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1201-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Dec 13, Sunday





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CROSSWORD SETTER: Alan Derkazarian
THEME: Two Halves in One … At first glance, today’s grid has a GREAT DIVIDE running diagonally from bottom-left to top-right, dividing the puzzle into two unconnected halves. However, there are four black squares that contain the word BACK, and which form the middle of four across-answers and four down-answers:
27A. Passage from life to death : GREAT DIVIDE
98A. 1980 hard rock album that went 22x platinum ... or a hint to how to cross this puzzle's 27-Across : BACK IN BLACK

39A. Round trip ... or the subtitle of "The Hobbit" : THERE AND BACK AGAIN
48A. Aquatic singer : HUMPBACK WHALE
75A. Inexpensive reprint, maybe : PAPERBACK BOOK
89A. 2005 nominee for Best Picture : BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN
13D. Revisits an earlier time : TURNS BACK THE CLOCK
30D. Stands one's ground : WON’T BACK DOWN
47D. Try very hard : BENT OVER BACKWARDS
59D. Cause of an audio squeal : FEEDBACK LOOP
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 28m 16s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Shot from a gun : BBS
A BB gun is an air pistol or rifle that shoots birdshot known as BBs. Birdshot comes in a number of different sizes, from size 9 (0.080" in diameter) to size FF (.23"). 0.180" diameter birdshot is size BB, which gives the airgun its name.

4. Hummus, e.g. : DIP
The lovely dip/spread called hummus usually contains mashed chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, salt and garlic. The name “hummus” is an Arabic word for “chickpeas”.

7. One-named rapper with a hyphen in his name : T-PAIN
T-Pain the stage name of rap artist Faheem Rasheed Najm. T-Pain is from Tallahassee, Florida.

12. C2H5OH : ETHANOL
Ethyl alcohol is more usually known as ethanol. Ethanol is the alcohol found in intoxicating beverages, and nowadays is also used as a fuel for cars. It is also found in medical wipes and hand sanitizer, in which it acts as an antiseptic.

20. Disney deer : ENA
Ena is Bambi's aunt in the 1942 Disney film “Bambi”. The movie is based on the novel "Bambi, A Life in the Woods" written by Austrian author Felix Salten and first published in 1923.

21. Company named for a volcano : AETNA
When the health care management and insurance company known as Aetna was founded, the name was chosen to evoke images of Mt. Etna, the European volcano.

23. Actress ___ Dawn Chong : RAE
Rae Dawn Chong is the daughter of Tommy Chong, of "Cheech and Chong" fame. Rae Dawn acted in quite a few films in the eighties and nineties, including "The Color Purple" and "Commando".

24. Aught : NIL
An “aught” is a zero. The term can be used in the context of dates as in “the aughts”, the years 2000-2009. I’ve also heard those years referred to as “the noughties”.

25. Subject for the philosopher Heidegger : BEING
Martin Heidegger was a German philosopher. Heidegger’s best known publication is “Being and Time”.

34. Sources of feta and ricotta cheese : EWES
Feta is a Greek cheese made from sheep's milk, or a mixture of sheep's and goat's milk. The cheese is salted and cured in a brine solution for several months before it is eaten.

Ricotta is an Italian cheese made from sheep or cow's milk. Ricotta is actually produced from the whey of the milk, the liquid left after the curds have been separated out (curds are used to make "traditional" cheese). The whey is heated again so that the remaining protein, above and beyond that in the curd already removed, precipitates out making ricotta cheese. The word "ricotta" literally means "recooked", which makes sense to me now ...

38. Biological ring : AREOLE
An areola (sometimes “areole”) in anatomy is a small ring of color, as in the areola surrounding the nipple, and the areola surrounding the pupil of the eye. “Areola” comes from Latin, meaning "small open space", and is a diminutive of the Latin word "area", meaning "open space".

39. Round trip ... or the subtitle of "The Hobbit" : THERE AND BACK AGAIN
J. R. R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings” is the second best-selling novel ever written, with only “A Tale of Two Cities” by Charles Dickens having sold more copies around the world. Remarkably I think, the third best-selling novel is "The Hobbit", which was also written by Tolkien.

42. "This I Promise You" band : ‘N SYNC
'N Sync was a boy band from Orlando, Florida that was formed in 1995. The name of the group came from a comment by the mother of band member Justin Timberlake, who said the boys voices sounded "in sync". But, it's also true that the letters of the name 'N Sync are the last letters of the given names of the five band members:
- Justin Timberlake
- Chris Kirkpatrick
- Joey Fatone
- Lance "Lansten" Bass
- JC Chasez

43. Neptune's home : SEA
Neptune was the Roman god of the sea and of freshwater. He was sometimes known as “Neptunus Equester” as he was also the god of horses and patron of horse-racing.

44. Brewer's oven : OAST
An oast is a kiln used for drying hops as part of the brewing process. Such a structure might also be called an "oast house".

46. Fins : ABES
The US five-dollar bill is often called an “Abe”, as President Lincoln’s portrait is on the front. An Abe is also referred to as a “fin”, a term that has been used for a five-pound note in Britain since 1868.

48. Aquatic singer : HUMPBACK WHALE
The males of the humpback whale species are particularly known for their song. This song can last up to 20 minutes and can be repeated for hours at a time. It is usually assumed that the song is part of a mating ritual.

50. Camp treats : S’MORES
S'mores are a treat peculiar to North America, usually eaten around a campfire. A s'more consists of a roasted marshmallow and a layer of chocolate sandwiched between two graham crackers. The earliest written reference to the recipe is in a 1927 publication called "Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts". Girl Scouts always did corner the market on cookies and the like!

55. Nutritional std. : RDA
Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

58. Eponym of Warsaw's airport : CHOPIN
Warsaw Chopin Airport is the busiest airport in Poland. The facility was opened in 1934 and was named Okecie International after the Warsaw neighborhood in which it was located. It was renamed to Warsaw Chopin Airport in 2001, in honor of the Polish composer Frederic Chopin who once lived in the city.

59. Numismatic classification : FINE
A numismatist is a coin collector. The term “numismatics” comes into English via French from the Latin word “nomisma”, meaning”coin”.

60. Private gatherings : CONCLAVES
Our use of the word “conclave” as a private assembly comes from its original use with reference to the papal conclave, a meeting of the College of Cardinals to elect a new Pope.

64. Part of E.S.L.: Abbr. : ENG
English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

69. Old capital of Europe : BONN
After WWII, Bonn was chosen as the capital of West Germany, a choice promoted by Chancellor Konrad Adenauer who was from the area. After German reunification, the capital was moved to Berlin.

70. Cat also known as the dwarf leopard : OCELOT
The ocelot is found mainly in South and Central America, although there have been sightings as far north as Arkansas. An ocelot doesn't look too different from a domestic cat, and some have been kept as pets. Perhaps most famously, Salvador Dali had one that he carried around everywhere with him.

72. YouTube posting, for short : VID
YouTube is a video-sharing website, launched in 2005 by three ex-PayPal employees. Google bought YouTube in 2006 for $1.65 billion. Yep, $1.65 billion ... less than two years after it was founded ...

79. Ocean menace : MAKO
The shortfin mako shark can appear on restaurant menus, and as a result the species is dying out in some parts of the world. The mako gets its own back sometimes though, and attacks on humans are not unknown. And the shark in Ernest Hemingway's "The Old Man and the Sea", that's a mako.

82. Deuteronomy contents : LAWS
Deuteronomy is the fifth book of the Hebrew Bible. The English title of Deuteronomy comes from a Greek word that translates as "second law".

83. German Expressionist Otto : DIX
Otto Dix was a German painter and printmaker. Dix fought in the military in WWI and was profoundly affected by his experiences. Many of his artistic works reflected those experiences.

84. Sin city : SODOM
The two cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, as well as Admah and Zeboim, were destroyed by God for the sins of their inhabitants, according to the Bible. The name Sodom has become a metaphor for vice and homosexuality, and gives us our word "sodomy".

89. 2005 nominee for Best Picture : BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN
“Brokeback Mountain” is a 2005 movie about the romantic and sexual relationship between two cowboys, played by Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal. Matt Damon was asked to play one of the leads but declined. Damon gave the excuse, “I did a gay movie (The Talented Mr. Ripley), then a cowboy movie (All the Pretty Horses). I can’t follow it up with a gay-cowboy movie!”

92. Name on some European stamps : ESPANA
Spain is the second largest country in the European Union (after France). “Spain” is an anglicized form of the Spanish name “España”, which comes from the Roman name for the country “Hispania”.

93. "Do the Right Thing" pizzeria : SAL’S
"Do the Right Thing" is a Spike Lee movie, released in 1989. Much of the action in the film is centered on a local pizzeria called "Sal's" owned by Italian-American Salvatore Frangione (played by Danny Aiello).

98. 1980 hard rock album that went 22x platinum ... or a hint to how to cross this puzzle's 27-Across : BACK IN BLACK
“Back in Black” is an album released by the Australian band AC/DC.

The Heavy Metal band known as AC/DC was formed by two brothers in Australia. The group is usually called "Acca Dacca" down under.

99. University in Lewiston, N.Y. : NIAGARA
Niagara University is a private Catholic school in the town of Lewiston, New York. It was founded as Our Lady of Angels Seminary in 1856 and renamed as Niagara University in 1883.

106. Terre in the mer : ILE
In French, an island (île) is a piece of ground (terre) in the sea (mer).

109. Not a reduction: Abbr. : ENL
Enlargement (enl.)

110. South of Spain? : SUR
“Sur” is Spanish for “south”.

111. Anne Bradstreet, for one : POETESS
Anne Bradstreet was a poetess who was the wife of Simon Bradstreet, a governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Anne was the first poet in the British North American colonies to have her works published.

112. Lane in Hollywood : DIANE
Diane Lane is a beautiful American film actress, born and raised in New York City. Not so long ago I saw Lane with Richard Gere in “Nights in Rodanthe” (a movie that I recommend). But my absolute favorite movie of hers is “Under the Tuscan Sun” based on the memoir of the same name by Frances Mayes (a writer from San Francisco). It's a lovely romantic story, not without humor, set in the gorgeous Tuscan landscape.

114. Conan's network : TBS
Before Conan O'Brien came to fame as a late night talk show host, he was a writer. O'Brien wrote for both "Saturday Night Live" and "The Simpsons".

Down
1. Director with three Best Foreign Film Oscars : BERGMAN
Ingmar Bergman was a director of movies, stage and television from Sweden. Late in his life, Bergman ceased working for several years and left Sweden when he was wrongly charged with tax evasion, an event that caused him to have a nervous breakdown. Despite pleas from even the Swedish Prime Minister to return to his homeland, Bergman stayed in Germany for eight years before finally picking up his life again in Sweden.

3. Todd of Broadway : SWEENEY
"Sweeney Todd" was originally a 1936 film, and later in 1973 a play, then a 1979 musical and a movie adaptation of the musical in 2007. After Sweeney Todd has killed his victims, his partner in crime Mrs. Lovett helped him dispose of the bodies by taking the flesh and baking it into meat pies that she sold in her pie shop. Ugh!

4. Tooth decay, to professionals : DENTAL CARIES
Dental caries is a disease that causes progressive destruction of the teeth.

6. Michael or Sarah : PALIN
Michael Palin is a marvelously talented comedian and actor, most famous as one of the “Monty Python” team. Palin is well known as a travel writer and has made some outstanding travel documentaries for television. He did one show called “Michael Palin: Around the World in 80 Days” in which he followed the route called out in the Jules Verne classic, without using airplanes. Palin also made “Pole to Pole”, a journey from the North to South Poles, along the 30 degree line of longitude. Currently, Michael Palin is the President of the Royal Geographical Society.

When John McCain selected Sarah Palin as candidate for Vice President in the 2008 presidential election, she became the first Alaskan to go on the national ticket for a major party. She also became the first woman nominated for Vice President by the Republican Party.

7. Daughter on "Bewitched" : TABITHA
On the hit sitcom “Bewitched”, Samantha and Darrin’s daughter is Tabitha. Tabitha has supernatural powers just like her mother. The daughter also got her own spinoff show called “Tabitha”.

"Tabitha" was a big flop, a spin-off of the very successful "Bewitched" series that had finished several years before "Tabitha" aired. The title role was played by Lisa Hartman, who continued with her acting career after "Tabitha" with some degree of success. Hartman is the wife of country music star Clint Black.

8. The Carolinas' ___ River : PEE DEE
The Pee Dee River takes its name from the Pee Dee tribe of Native Americans from the southeast of the United States.

10. Comfort or country follower : INN
The Comfort Inn chain is part of Choice Hotels International. I stay in Comfort Suites every so often. Not bad for the price ...

18. "Purple haze" : LSD
“Purple Haze” is a 1967 song written and recorded by Jimi Hendrix that has been described as a “psychedelic drug song of the sixties”. In fact, the term “purple haze” came to refer to LSD. Having said that, Hendrix denied any relation of the lyrics to drugs at all.

29. Plebiscites : VOTES
A plebiscite is a vote in which the entire electorate accepts or rejects a proposition. A referendum might be termed a plebiscite, as are propositions that appear on the ballot in some states.

34. Yves's "even" : EGAL
"Egal" is the French word for "equal, alike", and a word we sometimes use in English. The national motto of France is "Liberté, égalité, fraternité", meaning "Liberty, equality, fraternity (brotherhood).

36. Autobahn hazard : EIS
“Eis” is the German word for “ice”.

37. With 60-Down, carnival treat : SNO
(60D. See 37-Down : CONE)
A sno-cone (also "snow cone") is just a paper cone filled with crushed ice and topped with flavored water. Italian ice is similar, but different. Whereas the flavoring is added on top of the ice to make a sno-cone, Italian ice is made with water that is flavored before it is frozen.

43. Parisian possessive : SES
“Ses” is the French word for “his”, “her” or “its”, when referring to a group of items.

50. Coach with two Super Bowl championships : SHULA
Don Shula is a former football player and coach. Shula appeared as head coach in a record six Super Bowls, including a run of three successive Super Bowls (1971-73, winning twice).

56. Three-time N.B.A. All-Star Williams : DERON
Deron Williams is a player for the Brooklyn Nets basketball team. Williams was on the gold medal-winning US national team in the 2008 and 2012 Olympics.

57. Part of P.D.A.: Abbr. : ASST
Personal Digital Assistant (PDA)

58. Jim Cramer's network : CNBC
The television show "Mad Money" started airing in 2005, and is hosted by the ebullient Jim Cramer. Cramer recommends that essential funds, such as those reserved for retirement, be safely locked away in conservative investment vehicles. Any money left over (still looking for that here!) is classed as "Mad Money" and can be invested in more risky stocks.

61. It's caught by a stick on a field : LACROSSE BALL
Even though lacrosse was dropped from the Olympics after the 1908 games, it is currently enjoying a resurgence of popularity outside of North America.

68. Yuri's "peace" : MIR
“Mir” is the Russian word for “peace”.

74. One was blown in Ellington's band : SAX
Duke Ellington was a bandleader and composer believed by many to have elevated jazz to the same level as other respected genres of music. Ellington tended not to use the word “jazz” to describe his compositions, preferring the term “American Music”.

77. Presentation opening? : PEE
The opening letter of the word “presentation” is P (pee).

78. Dial-up unit : BAUD
In telecommunications, the “baud” unit represents pulses per second. The higher the baud rate of a modem, the faster information can be transferred. The baud unit is named for Émile Baudot, a pioneer in the world of telecommunications.

79. European capital on the Svisloch River : MINSK
Minsk is the capital of Belarus, formerly known as the Belorussion Soviet Socialist Republic.

80. Scale abbr. : LBS
The unit of mass that we know today as a “pound” is descended from the old Roman unit of weight known as a “libra”. That “libra” connection is why we abbreviate pound to “lb”. The name “pound” though comes from the Latin “pondo” meaning “weight”.

81. ___ pro nobis : ORA
"Ora pro nobis" translates from Latin as "pray for us". It is a common term used in the Roman Catholic tradition and is often shortened to "OPN".

85. Libran stone : OPAL
97% of the world’s opals come from Australia, so it’s no surprise perhaps that the opal is the national gemstone of the country. The state of South Australia provides the bulk of the world’s production, about 80%.

86. Arp or Duchamp : DADAIST
Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

Hans Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn't the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both "Hans" and "Jean" translate into English as "John". In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. He was sent home …

Marcel Duchamp was a French artist whose works are associated with the Dadaist and Surrealist movements. One of his most celebrated "works" is simply what he called "readymade" art, a urinal which he titled "Fountain". Even though this work is considered to be "a major landmark in 20th century art", the original that was submitted for exhibition was never actually displayed and had been lost forever. Replicas were commissioned by Duchamp, and are on display in many museums around the world. I have no further comment ...

91. Support group since 1951 : AL-ANON
Al-Anon and Alateen are fellowships of relatives and friends of alcoholics. Alateen specifically supports teens who are affected by another’s drinking, whereas Al-Anon focuses on people of all ages.

92. Cause of weather weirdness : EL NINO
When the surface temperature of much of the Pacific Ocean rises more that half a degree centigrade, then there is said to be an El Niño episode. That small temperature change in the Pacific has been associated with climatic changes that can stretch right across the globe. El Niño is Spanish for "the boy" and is a reference to the Christ child. The phenomenon was given this particular Spanish name because the warming is usually noticed near South America and around Christmas-time.

96. Dickens villain : SIKES
Bill Sikes is the nasty criminal associate of Fagin in the Charles Dicken’s novel “Oliver Twist”.

102. "Little Caesar" weapon : GAT
“Gat” is a slang term for a gun that is derived from the Gatling gun, the precursor to the modern machine gun. The Gatling gun was invented by Dr. Richard J. Gatling in 1861. Apparently he was inspired to invent it so that one man could do as much damage as a hundred, thereby reducing the size of armies and diminishing the suffering caused by war. Go figure ...

“Little Caesar” is a gangster movie released in 1931. The film was the big break for Edward G. Robinson, who played the title character Caesar “Rico” Bandello.

104. Dish made from a root : POI
The corm of some taro plants is used to make poi, the traditional Hawaiian dish (that I think tastes horrible). When a taro plant is grown as an ornamental, it is often called Elephant Ears due to the shape of its large leaves.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Shot from a gun : BBS
4. Hummus, e.g. : DIP
7. One-named rapper with a hyphen in his name : T-PAIN
12. C2H5OH : ETHANOL
19. "Yuck!" : EEW!
20. Disney deer : ENA
21. Company named for a volcano : AETNA
22. Ones with bouquets, maybe : SUITORS
23. Actress ___ Dawn Chong : RAE
24. Aught : NIL
25. Subject for the philosopher Heidegger : BEING
26. Dressed with elaborate care : PREENED
27. Passage from life to death : GREAT DIVIDE
30. Scorecard column : WINS
31. Unwritten reminder : MENTAL NOTE
32. Wedges, e.g. : SHOES
34. Sources of feta and ricotta cheese : EWES
38. Biological ring : AREOLE
39. Round trip ... or the subtitle of "The Hobbit" : THERE AND BACK AGAIN
42. "This I Promise You" band : ‘N SYNC
43. Neptune's home : SEA
44. Brewer's oven : OAST
45. "Really?" : THAT SO?
46. Fins : ABES
48. Aquatic singer : HUMPBACK WHALE
50. Camp treats : S’MORES
53. Astronomical datum : MASS
54. 20-Across, e.g. : DOE
55. Nutritional std. : RDA
58. Eponym of Warsaw's airport : CHOPIN
59. Numismatic classification : FINE
60. Private gatherings : CONCLAVES
63. Having macadamias or pecans, say : NUTTED
64. Part of E.S.L.: Abbr. : ENG
65. Word with holy or sacred : COW
66. Sweats : LABORS
67. Met one's potential : BLOSSOMED
69. Old capital of Europe : BONN
70. Cat also known as the dwarf leopard : OCELOT
71. 51-Down unit : CAR
72. YouTube posting, for short : VID
73. Firm (up) : TONE
74. Basketball play : SCREEN
75. Inexpensive reprint, maybe : PAPERBACK BOOK
79. Ocean menace : MAKO
80. Less prudish : LOOSER
82. Deuteronomy contents : LAWS
83. German Expressionist Otto : DIX
84. Sin city : SODOM
89. 2005 nominee for Best Picture : BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN
92. Name on some European stamps : ESPANA
93. "Do the Right Thing" pizzeria : SAL’S
94. Where the wild things are? : WOODS
95. Steeply discounted product, maybe : LOSS LEADER
97. Distort : WARP
98. 1980 hard rock album that went 22x platinum ... or a hint to how to cross this puzzle's 27-Across : BACK IN BLACK
99. University in Lewiston, N.Y. : NIAGARA
103. Speculate, say : OPINE
105. Cadenza or Forte maker : KIA
106. Terre in the mer : ILE
107. Some badges : ID CARDS
108. Trademarks : LOGOS
109. Not a reduction: Abbr. : ENL
110. South of Spain? : SUR
111. Anne Bradstreet, for one : POETESS
112. Lane in Hollywood : DIANE
113. Fa-la connector : SOL
114. Conan's network : TBS

Down
1. Director with three Best Foreign Film Oscars : BERGMAN
2. Messengers, e.g. : BEARERS
3. Todd of Broadway : SWEENEY
4. Tooth decay, to professionals : DENTAL CARIES
5. Not going anywhere? : IN IDLE
6. Michael or Sarah : PALIN
7. Daughter on "Bewitched" : TABITHA
8. The Carolinas' ___ River : PEE DEE
9. End in ___ : A TIE
10. Comfort or country follower : INN
11. Badger : NAG
12. Seen : ESPIED
13. Revisits an earlier time : TURNS BACK THE CLOCK
14. Speeds : HIES
15. Tucked away : ATE
16. Prefix with smoker : NON-
17. What a picker may pick : ORE
18. "Purple haze" : LSD
28. Lots : A TON
29. Plebiscites : VOTES
30. Stands one's ground : WON’T BACK DOWN
32. Clothing lines : SEAMS
33. Metal fastener : HASP
34. Yves's "even" : EGAL
35. Amphibious rodent : WATER VOLE
36. Autobahn hazard : EIS
37. With 60-Down, carnival treat : SNO
40. Stir : ROUSE
41. It might be heard when a light bulb goes on : AHA!
43. Parisian possessive : SES
47. Try very hard : BENT OVER BACKWARDS
48. Remain undecided : HANG
49. Korean money : WON
50. Coach with two Super Bowl championships : SHULA
51. Collection of vehicles available to personnel : MOTOR POOL
52. Makes a choice : OPTS
53. Look after : MIND
56. Three-time N.B.A. All-Star Williams : DERON
57. Part of P.D.A.: Abbr. : ASST
58. Jim Cramer's network : CNBC
59. Cause of an audio squeal : FEEDBACK LOOP
60. See 37-Down : CONE
61. It's caught by a stick on a field : LACROSSE BALL
62. Busy as ___ : A BEE
65. Go pfft, with "out" : CONK
68. Yuri's "peace" : MIR
69. Publicize : BOOST
73. Atlas index listings : TOWNS
74. One was blown in Ellington's band : SAX
76. Quizzes : ASKS
77. Presentation opening? : PEE
78. Dial-up unit : BAUD
79. European capital on the Svisloch River : MINSK
80. Scale abbr. : LBS
81. ___ pro nobis : ORA
83. Bishop's place : DIOCESE
85. Libran stone : OPAL
86. Arp or Duchamp : DADAIST
87. Lowest bid in bridge : ONE CLUB
88. Buoys, e.g. : MARKERS
90. Mire : MORASS
91. Support group since 1951 : AL-ANON
92. Cause of weather weirdness : EL NINO
96. Dickens villain : SIKES
97. Goods : WARE
98. Nickname for Georgia's capital : BIG A
99. Small amount of drink : NIP
100. Oath-taking phrase : I DO
101. ___-high : ACE
102. "Little Caesar" weapon : GAT
103. Superseded : OLD
104. Dish made from a root : POI


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2 comments :

robert said...

I have a problem with this kind of puzzle. i never know when i am trying to cram an answer i like into a space or should figure that the puzzle has unmentioned additional words. so, in this one, i think "humpback whale" but won't enter it because i think maybe i am just missing the correct answer, never thinking that the puzzle has included in it the word "back".
how do you know when to just assume the answer is part of the maker's design? as opposed to simply having an incorrect response?

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, Robert.

In my experience, these rebus puzzles (i.e. more than one letter in a square) cause the most frustration of any type of puzzle. All I can tell us that personally I have learned to question myself when I am doing particulalry badly in solving a puzzle. When I come to that conclusion, I immediately think I could be dealing with a rebus. Usually being aware of that possibility is enough to give me one or two answers and the puzzle opens up from there.

Hope that helps, Robert.

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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