol, found in all animals as it is a vital component of cell walls. Cholesterol is made within the body, so it isn't a necessary part of the diet.

119. French wine classification : CRU
"Cru" is a term used in the French wine industry that means "growth place". So, "cru" is the name of the location where the grapes are grown, as opposed to the name of a specific vineyard. The terms "premier cru" and "grand cru" are also used, but the usage depends on the specific wine region. Generally it is a classification awarded to specific vineyards denoting their potential for producing great wines. “Grand cru” is reserved for the very best vineyards, with “premier cru” the level just below.

122. With 124-Across, dedicated in October 1913, project represented by the 13 pairs of circled letters : LINCOLN
124. See 122-Across : HIGHWAY
When the Lincoln Highway was dedicated in 1913, it became the first major memorial to President Abraham Lincoln (Washington’s Lincoln Memorial was completed in 1922).

131. "Alley ___" : OOP
"Alley Oop" is a comic strip that ran for four decades starting in 1932. "Alley Oop" was drawn by V. T. Hamlin. The title character lived in the prehistoric kingdom of Moo and had a pet dinosaur called Dinny. Alley Oop also had a girlfriend called Ooola. I had assumed that Ooola’s name was a play on “hula hoop”, but that wasn't invented until the 1950s (a kind blog reader informs me) ...

132. Sports org. headquartered in Indianapolis : NCAA
The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) dates back to the Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt. When his son broke his nose playing football at Harvard, President Roosevelt turned his attention to the number of serious injuries and even deaths occurring in college sports. He instigated meetings between the major educational institutions leading to the formation of the Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States (IAAUS) in 1906, which was given the remit of regulating college sports. The IAAUS became the NCAA in 1910.

136. Wearing clothes fit for a queen? : IN DRAG
The etymology of the term "drag", as used in the transvestite world, seems to be unclear. It perhaps relates to the tendency of a transvestite's skirts to drag along the ground in days of old (although why they just didn't hitch up their skirts is beyond me!).

146. Kindle downloads : EBOOKS
I finally bought myself a Kindle Fire HD a couple of months ago. For the price, it really is a great device. That said, the applications that interest me don’t seem to be available for the Kindle. However, I’ve started reading e-books for the first time in my life. I’ve always been behind the times ...

155. Sauce brand : MOTT’S
Samuel R. Mott was a producer of apple cider and vinegar. In 1842 he founded his own company to market and sell his products. The Mott's company (now part of the Dr. Pepper Snapple Group) owns brands such as Mr & Mrs T, Hawaiian Punch and ReaLime/ReaLemon.

Down
2. Weightlifting move : SNATCH
There are two weightlifting events in the Olympics. One is the “snatch” in which the competitor lifts the barbell from the platform over his or head in one continuous movement. The “clean and jerk” is a two-part lift. The “clean” brings the barbell off the platform mainly using the knees. The “jerk” brings the barbell over the head to complete the lift.

5. Sue Grafton's "___ for Evidence" : E IS
Sue Grafton writes detective novels, and her "alphabet series" features the private investigator Kinsey Millhone. She started off with "A Is for Alibi" in 1982 and is working her way through the alphabet, most recently publishing "’W’ is for Wasted" in 2009. What a clever naming system!

6. "Tartuffe" segment : ACTE
“Acte” is French for “act”.

Molière was the stage name of French actor and playwright Jean-Baptiste Poquelin. It is amazing how well the comedies of Molière, written in the 1600s, entertain us on stage today. Among his best-known plays are "The Misanthrope", "The School for Wives” and "Tartuffe or the Hypocrite".

7. TV's Griffin : MERV
Merv Griffin was quite the entertainer, truly a mogul in the business. He started his career as a singer on the radio during the big band era. In the sixties he hosted his own talk show, and then famously developed such great game shows as “Jeopardy!” and “Wheel of Fortune”.

8. ___ kwon do : TAE
Taekwondo is the national sport of Korea. "Tae" means "to strike or break with foot"; "kwon" means "to strike or break with fist"; "do" means "way" or "art". Along with judo, taekwondo is one of only two martial arts included in the Olympic Games.

9. Tulip festival city : OTTAWA
Tulip festivals are held in a few cities around the world. The largest of these is the Canadian Tulip Festival that is held every year in the capital city of Ottawa. The tradition of growing tulips in Ottawa really started at the end of WWII. The Dutch royal family presented the city with 100,000 tulip bulbs as an act of thank for having sheltered Princess Juliana and her children while the Nazis occupied the Netherlands. The first Canadian Tulip Festival took place in 1953.

11. Cicero's 350 : CCCL
Cicero was a very influential senator in Ancient Rome, in part due to his renowned ability to deliver a persuasive speech.

12. Rhine tributary : AARE
The Aar (also called the "Aare" in German) is the longest river entirely in Switzerland. A famous spot along the Aar is the Reichenbach Falls in the center of the country, actually a series of waterfalls near the city of Meiringen. These falls are renowned in the world of literature as it was here that Sherlock Holmes fell to his supposed doom with his nemesis Professor Moriarty (in "The Adventure of the Final Problem").

13. For now, for short : PRO TEM
"Pro tempore" can be abbreviated to "pro tem" or "p.t." "Pro tempore" is a Latin phrase that best translates as "for the time being". It is used to describe a person who is acting for another, usually a superior.

14. Campus political grp. : SDS
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) was an activist group in the sixties. The SDS organized the largest student strike in the history of the United States on 26 April 1968, with about a million students staying away from class that day. The “Students for a Democratic Society” name was revived in 2006 with the foundation of a new US-based student organization with left wing beliefs. Today’s SDS was founded by a pair of high school students from Greenwich Village, New York.

15. Mt. Rushmore's home: Abbr. : S DAK
The four presidents whose faces are carved in the granite face of Mount Rushmore are (from left to right) George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. Each of the presidents is about 60 feet in height, although they might have been larger. The original intent was for the presidents to be depicted from head to waist, but the project lost funding.

18. Sony co-founder Akio : MORITA
Sony was founded by Akio Morita and Masaru Ibuka. The two partners met in the Japanese Navy during WWII.

27. Historic march site : SELMA
The Bloody Sunday march took place between Selma and Montgomery, Alabama on 7 March 1965. The 600 marchers involved were protesting the intimidation of African-Americans registering to vote. When the marchers reached Dallas County, Alabama they encountered a line of state troopers reinforced by white males who had been deputized that morning to help keep the peace. Violence broke out with 17 marchers ending up in hospital, one nearly dying. Because the disturbance was widely covered by television cameras, the civil rights movement picked up a lot of support that day.

34. Vivaldi's "___ Dominus" : NISI
Antonio Vivaldi was one of the great composers of the Baroque period. Vivaldi achieved fame and success within in his own lifetime, notoriety that faded soon after he died. His music has reemerged in recent decades and most people are familiar with at least part of his most famous composition, the violin concerto called “The Four Seasons”. Vivaldi was nicknamed “The Red Priest” because he was indeed a priest, and he had red hair.

36. Latin 101 verb : AMAT
"Amo, amas, amat: ... "I love, you love, he/she/it loves", in Latin.

39. Caesar and others : SIDS
Sid Caesar achieved fame in the fifties on TV's "Your Show of Shows". To be honest, I know Sid Caesar mainly from the fun film version of the musical "Grease", in which he played Coach Calhoun.

41. Motorola phone : RAZR
The RAZR is a line of flip phones introduced by Motorola in 2004.

42. Eurasian ducks : SMEWS
The smew is a beautiful-looking species of duck found right across northern Europe and Asia.

43. Funny Garofalo : JANEANE
Janeane Garofalo is a stand-up comedian, actress and political activist. On the big screen, she appears in two of my favorite (light) movies: “The Truth About Cats and Dogs” (1996) and “The Matchmaker” (1997). I must admit, I have quite a crush on Ms. Garofalo ...

51. Pueblo pot : OLLA
An olla is a traditional clay pot used for the making of stews. “Olla” was the Latin word used in Ancient Rome to describe a similar type of pot.

A pueblo is a Native American village, a term used in the American Southwest. The buildings in a pueblo are usually made of stone and adobe mud, and hence are ochre in color.

52. Whistle time? : NOON
To this very day, there is a tradition in some towns and cities calling for the blowing of a whistle at noon. The tradition is mainly observed in industrial municipalities, where it signifies “time for lunch”.

53. 1999 Ron Howard film : EDTV
“EDtv” is a comedy directed by Ron Howard starring Matthew McConaughey, released in 1999. The plot has a “Big Brother” feel to it, as it is about a TV show broadcasting someone's life, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

61. Or or nor: Abbr. : CONJ
Conjunction (conj.)

62. "May It Be" singer, 2001 : ENYA
Enya's real name is Eithne Patricia Ní Bhraonáin, which can translate from Irish into Enya Brennan. Her Donegal family (in the northwest of Ireland) formed a band called Clannad, which included Enya. In 1980 Enya launched her very successful solo career. She sure does turn up a lot in crosswords!

67. "So-so" : MEH
“Meh!” is one of those terms unfamiliar to me outside of crosswords. It is a modern colloquialism meaning “I’m not great, but not bad”.

74. 1980s-'90s German leader Helmut : KOHL
Helmut Kohl served as Chancellor of Germany right through the country’s reunification. He took office as Chancellor of West Germany in 1982, and continued as Chancellor of the reunited Germany from 1990 to 1998. Kohl also partnered with French president François Mitterrand as the main drivers behind the formation of the European Union.

75. ___ B'rith : B’NAI
B'nai B'rith is a Jewish service organization founded in New York City in 1843. “B'nai B'rith” is Hebrew for “Sons of the Covenant”.

81. Bell Labs system : UNIX
Unix is a computer operating system that was developed at Bell Labs in 1969.

I always think of an operating system as that piece of software that sits between the hardware on my computer and the programs that I choose to run. Developers of application programs don't really have to worry about being able to "talk to" the countless different types of hardware found in the wide variety of computers that are manufactured, they just need to talk to the handful of operating systems that are out there, like Windows, MAC and Unix. The operating system takes care of the rest.

85. Popeye's ___' Pea : SWEE
Originally Popeye used the nickname "swee'pea" to address his girlfriend Olive Oyl. Then along comes a baby, found on Popeye's doorstep. Popeye adopts the little guy and raises him, calling him "Swee'Pea".

87. Phoebe of "Gremlins" : CATES
Phoebe Cates is an actress and model best-known for the roles she played in the films “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” and “Gremlins”. Cates retired from acting in the mid-90s to raise her children. Cates is married to fellow actor Kevin Kline.

88. Buddhist who has attained nirvana : ARHAT
“Arhat” is a Sanskrit word, the exact translation of which is somewhat disputed, with the various Buddhist traditions assuming different meanings. Translations vary from "worthy one" to "vanquisher of enemies".

Nirvana is a philosophical concept in some Indian-based religions. In the Buddhist tradition, nirvana is the state of being free from suffering i.e. not experiencing craving, anger or other afflicting states.

90. Stun with a gun : TASER
Victor Appleton wrote a novel for young adults called "Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle". The company that developed the TASER electroshock weapon named its product as a homage to the novel. The acronym TASER stands for "Thomas A. Swift's Electric Rifle".

91. Very, in Vichy : TRES
Vichy is a spa town in the center of France. The people from Vichy are known as Vichyssois. After Paris, was occupied by the Germans in WWII, Vichy was chosen as the seat of government for what was called the French State. The Vichy government had theoretical authority even in occupied France, and is remembered for its collaboration with the German authorities. Vichy was chosen as the new seat of government because of its relative proximity to Paris, and simply because the town had the largest hotel room capacity in the “free zone” of the country.

94. Body type : SEDAN
The American "sedan" car is the equivalent of the British "saloon" car. By definition, a sedan car has two rows of seating and a separate trunk (boot in the UK), although in some models the engine can be at the rear of the car.

95. Actress Graff : ILENE
Ilene Graff is an American actress, probably best known for playing Marsha Owens, the wife of George in the TV series "Mr. Belvedere".

101. Revolutionary figure : CHE
Ernesto "Che" Guevara was born in Argentina, and in 1948 he started to study medicine at the University of Buenos Aires. While at school he satisfied his need to "see the world" by taking two long journeys around South America, the story of which are told in Guevara's memoir later published as "The Motorcycle Diaries". While travelling, Guevara was moved by the plight of the people he saw and their working conditions and what he viewed as capitalistic exploitation. In Mexico City he met brothers Raul and Fidel Castro and was persuaded to join their cause, the overthrow of the US-backed government in Cuba. He rose to second-in-command among the Cuban insurgents, and when Castro came to power Guevara was influential in repelling the Bay of Pigs Invasion and bringing Soviet nuclear missiles to the island. Guevara left Cuba in 1965 to continue his work as a revolutionary. He was captured by Bolivian forces in 1967, and was executed. Fidel Castro led the public mourning of Guevara's death, and soon the revolutionary was an icon for many left-wing movements around the world.

109. iPhone voice : SIRI
Siri is software application that works with Apple’s iOS operating system. “Siri” is an acronym standing for Speech Interpretation and Recognition Interface. You’ve probably seen the ads on television, with folks talking to their iPhones asking for information and responding with a voice. I hear that Google is a little scared by Siri, as Siri is non-visual. There’s no need to touch a screen or a keyboard to work with Siri, no opportunity to click on one of Google’s ads! By the way, voice-over artist Susan Bennett recently revealed herself as the female American voice of Siri.

120. 1945 battle site, for short : IWO
Iwo Jima is a volcanic island located south of Tokyo that today is uninhabited. There were about a thousand Japanese civilians living on the island prior to WWII. In 1944, there was a massive influx of Japanese military personnel in anticipation of the inevitable US invasion. As the Japanese military moved in, the civilians were forced out and no one has lived there since.

123. Dos y dos : CUATRO
In Spanish, two and two (dos y dos) make four (cuatro).

129. Motorola phone : DROID
The Droid is a smartphone from Motorola that is noted for running Google’s Android operating system.

132. Stars bursting in air? : NOVAE
A nova is basically a star that suddenly gets much brighter, gradually returning to its original state weeks or even years later. The increased brightness of a nova is due to increased nuclear activity causing the star to pick up extra hydrogen from a neighboring celestial body. A supernova is very different from a nova. A supernova is a very bright burst of light and energy created when most of the material in a star explodes. The bright burst of a supernova is very short-lived compared to the sustained brightness of a nova.

133. Frosty's eyes : COALS
“Frosty the Snowman” is a song that was recorded first by Gene Autry, in 1950. The song was specifically written in the hope that it would become a follow-up hit to Autry’s “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” that topped the charts the previous year.

134. Buckeye city : AKRON
For part of the 1800s, the Ohio city of Akron was the fasting growing city in the country, feeding off the industrial boom of that era. The city was founded in 1825 and its location, along the Ohio and Erie canal connecting Lake Erie with the Ohio River, helped to fuel Akron's growth. Akron sits at the highest point of the canal and the name "Akron" comes from the Greek word meaning "summit". Indeed, Akron is the county seat of Summit County.

135. A.L. West player : ASTRO
The Houston baseball team changed its name to the Astros from the Colt .45s in 1965 when they started playing in the Astrodome. The Astrodome was so called in recognition of the city's long association with the US space program.

137. Some war heroes : ACES
A flying ace is an aviator who has shot down a number of enemy planes during combat. The qualifying number of kills seems to vary, but five is common. The first use of "ace" was during WWI when the French newspapers dubbed pilot Adolphe Pegoud "l'as" (French for "the ace") when he shot down his fifth German plane.

139. Exam for jrs. : PSAT
Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT)

143. CPR experts : EMTS
Emergency medical technician (EMT)

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has for decades involved the simultaneous compression of the chest to pump blood using the heart, and artificial respiration by blowing air into the lungs. Nowadays emergency services are placing more emphasis on heart compressions, and less on artificial respiration.

144. TV girl with a talking map : DORA
“Dora the Explorer” is a cartoon series shown on Nickelodeon. Part of Dora’s remit is to introduce the show’s young viewers to some Spanish words and phrases.

145. Mexican transportación : TREN
In Spanish, one form of transportation (transportación) is a train (tren).

147. ___ of beauties : BEVY
“Bevy” is a collective noun used for a number of types of bird, including quails and swans. "Bevy" is also sometimes used as a collective noun for ladies.

149. Novelist Clancy : TOM
I loved the Tom Clancy series of novels, most of which feature Jack Ryan as the main character, but I felt that with each successive title, my interest faded a little. I was hooked with "The Hunt for Red October" published in 1984, and dutifully worked my through all Clancy's subsequent novels, before giving up halfway through the 1998 "Rainbow Six". Tom Clancy passed away quite recently, at the beginning of October 2013.

150. Draft org. : SSS
Selective Service System (SSS)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. In tandem : AS A TEAM
8. Decorative shoe features : TOECAPS
15. Like some feet and envelopes : STAMPED
22. Bill : INVOICE
23. It's often swiped by a shopaholic : ATM CARD
24. Go from A to B? : DO WORSE
25. Nickname for the 122-/124-Across : MAIN STREET ACROSS AMERICA
28. Stops: Abbr. : STAS
29. Jazz/blues singer Cassidy : EVA
30. Shoelace tip : AGLET
31. Barely make, with "out" : EKE
32. "___ two minds" : I’M OF
33. ___ Bell (Anne Brontë pseudonym) : ACTON
35. Like eggs in eggnog : RAW
37. Class for some immigrants, for short : ESL
39. Jump back, maybe : START
40. With 105-Across, historical significance of the 122-/124-Across : THE FIRST MAJOR MEMORIAL TO
48. It's ENE of Fiji : SAMOA
49. "Wheel of Fortune" buy : AN E
50. Declined : WANED
51. It fits all, sometimes : ONE-SIZE
55. Up on things : TUNED IN
58. Part of a page of Google results : AD SPACE
63. 1796 Napoleon battle site : LODI
64. Freight carrier: Abbr. : RWY
66. Young and Sedaka : NEILS
67. Italian possessive : MIO
68. Von Furstenberg of fashion : EGON
69. "___ luck!" : LOTSA
71. European capital once behind the Iron Curtain : SOFIA
73. Comic finisher : INKER
75. Ocean : BRINY
76. Item dropped by Wile E. Coyote : ANVIL
77. Times Square flasher? : NEON
78. "So nice!" : OOOH!
79. Masked warrior : NINJA
80. Beer belly : GUT
83. Chemistry suffix : -ENE
84. Ultimate : NTH
85. Day ___ : SPA
87. They really click : CASTANETS
92. It may be corrected with magnification : LOW VISION
98. Piece at the Met : ARIA
99. El Al destination: Abbr. : ISR
100. German cry : ACH!
103. Inherit : GET
104. Italian writer Vittorini : ELIO
105. 122-Across : THE SIXTEENTH US PRESIDENT
112. Like most houses : EAVED
113. Expensive patio material : SLATE TILE
114. Comment before "Bitte schön" : DANKE
115. Components of fatty tissues : STEROLS
118. Bit of jive : LIE
119. French wine classification : CRU
120. It may leave you weak in the knees : ILLNESS
122. With 124-Across, dedicated in October 1913, project represented by the 13 pairs of circled letters : LINCOLN
124. See 122-Across : HIGHWAY
126. Captain : HEAD
130. ___-turn : NO U
131. "Alley ___" : OOP
132. Sports org. headquartered in Indianapolis : NCAA
136. Wearing clothes fit for a queen? : IN DRAG
138. Concerned : APPLIED TO
146. Kindle downloads : EBOOKS
148. Follows the east-west route of the 122-/124-Across? : TSAOC OT TSAOC MORF SLEVART (“travels from coast to coast” in reverse)
151. Doll : CUTIE
152. Tropicana grove : ORANGE TREES
153. Knight's trait : VALOR
154. Follows : HEEDS
155. Sauce brand : MOTT’S
156. ___ of time : SANDS
157. Kind of question : YES/NO

Down
1. Targets : AIMS AT
2. Weightlifting move : SNATCH
3. Hedgehop, e.g. : AVIATE
4. Many, many : TONS OF
5. Sue Grafton's "___ for Evidence" : E IS
6. "Tartuffe" segment : ACTE
7. TV's Griffin : MERV
8. ___ kwon do : TAE
9. Tulip festival city : OTTAWA
10. Web periodical : EMAG
11. Cicero's 350 : CCCL
12. Rhine tributary : AARE
13. For now, for short : PRO TEM
14. Campus political grp. : SDS
15. Mt. Rushmore's home: Abbr. : S DAK
16. Heavy volume : TOME
17. Bowl over : AWE
18. Sony co-founder Akio : MORITA
19. Elementary : PRIMAL
20. Kind of service : ESCORT
21. Intentionally disregarding : DEAF TO
26. Keep one's ___ the ground : EAR TO
27. Historic march site : SELMA
34. Vivaldi's "___ Dominus" : NISI
36. Latin 101 verb : AMAT
38. In stitches : SEWN
39. Caesar and others : SIDS
41. Motorola phone : RAZR
42. Eurasian ducks : SMEWS
43. Funny Garofalo : JANEANE
44. "You're the ___ Love" : ONE I
45. Figure on the Scottish coat of arms : RED LION
46. Radio booth sign : ON AIR
47. Make over : REDO
51. Pueblo pot : OLLA
52. Whistle time? : NOON
53. 1999 Ron Howard film : EDTV
54. "Of course, Jorge!" : SI! SI!
56. Group in a striking photo? : UNION
57. "This ___ a test" : IS NOT
59. Prefix with -scope : PERI-
60. Not fer : AGIN
61. Or or nor: Abbr. : CONJ
62. "May It Be" singer, 2001 : ENYA
65. Over there : YON
67. "So-so" : MEH
70. Sea grass, e.g. : ALGA
72. Charges : FEES
74. 1980s-'90s German leader Helmut : KOHL
75. ___ B'rith : B’NAI
81. Bell Labs system : UNIX
82. Try : TEST
85. Popeye's ___' Pea : SWEE
86. Sarge's charges: Abbr. : PVTS
87. Phoebe of "Gremlins" : CATES
88. Buddhist who has attained nirvana : ARHAT
89. What's a strain to cook with? : SIEVE
90. Stun with a gun : TASER
91. Very, in Vichy : TRES
93. Gruesome sort : OGRE
94. Body type : SEDAN
95. Actress Graff : ILENE
96. Sounds from pens : OINKS
97. Jottings : NOTES
100. When some local news comes on : AT TEN
101. Revolutionary figure : CHE
102. China cupboard : HUTCH
106. Sacred cow : IDOL
107. London greeting : ‘ELLO
108. Something to file : NAIL
109. iPhone voice : SIRI
110. Promote : PLUG
111. Without thinking : IDLY
116. Jargon : LINGO
117. ___-Off (windshield cover) : SNO
120. 1945 battle site, for short : IWO
121. Big flap in 1970s fashion? : LAPEL
123. Dos y dos : CUATRO
125. Like cattle and reindeer : HOOFED
126. Snag : HITCH
127. Follow : ENSUE
128. "It's ___!" : A DATE
129. Motorola phone : DROID
132. Stars bursting in air? : NOVAE
133. Frosty's eyes : COALS
134. Buckeye city : AKRON
135. A.L. West player : ASTRO
137. Some war heroes : ACES
139. Exam for jrs. : PSAT
140. Hot dog breath? : PANT
141. Cabin material : LOGS
142. Slay, in slang : ICE
143. CPR experts : EMTS
144. TV girl with a talking map : DORA
145. Mexican transportación : TREN
147. ___ of beauties : BEVY
149. Novelist Clancy : TOM
150. Draft org. : SSS


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

2 comments :

Anonymous said...


148A: Follows the east-west route of the 122- / 124-Across (TSAOC OT TSAOC MORF SLEVART)

Is it just me or is this REALLY bad?

Bill Butler said...

Well, the "writing backwards" of an answer is an unusual tactic in a puzzle, but it's not unknown. I think we see it about once a year.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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