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I am currently on vacation in Ireland, returning on October 9th. I am hoping to complete a blog post each evening, even if it is only the basics (solved grid and clues, plus explanation of theme). I apologize in advance if I am late in posting.

Bill

0201-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Feb 13, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Josh Knapp
THEME: None
COMPLETION TIME: 35m 01s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. Highly revered one : DEMIGOD
In Greek mythology, a demigod was a half-god, the offspring of one parent who was a god and one parent who was human. The list of demigods includes the Greek Heracles and the Celtic hero Cú Chulainn.

15. Delta factor? : AIRFARE
Today, Delta is the world's largest airline (after merging with Northwest Airlines in 2008) and is also the oldest airline still operating in the US. Delta's roots go back to 1924 before it started carrying passengers and was called Huff Duland Dusters, a crop dusting company based in Macon, Georgia. The name Delta Air Service was introduced in 1928.

19. Piece of gladiatorial combat gear : NET
The term “gladiator” means “swordsman”, coming from “gladius”, the Latin word for “sword”.

25. Pollen count plant : RAGWEED
The pollen of ragweed is the greatest allergen of all pollens. It seems that the pollen season has been lengthening in recent years, probably due to global warming.

28. 2011 Emmy-winning MSNBC host : RACHEL MADDOW
You used to be able to listen to "The Rachel Maddow Show" on Air America Radio before the radio station went bust. Now you can see Maddow on a TV show with the same name, every night on MSNBC. She is the first openly gay anchor to host a prime-time news program in the US.

32. ID tag? : MST
Idaho is on Mountain Standard Time (MST).

35. Wide-beamed vessel : SCOW
A scow is a flat-bottomed boat with squared-off ends that's often used for transportation, usually pushed or pulled by a barge. Often a scow can be seen carrying junk or garbage.

37. "Laughable Lyrics" poet : LEAR
“Laughable Lyrics” is Edward Lear’s fourth book of nonsense poems, first published in 1877.

38. Evil eye, e.g. : HEX
"Hexen" is a German word meaning "to practice witchcraft". The use of the word "hex" in English started with the Pennsylvania Dutch in the early 1800s.

39. Fizzy drink measure : LITRE
“Fizzy drink” is a term often used for soda, especially in the UK.

40. Roger's relative : WILCO
In the world of radiotelephony, “wilco” is short for “I understand and will comply”.

The term “roger”, meaning “yes” or “acknowledged”, comes from the world of radiotelephony. The British military used a phonetic alphabet in the fifties that included "Roger" to represent the letter “R”. As such, it became customary to say “Roger” when acknowledging a message, with R (Roger) standing for “received”.

41. Absent without leave? : PLAYING HOOKY
Apparently the term “playing hooky” derives from the Dutch name for hide-and-seek (“hoekje”).

43. Ecosystem-replicating facility : BIODOME
A biodome is an enclosed ecological system, usually a man-made structure.

47. Benjamin : C-SPOT
Benjamin Franklin is featured on one side of the hundred-dollar bill, and Philadelphia's Independence Hall on the other side. There is a famous "error" in the image of Independence Hall. If you look closely at the clock face at the top of the building you can see that the "four" is written in Roman numerals as "IV". However, on the actual clock on Independence Hall, the "four" is denoted by "IIII", which has been the convention for clock faces for centuries.

49. Q-Tip specialty : RAP
Q-Tip is the stage name of rapper Kamaal Ibn John Fareed from Queens, New York. That’s about all I know ...

51. Not freelancing, say : ON STAFF
“Free lance” was coined by Sir Walter Scott in his 1820 novel “Ivanhoe” in which he used the term to describe a medieval mercenary warrior. Forty years later, a freelancer was a journalist who did work for more than one publication without a long-term commitment.

56. Kind of artery or vein : FEMORAL
The femoral artery and femoral vein run up and down the leg, beside the femur.

The thigh bone, the femur, is the longest and the largest bone in the human body.

58. Semi-opponent : FRENEMY
A frenemy is someone who feigns friendship but who is actually an enemy or competitor.

Down
1. What a dolorimeter measures : PAIN
A dolorimeter is an instrument used to measure tolerance to pain or a pain threshold. To make measurements, pain is applied in a controlled way by increasing pressure, heat or perhaps electrical stimulation.

2. The Stroll, e.g. : LINE DANCE
“The Stroll” was both a song and a dance in the late fifties. “The Stroll” is a slow dance in a rock ‘n’ roll style. In the dance, men and women line up opposite each other and then each couple processes down between the two lines, making their own unique moves.

3. Tundra hunter : ARCTIC FOX
The arctic fox is a mammal that is remarkably well adapted to its native environment in the Arctic region of the northern hemisphere. One adaptation is that its thick fur is brown in the summer and white in the winter.

Tundra is an ecosystem that is treeless, or very nearly so. There are three types of tundra. Arctic and Antarctic tundra can't support the growth of trees as the ground is pretty much frozen. Alpine tundra cannot support tree-growth due to high altitude.

4. Grp. whose members 28-Down : NFL
More people attend an average game in the National Football League (NFL) than any other domestic sports league in the world.

9. Source of extra-large eggs : EMU
Emu eggs are very large, with a thick shell that is dark-green in color. One emu egg weighs about the same as a dozen chicken eggs.

12. Mansard alternative : GABLE
A mansard roof is a type of hip roof with two slopes on each side. The lower part of the roof has the steepest slope and is penetrated by several dormer windows. The style of roof takes its name from the French Baroque architect François Mansart.

26. Barbie greeting : G’DAY
“Barbie” is a nickname for “barbecue” in Australia.

27. Bowl on a range : WOK
“Wok” is a Cantonese word, the name of the frying pan now used in many Asian cuisines.

29. Time-traveling 1980s film character : MARTY MCFLY
Michael J. Fox was the first choice to play the lead character, Marty McFly, in 1985's "Back to the Future". Unfortunately, the producers of his TV sitcom "Family Ties" would not release Fox to make the movie, so the crew started filming with a different choice for the lead, actor Eric Stoltz. Weeks into production, it was decided that Stoltz was miscast and Fox was approached again. Eventually an arrangement was made with the "Family Ties" producers to "share" Fox, which led to an exhausting schedule for the actor. Fox worked seven days a week, filming "Family Ties" during the day and working on "Back to the Future" at night, usually till 2:30 in the morning.

32. Common soap ingredient : MELODRAMA
As almost everyone knows, the original soap operas were radio dramas back in the fifties. Given the structure of society back then, the daytime broadcasts were aimed at housewives working in the home. For some reason the sponsors of those radio shows, and the television shows that followed, were soap manufacturers like Procter & Gamble, Colgate-Palmolive and Lever Brothers. And that's how the "soap" opera got its name ...

34. Home of Paris : TROY
In Greek legend, Paris was the son of the king of Troy. Paris eloped with Helen, Queen of Sparta, and this act was a major trigger for the Trojan War. Also it was Paris who fatally wounded Achilles by shooting him in the heel with an arrow.

36. "I'm gone" : CIAO
"Ciao" is the Italian for "'bye". "Arrivederci" is more formal, and translates better as "goodbye".

39. Honorary law deg. : LLD
The honorary degree of Legum Doctor (LL.D.) translates from the Latin as Doctor of Laws, a plural. This practice of using the plural originated in Cambridge University in England, as one was awarded an LL.D. after having been taught both Canon Law and Civil Law.

41. Three-time "Newhart" Emmy nominee : POSTON
Tom Poston was an actor from Columbus, Ohio. Poston had a successful television and film career starting in the 1950s, although I most remember him as the bumbling handyman on “Newhart”. Poston was actually married to Suzanne Pleshette who played the wife of Newhart’s character in “The Bob Newhart Show”.

42. Oscar, e.g. : GROUCH
Oscar the Grouch is the Muppet that lives in a garbage can. Oscar's persona comes from various sources. He is named after Oscar Brand who was one of the board members of the Children's Television Workshop, the backers for Sesame Street as the Muppets were being developed in the sixties. Oscar's personality was inspired by an angry waiter that once served Jim Henson (father of the Muppets). And the voice was modeled on a grumpy New York cab driver encountered one day by Caroll Spinney, the puppeteer who brings Oscar to life.

43. Screw-up : BONER
"Boner" is one of those terms that I just don't like because it can be used offensively. "Boner" can be used for a faux pas, an error.

46. Remove out of respect : DOFF
One doffs one's hat, usually as a mark of respect. To doff is to take off, with "doff" being a contraction of "do off".

52. Modern art form? : ARE
Nowadays one might say “you are” instead of “thou art”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Take into account, as contingencies : PLAN FOR
8. Highly revered one : DEMIGOD
15. Delta factor? : AIRFARE
16. Comment from one who's just getting by : I MANAGE
17. Cover : INCLUDE
18. Subject to change : MUTABLE
19. Piece of gladiatorial combat gear : NET
20. Cliffhanger locale? : LEDGE
22. Bugged out : FLED
23. Decrees : DICTA
25. Pollen count plant : RAGWEED
28. 2011 Emmy-winning MSNBC host : RACHEL MADDOW
30. Like many neglected pets : UNFED
31. Sturdy as ___ : AN OAK
32. ID tag? : MST
35. Wide-beamed vessel : SCOW
36. Way out there : CRAZY
37. "Laughable Lyrics" poet : LEAR
38. Evil eye, e.g. : HEX
39. Fizzy drink measure : LITRE
40. Roger's relative : WILCO
41. Absent without leave? : PLAYING HOOKY
43. Ecosystem-replicating facility : BIODOME
45. Absence with leave? : R AND R
46. Detectives connect them : DOTS
47. Benjamin : C-SPOT
49. Q-Tip specialty : RAP
51. Not freelancing, say : ON STAFF
54. Get ahead of : OUTPACE
56. Kind of artery or vein : FEMORAL
57. Works on a plot : SCHEMES
58. Semi-opponent : FRENEMY
59. It's impractical to live in : THE PAST

Down
1. What a dolorimeter measures : PAIN
2. The Stroll, e.g. : LINE DANCE
3. Tundra hunter : ARCTIC FOX
4. Grp. whose members 28-Down : NFL
5. Bearing the blame : FAULTED
6. Baptism by fire : ORDEAL
7. Bit of thatching : REED
8. Common : DIME-A-DOZEN
9. Source of extra-large eggs : EMU
10. Something to flip on : MAT
11. "Soon" : IN A FEW
12. Mansard alternative : GABLE
13. Checked out impolitely : OGLED
14. It's signed, sealed and delivered : DEED
21. Their contents have been threshed : GRANARIES
24. Think (on) : CHEW
26. Barbie greeting : G’DAY
27. Bowl on a range : WOK
28. Charge on a field : RUSH
29. Time-traveling 1980s film character : MARTY MCFLY
32. Common soap ingredient : MELODRAMA
33. They make people jump at picnics : SACK RACES
34. Home of Paris : TROY
36. "I'm gone" : CIAO
37. Highly revered one : LION
39. Honorary law deg. : LLD
40. "Seriously?!" : WHAT THE?!
41. Three-time "Newhart" Emmy nominee : POSTON
42. Oscar, e.g. : GROUCH
43. Screw-up : BONER
44. Answer at the door : IT’S ME
46. Remove out of respect : DOFF
48. Sentry's station : POST
50. Slug, e.g. : PEST
52. Modern art form? : ARE
53. Pop is part of it: Abbr. : FAM
55. Zing : PEP

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0131-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Jan 13, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Mike Buckley
THEME: T-Shapes … today’s grid is replete with black squares arranged in T-shapes. In addition, each of the clues starts with the letter T, the answers across the center of the grid sound like T:
31A. Tetley products : TEAS
32A. Twit : TEASE
34A. Tiger's bagful : TEES

23. This puzzle's theme : T-SHAPES
COMPLETION TIME: 31m 54s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … FARON (Feron), AGENA (Agene)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Toon/live action film of 1996 : SPACE JAM
“Space Jam” is a 1996 movie that is a fictional account of the retirement of Michael Jordan from the NBA. Michael Jordan himself stars in the film, along with a whole host of “Looney Tunes” cartoon characters.

17. "Three Sisters" playwright Chekhov : ANTON
Anton Chekhov was a Russian writer of short stories and a playwright, as well as a physician. Chekhov wrote four classic plays that are often performed all around the world, namely “The Seagull”, “Uncle Vanya”, “Three Sisters” and “The Cherry Orchard”. While Chekhov was advancing his writing career, he continued to practice medicine. He is quoted as saying “Medicine is my lawful wife, and literature is my mistress.”

The title characters in Anton Chekhov’s play “Three Sisters” were inspired by the English authors, the three Brontë sisters.

18. Torpedo detector : SONAR
The British developed the first underwater detection system that used sound waves. Research was driven by defence demands during WWI, leading to production of working units in 1922. This new sound detection system was described as using "supersonics", but for the purpose of secrecy the term was dropped in favor of an acronym. The work was done under the auspices of the Royal Navy's Anti-Submarine Division, so ASD was combined with the IC from "superson-ic-s" to create the name ASDIC. The navy even went as far as renaming the quartz material at the heart of the technology "ASDivite". By the time WWII came along, the Americans were producing their own systems and coined the term SONAR, playing off the related application, RADAR. And so the name ASDIC was deep-sixed ...

19. Trademarked Intel chip : CELERON
Intel’s Celeron microprocessors are aimed at the low end of the market, the budget machines.

Intel is the world’s largest manufacturer of semiconductor chips. The company was founded in 1968, and the name “Intel” is a derived from the term "int(egrated) el(ectronics)".

21. "This Little Girl of Mine" country singer ___ Young : FARON
Faron Young was a country singer who was nicknamed the Hillbilly Heartthrob. Young started performing in the fifties and continued until the mid-nineties. Some believe that a waning career and failing health led to his suicide in 1996 at the age of 64 years.

24. Telegraph suffix : -ESE
“Telegraphese” is the clipped form of language that was used in writing a telegram.

26. Tripp's rank on "CSI: Miami": Abbr. : SGT
Detective Sergeant Frank Tripp is a character on the television show “CSI: Miami”. Tripp is played by actor Rex Linn. I’ve seen the show a few times, and to me Tripp is the least annoying character in a very annoying cast.

31. Tetley products : TEAS
Tetley was founded by Joseph Tetley in Yorkshire in 1837. Joseph and his brother used to sell salt door-to-door from a packhorse and started to distribute tea the same way. They became so successful selling tea that they relocated to London. Notably, Tetley's was the first company to introduce tea bags in the UK, back in 1953.

32. Twit : TEASE
“To twit” is to tease someone for making an embarrassing mistake.

34. Tiger's bagful : TEES
By now, everyone must know everything there is to know about Tiger Woods. But did you know that Tiger's real name is Eldrick Tont Woods? "Tont" is a traditional Thai name.

35. Taoism, e.g.: Abbr. : REL
The Chinese character "tao" translates as "path", but the concept of Tao signifies the true nature of the world.

42. TV channel with "Style Report" and "Beauty Report" : HSN
The Home Shopping Network (HSN) was the first national shopping network, and was launched locally as the Home Shopping Club in Florida in 1982. The whole concept just scares me ...

44. Tsars and others : MONARCHS
The term czar (also tsar) is a Slavic word that was first used as a title by Simeon I of Bulgaria in 913 AD. "Czar" is derived from the word "Caesar", which was synonymous with "emperor" at that time.

45. Tide's ebb, e.g. : OUTGO
Tides of course are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon's effect. At spring tides, the sun and the moon's gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

49. Texas hold'em action : RAISE
The official birthplace of the incredibly popular poker game of Texas Hold 'Em is Robstown, Texas where the game dates back to the early 1900s. The game was introduced into Las Vegas in 1967 by a group of Texan enthusiasts including Doyle Brunson, a champion often seen playing on TV today. Doyle Brunson published a poker strategy guide in 1978, and this really helped increase the popularity of the game. But it was the inclusion of Texas Hold 'Em in the television line-up that really gave the game its explosive surge in popularity, with the size of the prize money just skyrocketing.

51. Text you might R.S.V.P. to : E-VITE
RSVP stands for "Répondez s'il vous plaît", which is French for "please, answer".

56. Trig functions : SINES
The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine, cosine and tangent. Each of these is a ratio, a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The inverse to these three functions are arcsine, arccosine and arctangent. The inverse functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine, cosine and tangent.

58. Toboggan : SLED
“Toboggan” came into English from the French Canadian "tabagane", the name for a long sled with a flat bottom. The French Canadian word is probably from the Algonquian word for a sled, "tobakun",

Down
3. Titan booster : AGENA
The RM-81 Agena was an upper-stage rocket designed and built by Lockheed, first used in 1959. After 365 launches it was retired in 1987.

4. The Café Carlyle and others : CABARETS
The Café Carlyle was located in the Carlyle Hotel in New York City. The Café is noted as a venue for jazz performers and has hosted many of the greats. Woody Allen plays there with his jazz band almost every week.

5. Times to start new calendarios : ENEROS
In Spanish, we start years (anos) in January (enero) as noted on a calendar (calendrio).

6. "The ___ is up!" : JIG
Back in Elizabethan times, a “jig” was a trick or game. So, the expression “the jig is up” has for some time meant “the trick or game is exposed”.

7. Type of dye : AZO
Azo compounds have very vivid colors and so are used to make dyes, especially dyes with the colors red, orange and yellow.

8. Target audience of Maxim : MEN
"Maxim" is an international men's magazine featuring revealing photo spreads (non-nude in the US) of female celebrities and models.

9. Ten-spots and such : DINERO
Lettuce, cabbage, kale, dinero, dough and moola (also moolah) are all slang terms for money.

11. Traveled by Vespa : SCOOTERED
Vespa is a brand of motor scooter originally made in Italy (and now all over the world) by Piaggio. “Vespa” is Italian for “wasp”.

12. Ted and others : KENNEDYS
Ted Kennedy was the youngest boy in the family that included his older brothers: Joseph Jr. (killed in action in WWII), John (assassinated) and Robert (assassinated). Ted went into the US Senate in 1962 in a special election held after his brother became US President. He remained in the Senate until he passed away in 2009, making Ted Kennedy the fourth-longest-serving Senator in history.

15. "The House of the Seven Gables" locale : SALEM
I had the pleasure of visiting the charming House of Seven Gables not so long ago in Salem, Massachusetts. The core of the house was built in 1668, for one Captain John Turner, and overlooks Salem Harbor. After a couple of generations, the house had to be sold by the Turners and it was purchased by the Ingersoll family. The author Nathaniel Hawthorne was a relative of the Ingersolls and often visited the house growing up. It was of course this house that gave Hawthorn the title for his famous Gothic novel “The House of the Seven Gables”.

22. Tadpole's later form, perhaps : NEWT
Newts wouldn't be my favorite animals. They are found all over the world living on land or in water depending on the species, but always associated with water even if it is only for breeding. Newts metamorphose through three distinct developmental stages during their lives. They start off as larvae in water, fertilized eggs that often cling to aquatic plants. The eggs hatch into tadpoles, the first developmental form of the newt. After living some months as tadpoles swimming around in the water, they undergo another metamorphosis, sprouting legs and replacing their external gills with lungs. At this juvenile stage they are known as efts, and leave the water to live on land. A more gradual transition takes place then, as the eft takes on the lizard-like appearance of the adult newt.

26. Turn a blind eye, say : SEE NO EVIL
The old adage "see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil" originated in the 17th century. The phrase comes as an interpretation of a wood carving over a door in a shrine in Nikko, Japan. The carving depicts the "Three Wise Monkeys":
- Mizaru, covering his eyes
- Kikazaru, covering his ears
- Iwazaru, covering his mouth

27. Turkey or chicken dish served cold : GALANTINE
A galentine is a dish usually made with poultry or fish that has been deboned. A galentine is often elaborately decorated, partially because it’s a lot of work getting all those bones out and a fancy garnish isn't that much extra work!

34. Trumpet blares : TANTARAS
A tantara is a fanfare from a trumpet or a horn.

40. Touchdowns : football :: ___ : rugby : TRIES
In the game of rugby, a try is scored by grounding the ball behind the opposition’s goal line. A try is similar to a touchdown in American football, although in rugby the ball must be manually placed on the ground by the player making the score. The term “try” is used as originally that act of touching the ball to the ground simply qualified a team for a “try at goal”, an opportunity to kick the ball at goal to make the score.

43. Tec group in old France : SURETE
The French National Police Force used to be known as “La Sûreté Nationale”. The National Police force operates in cities and large towns. The military Gendarmerie is the second national organization tasked with law enforcement in France, and it has jurisdiction in smaller towns and rural areas as well as at the country’s borders.

46. Terri with the 1980 country hit "Somebody's Knockin'" : GIBBS
Terri Gibbs is a country music singer. Gibbs had thirteen singles that made the Billboard country singles charts in the eighties. Gibbs was born blind.

47. Tenor standard "___ Mio" : ‘O SOLE
"'O sole mio" is a famous Italian song from Naples, written in 1898. The song's lyrics are usually sung in the original Neapolitan, as opposed to Italian. The title translates from Neapolitan into "My Sun" (and not into "O, My Sun" as one might expect). It's a love song of course, sung by a young man declaring that there is a sun brighter than that in the sky, the sun that is his lover's face. Awww ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Toon/live action film of 1996 : SPACE JAM
9. Typewriter's spot : DESK
13. Tool for the scatterbrained : ORGANIZER
15. Thereafter : SINCE
16. Tragedy-stricken : WOEBEGONE
17. "Three Sisters" playwright Chekhov : ANTON
18. Torpedo detector : SONAR
19. Trademarked Intel chip : CELERON
21. "This Little Girl of Mine" country singer ___ Young : FARON
23. Take : TOLERATE
24. Telegraph suffix : -ESE
25. Told to come : SUMMONED
26. Tripp's rank on "CSI: Miami": Abbr. : SGT
28. True: Ger. : WAHR
30. Tear up : CRY
31. Tetley products : TEAS
32. Twit : TEASE
34. Tiger's bagful : TEES
35. Taoism, e.g.: Abbr. : REL
36. Technical work requirement : SPEC
37. Total : ADD
38. Tense, maybe : IN A STATE
42. TV channel with "Style Report" and "Beauty Report" : HSN
44. Tsars and others : MONARCHS
45. Tide's ebb, e.g. : OUTGO
48. Threaded across and down : NETLIKE
49. Texas hold'em action : RAISE
51. Text you might R.S.V.P. to : E-VITE
52. Thing that's highly explosive : TINDERBOX
56. Trig functions : SINES
57. Treating all fairly : EQUITABLE
58. Toboggan : SLED
59. Taxed : STRESSED

Down
1. Tosses, as seeds : SOWS
2. Theorem work : PROOF
3. Titan booster : AGENA
4. The Café Carlyle and others : CABARETS
5. Times to start new calendarios : ENEROS
6. "The ___ is up!" : JIG
7. Type of dye : AZO
8. Target audience of Maxim : MEN
9. Ten-spots and such : DINERO
10. Taken : ENTRANCED
11. Traveled by Vespa : SCOOTERED
12. Ted and others : KENNEDYS
14. Third way, maybe : RECOURSE
15. "The House of the Seven Gables" locale : SALEM
20. Towering tree : ELM
22. Tadpole's later form, perhaps : NEWT
23. This puzzle's theme : T-SHAPES
26. Turn a blind eye, say : SEE NO EVIL
27. Turkey or chicken dish served cold : GALANTINE
29. Taste authority : AESTHETE
31. Toned quality : TRIMNESS
33. Tunnel effect : ECHO
34. Trumpet blares : TANTARAS
39. Treated for preservation, maybe : SALTED
40. Touchdowns : football :: ___ : rugby : TRIES
41. "That's terrible!" : ACK!
43. Tec group in old France : SURETE
46. Terri with the 1980 country hit "Somebody's Knockin'" : GIBBS
47. Tenor standard "___ Mio" : ‘O SOLE
50. Took (out) : EXED
53. Test figs. : IQS
54. Tough ___ : NUT
55. Theater head: Abbr. : DIR

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0130-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jan 13, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Will Nediger
THEME: Double-Endings … each of the theme answers is a well-known phrase with the last two letters repeated:
17A. Coming on to a patient, perhaps? : DOCTOR NO-NO (from “Doctor No”)
21A. Deny membership to skater Starbuck? : BAN JOJO (from “banjo”)
36A. Dictator's directive at a dance club? : LET MY PEOPLE GO-GO (from “Let My People Go”)
55A. Bad-mouth designer Chanel? : DIS COCO (from “disco”)
59A. "Strive for medium quality on this one"? : MAKE IT SO-SO (from “make it so”)
COMPLETION TIME: 10m 51s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Muscles strengthened by squats : QUADS
The quadriceps femoris is the muscle group at the front of the thigh. It is the strongest muscle in the human body, and is also the leanest. The “quads” are actually a group of four muscles in the upper leg, hence the use of the prefix “quad-”.

6. Shul attendees : JEWS
Shul is another word for a synagogue. "Shul" is the term mostly used in Orthodox Judaism, "synagogue" in Conservative Judaism, and "temple" in Reform Judaism.

10. Easy-to-spread cheese : BRIE
Brie is a soft cheese, named after the French province of Brie where it originated.

14. Zac of "High School Musical" : EFRON
Zac Efron is an actor from San Luis Obispo, California. Apparently Efron is a heartthrob to “tweenyboppers”. His big break was in the Disney hit movie “High School Musical”.

“High School Musical” is a 2006 Disney film made for televison that spawned two sequels released to movie theaters worldwide. The soundtrack to “High School Musical” ended up being the best-selling album for 2006. Apparently the storyline is based on Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”.

17. Coming on to a patient, perhaps? : DOCTOR NO-NO (from “Doctor No”)
The movie and book “Dr. No” that feature the character James Bond use the abbreviation for "doctor".

"Dr. No" may have been the first film in the wildly successful James Bond franchise, but it was the sixth novel in the series of books penned by Ian Fleming. Fleming was inspired to write the story after reading the Fu Manchu tales by Sax Rohmer. If you've read the Rohmer books or seen the films, you'll recognize the similarities between the characters Dr. No and Fu Manchu.

20. Piltdown man, for one : HOAX
The Piltdown Man hoax is the most famous deception in the world of paleontology. The hoax played out in 1912 when a Charles Dawson announced that he had a skull fragment that was discovered at a gravel pit near the village of Piltdown in East Sussex in England. Most of the scientific community believed this was the fossilized remains of a form of man unknown up to that point. It was forty years later when it was determined that the skull fragment was in fact a composite of a medieval human skull, a 500-year old orangutan and some fossilized chimpanzee teeth. No one is really sure who pulled off the hoax, but I believe the police are looking at the usual suspects ...

21. Deny membership to skater Starbuck? : BAN JOJO (from “banjo”)
JoJo Starbuck is a champion figure skater from Downey, California. Starbuck and her partner Kenneth Shelley won the US pair skating championship for three years in a row from 1970 to 1972. For several years, Starbuck was married to famed Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Tery Bradshaw.

26. Kedrova of "Zorba the Greek" : LILA
Lila Kedrova was a Russian-born French actress best-known for playing Mme. Hortense in the 1964 film "Zorba the Greek". Kedrova won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for that performance.

31. Less-than sign's keymate : COMMA
Our word "comma" comes into English via Latin from the Greek "komma" meaning "clause in a sentence".

33. First name in scat : ELLA
Ella Fitzgerald, the "First Lady of Song", had a hard and tough upbringing. She was raised by her mother alone in Yonkers, New York. Her mother died while Ella was still a schoolgirl, and around that time the young girl became less interested in her education. She fell in with a bad crowd, even working as a lookout for a bordello and as a Mafia numbers runner. She ended up in reform school, from which she escaped, and found herself homeless and living on the streets for a while. Somehow Fitzgerald managed to get herself a spot singing in the Apollo Theater in Harlem. From there her career took off and as they say, the rest is history.

Our word "scat" comes from a 19th-century expression "quicker than s'cat", which meant "in a great hurry". The original phrase probably came from the words "hiss" and "cat".

34. "Make my ___!" : DAY
“Go ahead, make my day” is a famous line spoken by the character Harry Callahan, played by Clint Eastwood in the 1983 movie “Sudden Impact”.

36. Dictator's directive at a dance club? : LET MY PEOPLE GO-GO (from “Let My People Go”)
“Let my people go” is a phrase from the spiritual “Go Down Moses”.
When Israel was in Egypt's land: Let my people go,
Oppress'd so hard they could not stand, Let my People go.
Go down, Moses,
Way down in Egypt's land,
Tell old Pharaoh,
Let my people go.

44. Close to closed : AJAR
Our word "ajar" is thought to come from Scottish dialect, in which "a char" means "slightly open".

45. "Taras Bulba" author : GOGOL
Nikolai Gogol was a Russian writer, born in Ukraine. Gogol wrote a lot of satirical pieces that attacked corrupt bureaucracy in Russia, which led to his being exiled. His most famous work is probably "Taras Bulba", from 1836.

50. Hollywood's Gardner : AVA
Ava Gardner is noted for her association with some big movies, but also for her association with some big names when it came to the men in her life. In the world of film, she appeared in the likes of "Mogambo" (1953), "On the Beach" (1959), "The Night of the Iguana" (1964) and "Earthquake" (1974). The men in her life included husbands Mickey Rooney, Artie Shaw and Frank Sinatra. After her marriages had failed (and perhaps before!) she had long term relationships with Howard Hughes and bullfighter Luis Miguel Dominguin whom she met through her friend Ernest Hemingway.

51. Cowardly Lion portrayer : LAHR
Bert Lahr's most famous role was the cowardly lion in "The Wizard of Oz". Lahr had a long career in burlesque, vaudeville and on Broadway. Remember the catch phrase made famous by the cartoon character Snagglepuss, "Heavens to Murgatroyd!"? Snagglepuss stole that line from a 1944 movie called, "Meet the People" in which it was first uttered by none other than Bert Lahr.

53. New York site of Mark Twain's grave : ELMIRA
Elmira is a city in the southern tier of New York State located closed close to the border with Pennsylvania. Elmira was also the family home of Olivia Langdon, wife of Samuel Clemens (aka Mark Twain). Mark Twain and family are buried in Elmira's Woodlawn Cemetery.

55. Bad-mouth designer Chanel? : DIS COCO (from “disco”)
“Dis” is a slang term meaning “insult” that originated in the eighties, and is a shortened form of "disrespect: or "dismiss".

Coco Chanel was a French designer. Perhaps because I am a man, clothes design is not my forte, however, if I had to pick a designer whose clothes I really liked, it would be Chanel. She had a way of creating simpler designs that looked so elegant on a woman.

Discotheques started up during WWII in Occupied France. American-style music (like jazz and jitterbug dances) was banned by the Nazis, so French natives met in underground clubs that they called discotheques where records were often played on just a single turntable. After the war, these clubs came out into the open. One famous Paris discotheque was called "Whiskey a Gogo". In that Paris disco, non-stop music was played using two turntables next to a dance-floor, and this concept spread around the world.

57. "Mon ___!" : DIEU
“Mon Dieu” is French for “my God”.

58. Radio City's architectural style : DECO
Art deco is the name given to a style of design and architecture of the 1920s that actually had its roots in Belgium and then spread throughout Europe before arriving in North America. Celebrated examples of art deco architecture are the magnificent Chrysler Building in New York City completed in 1930, and the GE Building that sits in the middle of Rockefeller Center also in New York City, with the address of "30 Rock".

64. Cheese that doesn't spoil : EDAM
Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

65. Painter Nolde : EMIL
Emil Nolde was a German Expressionist painter. He was actually born Emil Hansen, near the village of Nolde in the Prussian Duchy of Schleswig in 1867. Hansen officially changed his name to Nolde on the occasion of his marriage in 1902.

66. Muslim woman's veil : HIJAB
The “hijab” is a veil worn by many Muslim women in the presence of adult males who are not related to them. The hijab covers the head but leaves the face visible.

69. Potentially dangerous strain : E COLI
Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

Down
1. Proof letters : QED
QED is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. The QED acronym stands for the Latin "quod erat demonstrandum" meaning "that which was to be demonstrated".

2. Area 51 craft, supposedly : UFO
The famed Area 51 is a remote base in the USAF Nevada Test and Training Range. There’s no question that Area 51 is an unusual base in that frontline operational units are not deployed there. It seems that it is used for developing and testing new and classified weapons facilities for the US Military and other US agencies like the CIA. The government did not even acknowledge that Area 51 existed until 1995, and this official position fuelled a theory that the base is home to UFOs that landed on Earth.

4. Dance to Tito Puente, say : DO THE MAMBO
The form of music and dance known as mambo developed in Cuba. “Mambo” means “conversation with the gods” in Kikongo, a language spoken by slaves taken to Cuba from Central Africa.

After serving in the navy in WWII for three years, the musician Tito Puente studied at Julliard, where he got a great grounding in conducting, orchestration and theory. Puente parlayed this education into a career in Latin Jazz and Mambo. He was know as "El Rey" as well as "The King of Latin Music".

6. Give bad luck : JINX
A jinx is a charm or a spell, and the word "jinx" comes from an older word "jyng" from the 17th-century. A "jyng" was another word for the wryneck, a type of bird much used in witchcraft.

7. Rock subgenre : EMO
The musical genre of "emo" originated in Washington D.C. in the 80s, and takes its name from "emotional hardcore". Not my cup of tea ...

9. Toast word : SKOAL
Skoal is a Swedish toast, with roots in the old Norse word "skaal" meaning "cup".

13. Moon of Jupiter : EUROPA
As are many celestial bodies, the moon of Jupiter called Europa was named after a figure in Greek mythology. Europa was a Phoenician woman who was abducted by Zeus. Of course, Europa also gave her name to the continent of Europe.

18. Suitable for most audiences : RATED PG
The Motion Picture Association of America's (MPAA) film-rating system (R, PG-17, G etc.) is purely voluntary and is not backed by any law. Movie theaters agree to abide by the rules that come with the MPAA ratings in exchange for access to new movies.

22. Decorative inlay material : NACRE
Nacre is another name for mother-of-pearl. Nacre is the strong iridescent material laid down by some mollusks on the inside of their shells, and it's also what makes up pearls. The creature lays down nacre as a defensive mechanism, protecting the soft tissue of its body from the rough surface of the outer shell. Similarly, it uses nacre to encapsulate harmful debris or a parasite that penetrates the shell, and that's how a pearl is formed.

24. Nat or Natalie : COLE
Nat King Cole's real name was Nathaniel Adams Coles. Cole made television history in 1956 when his own show debuted on NBC, a first for an African-American. Cole couldn't pick up a national sponsor, so in order to save money and possibly save the show, many guest artists worked for no fee at all - the likes of Ella Fitzgerald, Harry Belafonte and Peggy Lee. The show survived for a year, but eventually Nat King Cole had to pull the plug on it himself.

Natalie Cole is of course the daughter of Nat King Cole. Natalie’s mother was Maria Cole, a singer with the Duke Ellington Orchestra. The most famous version of the hit song "Unforgettable" was released in 1951 by Nat King Cole. In 1991, Natalie Cole recorded a version that was mixed with an earlier 1961 version sung by her father, creating an "unforgettable" father-daughter duet that was made 26 years after Nat King Cole had passed away.

30. Fannie ___ : MAE
The Federal National Mortgage Association is commonly called Fannie Mae, a play on the acronym FNMA.

35. 2002 sequel starring Wesley Snipes : BLADE II
Wesley Snipes is a movie actor, and a martial artist. The role most associated with Snipes is the title character in the “Blade” series of films. Snipes has been in federal prison since 2010 serving a 3-year sentence for wilful failure to file tax returns.

37. Mello ___ (soft drink) : YELLO
Like so many beverages introduced by the Coca-Cola Company, Mello Yello was launched to compete against a successful drink already on the market. Mello Yello first hit the shelves in 1979, designed to take market share from Pepsico's "Mountain Dew".

39. City near Santa Barbara : OJAI
The city of Ojai, California is located just northwest of Los Angeles. One of the city's claims to fame is that according to the TV shows “The Bionic Woman” and “The Six Million Dollar Man”, Jaime Sommers and Steve Austin grew up in Ojai and were childhood sweethearts!

40. Teri of "Tootsie" : GARR
The lovely Teri Garr had a whole host of minor roles in her youth, including appearances in nine Elvis movies. Garr's big break came with the role of Inga in "Young Frankenstein", and her supporting role in "Tootsie" earned Garr an Academy Award nomination. Sadly, Teri Garr suffers from multiple sclerosis. She is a National Ambassador for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

“Tootsie” is a 1982 comedy film starring Dustin Hoffman, directed and produced by Sydney Pollack.

41. Ocean predator : ORCA
The taxonomic name for the killer whale is Orcinus orca. The use of the name "orca", rather than "killer whale", is becoming more and more common. The Latin word "Orcinus" means "belonging to Orcus", with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

45. Traipsed (about) : GADDED
"To gad about" is to move around with little purpose. The word comes from the Middle English "gadden" meaning "to hurry".

54. Hades' river of forgetfulness : LETHE
The Lethe is one of the five rivers of Hades in Greek mythology. All the souls who drank from the river Lethe experienced complete forgetfulness. The Greek word “lethe” means “oblivion, forgetfulness”.

62. ___ ammoniac : SAL
Sal ammoniac is a mineral made up of ammonium chloride. It is fairly rare as it is very soluble in water and is quite soft. It is most often found around volcanic vents. Sal ammoniac used to be an ingredient in cookies, making them very crispy.

63. Geisha's accessory : OBI
The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied in what is called a butterfly knot.

The Japanese term “geisha” best translates as “artist” or “performing artist”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Muscles strengthened by squats : QUADS
6. Shul attendees : JEWS
10. Easy-to-spread cheese : BRIE
14. Zac of "High School Musical" : EFRON
15. "Don't worry about me" : I’M OK
16. Course list : MENU
17. Coming on to a patient, perhaps? : DOCTOR NO-NO (from “Doctor No”)
19. Way off : AFAR
20. Piltdown man, for one : HOAX
21. Deny membership to skater Starbuck? : BAN JOJO (from “banjo”)
23. Agree to : ACCEPT
26. Kedrova of "Zorba the Greek" : LILA
27. Genre that includes freestyling : RAP
28. Up time : BOOM
29. Cyberspace 'zine : E-MAG
31. Less-than sign's keymate : COMMA
33. First name in scat : ELLA
34. "Make my ___!" : DAY
35. Shiverer's sound : BRR
36. Dictator's directive at a dance club? : LET MY PEOPLE GO-GO (from “Let My People Go”)
42. Seek pocket change, say : BEG
43. Itinerary word : VIA
44. Close to closed : AJAR
45. "Taras Bulba" author : GOGOL
48. Marijuana, informally : WEED
49. Seeker of illicit 48-Across : NARC
50. Hollywood's Gardner : AVA
51. Cowardly Lion portrayer : LAHR
53. New York site of Mark Twain's grave : ELMIRA
55. Bad-mouth designer Chanel? : DIS COCO (from “disco”)
57. "Mon ___!" : DIEU
58. Radio City's architectural style : DECO
59. "Strive for medium quality on this one"? : MAKE IT SO-SO (from “make it so”)
64. Cheese that doesn't spoil : EDAM
65. Painter Nolde : EMIL
66. Muslim woman's veil : HIJAB
67. Idiot : DOPE
68. Onion rings, e.g. : SIDE
69. Potentially dangerous strain : E COLI

Down
1. Proof letters : QED
2. Area 51 craft, supposedly : UFO
3. Part of a curve : ARC
4. Dance to Tito Puente, say : DO THE MAMBO
5. Buttinsky : SNOOP
6. Give bad luck : JINX
7. Rock subgenre : EMO
8. Hit the jackpot : WON BIG
9. Toast word : SKOAL
10. Key using all the black keys: Abbr. : B MAJ
11. Go straight : REFORM
12. Facing big trouble : IN A JAM
13. Moon of Jupiter : EUROPA
18. Suitable for most audiences : RATED PG
22. Decorative inlay material : NACRE
23. First fratricide victim : ABEL
24. Nat or Natalie : COLE
25. Gelding-to-be, maybe : COLT
26. Break between flights : LAYOVER
30. Fannie ___ : MAE
32. Sunday hymn accompaniment : ORGAN MUSIC
35. 2002 sequel starring Wesley Snipes : BLADE II
37. Mello ___ (soft drink) : YELLO
38. Budget chart shape : PIE
39. City near Santa Barbara : OJAI
40. Teri of "Tootsie" : GARR
41. Ocean predator : ORCA
45. Traipsed (about) : GADDED
46. City of northern Spain : OVIEDO
47. Often-removed car part : GAS CAP
48. Amnesiac's question : WHO AM I?
52. Topmost points : ACMES
54. Hades' river of forgetfulness : LETHE
56. Command to Fido : COME
57. Editorial strike-out : DELE
60. Give a ribbing : KID
61. Spanish eye : OJO
62. ___ ammoniac : SAL
63. Geisha's accessory : OBI

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0129-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Jan 13, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: David Steinberg
THEME: Exclamation after a Movie … each of the themed answers is the title of a film that finishes with an exclamation mark:
17A. *1952 Marlon Brando film : VIVA ZAPATA!
21A. *2008 Meryl Streep film : MAMMA MIA!
30A. *1968 Mark Lester film : OLIVER!
46A. *1972 Jack Lemmon film : AVANTI!
54A. *1980 Robert Hays film : AIRPLANE!
64A. *1969 Barbra Streisand film : HELLO, DOLLY!
COMPLETION TIME: 10m 39s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. White-bellied whales : ORCAS
The taxonomic name for the killer whale is Orcinus orca. The use of the name "orca", rather than "killer whale", is becoming more and more common. The Latin word "Orcinus" means "belonging to Orcus", with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

10. Musical Mama : CASS
Cass Elliot was one of the four singers in the Mamas and the Papas, a sensational group from the sixties. Elliot was performing sold-out concerts in London in 1974 when she was found dead one morning, having had a heart attack. She was only 32 years old. Eerily, she died in the same flat (on loan from Harry Nilsson) in which the Who's drummer, Keith Moon, would die just four years later.

15. Bubkes : ZILCH
“Bupkis” (also “bubkes”) is a word that means “absolutely nothing, nothing of value”, and is of Yiddish origin.

17. *1952 Marlon Brando film : VIVA ZAPATA!
“Viva Zapata!” is a 1952 film directed by Elia Kazan. The film is based on the life the Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata, with a screenplay written by John Steinbeck.

21. *2008 Meryl Streep film : MAMMA MIA!
The hit musical “Mamma Mia!” was written to showcase the songs of ABBA. I’m a big fan of ABBA’s music, so I’ve seen this show a couple of times and just love it. “Mamma Mia!” is such a big hit on the stage that on any given day there are at least seven performances going on somewhere in the world. There is a really interesting film version of the show that was released in 2008. I think the female lead Meryl Streep is wonderful in the movie, but the male leads, not so much …

Meryl Streep has had more nominations for an Academy Award than any other actor, a tribute to her talent and the respect she has earned in the industry. I am not a huge fan of her earlier works but some of her recent movies are now on my list of all-time favorites. I recommend "Mamma Mia!" (you'll either love it or hate it!), "Julie & Julia", "It's Complicated" and ”Hope Springs”.

23. Parent who can pass on an X or Y chromosome : DAD
In most mammalian species, including man, females have two identical sex chromosomes (XX) and males two distinct sex chromosomes (XY). As a result it is the males who determine the sex of the offspring. However, in birds the opposite is true and so females determine the sex of the chicks.

25. Orioles and Blue Jays, informally : ALERS
The Baltimore Orioles was one of the eight charter teams of MLB's American League, so the franchise dates back to 1901. Prior to 1901, the team has roots in the Minor League Milwaukee Brewers, and indeed entered the American League as the Brewers. In 1902 the Brewers moved to St. Louis and became the Browns. The team didn't fare well in St. Louis, so when it finally relocated to Baltimore in the early fifties the team changed its name completely, to the Baltimore Orioles. The owners so badly wanted a fresh start that they traded 17 old Browns players with the New York Yankees. The trade didn't help the team's performance on the field in those early days, but it did help distance the new team from its past.

The Toronto Blue Jays baseball franchise was founded in 1977. The Blue Jays are the only team based outside the US to have won a World Series, doing so in 1992 and 1993. And since the Montreal Expos relocated to Washington, the Blue Jays are the only Major League Baseball team now headquartered outside of the US.

26. From the start : AB OVO
"Ab ovo" translates literally from Latin as "from the egg", and is used in English to mean “from the beginning”.

30. *1968 Mark Lester film : OLIVER!
"Oliver Twist" is of course a novel by Charles Dickens. It is a popular tale for adaptation to the big screen. There are two silent film versions, released in 1909 and 1922, and the first talkie version was released in 1933, with many more to follow. The most successful movie is “Oliver!” from 1968, which is based on a musical adaptation for the stage by Lionel Bart. The latest "Oliver" for the big screen is a 2005 Roman Polanski production.

Mark Lester was a child actor whose most famous role is the title character in the 1968 musical film “Oliver!”, a performance he gave when he was just 8-years-old. Lester was a close friend of Michael Jackson for over twenty years, right up until Jackson’s death in 2009. Lester was also the godfather to Jackson’s children.

36. Part of fashion's YSL : YVES
Yves Saint-Laurent was a French fashion designer, actually born in Algeria. Saint-Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint-Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from prison, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story ...

43. Medvedev's denial : NYET
Dmitry Medvedev was the third President of Russia from from 2008 to 2012, at which time he was appointed as the country’s tenth Prime Minister. That appointment was made by Medvedev’s successor as president, Vladimir Putin. The president supposedly wields more power than the prime minister according to Russia’s constitution, although it is generally assumed that Putin has been calling most of the shots consistently for many years now. Medvedev had served as Putin’s campaign manager in the 2000 presidential election.

45. Blue Cross competitor : AETNA
When the health care management company known as Aetna was founded, the name was chosen to evoke images of Mt. Etna, the European volcano.

The Blue Cross association of health plans was established in 1929 in Dallas, Texas. The first plan put in place was for teachers, and guaranteed 21 days of hospital care if needed, for a premium of $6 a year. One can only dream …

46. *1972 Jack Lemmon film : AVANTI!
“Avanti!” is a 1972 comedy film mainly set in Italy, and starring Jack Lemmon opposite the lovely Juliet Mills. I’ve seen this movie a couple of times and it doesn’t quite deliver, despite a wonderful cast and director (Billy Wilder).

The great actor Jack Lemmon appeared in some of my favorite films, over a career that spanned over fifty years. Included in the list of fine movies that featured Lemmon are “Some Like It Hot” (1959), “The Apartment” (1960), “Irma la Douce” (1963), “The Odd Couple” (1968), “Grumpy Old Men” (1995) and “My Fellow Americans” (1996).

48. Atlas blowup : INSET
We call a book of maps an “atlas” after a collection of maps published by the famous Flemish geographer Gerardus Mercator. Mercator's collection contained a frontispiece with an image of Atlas the Titan from Greek mythology holding up the world on his shoulders, giving us our term "atlas".

49. Harvard Law Review editor who went on to become president : OBAMA
Not only did President Barack Obama attend Harvard University, but so did his birth father, Barack Obama, Sr. President Obama’s parents separated when Barack Obama, Sr. went off to Harvard leaving his wife and child back in Hawaii.

54. *1980 Robert Hays film : AIRPLANE!
The 1980 movie “Airplane!” has to be one of the zaniest comedies ever made. The lead roles were Ted Striker (played by Robert Hays) and Elaine Dickinson (played by Julie Hagerty). But it was Leslie Nielsen who stole the show, playing Dr. Barry Rumack. That's my own humble opinion of course ...

63. Tart fruit : SLOE
The sloe is the fruit of the blackthorn bush, and is the flavoring that gives gin its distinctive taste.

64. *1969 Barbra Streisand film : HELLO, DOLLY!
“Hello, Dolly!” is a Broadway musical first produced in 1964, adapted into a hugely successful movie in 1969. The title role of Dolly Levi was of course played by Barbra Streisand in the film, with Gene Kelly directing and a leading part for a young Michael Crawford.

Barbra Streisand has recorded 31 top-ten albums since 1963, more than any other female recording artist. In fact, she has had an album in the top ten for the last five decades, a rare achievement in itself.

67. Lensman Adams : ANSEL
As an amateur photographer, I have been a big fan of the work of Ansel Adams for many years and must have read all of his books. Adams was famous for clarity and depth in his black and white images. Central to his technique was the use of the zone system, his own invention. The zone system is a way of controlling exposure in an image, particularly when there is a high contrast in the subject. Although the technique was developed primarily for black & white film, it can even apply to digital color images. In the digital world, the main technique is to expose an image for the highlights, and one or more images for the shadows. These images can then be combined digitally giving a final photograph with a full and satisfying range of exposures.

68. Common feature in Roman statuary : TOGA
In Ancient Rome the classical attire known as a toga (plural “togae”) was usually worn over a tunic. The tunic was made from linen, and the toga itself was a piece of cloth about twenty feet long made from wool. The toga could only be worn by men, and only if those men were Roman citizens. The female equivalent of the toga was called a "stola".

71. Former New York archbishop : EGAN
Edward Egan served as Roman Catholic Archbishop of New York from 2000 to 2009. Egan was made a cardinal in 2001.

Down
1. Shankar at Woodstock : RAVI
Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous virtuoso (to us Westerners) from the world of Indian classical music, and was noted for his sitar playing. Shankar was the father of the beautiful singer Norah Jones.

4. Baden-Baden and others : SPAS
Baden-Baden is located in the southwest of German in the Black Forest, very close to the border with France. The natural springs of Baden-Baden were greatly prized by the Ancient Romans who used the town as a spa. Baden-Baden became very popular with the aristocracy in the 1800s when visitors included Queen Victoria, as well as the composers Berlioz and Brahms, and the writer Dostoevsky. The town's reputation earned it the nickname of the "European Summer Capital". The town was originally called just Baden in the Middle Ages, and the name was officially changed to Baden-Baden in 1931. Baden-Baden is short for "the town of Baden in the state of Baden".

5. Seiji ___, longtime Boston Symphony maestro : OZAWA
Seiji Ozawa is most famous for his work as music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, although he is also the principal conductor of the Vienna State Opera. Ozawa is renowned for wearing a white turtleneck under his dress suit when he conducts, rather than the traditional starched shirt and white tie.

6. Dead letters? : RIP
The commonly held belief that the acronym RIP stands for the English "rest in peace" isn't quite correct, not completely anyway. RIP is actually an abbreviation for a Latin phrase "requiescat in pace", which translates to "may he rest in peace".

8. Court proceedings : ACTA
Actum (plural "acta") is the Latin word for "deed". "Acta" is used in English to describe many official records, including minutes, proceedings etc.

10. Chargers in "The Charge of the Light Brigade" : CAVALRYMEN
The disastrous "Charge of the Light Brigade" took place in Balaclava in the Crimea on October 25th 1854 during the Crimean War. Commander of the British Army that day was Lord Raglan, and in overall command of the Calvary unit was the Earl of Lucan. Under Lucan, in command of the Light Brigade was the Earl of Cardigan. Raglan sent a Captain Nolan to Lucan with orders to attack "the guns". When Lucan asked Nolan which guns, it appears that Nolan indicated the wrong ones. Lucan then instructed Cardigan to lead the Light Cavalry in a charge on the designated guns, which he dutifully did. As the charge started, Nolan noted the error and rode onto the field to intercept the Light Brigade, but was killed by an artillery shell. The charge continued into an overwhelming artillery battery ("into the Valley of Death" to use Tennyson's famous words), causing the loss of over 2/3 of the mounted brigade, a loss of 400 horses and 250 men killed or wounded, for no military purpose at all. Cardigan survived, left the field of battle immediately and boarded his yacht in Balaklava Harbor and had a champagne lunch. Lucan was made a member of the Order of the Bath the following year, and Raglan was promoted to Field Marshal ...

11. Japanese cartoon art : ANIME
Anime is animation in the style of Japanese Manga comic books.

13. Fictional Marner : SILAS
"Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe" is a novel written by George Eliot and first published in 1861. There's an excellent BBC TV version of the tale (shown on PBS) starring Ben Kingsley in the title role, with Patsy Kensit playing Eppie, the young orphaned child that Marner takes under his wing.

18. Actress Pia : ZADORA
Pia Zadora is an American actress and singer. Zadora's most famous role was in the 1982 film "Butterfly" in which she worked with Orson Welles and Stacey Keach. The film was based on the novel "The Butterfly" by James M. Cain and deals with the difficult subject of father-daughter incest.

26. Mideast oil port : ADEN
Aden is a seaport in Yemen, located on the Gulf of Aden by the eastern approach to the Red Sea. Aden has a long history of British rule, from 1838 until a very messy withdrawal in 1967.

29. Watt's equivalent : VOLT-AMPERE
The watt (W) and the volt-ampere (VA) are equivalent units of power, although not the same thing. Both are measures of electrical power but watts refer to “real power” and volt-amperes refer to “apparent power”. That’s all I know!

32. Silent film effect : IRIS-IN
In the word of movie-making, An “Iris” is a technique in which an image is shown in only a small round area of the screen. An “Iris-out” starts as a pinpoint in the screen then moves outward to reveal a full scene. An “Iris-in” begins as a full scene and then closes down to pinpoint a specific circular area in the scene.

33. Letters on brandy : VSO
Cognac is a most famous variety of brandy named after the town of Cognac in the very west of France. To be called cognac, the brandy must be distilled twice in copper pot stills and aged at least two years in very specific French oak barrels. It is the length of this aging that defines the various grades of cognac (and other brandies):
- VS: Very Special ... at least 2 years storage
- VSOP: Very Special (or Superior) Old Pale ... at least 4 years storage
- XO: Extra Old ... at least 6 years
- VSO: Very Superior Old ... 12-17 years

37. Textile factory containers : VATS
Textile factories might contain vats of dye, I guess.

38. White-tailed raptor : ERNE
The ern (also erne) is also called the white-tailed eagle, and the sea-eagle.

"Raptor" is a generic term for a bird of prey, one that has talons to grip its victims.

39. Game similar to bridge : SKAT
When I was a teenager in Ireland, I had a friend with a German father. The father taught us the game of Skat, and what a great game it is. Skat originated in Germany in the 1800s and is to this day the most popular game in the country. I haven't played it in decades, but would love to play it again ...

41. Many a C.E.O. has one : MBA
The world's first MBA degree was offered by Harvard’s Graduate School of Business Administration, in 1908.

47. Batman portrayer Kilmer : VAL
Val Kilmer's first big leading role in a movie was playing Jim Morrison in Oliver Stone's 1991 biopic "The Doors". A few years later, Morrison was chosen for the lead in another big production, "Batman Forever". Things haven't really gone as well for Kilmer since then, I'd say. Off the screen, he flirted with the idea of running for Governor of New Mexico in 2010. A Hollywood actor as a Governor? Would never happen ...

49. Desert stop-off : OASIS
The most famous oasis in the US is ... Las Vegas, in the middle of the Mojave Desert.

50. A ring bearer : BILBO
Bilbo Baggins is the main character in Tolkien's "The Hobbit", and a character who features in "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy.

53. Poker player's "Uncle" : I FOLD
The term “uncle”, meaning “stop, I quit”, is a very North American expression. It has been around since the early 1900s but I couldn't unearth its etymology.

55. Melville captain : AHAB
Captain Ahab is the obsessed and far from friendly Captain of the Pequod in Herman Melville's "Moby Dick".

56. "99 Luftballons" singer : NENA
Nena is a German singer ("Nena" became the name of her band as well) who had a big hit with one of my favorite songs of the eighties "99 Luftballons". The English translation of the German title ("99 Red Balloons") isn't literal, with the color "red" added just so that the title had the right number of syllables for the tune. "Luftballon" is the name given to a child's toy balloon in German.

57. "Lohengrin" heroine : ELSA
"Lohengrin" is a very popular opera by Richard Wagner, first performed in 1850. Many arias from "Lohengrin" are staples on "Opera's Greatest Hits" collections.

We've often heard the "Bridal Chorus" from Richard Wagner's opera "Lohengrin". It's the tune to "Here comes the bride ...", which is played regularly at the start of wedding ceremonies as the bride walks down the aisle. In the opera, the "Bridal Chorus" is sung not at the start of the ceremony but afterwards, by the women of the wedding party as they accompany newlywed Elsa to the bridal chamber.

60. Many a YouTube upload : VLOG
A video blog is perhaps what one might expect, a blog that is essentially a series of video posts. The term “video logging” is often shortened to “vlogging”.

61. Gymnast Korbut : OLGA
Olga Korbut is from modern-day Belarus, but was born during the days of the Soviet Union. Korbut competed for the USSR team in the 1972 and 1976 Olympic Games. She was 17 when she appeared in the 1972 Munich Games, and had been training in a sports school since she was 8-years-old. The world fell in love with her as she was a very emotional young lady, readily expressing joy and disappointment, something that we weren't used to seeing in athletes from behind the Iron Curtain. Korbut immigrated to the US in 1991 and now lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

62. Meg of "Sleepless in Seattle" : RYAN
Meg Ryan is the stage name of the actress Margaret Mary Hyra. Ryan's big break came with the excellent 1989 movie “When Harry Met Sally” from which she went on to star in some of the greatest romantic comedies ever made.

“Sleepless in Seattle” is a lovely romantic comedy directed and co-written by Nora Ephron, released in 1993. The film’s storyline is based on the excellent 1957 movie “An Affair to Remember”, and there are numerous direct references to the Cary Grant/Deborah Kerr classic throughout the “remake”. The lead roles in “Sleepless …” are played by Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan.

65. Big name in jeans : LEE
The Lee company famous for making jeans was formed in 1889, by one Henry David Lee in Salina, Kansas.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Wines said to go well with meat : REDS
5. White-bellied whales : ORCAS
10. Musical Mama : CASS
14. Each : A POP
15. Bubkes : ZILCH
16. Voting nay : ANTI
17. *1952 Marlon Brando film : VIVA ZAPATA!
19. It might hold the solution : VIAL
20. Arctic fishing tool : ICE SAW
21. *2008 Meryl Streep film : MAMMA MIA!
23. Parent who can pass on an X or Y chromosome : DAD
25. Orioles and Blue Jays, informally : ALERS
26. From the start : AB OVO
30. *1968 Mark Lester film : OLIVER!
34. Name on a plaque, maybe : DONOR
35. French seas : MERS
36. Part of fashion's YSL : YVES
40. It follows the answer to each starred clue : EXCLAMATION MARK
43. Medvedev's denial : NYET
44. Skew : BIAS
45. Blue Cross competitor : AETNA
46. *1972 Jack Lemmon film : AVANTI!
48. Atlas blowup : INSET
49. Harvard Law Review editor who went on to become president : OBAMA
52. Bubkes : NIL
54. *1980 Robert Hays film : AIRPLANE!
58. Intense passion : FERVOR
63. Tart fruit : SLOE
64. *1969 Barbra Streisand film : HELLO, DOLLY!
66. Letter-shaped support : I-BAR
67. Lensman Adams : ANSEL
68. Common feature in Roman statuary : TOGA
69. Achy : SORE
70. Emulated a lamb : BAAED
71. Former New York archbishop : EGAN

Down
1. Shankar at Woodstock : RAVI
2. Like some fails, in modern slang : EPIC
3. Bird of peace : DOVE
4. Baden-Baden and others : SPAS
5. Seiji ___, longtime Boston Symphony maestro : OZAWA
6. Dead letters? : RIP
7. Tight-lipped sort : CLAM
8. Court proceedings : ACTA
9. Hoax : SHAM
10. Chargers in "The Charge of the Light Brigade" : CAVALRYMEN
11. Japanese cartoon art : ANIME
12. Connector of stories : STAIR
13. Fictional Marner : SILAS
18. Actress Pia : ZADORA
22. Daisy ___ : MAE
24. Realm : DOMAIN
26. Mideast oil port : ADEN
27. Hardly aerodynamic : BOXY
28. Formerly : ONCE
29. Watt's equivalent : VOLT-AMPERE
31. Allow to attack : LET AT
32. Silent film effect : IRIS-IN
33. Letters on brandy : VSO
37. Textile factory containers : VATS
38. White-tailed raptor : ERNE
39. Game similar to bridge : SKAT
41. Many a C.E.O. has one : MBA
42. Did perfectly : NAILED
47. Batman portrayer Kilmer : VAL
49. Desert stop-off : OASIS
50. A ring bearer : BILBO
51. Loud, as a crowd : AROAR
53. Poker player's "Uncle" : I FOLD
55. Melville captain : AHAB
56. "99 Luftballons" singer : NENA
57. "Lohengrin" heroine : ELSA
59. Tedious learning method : ROTE
60. Many a YouTube upload : VLOG
61. Gymnast Korbut : OLGA
62. Meg of "Sleepless in Seattle" : RYAN
65. Big name in jeans : LEE

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0128-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Jan 13, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jaime Hutchison & Vic Fleming
THEME: Tooling Along … each of today’s themed answers ends with the name of a tool:
35A. Common put-down that hints at the ends of 17-, 21-, 53- and 58-Across : WHAT A TOOL!

17A. Info on a dashboard gauge : FUEL LEVEL
21A. "I, the Jury" detective : MIKE HAMMER
53A. Flier made from a do-it-yourself kit : MODEL PLANE
58A. Safety exercise prompted by an alarm : FIRE DRILL
COMPLETION TIME: 06m 14s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. TV host Gibbons : LEEZA
Leeza Gibbons has her own radio show called "Hollywood Confidential", and used to have her own talk show on NBC television that aired from 1994 to 2000. Gibbons is the founder of a nonprofit group called Leeza's Place which supports people giving care to patients with memory disorders. Since 2007 she has been a board member of California's stem cell research agency, appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

16. Go off like a volcano : ERUPT
Our word “volcano” comes from “Vulcano”, the name of a volcanic island off the coast of Italy. The island’s name comes from Vulcan, the Roman god of fire. The Romans believed that the island of Vulcano was the chimney of the forge belonging to the god Vulcan. The Romans also believed that the eruptions on Mount Etna in Sicily were caused by Vulcan getting angry and working his forge so hard that sparks and smoke flew out of the top of the volcano.

17. Info on a dashboard gauge : FUEL LEVEL
Back in the 1800s, “dashboard” was the name given to a "board" placed at the front of a carriage to stop mud from "dashing" against the passenges in the carriage, mud that was kicked up by the hoofs of the horses. Quite interesting ...

21. "I, the Jury" detective : MIKE HAMMER
Mike Hammer is the protagonist in a series of private detective novels by Mickey Spillane. The novels have been adapted for radio, television and the big screen. The actor most associated with Mike Hammer is Stacy Keach, who played the role in the TV series “Mickey Spillane’s Mike Hammer” from 1984 to 1987.

"I, The Jury" is the first novel in the "Mike Hammer" series written by Mickey Spillane. The story was filmed twice, once in 1953 with Biff Elliot playing Hammer, and again in 1982 with Armand Assante taking the lead.

23. Big name in art glass : STEUBEN
Steuben Glass Works was a manufacturer of art glass that was founded in 1903 and was shut down not so long ago, in 2011. The glass factory was located in Corning, New York. The city of Corning is in Steuben County, giving the company its name.

25. Comic Caesar : SID
Sid Caesar achieved fame in the fifties on TV's "Your Show of Shows". To be honest, I know Sid Caesar mainly from the fun film version of the musical "Grease", in which he played Coach Calhoun.

26. Thanksgiving side dish : YAM
Although in the US we sometimes refer to sweet potatoes as "yams", the yam is actually a completely different family of plants. True yams are more common in other parts of the the world than they are in this country, and are especially found in Africa.

30. French legislature : SENAT
The French Senate (“Sénat”) meets in the beautiful Luxembourg Palace (“Palais du Luxembourg”) in Paris.

34. Newspaper opinion piece : OP-ED
Op-ed is an abbreviation for "opposite the editorial page". Op-eds started in "The New York Evening World" in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

35. Common put-down that hints at the ends of 17-, 21-, 53- and 58-Across : WHAT A TOOL!
If I am not mistaken, the expression “What a tool!” is rather rude …

38. Asia's shrunken ___ Sea : ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad ...

42. British fellow : BLOKE
A “bloke” in Britain is a chap, a fellow. The origin of the term seems to be unclear.

49. Pres. Lincoln : ABE
There is a story that just before Abraham Lincoln was elected president in 1860, he received a letter from a 12-year-old girl who criticized Lincoln's appearance and his pock-marked, gaunt face. The little girl, Grace Bedell from New York, promised to get her brothers to vote for Lincoln if he would just grow a beard. However, Lincoln waited until after the election to grow his famous whiskers, a distinctive look that would forever be associated with his presidency.

50. Pop singer Carly ___ Jepsen : RAE
Carly Rae Jepsen is a singer/songwriter from Mission, British Columbia. Jepsen got her start on TV's “Canadian Idol” when she placed third in the show’s fifth season.

56. Fashion magazine with a French name : ELLE
"Elle" magazine was founded in 1945 in France and today has the highest circulation of any fashion magazine in the world. "Elle" is the French word for "she".

57. Rust, for example : OXIDE
Rust is iron oxide.

60. Laura and Bruce of the silver screen : DERNS
The actress Laura Dern is the daughter of the actors Bruce Dern and Diane Ladd. Among her many notable roles, Dern played the Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris in the 2008 movie “Recount”, and Dr. Ellie Sattler in the 1993 blockbuster “Jurassic Park”.

Bruce Dern is a Hollywood actor with quite a pedigree. Dern is the grandchild of former Utah governor and Secretary of War, George Henry Dern. Bruce’s godparents were Adlai Stevenson and Eleanor Roosevelt!

62. Cambodia's Lon ___ : NOL
Lon Nol was a soldier and politician in Cambodia, later serving twice as the country's president. When the Khmer Rouge took over Cambodia in 1975, Nol escaped the country to Indonesia. He eventually found a home in Fullerton, California, where he died in 1985.

Down
2. Canadian police officer : MOUNTIE
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (the Mounties; RCMP) is an unusual police force in that it provides all policing for the whole country. The RCMP works on the national level, and right down to the municipal level. The force's distinctive uniform of red serge tunic, blue pants with a yellow stripe, stetson hat etc. is known internally as "Review Order". The red uniform dates back to the days of the North-West Mounted Police, which was one of the existing forces that were merged in 1920 to form the RCMP.

6. "Deathtrap" playwright Ira : LEVIN
As well as writing novels, Ira Levin was a dramatist and a songwriter. Levin's first novel was "A Kiss Before Dying", and his most famous work was "Rosemary's Baby" which became a Hollywood hit. His best known play is "Deathtrap", a production that is often seen in local theater (I've seen it a couple of times around here). "Deathtrap" was also was a successful movie, starring Michael Caine and Christopher Reeve. My favorite of Levin's novels though are "The Boys from Brazil" and "The Stepford Wives".

7. Book before Daniel: Abbr. : EZEK
The Book of Daniel in the Hebrew Bible tells mainly of the life of Daniel. The Book of Ezekiel is a collection of the preachings of the prophet Ezekiel.

10. Biblical name for Syria : ARAM
The ancient Biblical land of Aram was named after Aram, a grandson of Noah. Aram was located in the center of modern-day Syria.

18. Singer with the #1 R&B hit "You'll Never Find Another Love Like Mine" : LOU RAWLS
Lou Rawls was an American soul and blues singer known for his smooth vocal style. With his singing career well on the way, Rawls was asked to sing "The Star Spangled Banner" in 1977 at a Muhammad Ali fight in Madison Square Garden. This early performance led to him being asked to sing the anthem many, many times in the coming years with his last rendition being at a World Series game in 2005. Rawls passed away in January of the following year.

22. Zoo heavyweight, for short : HIPPO
The name “hippopotamus” comes from the Greek for “river horse”. Hippos are the third largest land mammals, after elephants and rhinos. The closest living relatives to hippos don’t even live on land. They are the whales and porpoises of the oceans.

24. Top 10 Kiss hit with backing by the New York Philharmonic : BETH
KISS is a hard rock band from New York City. KISS is the group whose bandmembers use all that scary face paint and wear wacky outfits on stage.

31. Springfield resident Disco ___ : STU
On television's "The Simpsons", the character of Disco Stu is voiced by Hank Azaria, although Stu was voiced for a while by Phil Hartman. Disco Stu is described as "a black, wrinkly John Travolta".

37. Lead-in to "di" or "da" in a Beatles song : OB-LA-
"Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da" was one of many songs credited to Lennon/McCartney that was actually written by just one of the pair. Paul McCartney wrote this one, a song that John Lennon really did not like at all. Apparently Lennon was quite obstructionist during the recording of the song and even walked out at one point.

38. With ice cream : A LA MODE
In French, "à la mode" simply means "fashionable". In America, the term has come to describe a way of serving pie, usually with ice cream, or as I recall from when I lived in Upstate New York, with cheese.

44. Garrison of "A Prairie Home Companion" : KEILLOR
The amazing humorist Garrison Keillor is one of Minnesota's most famous sons. Keillor's wonderful radio show called "A Prairie Home Companion" made its debut in 1974 and is named after the Prairie Home Cemetery in Moorhead, Minnesota. I actually saw a live taping of “A Prairie Home Companion” not so long ago in San Francisco and thoroughly enjoyed the experience …

45. Actress Getty of "The Golden Girls" : ESTELLE
The actress Estelle Getty was best known for playing Sophia Petrillo on “The Golden Girls”. Bea Arthur played Sophia’s daughter on the show, even though Estelle was actually a year younger than Bea in real life!

48. Edam or Brie : CHEESE
Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

Brie is a soft cheese, named after the French province of Brie where it originated.

51. Leprechaunlike : ELFIN
A leprechaun is a mischievous fairy in Irish folklore. Traditionally, leprechauns spend their days making shoes and hide all of their money in a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow. Our word “leprechaun” comes from the Irish name for such a sprite: “leipreachán”.

52. Against property, to a judge : IN REM
"In rem" translates from Latin as "in a thing". In a lawsuit, an action is described as "in rem" if it is directed against some property. This would be the case if someone disputes ownership of a piece of land, for example. An action "in personam" on the other hand, is directed against a specific individual.

54. Poet ___ St. Vincent Millay : EDNA
Edna St. Vincent Millay was an American poet and playwright, the third woman to receive the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry (in 1923 for "The Ballad of the Harp-Weaver"). Millay was noted not only for her work, but also for the open arrangement that she and her husband had in their marriage. Millay took many lovers, including the poet George Dillon for whom she wrote a number of sonnets.

55. Opera with a slave girl : AIDA
"Aida" is the famous opera by Giuseppe Verdi, actually based on a scenario written by French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette, who also designed the costumes and stages for the opening performance. The opera was first performed in 1871 in an opera house in Cairo. In the storyline, Aida is an Ethiopian princess brought into Egypt as a slave. Radames is an Egyptian commander who falls in love with her, and then of course complications arise!

59. Drunk's woe, informally : DTS
The episodes of delirium that can accompany withdrawal from alcohol are called Delirium Tremens (the DTs). The literal translation of this Latin phrase is "trembling madness".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Little prankster : IMP
4. Does nothing : IDLES
9. Tots' fathers : DADAS
14. Neither's partner : NOR
15. TV host Gibbons : LEEZA
16. Go off like a volcano : ERUPT
17. Info on a dashboard gauge : FUEL LEVEL
19. Countryside: Sp. : CAMPO
20. Within: Prefix : ENTO-
21. "I, the Jury" detective : MIKE HAMMER
23. Big name in art glass : STEUBEN
25. Comic Caesar : SID
26. Thanksgiving side dish : YAM
27. In layers : TIERED
28. Read leisurely : PERUSE
30. French legislature : SENAT
31. Tiny misstep : SLIP
34. Newspaper opinion piece : OP-ED
35. Common put-down that hints at the ends of 17-, 21-, 53- and 58-Across : WHAT A TOOL!
38. Asia's shrunken ___ Sea : ARAL
41. Fill-ins, informally : SUBS
42. British fellow : BLOKE
46. Divulges : LETS ON
48. PC lookalikes, e.g. : CLONES
49. Pres. Lincoln : ABE
50. Pop singer Carly ___ Jepsen : RAE
52. "Aha!" : I HAVE IT!
53. Flier made from a do-it-yourself kit : MODEL PLANE
56. Fashion magazine with a French name : ELLE
57. Rust, for example : OXIDE
58. Safety exercise prompted by an alarm : FIRE DRILL
60. Laura and Bruce of the silver screen : DERNS
61. That is: Lat. : ID EST
62. Cambodia's Lon ___ : NOL
63. These, to Conchita : ESTAS
64. When repeated, identifies people : NAMES
65. Before, to a bard : ERE

Down
1. Overruns as pests might : INFESTS
2. Canadian police officer : MOUNTIE
3. In the sixth grade or earlier, typically : PRETEEN
4. Sick : ILL
5. Judged : DEEMED
6. "Deathtrap" playwright Ira : LEVIN
7. Book before Daniel: Abbr. : EZEK
8. Counterpart of purchases : SALES
9. 2010s, e.g. : DECADE
10. Biblical name for Syria : ARAM
11. Produce, as page layouts for a printer : DUMMY UP
12. Mollify : APPEASE
13. Attacked en masse : STORMED
18. Singer with the #1 R&B hit "You'll Never Find Another Love Like Mine" : LOU RAWLS
22. Zoo heavyweight, for short : HIPPO
24. Top 10 Kiss hit with backing by the New York Philharmonic : BETH
29. Dog command : ROLL OVER
31. Springfield resident Disco ___ : STU
32. Experiment site : LAB
33. With 36-Down, "Easy!" : IT’S
36. See 33-Down : A SNAP!
37. Lead-in to "di" or "da" in a Beatles song : OB-LA-
38. With ice cream : A LA MODE
39. Packs again for shipping : RE-BOXES
40. Suffered humiliation : ATE DIRT
43. Length of a pithy joke : ONE LINE
44. Garrison of "A Prairie Home Companion" : KEILLOR
45. Actress Getty of "The Golden Girls" : ESTELLE
47. Discount price phrase : OR LESS
48. Edam or Brie : CHEESE
51. Leprechaunlike : ELFIN
52. Against property, to a judge : IN REM
54. Poet ___ St. Vincent Millay : EDNA
55. Opera with a slave girl : AIDA
59. Drunk's woe, informally : DTS

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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