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0301-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Mar 13, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Doug Peterson & Brad Wilber
THEME: None
COMPLETION TIME: 30m 12s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Game with the figures "soldier's bed" and "fish in a dish" : CAT'S CRADLE
Cat's Cradle is likely to be one of the oldest games played by man, one that sprung up independently in all parts of the world. The game is played by two people and involves the making of a series of figures with a loop of string held by the fingers.

11. Real-estate mogul Olenicoff : IGOR
Igor Olenicoff is a real estate developer and billionaire who now lives in the US. Olenicoff was born in Russia in 1942, raised in Iran and arrived in the US when he was 15 years old with not a lot of money to his name.

15. Superpower with which Clark Kent shaves himself : HEAT VISION
Apparently Superman has the power to emit solar energy from his eyes, so called Heat Vision.

16. Boulevardier's accessory : CANE
A boulevardier is a man about town, coming from the French “boulevard” meaning … boulevard!

18. Fangorn Forest denizens : ENTS
Ents are those tree-like creatures that live in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth in his series of books "The Lord of the Rings". “Ent” is an Old English word for “giant”.

19. Source of the line "Hope springs eternal ..." : POPE
Alexander Pope wrote the following lines in “An Essay on Man” in 1734:
Hope springs eternal in the human breast;
Man never Is, but always To be blest:
The soul, uneasy and confin'd from home,
Rests and expatiates in a life to come.

20. Larder lineup : JARS
The Latin word for bacon or lard, is "lardum", from which developed a Middle Latin word "lardarium" meaning a "room for meats". This came into English as "larder" to describe a meat storeroom. Over time, our larders stored all types of foods and our fresh meats went into refrigerators.

22. Greg Evans comic strip : LUANN
“Luann” is a newspaper comic strip written and drawn by Greg Evans. The strip centers on the suburban adventures of teenager Luann DeGroot.

25. Daughter of Zeus and Leda : HELEN
In Greek mythology, Leda was the beautiful Queen of Sparta who was seduced by Zeus when he took the form of a swan. Leda produced two eggs from the union. One egg hatched into the beautiful Helen, later to be known as Helen of Troy and over whom the Trojan War was fought. The other egg hatched into the twins Castor and Pollux. Castor and Pollux had different fathers according to the myth. Pollux was the son of Zeus and was immortal, while Castor was the son of Leda's earthly husband, and so he was a mortal. William Butler Yeats wrote a famous sonnet called “Leda and the Swan” in 1924.

28. Drum that might accompany a fife : TABOR
A tabor is a portable snare drum that is played with one hand. The tabor is usually suspended by a strap from one arm, with the other hand free to beat the drum. It is often played as an accompaniment for a fife or other small flutes. The word "tabor" comes from the Welsh name for the drum, "tabwrdd".

30. First carrier to offer regular in-flight movies, 1961 : TWA
In-flight entertainment has changed quite a bit over the decades. We do get to see in-flight movies these days, but in 1936 we might have enjoyed travel a little more. The “Hindenburg” airship had a bar, lounge, dining room, smoking room and piano available for passengers. Mind you, the trip between Europe and America took 2½ days to complete.

31. Garment made of Gore-Tex, maybe : ANORAK
Anoraks aren't very popular over here in America. Everyone has one in Ireland! An anorak is a heavy jacket with a hood, often lined with fur (or fake fur), and is an invention of the Inuit people.

Gore-Tex is a waterproof fabric that also “breathes”. This is because the pores in Gore-Tex are small enough to keep out water droplets, but large enough to allow water vapor molecules to pass through.

33. They're no longer tender in a typical trattoria : LIRE
The word "lira" is used in a number of countries for currency. "Lira" comes from the Latin for "pound" and is derived from a British pound sterling, the value of a Troy pound of silver. For example, the lira (plural “lire”) was the official currency of Italy before the country changed over to the euro.

A trattoria is an Italian restaurant. In Italian, a “trattore” is the keeper of an eating house.

34. Yellowfin, on some menus : AHI
Yellowfin tuna is usually marketed as "ahi", its Hawaiian name. Yellowfin tuna is one big fish, often weighing over 300 pounds.

37. Classic Chrysler : LEBARON
The Chrysler LeBaron made from 1977 to 1995 was a low-priced mid-sized automobile. However, the original LeBaron made in the 1930s was Chrysler's luxury model, which competed with other luxury cars such as the Lincoln and the Packard.

39. Lead characters in "Mork & Mindy"? : EMS
The leading letter in both “Mork” and “Mindy” is an M.

"Mork & Mindy" was broadcast from 1978 to 1982. We were first introduced to Mork (played by Robin Williams, of course) in a special episode of "Happy Days". The particular episode in question has a bizarre storyline culminating in Fonzie and Mork having a thumb-to-finger duel. Eventually Richie wakes up in bed, and alien Mork was just part of a dream! Oh, and "Nanu Nanu" means both "hello" and "goodbye" back on the planet Ork. "I am Mork from Ork, Nanu Nanu". Great stuff ...

43. Tillis or Tormé : MEL
Mel Tillis is a country singer who had most of hits in the seventies. Notably, Tillis has a speech impediment, but this does not affect his singing at all.

Mel Tormé was a jazz singer, with a quality of voice that earned him the nickname “The Velvet Fog”. Tormé also wrote a few books, and did a lot of acting. He was the co-author of the Christmas classic known as “The Christmas Song”, which starts out with the line "Chestnuts roasting on an open fire …"

46. Full of adrenaline, informally : AMPED
The naturally occurring hormone adrenaline is also known as epinephrine. Adrenaline takes its name from the adrenal glands that produce the hormone. The glands themselves take their name from their location in the body, right on the kidneys ("ad-renes" meaning near or at the kidneys in Latin). The alternative name of epinephrine has a similar root ("epi-nephros" meaning upon the kidney, in Greek).

47. West Point newcomers : PLEBES
Plebe is a slang term for a freshman in the US military and naval academies. Plebe is probably short for "plebeian", the name given to someone of the common class in Ancient Rome (as opposed to a Patrician). "Pleb" is a shortened version of plebeian, and is a term used outside of the military schools.

51. O. Henry is known for one : AWARD
The O. Henry Award has been given annually since 1919 and honors exceptional short stories.

O. Henry was the pen name of writer William Sydney Porter from Greensboro, North Carolina. O. Henry is famous for his witty short stories that have a clever twist in the tail.

52. Baccarat cousin : FARO
Faro is a card game somewhat akin to Baccarat that was popular in England and France in the 18th century. Faro made it to the Old West, where it became a favorite of Doc Holliday and Wyatt Earp. The origin of the name "Faro" is unclear. One popular theory is that Faro is a contraction of ‘pharaoh’ given that Egyptian motifs used to be common on playing cards of the period. There’s another theory involving the usual suspects: Irish immigrants and famines …

57. Zip : NADA
"Nada" is the Spanish word for "nothing".

58. 1971 film with the tagline "You don't assign him to murder cases. You just turn him loose." : DIRTY HARRY
“Dirty” Harry Callahan was the protagonist in a series of five movies starring Clint Eastwood:
- “Dirty Harry” (1971)
- “Magnum Force” (1973)
- “The Enforcer” (1976)
- “Sudden Impact” (1983)
- “The Dead Pool” (1988)

60. Like shellfish : TREF
According to Jewish dietary law, "kosher" food is "fit" to eat, and food that is not kosher is called "treif" (or tref).

62. Hard worker : SERF
A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. "Serf" comes from the Latin "servus", meaning "slave".

63. Site near an outdoor recording session in "Help!" : STONEHENGE
The magnificent Stonehenge monument in the south of England was built from 3000 to 2000 BC. “Stonehenge” has given its name to “henges”, a whole class of earthenwork monuments that are circular in form with an internal ditch surrounded by a bank. Paradoxically, Stonehenge doesn’t qualify as a henge by this contemporary definition, as its earthen bank is surrounded by an external ditch.

Down
2. Prefix with -stat : AERO-
An aerostat is a type of aircraft that doesn't derive its lift from forward motion like a fixed wing airplane. Instead, the lift comes from buoyancy, as in a balloon or a dirigible.

3. Pool protector : TARP
Originally, tarpaulins were made from canvas covered in tar that rendered the material waterproof. The word "tarpaulin" comes from "tar" and "palling", with "pall" meaning "heavy cloth covering".

4. Six-time Lombardi Trophy winners : STEELERS
The Pittsburgh Steelers football team were founded in 1933, making it the oldest franchise in the AFC. Back in 1933, the team was known as the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Pirates name was chosen as the Pittsburgh baseball team was the Pirates. The name was changed to the Steelers in 1940, and then the Steagles in 1943 when the team merged with the Philadelphia Eagles. There was a further merger in 1944, with the Chicago Cardinals to form Card-Pitt. In 1945, the Steelers name was resurrected.

5. Rx chain : CVS
The name of the drugstore chain CVS once stood for Consumer Value Stores, although these days the company uses the acronym to denote Convenience, Value and Service.

6. Spanish wine : RIOJA
Rioja wines come from the province of La Rioja in Northern Spain. In my days living back in Europe, Rioja wines were noted for their heavy oaky flavors and it wasn’t uncommon to order a “rough Rioja” when out for dinner of an evening.

8. Like the snowy owl : DIURNAL
A diurnal animal is active during the day, whereas a nocturnal animal is active at night.

12. Genre that glorifies gunplay : GANGSTA RAP
Gangsta rap is a type of hip hop music with lyrics that reflect the violent lifestyle experienced by some inner-city youth.

21. Emergency oil rig visitor : FIREBOAT
A fireboat is a firefighting vehicle used for fighting fires on board ships and on shoreside. A fireboat has a distinct advantage over other firefighting vehicles in that it has an unlimited supply of water.

24. "Whitman Cantata" composer : ROREM
American composer Ned Rorem is famous for his musical compositions, but also for his book, "Paris Diary of Ned Rorem" that was published in 1966. Rorem talks openly about his sexuality in the book, and also about the sexuality of others including Noel Coward, Leonard Bernstein and Samuel Barber, much to some people’s chagrin.

25. Part of an iconic Eden outfit : HAREM PANTS
Back in 1964, the second most watched show on American television was ABC’s “Bewitched”. Sidney Sheldon was tasked with the job of creating a rival sitcom and he came up with “I Dream of Jeannie”, which first aired in 1965. The censors had a big say in how the story developed. For starters, Jeannie’s skimpy costume was permitted provided Barbara Eden didn’t show off her navel on the screen. Also, Jeannie was only allowed to live with an unmarried man as long as the story made it clear that she slept in a bottle.

29. Cartoonist Keane : BIL
Bil Keane is a cartoonist most associated with his strip “The Family Circus”. Once Bil sketches out the text and idea for the cartoon, he sends it off to his son Jeff Keane who inks and colors the pictures so that the strip is ready for publication. In the storyline itself, the main characters are based on Bil's own family. In fact, the son "Jeffy" in the story is based on Jeff, Bil's son and production assistant.

32. Ululates : KEENS
“To keen” is to wail in lamentation. The word "keening" has its roots in Ireland, coming from the Irish word “caoinim” meaning “I weep, wail, lament”.

A ululation is a high-pitched trill, a sound usually practiced by women in ritual situations. I came across the practice not too long ago as an expression of celebration at an Arab-American wedding.

36. TV show that has spawned many movies, briefly : SNL
“Saturday Night Live” (“SNL”).

41. Yvonne of "The Munsters" : DE CARLO
Yvonne De Carlo was a Canadian-American actress with a string of appearances in Hollywood movies in the forties and fifties. In the sixties she turned to television, playing Lily Munster on the comedy show “The Munsters”.

45. Striped identifier : TARTAN
Tartan is sometimes called "plaid" over here in the US, a word not used in the same sense outside of this country. In Scotland a "plaid" is a blanket or a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder.

48. Zach ___, "Garden State" actor/director : BRAFF
The actor Zach Braff’s big break came with the lead role in the TV series “Scrubs”, which ran from 2001 to 2010. Braff made a successful transition from the small to the big screen in 2004’s “Garden State”, in which he starred as well as directed.

50. Early automaker Frederick Henry ___ : ROYCE
Henry Royce founded the Rolls-Royce company in 1904 with his partner, Charles Rolls. Royce died at 70 years of age in 1933. His last words were, reportedly, "I wish I had spent more time in the office ..."

52. Direction from on high : FIAT
A "fiat" is an arbitrary rule that is imposed, and is the Latin for "let it be done".

55. "Hullabaloo" dance : FRUG
The Frug was a sixties dance craze that evolved out of another dance fad called the Chicken. After the Frug came the Swim, the Monkey, the Dog, the Watusi, the Mashed Potato and the Jerk.

58. Fielding feats, for short : DPS
Double plays (DPs).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Game with the figures "soldier's bed" and "fish in a dish" : CAT'S CRADLE
11. Real-estate mogul Olenicoff : IGOR
15. Superpower with which Clark Kent shaves himself : HEAT VISION
16. Boulevardier's accessory : CANE
17. Waffling : IRRESOLUTE
18. Fangorn Forest denizens : ENTS
19. Source of the line "Hope springs eternal ..." : POPE
20. Larder lineup : JARS
21. It moves along via a series of belts : FIGHT
22. Greg Evans comic strip : LUANN
24. Dental patient, often : RINSER
25. Daughter of Zeus and Leda : HELEN
28. Drum that might accompany a fife : TABOR
30. First carrier to offer regular in-flight movies, 1961 : TWA
31. Garment made of Gore-Tex, maybe : ANORAK
33. They're no longer tender in a typical trattoria : LIRE
34. Yellowfin, on some menus : AHI
35. Tangles with, in the country : RASSLES
37. Classic Chrysler : LEBARON
39. Lead characters in "Mork & Mindy"? : EMS
40. Impart : LEND
42. Coaching concern : MORALE
43. Tillis or Tormé : MEL
44. Place to moor : INLET
46. Full of adrenaline, informally : AMPED
47. West Point newcomers : PLEBES
49. Aids in marketing? : CARTS
51. O. Henry is known for one : AWARD
52. Baccarat cousin : FARO
53. Estrangement : RIFT
57. Zip : NADA
58. 1971 film with the tagline "You don't assign him to murder cases. You just turn him loose." : DIRTY HARRY
60. Like shellfish : TREF
61. Regime change catalyst : PALACE COUP
62. Hard worker : SERF
63. Site near an outdoor recording session in "Help!" : STONEHENGE

Down
1. Pot item : CHIP
2. Prefix with -stat : AERO-
3. Pool protector : TARP
4. Six-time Lombardi Trophy winners : STEELERS
5. Rx chain : CVS
6. Spanish wine : RIOJA
7. Leaning : ASLANT
8. Like the snowy owl : DIURNAL
9. Very much : LOTS
10. Shanghai-to-Tokyo dir. : ENE
11. Block during a blizzard : ICE IN
12. Genre that glorifies gunplay : GANGSTA RAP
13. Mostly : ON THE WHOLE
14. Checked : RESTRAINED
21. Emergency oil rig visitor : FIREBOAT
23. Out of one's league? : UNALLIED
24. "Whitman Cantata" composer : ROREM
25. Part of an iconic Eden outfit : HAREM PANTS
26. Durable kitchen items : ENAMELWARE
27. Low-priced item, maybe : LOSS LEADER
29. Cartoonist Keane : BIL
32. Ululates : KEENS
36. TV show that has spawned many movies, briefly : SNL
38. Cold war concern : ARMS RACE
41. Yvonne of "The Munsters" : DE CARLO
45. Striped identifier : TARTAN
48. Zach ___, "Garden State" actor/director : BRAFF
50. Early automaker Frederick Henry ___ : ROYCE
52. Direction from on high : FIAT
54. Weights, colloquially : IRON
55. "Hullabaloo" dance : FRUG
56. Bang out : TYPE
58. Fielding feats, for short : DPS
59. When repeated, a sneaky laugh : HEH

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0228-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Feb 13, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Joe Krozel
THEME: Missing the Pros and Cons … all of today’s across answers start with either PRO or CON, but the PROS and CONS are missing in the grid. Also, the black squares in the grid form "+" and "-" signs, indicative of pros and cons:
1A. With 4- and 7-Across, both sides ... or the missing starts for all the remaining Across answers : PRO
4A. See 1-Across : AND
7A. See 1-Across : CON
COMPLETION TIME: 22m 23s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. For free : PRO BONO
The Latin term “pro bono publico” means “for the public good”, and is usually shorted to “pro bono”. The term applies to professional work that is done for free or at a reduced fee as a service to the public.

22. German toast : PROSIT
Prosit is a German toast, meaning "may it benefit"..

23. Bowl-shaped part of the ear : CONCHA
A “concha” or “conch” is an anatomical structure that resembles a shell in shape. In particular, it is the name given to the bowl- or shell-shaped part of the external ear.

32. Atom parts : PROTONS
A proton is a subatomic particle, with at least one found in the nucleus of every atom. A proton is not a “fundamental particle” though, as it itself is made up of three quarks; to up quarks and one down quark.

35. Study of verse : PROSODY
Prosody is the study of the metrical structure of poetry.

37. Family name on "Roseanne" : CONNER
The comedienne Roseanne Barr is perhaps best known as the star of her own sitcom called “Roseanne” in which she played the character Roseanne Conner. In 2012 Barr unsuccessfully vied for the Green Party’s nomination for US President. She didn’t give up though, and was successful in winning the nomination of the Peace and Freedom Party. In the 2012 presidential election she earned over 60,000 votes, and placed sixth in the list of candidates.

38. Singer Stevens : CONNIE
Connie Stevens is an actress and singer who was born Concetta Ingoglia in Brooklyn, New York in 1938. Her father was a musician using the stage name Teddy Stevens, so Connie took the Stevens name as her own.

48. Iran-___ : CONTRA
The Iran-Contra affair (also called “Irangate”) came to light in 1986. The "Iran" part of the scandal was the sale of arms to Iran by the Reagan administration, initially to facilitate the release of US hostages. This was done in secret largely because there was ostensibly a US arms embargo in place against Iran. The "Contra" part of the scandal arose when the man in charge of the operation, Oliver North, took funds from the arms sales and funneled the cash to the Contra militants who were fighting to topple the government in Honduras.

49. 1997 Nicolas Cage/John Malkovich thriller : CON AIR
“Con Air” is an entertaining action movie that was released in 1997. The film tells the story of a bunch of convicts being transported by air who escape and take control of the plane. If you take a look at the movie’s closing credits you’ll see the words “In Memory of Phil Swartz”. Swartz, a welder with the special effects team, was killed in a tragic accident when a static model of the plane used in the movie fell on him.

62. Big shells : CONCHES
Although conch is now used as a generic term for largish sea snails and their shells, the true conch belongs to a specific group of gastropods. The "meat" of a conch is very popular making the conch the second most popular edible snail after "escargots". The conch shell can of course be used as a wind instrument, and the true conch is also a good source for pearls.

65. For a while : PRO TEM
"Pro tempore" can be abbreviated to "pro tem" or "p.t." "Pro tempore" is a Latin phrase that best translates as "for the time being". It is used to describe a person who is acting for another, usually a superior.

66. French tales : CONTES
“Conte” is the French word for “tale”. There is an idiomatic phrase in France “conte de bonne femme” which translates literally as “tale of the good woman”. We would use the equivalent phrase “old wive’s tale”.

67. "Now!" : PRONTO!
The Spanish, Italian (and now English) word “pronto” is derived from the Latin “promptus” meaning “ready, quick”.

Down
1. ___-Penh : PNOM
Phnom Penh (also “Pnom Penh”) is the capital of Cambodia, and has been so since the French colonized the country in the late 1800s. The city's name translates from the Khmer language as "Hill of Penh".

4. "___ Death" (Grieg work) : ASE’S
"Ase's Death" is a movement in Edvard Grieg's beautiful "Peer Gynt" suite. The suite is a collection of incidental music that Grieg composed for Ibsen's play of the same name. Ase is the widow of a peasant, and the mother of Peer Gynt.

7. Cobra's shape, at times : COIL
“Cobra” is the name given to a group of snakes, some of which are in different animal families. The term "cobra" is reserved for those snakes that can expand their neck ribs to create a hood. The name “cobra” is an abbreviated form of “cobra de capelo” which translates from Portuguese as “snake with hood”.

12. Complain : KVETCH
The word "kvetch" of course comes to us from Yiddish, with "kvetshn" meaning "to complain" or "squeeze".

19. Cacophony : DIN
“Cacophony” is such a lovely word, used to describe a harsh or jarring sound. The term arises from the Greek “kakos” (bad) and “phone” (voice).

21. Quaker cereal : OH’S
There used to be two varieties of Oh's made by Quaker Oats Company. One was Honey Nut Oh's, later known as Crunchy Nut Oh's, but it was phased out. The second type was called Crunchy Graham Oh's, and is still available today as Honey Graham Oh's.

24. Laurel and Lee : STANS
Stan Laurel was an English comic actor (born Arthur Stanley Jefferson), who made a great career for himself in Hollywood. Laurel ended up at the Hal Roach studio directing films, intent on pursuing a career in writing and directing. However, he was a sometime actor and was asked to step in when another comic actor, Oliver Hardy, was injured and couldn't perform. Laurel and Hardy started to share a stage together during that time and when it was clear they worked so well together, their partnership was born. Oh, and the oft-quoted story that Clint Eastwood is the son of Stan Laurel … that’s just an urban myth.

Stan Lee did just about everything at Marvel Comics over the years, from writing to being president and chairman of the board.

25. Astronomer's sighting : COMET
Comets and asteroids are similar, both being relatively small celestial bodies orbiting the sun. Comets differ from asteroids in that they have a coma or tail, especially when they are close enough to the sun. The coma and tail are temporary fuzzy atmospheres that develop due to the presence of solar radiation.

29. Like some columns : IONIC
An Ionic column is relatively ornate. It usually has grooves running up and down its length and at the top there is a "scroll" design called a "volute". The scroll motif makes Ionic columns popular for the design of academic buildings. The term “Ionic” means “pertaining to Ionia”, with Ionia being an ancient territory that is located in modern-day Turkey.

30. Keats, for one : ODIST
The poet John Keats is famous for writing a whole series of beautiful odes. The most renowned are the so-called “1819 Odes”, a collection from the year 1819 that includes famous poems such as “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, "Ode to a Nightingale” and “Ode to Psyche”.

31. Some Security Council votes : NYETS
"Nyet" is Russian for "no", and “da” is Russian for “yes”.

The United Nations Security Council has 15 members, 5 of whom are permanent and who have veto power over any resolution. The 10 non-permanent members are elected into place, and hold their seats for two years. The UN charter requires that authorized representatives of the member nations are always present at UN headquarters so that the Security council can meet at any time. The permanent members are:
- China
- France
- Russia
- United Kingdom
- United States

40. Pictures of the Old West : OATERS
The term "oater" that is used for a western movie comes from the number of horses seen, as horses love oats!

45. Dander : IRE
The phrases "to get one's Irish up" and "to get one's dander up" mean to get riled up, to get angry. I guess we are always picking on the poor Irish!

47. Narrow waterway : RIA
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

51. "___ hollers, let ..." : IF HE
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

56. Conseil d'___ : ETAT
The Conseil d'État (Council of State) is a body within the French national government. The Conseil d'État provides legal advice to the Prime Minister and is also the administrative court of last resort.

60. Test for an M.A. seeker : GRE
Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. With 4- and 7-Across, both sides ... or the missing starts for all the remaining Across answers : PRO
4. See 1-Across : AND
7. See 1-Across : CON
10. Plot : CONNIVE
12. Stops working : CONKS OUT
14. For free : PRO BONO
15. Manuscript reviewer : PROOFER
16. Talk : CONVERSE
17. Disclose : CONFIDE
18. Walks : PROMENADES
20. Like some explosions and substances : CONTROLLED
22. German toast : PROSIT
23. Bowl-shaped part of the ear : CONCHA
24. Moral sense : CONSCIENCE
28. Traffic : CONGESTION
32. Atom parts : PROTONS
33. Ban : PROHIBIT
35. Study of verse : PROSODY
36. Some golf events : PRO-AMS
37. Family name on "Roseanne" : CONNER
38. Singer Stevens : CONNIE
39. Characterized by : PRONE TO
41. Solidifies : CONGEALS
43. Be made up (of) : CONSIST
44. Hinders : CONSTRAINS
46. Squeezes : CONSTRICTS
48. Iran-___ : CONTRA
49. 1997 Nicolas Cage/John Malkovich thriller : CON AIR
50. Ones jacking up prices, maybe : PROFITEERS
54. Declared publicly : PROCLAIMED
58. Bit of mountain flora : CONIFER
59. Introduction : PROLOGUE
61. Signify : CONNOTE
62. Big shells : CONCHES
63. Associates : CONSORTS
64. Show : PROGRAM
65. For a while : PRO TEM
66. French tales : CONTES
67. "Now!" : PRONTO!

Down
1. ___-Penh : PNOM
2. Rampant : RIFE
3. Something you might get your mitts on : OVEN
4. "___ Death" (Grieg work) : ASE’S
5. Conjunction that's usually part of a pair : NOR
6. Tidy up, in a way : DUST
7. Cobra's shape, at times : COIL
8. French wave : ONDE
9. Declined : NOED
11. Clears the board : ERASES
12. Complain : KVETCH
13. Group of three rhyming lines : TERCET
14. They're a couple short of C notes : B-FLATS
19. Cacophony : DIN
21. Quaker cereal : OH’S
24. Laurel and Lee : STANS
25. Astronomer's sighting : COMET
26. Orch. member : INSTR
27. German article : EINES
28. Ladies in waiting? : GIRLS
29. Like some columns : IONIC
30. Keats, for one : ODIST
31. Some Security Council votes : NYETS
34. "___ pal" : BE A
40. Pictures of the Old West : OATERS
41. Twists into a knot : GNARLS
42. Loses freshness : STALES
43. Fathering : SIRING
45. Dander : IRE
47. Narrow waterway : RIA
50. Half of a best-seller list: Abbr. : FICT
51. "___ hollers, let ..." : IF HE
52. Overflow (with) : TEEM
53. Shade of black : SOOT
54. Skips, as class : CUTS
55. Early time : MORN
56. Conseil d'___ : ETAT
57. Show, informally : DEMO
60. Test for an M.A. seeker : GRE

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0227-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Feb 13, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Daniel Kantor
THEME: Change of Heart … four of today’s five themed answers include an anagram of the word HEART, with CHANGE OF HEART being the fifth themed answer:
37A. Decision reversal ... or, literally, what can be found inside 17-, 22-, 49- and 58-Across : CHANGE OF HEART

17A. Yellow-eyed birds of prey : G(REAT H)ORNED OWLS
22A. Part of a fraternity ritual, perhaps : SEC(RET HA)NDSHAKE
49A. Cybermenaces : COMPU(TER HA)CKERS
58A. How children should be, in a saying : SEEN, BUT NO(T HEAR)D
COMPLETION TIME: 10m 44s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

11. Josh : RIB
"To rib", meaning "to tease", is a term dating back to 1930 and is probably an extension from "poking someone in the ribs".

14. "The Family Circus" cartoonist : KEANE
Bil Keane is a cartoonist most associated with his strip “The Family Circus”. Once Bil sketches out the text and idea for the cartoon, he sends it off to his son Jeff Keane who inks and colors the pictures so that the strip is ready for publication. In the storyline itself, the main characters are based on Bil's own family. In fact, the son "Jeffy" in the story is based on Jeff, Bil's son and production assistant.

15. Corral : PEN IN
“Corral” is the Spanish word for an enclosure for livestock, and is a word we’ve imported into English. Ultimately, the term comes from the Vulgar Latin “currale” meaning “enclosure for carts”, itself coming from “currus”, the Latin for “cart”.

16. Surgeon's org. : AMA
The American Medical Association (AMA) was founded in 1847 at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. The first female member was allowed to join the AMA in 1868, but the first African American members weren't admitted until one hundred years later, in 1968.

17. Yellow-eyed birds of prey : G(REAT H)ORNED OWLS
The Great Horned Owl is a large owl that is native to North and South America. Also called the Tiger Owl, it is the most common true owl in the region.

20. Apple products since 1998 : IMACS
The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an "all-in-one" design, with the computer console and monitor integrated.

21. Solemn column : OBIT
"Obituary" comes from the Latin "obituaris", originally the record of the death of a person, although the literal meaning is "pertaining to death".

28. energystar.gov grp. : EPA
The Energy Star standard was created by the Environmental Protection Agency during the Clinton Administration. In general, an item marked with an Energy Star uses 20-30% less energy than that mandated by federal standards. We just put an Energy Star roof on our house, and I am looking forward to seeing if the home stays cooler this summer.

30. Spectrum start : RED
The number of colors in the visible spectrum is actually infinite because the spectrum is a continuum. However, the human eye can distinguish about 100 different colors in all. The brain tends to divide the rainbow of colors into a smaller number, seven so-called primary colors:
- Red
- Orange
- Yellow
- Green
- Blue
- Indigo
- Violet

34. Dr. Seuss's surname : GEISEL
Dr. Seuss was the pen name of Theodor Seuss Geisel. Geisel was commander of the Animation Department of the USAF during WWII. He was behind many propaganda films including one called "Our Job in Japan". Even though the film was produced specifically as propaganda, this same movie was used after the war as a basis for the short feature "Design for Death", a study of Japanese culture released in 1947 and winner of an Oscar for best Documentary.

44. Counselors' org. : ABA
The American Bar Association (ABA) was founded back in 1878 and is a voluntary association for lawyers and law students. The ABA focuses on setting academic standards for law schools and setting ethical codes for the profession.

57. Hunter in the night sky : ORION
The very recognizable constellation of Orion is of course named after the Greek God Orion, the Hunter. If you take a look at the star in Orion's "right shoulder", the second brightest star in the constellation, you might notice that it is quite red in color. This is the famous star called Betelgeuse, a red supergiant, a huge star that is on its way out. Betelgeuse is expected to explode into a supernova within the next thousand years or so. You don't want to miss that ...

58. How children should be, in a saying : SEEN, BUT NO(T HEAR)D
The expression “children should be seen and not heard” dates back to the 1400s, and back then was very sexist in that it was structured as “a mayde schuld be seen, but not herd”. In other words, a young lady (mayde) should be seen, but not heard. Wow!

65. Eye, to a bard : ORB
Our word “bard” comes from the Old Celtic word “bardos” which means “poet, singer”.

66. Apple products since 2001 : IPODS
The iPod is Apple's signature line of portable media players. The iPod first hit the market in 2001 with a hard drive-based device, now known as the iPod Classic. Later models all use flash memory, allowing a smaller form factor. The smallest of the flash-based models is the iPod Shuffle, which was introduced in 2005.

68. Code-cracking org. : NSA
The National Security Agency (NSA) was set up in 1952 by President Truman, a replacement for the Armed Forces Security Agency that had existed in the Department of Defense since 1949. The NSA has always been clouded in secrecy and even the 1952 letter from President Truman that established the agency was kept under wraps from the public for over a generation. I really like the organization’s nickname ... "No Such Agency".

69. Guitar accessories : CAPOS
A capo is a clamp-like device that is placed around the neck of a guitar to shorten the strings, and hence raise the pitch. The full name, rarely used these days, is "capo tasto", which is Italian for "head tie".

70. Place to schuss : SLOPE
A schuss is a very fast run downhill, not taking any turns to slow the pace of the descent. “Schuss” is a German word for “shot”.

Down
1. Hosp. readout : EKG
An EKG measures electrical activity in the heart. Back in my homeland of Ireland, an EKG is known as an ECG (for electrocardiogram). We use the German name in the US, Elektrokardiogramm, giving us EKG. Apparently the abbreviation EKG is preferred as ECG might be confused (if poorly handwritten, I guess) with EEG, the abbreviation for an electroencephalogram.

2. Gen ___ : XER
The term Generation X originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful publication "Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture". By the latest accepted definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

3. ___ Bo (exercise system) : TAE
Tae Bo isn't an ancient martial art, and rather was developed as a form of aerobic exercise in the 1990s. The discipline was introduced by taekwondo expert Billy Blanks who gave it the name Tae Bo, a melding of "taekwondo" and "boxing".

6. Geologic span : EPOCH
Geologic time is divided into different units which are, starting with the longest:
- Supereons
- Eons
- Eras
- Periods
- Epochs
- Ages
So, supereons can be divided in eons, and eons divided into eras etc.

7. Vice ___ : VERSA
"Vice versa" is a Latin phrase meaning "with position turned". We always pronounce this term "incorrectly". In Latin, a "c" is always a hard sound, and a "v" is pronounced like a "w". The pronunciation should be something like "wee-kay wehr-sa".

12. "My answer was ...," in teen-speak : I’M LIKE
Oh yeah, “I’m like …”, that’s an expression that I just love …

24. Transaction option : CASH
Our word “cash” comes from the Middle French “caisse” meaning “money box”.

25. Unworldly ones : NAIFS
A naïf is someone who is naive, as "naïf" is the French word for "naive".

26. Gauge site, for short : DASH
Back in the 1800s, “dashboard” was the name given to a "board" placed at the front of a carriage to stop mud from "dashing" against the passengers in the carriage, mud that was kicked up by the hoofs of the horses. Quite interesting ...

32. Pre-election ad buyer, maybe : PAC
A Political Action Committee (PAC) is a private group that works to influence the outcome of a particular election or group of elections. Any group becomes a PAC by law when it receives or spends more than $1,000 for the purpose of influencing the outcome of an election.

33. Chaotic situation : SNAFU
SNAFU is an acronym standing for Situation Normal: All Fouled Up (well, that's the "polite" version!). As you might imagine, the term developed in the US Army, during WWII.

34. Crystal-filled rock : GEODE
A geode is a rock in which there is a cavity lined or filled with crystal formations.

36. Southeast Asian tongue : LAO
Lao, the language of Laos, does not use spaces between words (or periods!), although this is apparently changing. Spaces are used between sentences and clauses.

38. Swarming annoyance : GNAT
Gnats are attracted to the smell of rotting food, and to vinegar. Simple homemade traps that use vinegar are often constructed to attract and kill gnats.

39. Major Thai export : RICE
A paddy field is the flooded piece of land used to grow rice. The water reduces competition from weeds allowing the rice to thrive. The word "paddy" has nothing to do with us Irish folk, and is an anglicized version of the word "padi", the Malay name for the rice plant.

40. Late 19th-century anarchist's foe : TSAR
By definition, an anarchist is someone who feels that government is oppressive and should be gotten rid of. Anarchists stood side-by-side with the Bolsheviks in the February Revolution of 1917 that led to the abdication of Tsar Nicholas II and the end of the Russian Empire.

43. Ambulance letters : EMS
Emergency Medical Services (EMS).

Our word “ambulance” originated in the French term “hôpital ambulant” meaning field hospital (literally “walking hospital”). In the 1850s, the term started to be used for a vehicle transporting the wounded from the battlefield, leading to our “ambulance”.

46. Simple creature : AMOEBA
An ameba (or "amoeba" as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek "amoibe", meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

50. Wordplay from Groucho : PUN
Groucho Marx's real name was Julius Henry Marx. By the time Groucho started his successful, post-Hollywood career hosting the quiz show "You Bet Your Life", he was sporting a real mustache. For all his movies, his mustache had been painted on with greasepaint.

51. Sonata finale, often : RONDO
A rondo was often chosen by composers in the classical period for the last movement of a sonata (or symphony or concerto, for that matter). In rondo form there is a principal theme that alternates with a contrasting theme(s). So, the original theme anchors the whole piece in between secondary digressions.

52. ___ Perot : H ROSS
Henry Ross Perot graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1953, as president of his class. Ross Perot served his 4-year commitment but then resigned his commission, apparently having become somewhat disillusioned with the navy.

53. River islet : AIT
Aits are little islands found in a river. Aits aren't formed by erosion, but by the deposition of silt over time. As a result, aits often have a long and narrow shape running parallel to the banks as the sediment builds up with the flow of the water. Many of the islands in the River Thames in England have been given the name "Ait", like Raven's Ait in Kingston-upon-Thames, and Lot's Ait in Brentford.

54. Some Pacific salmon : COHOS
The Coho salmon is silver along the side of its body, but only during the phase of its life while it is in the ocean. When spawning and heading up into a freshwater river, the Coho has bright red sides.

55. Belfry sound : KNELL
The word "knell" is used for a solemn ring from a bell, often associated with death or a funeral. "Knell" comes the Old English "cnell" and is probably imitative in origin, sounding like a peal from a large bell.

59. Razor brand : BIC
Société Bic is a French company, based in Clichy in France. The first product the company produced, more than fifty years ago, was the Bic Cristal ballpoint pen that is still produced today. Bic also makes other disposable products such as lighters and razors.

63. Letters on Halloween decorations : RIP
All Saints' Day is November 1st each year. The day before All Saints' Day is All Hallows Eve, better known by the Scottish term, "Halloween".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Sing the praises of : EXTOL
6. Online party reminder : EVITE
11. Josh : RIB
14. "The Family Circus" cartoonist : KEANE
15. Corral : PEN IN
16. Surgeon's org. : AMA
17. Yellow-eyed birds of prey : G(REAT H)ORNED OWLS
20. Apple products since 1998 : IMACS
21. Solemn column : OBIT
22. Part of a fraternity ritual, perhaps : SEC(RET HA)NDSHAKE
28. energystar.gov grp. : EPA
29. Sound of delight : AAH
30. Spectrum start : RED
31. Traces of smoke : WISPS
34. Dr. Seuss's surname : GEISEL
37. Decision reversal ... or, literally, what can be found inside 17-, 22-, 49- and 58-Across : CHANGE OF HEART
41. Church laws : CANONS
42. Model's asset : POISE
44. Counselors' org. : ABA
47. It's hot, then it's not : FAD
48. Web video gear : CAM
49. Cybermenaces : COMPU(TER HA)CKERS
56. Pants, slangily : TROU
57. Hunter in the night sky : ORION
58. How children should be, in a saying : SEEN, BUT NO(T HEAR)D
65. Eye, to a bard : ORB
66. Apple products since 2001 : IPODS
67. Blast from the past : OLDIE
68. Code-cracking org. : NSA
69. Guitar accessories : CAPOS
70. Place to schuss : SLOPE

Down
1. Hosp. readout : EKG
2. Gen ___ : XER
3. ___ Bo (exercise system) : TAE
4. How elated people walk : ON AIR
5. "I want to try!" : LET ME!
6. Geologic span : EPOCH
7. Vice ___ : VERSA
8. Room offerer : INN
9. Homophone of 3-Down : TIE
10. Maze's goal : END
11. Where to order oysters : RAW BAR
12. "My answer was ...," in teen-speak : I’M LIKE
13. Whacked good : BASTED
18. Magician's prop : HAT
19. Sound of delight : OOH
22. Embroider, e.g. : SEW
23. Movie that might have a cast of thousands : EPIC
24. Transaction option : CASH
25. Unworldly ones : NAIFS
26. Gauge site, for short : DASH
27. Docile sorts : SHEEP
32. Pre-election ad buyer, maybe : PAC
33. Chaotic situation : SNAFU
34. Crystal-filled rock : GEODE
35. Seemingly forever : EON
36. Southeast Asian tongue : LAO
38. Swarming annoyance : GNAT
39. Major Thai export : RICE
40. Late 19th-century anarchist's foe : TSAR
43. Ambulance letters : EMS
44. Pursues, as a tip : ACTS ON
45. Wood-damaging insects : BORERS
46. Simple creature : AMOEBA
50. Wordplay from Groucho : PUN
51. Sonata finale, often : RONDO
52. ___ Perot : H ROSS
53. River islet : AIT
54. Some Pacific salmon : COHOS
55. Belfry sound : KNELL
59. Razor brand : BIC
60. ___ creek : UP A
61. Blouse, e.g. : TOP
62. Hoo-ha : ADO
63. Letters on Halloween decorations : RIP
64. Near-failing mark : DEE

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0226-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Feb 13, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Gary Cee
THEME: Ways to Solve the Puzzle … each of today’s themed answers is a popular song that is also a “way”, a thoroughfare:
17A. Where "we can make it if we run," per Bruce Springsteen (1975) : THUNDER ROAD
24A. Where "the nights are stronger than moonshine," per America (1972) : VENTURA HIGHWAY
37A. Where "all the people that come and go stop and say hello," per the Beatles (1967) : PENNY LANE
52A. Where "we gonna rock down to," per Eddy Grant (1983) : ELECTRIC AVENUE
61A. Where "you'll drink the night away and forget about everything," per Gerry Rafferty (1978) : BAKER STREET
COMPLETION TIME: 08m 58s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Sporty car introduced in '55 : T-BIRD
Ford manufactured the Thunderbird (T-Bird) from 1955 to 2005, originally as a two-seater sporty convertible.

6. Italian lawn bowling : BOCCI
I’ve had the privilege of seeing bocce played in Europe, and have never seen it played on grass. I thought it was always played on dirt or some similar surface.

The Italian bowling game of “bocce” (anglicized as “bocci”) is based on a game played in Ancient Rome. “Bocce” is the plural of the Italian word "boccia" meaning "bowl".

11. Urgent dispatch : SOS
The combination of three dots - three dashes - three dots, is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots - pause - three dashes - pause - three dots), although in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so SOS is in effect only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases "Save Our Souls" and "Save Our Ship" are also mnemonics, introduced after the "SOS" signal was adopted.

14. Alaska's ___ Peninsula : KENAI
The Kenai Peninsula juts out into the Gulf of Alaska from Alaska’s southern coast. The Kenai Peninsula is home to several towns, including Homer, Alaska. Home is nicknamed “the end of the road” as it is a terminus for North America’s paved highway system.

15. Hank with the retired #44 : AARON
The great Hank Aaron has many claims to fame. One notable fact is that he was last major league baseball player to have also played in the Negro League.

16. Tax season busy bee, for short : CPA
Back in 1913, “Tax Day” was March 1st, and this was moved to March 15th in 1918. We’ve been filing returns by April 15th since 1955.

17. Where "we can make it if we run," per Bruce Springsteen (1975) : THUNDER ROAD
“Thunder Road” is the first track on Bruce Springsteen’s 1975 album “Born to Run”.

22. Tennessee ___ : TITANS
The Tennessee Titans are a football team based in Nashville. The team relocated to Nashville from Houston in 1997, and was called the Tennessee Oilers for two seasons, before adopting the “Titans” moniker.

24. Where "the nights are stronger than moonshine," per America (1972) : VENTURA HIGHWAY
“Ventura Highway” is a 1972 song by the band America. The lyrics “Ventura Highway” contain the phrase “purple rain”, a phrase which was to become famous as the title of a song, album and film by Prince. It has been suggested that Prince “lifted” the title for his hit from the America song.

28. Before, to Kipling : ERE
Rudyard Kipling was a British poet and writer famous for his tales of the British Raj, the rule of the British Empire in India. Kipling was actually born in Bombay, but returned with his family to England when he was very young. After being educated in England, he returned to India and from there traveled the world. Kipling’s most famous works are the stories “The Jungle Book”, “Just So Stories”, “The Man Who Would Be King”, and the poems “Mandalay”, “Gunga Din” and “If-”.

31. Dry Italian wine : SOAVE
Soave is a dry white wine produced in the area around the city of Verona in northeast Italy.

34. Bit of Indian music : RAGA
Raga isn't really a type of music, but has been described as the "tonal framework" in which Indian classical music is composed. Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous raga virtuoso (to us Westerners).

37. Where "all the people that come and go stop and say hello," per the Beatles (1967) : PENNY LANE
When in their teens, Paul McCartney and John Lennon would often head into the center of Liverpool together on the bus. The convenient place for them to meet was at the end of Penny Lane. Years later, Paul McCartney wrote the song “Penny Lane”, which was a big hit in 1967. “Penny Lane” was released as a double A-side record with "Strawberry Fields Forever" penned by John Lennon. Coincidentally, Strawberry Field was also a real location, not far from Penny Lane in Liverpool. Strawberry Field was a Salvation Army Children's Home in the garden of which Lennon would play as a child. I don't think Lennon and McCartney ever really forgot their roots …

47. Figure in the tale of Jason and the Argonauts : HELLE
In Greek mythology, Helle and Phrixus were a twin sister and brother who appeared in the story of Jason and the Argonauts. Phrixus was set to be sacrificed, but instead he and Helle were rescued by a flying golden ram dispatched by their mother. Helle fell off the back of the flying ram to her death, but Phrixus survived and took the golden fleece from the ram. It was this Golden Fleece that Jason sought with his Argonauts.

52. Where "we gonna rock down to," per Eddy Grant (1983) : ELECTRIC AVENUE
There's an unusually named street in the Brixton area of London: Electric Avenue. The street name inspired reggae song from the eighties called “Electric Avenue” written and sung by Eddy Grant. It was to be Grant’s only number one record, but a fun one, I think …

57. One of the Bobbsey twins : NAN
The “Bobbsey Twins” series of children’s novels was first written by Edward Stratemeyer in 1904. Stratemeyer used the pseudonym Laura Lee Hope, as did subsequent authors who wrote 72 books in the series between 1904 and 1979. The title characters were two sets of fraternal twins, one called Bert and Nan (who were 12) and the other called Flossie and Freddie (who were 6).

61. Where "you'll drink the night away and forget about everything," per Gerry Rafferty (1978) : BAKER STREET
Gerry Rafferty’s song 1978 “Baker Street” was inspired by Rafferty’s early days busking in Baker Street underground station in London. The song includes a fabulous saxophone solo that had a remarkable impact on the use of the saxophone in popular music. Saxophone sales jumped after the record was released, as did the use of the instrument in television advertising, giving rise to the term “the Baker Street Phenomenon”. What is perhaps even more remarkable is that the solo was originally intended for the guitar. On the day of the recording, the guitarist contracted for the solo didn’t turn up, so sax player Raphael Ravenscroft said that he could fill in and play the theme on the saxophone.

65. "Peer Gynt" widow : ASE
"Ase's Death" is a movement in Edvard Grieg's beautiful "Peer Gynt" suite. The suite is a collection of incidental music that Grieg composed for Ibsen's play of the same name. Ase is the widow of a peasant, and the mother of Peer Gynt.

66. Anti-Parkinson's prescription : L-DOPA
L-3,4-DihydrOxyPhenylAlanine, thankfully can be shortened to L-DOPA. Swedish scientist Arvid Carlsson won a Nobel Prize for showing that L-DOPA could be used to reduce the symptoms of Parkinson's Syndrome.

67. Dark wood : EBONY
Ebony is a dark black wood that is very dense, one of the few types of wood that sinks in water. Ebony has been in high demand so the species of trees yielding the wood are now considered threatened. It is in such short supply that unscrupulous vendors have been known to darken lighter woods with shoe polish to look like ebony, so be warned …

68. "Hannah and ___ Sisters" : HER
“Hannah and Her Sisters” is a 1986 comedy-drama film that was written and directed by Woody Allen. Hannah is played by Mia Farrow, and Hannah’s two sisters are played by Barbara Hershey and Dianne Wiest.

Down
1. Times Square sign shown in lowercase letters : TKTS
The “tkts” booths sell discount theater tickets in Times Square in New York and in the West End of London.

3. Unborn : IN UTERO
"In utero" is a Latin term meaning "in the uterus". The Latin "uterus" translates as both "womb" and "belly". The Latin word was derived from the Greek "hystera" also meaning womb, which gives us the words "hysterectomy", and "hysterical".

6. Singer Streisand : BARBRA
Barbra Streisand has recorded 31 top-ten albums since 1963, more than any other female recording artist. In fact, she has had an album in the top ten for the last five decades, a rare achievement in itself.

7. Trireme implement : OAR
Triremes were galleys used in the Mediterranean by a number of cultures, including the Ancient Greeks and Romans. The trireme was so called because there were three rows of oars on each side of the vessel. The term “trireme” comes from the Latin “tres remi” meaning “three-oar”. There was also a less ambitious version of the trireme that had only two banks of oars, and that was known as a bireme.

8. ___-Magnon man : CRO
Remains of early man, dating back to 35,000 years ago, were found in Abri de Cro-Magnon in southwest France, giving the name to those early humans. Cro-Magnon remains are the oldest human relics that have been discovered in Europe.

9. Raccoon relative : COATI
A coati is a member of the raccoon family and is also known as the Brazilian aardvark, or the snookum bear. The coati is native to Central and South America, but can also be found in the southwest of the United States.

18. Liquide clair : EAU
In French, water (eau) is a clear liquid (liquide clair).

25. Kind of tide : NEAP
Tides of course are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon's effect. At spring tide, the sun and the moon's gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

26. Plexiglas, e.g. : ACRYLIC
Acrylic glass is an alternative name for the transparent thermoplastic poly(methyl methacrylate). Acrylic glass was put on the market in 1933 as Plexiglas, and since then has been sold as Lucite and Perspex.

32. 20 Questions category : VEGETABLE
Animal, vegetable or mineral … or abstract.

33. Musician Brian : ENO
Brian Eno started out his musical career with Roxy Music. However, Eno's most oft-played composition (by far!) is Microsoft's "start-up jingle", the 6-second sound you hear when the Windows operating system is booting up. Eno might have annoyed the Microsoft folks when he stated on a BBC radio show:
I wrote it on a Mac. I’ve never used a PC in my life; I don’t like them.

35. Petrol : GAS
Petrol is of course the same thing as gasoline. “Petrol” comes via French from the Latin “petroleum”, itself derived from “petra” meaning “rock” and “oleum” meaning “oil”.

38. "Avatar" people : NAVI
I went to the 3D version of "Avatar" when I saw it for the first time. That really is the only way to see such a movie!

40. Overthrown ruler of 1979 : THE SHAH
The last Shah of Iran was Mohammed-Reza Shah Pahlavi, as he was overthrown in the revolution led by the Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979. The post-revolution government sought the extradition of the Shah back to Iran while he was in the United States seeking medical care (he had cancer). His prolonged stay in the United States, recovering from surgery, caused some unrest back in Iran and resentment towards the United States. Some say that this precipitated the storming of the US Embassy in Tehran and the resulting hostage crisis.

41. Comic actor Dom : DELUISE
Dom DeLuise was of course a talented comic actor, and an avid cook. DeLuise wrote several books on cooking and appeared regularly on radio cooking shows. He also wrote a few children's books.

46. Former Supreme Court justice often seen in a bow tie : STEVENS
John Paul Stevens retired as an associate justice on the US Supreme Court in 2010 after having served for over 34 years. That made him the third longest serving justice in the history of the court. Stevens had been nominated by President Gerald Ford to replace Justice William O. Douglas, who had been the longest serving justice in the court (at over 36 years).

48. Calculator screen abbr. : LCD
Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) are the screens that are found in most laptops today, and in flat panel computer screens and some televisions. LCD monitors basically replaced Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) screens, the old television technology.

50. American avant-gardist : MAN RAY
Man Ray was an American modernist artist who spent most of his working life in Paris. Man Ray was born in South Philadelphia in 1890, and his real name was Emmanuel Radnitzky. His family adopted the name “Ray” in response to the anti-Semitic feeling that was prevalent at the time. Emmanuel was known as “Manny”, and he decided to assume the name Man Ray and use it for his work.

People described as being avant-garde are especially innovative. "Avant-garde" is French for “advance guard”.

54. ___ deferens : VAS
The vasa deferentia are the ducts that carry sperm into the urethra during ejaculation. In a vasectomy, the vasa deferentia are cut and the ends tied to prevent sperm from reaching the urethra.

63. Org. that monitors oil spills : EPA
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was set up during the Nixon administration and began operation at the end of 1970.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Sporty car introduced in '55 : T-BIRD
6. Italian lawn bowling : BOCCI
11. Urgent dispatch : SOS
14. Alaska's ___ Peninsula : KENAI
15. Hank with the retired #44 : AARON
16. Tax season busy bee, for short : CPA
17. Where "we can make it if we run," per Bruce Springsteen (1975) : THUNDER ROAD
19. Spanish king : REY
20. Grabbed a chair : SAT
21. Take captive : NAB
22. Tennessee ___ : TITANS
24. Where "the nights are stronger than moonshine," per America (1972) : VENTURA HIGHWAY
28. Before, to Kipling : ERE
29. Pass perfectly : ACE
30. "For real!" : NO LIE!
31. Dry Italian wine : SOAVE
34. Bit of Indian music : RAGA
36. The class of '13 in '13, e.g. : SRS
37. Where "all the people that come and go stop and say hello," per the Beatles (1967) : PENNY LANE
40. N.F.L. scores : TDS
43. Finish line : GOAL
44. Doesn't budge : STAYS
47. Figure in the tale of Jason and the Argonauts : HELLE
49. Pep : VIM
51. Corruption : ROT
52. Where "we gonna rock down to," per Eddy Grant (1983) : ELECTRIC AVENUE
56. Dessert that may include a banana : SUNDAE
57. One of the Bobbsey twins : NAN
58. Campers' campers, for short : RVS
60. Stashed away : HID
61. Where "you'll drink the night away and forget about everything," per Gerry Rafferty (1978) : BAKER STREET
65. "Peer Gynt" widow : ASE
66. Anti-Parkinson's prescription : L-DOPA
67. Dark wood : EBONY
68. "Hannah and ___ Sisters" : HER
69. Homework assignment : ESSAY
70. Lightly wash : RINSE

Down
1. Times Square sign shown in lowercase letters : TKTS
2. Doesn't act up : BEHAVES
3. Unborn : IN UTERO
4. Bolted : RAN
5. Failed to : DIDN’T
6. Singer Streisand : BARBRA
7. Trireme implement : OAR
8. ___-Magnon man : CRO
9. Raccoon relative : COATI
10. Huffy : INDIGNANT
11. Doctors' signatures, stereotypically : SCRAWLS
12. Lacking a roof : OPEN-AIR
13. Agrees : SAYS YES
18. Liquide clair : EAU
23. Yet, informally : THO’
25. Kind of tide : NEAP
26. Plexiglas, e.g. : ACRYLIC
27. Recover from a break, say : HEAL
32. 20 Questions category : VEGETABLE
33. Musician Brian : ENO
35. Petrol : GAS
38. "Avatar" people : NAVI
39. Merit : EARN
40. Overthrown ruler of 1979 : THE SHAH
41. Comic actor Dom : DELUISE
42. Fat's opposite : SLENDER
45. "It's a deal!" : YOU’RE ON
46. Former Supreme Court justice often seen in a bow tie : STEVENS
48. Calculator screen abbr. : LCD
50. American avant-gardist : MAN RAY
53. Enjoys literature : READS
54. ___ deferens : VAS
55. Step inside : ENTER
59. Eye irritation : STYE
62. Ring wallops, informally : KOS
63. Org. that monitors oil spills : EPA
64. Baseball stat : RBI

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0225-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 25 Feb 13, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Angela Olson Halsted
THEME: The Need for Speed … each of today’s themed answers ends with a “speedy” synonym:
17A. Iced tea brand : LIPTON BRISK
27A. Observance prescribed in the Book of Esther : THREE-DAY FAST
47A. It's headquartered at Naval Station Pearl Harbor : PACIFIC FLEET
62A. Country singer with the 2012 #1 hit "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" : TAYLOR SWIFT
COMPLETION TIME: 07m 50s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Open-air rooms : ATRIA
In modern architecture an atrium is a large open space, often in the center of a building and extending upwards to the roof. The original atrium was an open court in the center of an Ancient Roman house. One could access most of the enclosed rooms of the house from the atrium.

15. Chili ingredients : BEANS
The full name of the dish that is often called simply "chili" is "chili con carne", Spanish for "peppers with meat". The dish was first created by immigrants from the Spanish Canary Islands in the city of San Antonio, Texas (a city which the islanders founded). The San Antonio Chili Stand was a popular attraction at the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, and that stand introduced the dish to the rest of America and to the world.

17. Iced tea brand : LIPTON BRISK
Sir Thomas Lipton was a grocer in Glasgow, Scotland. He founded a tea packing company in North America in 1893 in Hoboken, New Jersey. He was very successful as his blends of tea became popular in the US. Despite the Lipton roots in the UK, Lipton black tea isn’t available there, so I’ve always thought of it as an American brand.

19. Mom's forte, in brief : TLC
Tender loving care (TLC).

20. Greets the Red Sox at Yankee Stadium, say : BOOS
Yankee Stadium in the Bronx in New York City cost $1.5m to construct, making it the most expensive baseball stadium ever built.

21. Young's partner in accounting : ERNST
Ernst & Young is one of the Big Four accountancy firms, alongside Deloitte, KPMG and PricewaterhouseCoopers. Ernst & Young is headquartered in London.

22. "Cheers" actress Perlman : RHEA
Rhea Perlman's most famous role has to be "Carla Tortelli", the irascible waitress in the long-running sitcom "Cheers". Perlman is also a successful children's author and has published a series of six books called "Otto Undercover". She is of course married to Hollywood actor Danny DeVito, and has been so since 1982. I was saddened to hear not too long ago that Perlman and DeVito are splitting up.

23. Canadian capital : OTTAWA
Ottawa is the second largest city in the Province of Ontario (after Toronto) and is the capital city of Canada. The name “Ottawa” comes from an Algonquin word “adawe” which means “to trade”.

35. An "A" in N.C.A.A.: Abbr. : ASSN
The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) dates back to the Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt. When his son broke his nose playing football at Harvard, President Roosevelt turned his attention to the number of serious injuries and even deaths occurring in college sports. He instigated meetings between the major educational institutions leading to the formation of the Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States (IAAUS) in 1906, which was given the remit of regulating college sports. The IAAUS became the NCAA in 1910.

36. Old-time actress Dolores : DEL RIO
Dolores del Rio was a Mexican film actress of the silent era, when she was regarded as the female counterpart of Rudolph Valentino. She was a remarkably beautiful woman.

39. BlackBerry or iPod Touch, for short : PDA
A device like perhaps an iPhone, Droid, or Treo can be termed a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA).

44. Ye ___ Shoppe : OLDE
The word "olde" wasn't actually used much earlier than the 1920s. "Olde" was introduced to give a quaint antique feel to brand names, shop names etc.

47. It's headquartered at Naval Station Pearl Harbor : PACIFIC FLEET
The US Navy fleet is the largest in world, by far. The US Navy’s battle fleet tonnage is greater than that of the next 13 largest navies combined. The second largest navy belongs to China, and the third to Russia.

50. Al of auto racing : UNSER
The Unser family seems to have racing cars in its blood. Al Unser, Sr. won the Indy 500 on four occasions. Al’s brother Jerry was the first of the Unsers to compete at Indianapolis. Al’s other brother Bobby, won the Indy three times. Al’s son, Al Junior, won the Indy twice. Al Junior’s son is also a racing driver who competes at the Indy Speedway.

51. Actor Brendan of "Journey to the Center of the Earth" : FRASER
Brendan Fraser is a Canadian-American actor (both parents are Canadian), born in Indianapolis, Indiana. Fraser was inducted into Canada’s Walk of Fame in 2006, the first American-born actor to be so honored.

“Journey to the Center of the Earth” is a 2008 screen adaptation of the classic novel of the same name by Jules Verne. Star of the film is Brendan Fraser.

57. ___ cuisine : HAUTE
"Haute cuisine", literally "high cooking" in French, is the name given to skillfully and elegantly prepared food, especially if it is in the French style.

61. Israeli-made weapon : UZI
The first Uzi submachine gun was designed in the late 1940s by Major Uziel Gal of the Israel Defense Forces who gave his name to the gun.

62. Country singer with the 2012 #1 hit "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" : TAYLOR SWIFT
Singer Taylor Swift had one of her first gigs at the US Open tennis tournament when she was in her early teens. There she sang the national anthem and received a lot of favorable attention for the performance.

64. Imus of "Imus in the Morning" : DON
Don Imus's syndicated radio show "Imus in the Morning" broadcasts from New York City.

65. Literary device much used by O. Henry : IRONY
O. Henry was the pen name of writer William Sydney Porter from Greensboro, North Carolina. O. Henry is famous for his witty short stories that have a clever twist in the tail.

68. Ferber and Krabappel : EDNAS
Edna Ferber won the Pulitzer for her novel "So Big", which was made into a film a few times, most famously in 1953 starring Jane Wyman.

In “the Simpsons” television show, Bart Simpson’s teacher is Edna Krabappel.

Down
1. ___ Baggins of "The Hobbit" : BILBO
Bilbo Baggins is the main character in Tolkien's "The Hobbit", and a character who features in "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy.

6. E.g., e.g. : ABBR
The Latin “exempli gratia” means “for the sake of example”, and we use it all the time in English. The term is almost always shortened to “e.g.”

7. Slender shorebird : TERN
Terns are seabirds that are found all over the world. The Arctic Tern makes a very long-distance migration. One Arctic Tern that was tagged as a chick in Great Britain in the summer of 1982, was spotted in Melbourne, Australia just three months later. The bird had traveled over 14,000 miles in over those three months, an average of about 150 miles a day. Remarkable …

10. "Don't ___, don't tell" (bygone military policy) : ASK
The official US policy on gays serving on the military from 1993 to 2011 was known as “don’t ask, don’t tell”. In effect, this policy outlawed discrimination against closeted gay service members while at the same time barring openly gay persons from serving in the military. Unauthorized investigations of suspected gay servicemen and servicewomen led to the policy being extended to “don’t ask, don’t tell, don’t pursue, don’t harass”. “Don’t ask, don’t tell” was repealed in 2011.

12. Singer Nat King ___ : COLE
Nat King Cole's real name was Nathaniel Adams Coles. Cole made television history in 1956 when his own show debuted on NBC, a first for an African-American. Cole couldn't pick up a national sponsor, so in order to save money and possibly save the show, many guest artists worked for no fee at all - the likes of Ella Fitzgerald, Harry Belafonte and Peggy Lee. The show survived for a year, but eventually Nat King Cole had to pull the plug on it himself.

13. Service org. for females : YWCA
The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) was founded in the late 1800s about 50 years after the YMCA, although the two organizations have always been independent of each other. Having said that, some YWCA and YMCA organizations have amalgamated at the local level and often share facilities. The YWCA is quite the organization, and is the largest women's group in the whole world.

22. Remington product : RIFLE
Remington Arms Company was founded way back, in 1816. That makes Remington the oldest continuously operating manufacturer in North America. It is also the oldest company in the US still making its original product.

26. Hearty-flavored brew : RYE BEER
Rye beer is a beer in which some or all of the barley malt is replaced by malted rye.

31. Peter of reggae : TOSH
Peter Tosh was a musician from Jamaica, a member of the Wailers reggae band. Sadly, Tosh was murdered in a home invasion and extortion attempt in 1987.

33. Author Jaffe : RONA
Rona Jaffe was an American novelist perhaps most famous for two of her books, "The Best of Everything" and "Mazes and Monsters". "The Best of Everything" was published in 1958 and has been compared with the HBO television series "Sex and the City" as it depicts women in the working world. "Mazes and Monsters" was published in 1981 and explores a role-playing game similar to Dungeons & Dragons and the impact it has on players.

43. Blockbuster Bruce Willis movie : DIE HARD
The original “Die Hard” movie was released in 1988 and is based on a 1979 novel by Roderick Thorp called “Nothing Lasts Forever”. In turn, “Nothing Lasts Forever” was a sequel to another Thorp novel, called “The Detective”. “The Detective” was adapted into a movie of the same name released in 1968 and starring Frank Sinatra in the lead role.

49. Taipei's land : TAIWAN
"Taipei" translates from Chinese as "Northern Taiwan City" and indeed is situated at the northern tip of the island of Taiwan.

53. "The Hunger Games" chaperon : EFFIE
“The Hunger Games” is a 2008 novel by Suzanne Collins, the first in a trilogy of titles that also includes “Catching Fire” (2009) and “Mockingjay” (2010). “The Hunger Games” was adapted into a very successful movie released in 2012, and I am sure more are coming ...

55. Cousin of karate : JUDO
Judo is a martial art from Japan that was developed relatively recently, in 1882. The name “judo” translates as “gentle way”.

56. Shirt brand that once had a crocodile symbol : IZOD
Jack Izod was a tailor of some repute over in England, producing shirts for King George V as well as other members of the Royal Family. As Izod was about to retire, he was approached for the use of his name by an American clothing manufacturer based in New York. The brand Izod of London was introduced to America in 1938.

58. Humerus neighbor : ULNA
The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the "thumb-side" of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the "pinkie-side".

The humerus is the long bone in the upper arm.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. ___ one's time (waits patiently) : BIDES
6. Open-air rooms : ATRIA
11. Slippery, as winter roads : ICY
14. Perfect : IDEAL
15. Chili ingredients : BEANS
16. This instant : NOW
17. Iced tea brand : LIPTON BRISK
19. Mom's forte, in brief : TLC
20. Greets the Red Sox at Yankee Stadium, say : BOOS
21. Young's partner in accounting : ERNST
22. "Cheers" actress Perlman : RHEA
23. Canadian capital : OTTAWA
25. Spine-tingling : EERIE
27. Observance prescribed in the Book of Esther : THREE-DAY FAST
32. Provide with guns : ARM
35. An "A" in N.C.A.A.: Abbr. : ASSN
36. Old-time actress Dolores : DEL RIO
37. Where an ocean and a continent meet : COAST
39. BlackBerry or iPod Touch, for short : PDA
41. Toots of a horn : BEEPS
42. "... better left ___" : UNSAID
44. Ye ___ Shoppe : OLDE
46. Baseball bat wood : ASH
47. It's headquartered at Naval Station Pearl Harbor : PACIFIC FLEET
50. Al of auto racing : UNSER
51. Actor Brendan of "Journey to the Center of the Earth" : FRASER
55. Leave at the altar, say : JILT
57. ___ cuisine : HAUTE
60. The "I" of F.Y.I., for short : INFO
61. Israeli-made weapon : UZI
62. Country singer with the 2012 #1 hit "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together" : TAYLOR SWIFT
64. Imus of "Imus in the Morning" : DON
65. Literary device much used by O. Henry : IRONY
66. "Imus in the Morning" medium : RADIO
67. Poem of praise : ODE
68. Ferber and Krabappel : EDNAS
69. Look of disdain : SNEER

Down
1. ___ Baggins of "The Hobbit" : BILBO
2. Birdbrain : IDIOT
3. Commercial word after Home or Office : DEPOT
4. Persistently aggravates : EATS AT
5. ___-mo (instant replay technique) : SLO
6. E.g., e.g. : ABBR
7. Slender shorebird : TERN
8. Lifted : RAISED
9. As an alternative : INSTEAD
10. "Don't ___, don't tell" (bygone military policy) : ASK
11. Close by : IN THE AREA
12. Singer Nat King ___ : COLE
13. Service org. for females : YWCA
18. Gets closer : NEARS
22. Remington product : RIFLE
24. Hypotheticals : WHAT-IFS
26. Hearty-flavored brew : RYE BEER
28. Clairvoyant's skill, for short : ESP
29. "It's the ___ the world ..." : END OF
30. Small tastes : SIPS
31. Peter of reggae : TOSH
32. Smallish bra size : A-CUP
33. Author Jaffe : RONA
34. Like a he-man : MASCULINE
38. Matthew, Mark, Luke or John : SAINT
40. Every last one : ALL
43. Blockbuster Bruce Willis movie : DIE HARD
45. Put off until later : DEFER
48. Kid's coloring implement : CRAYON
49. Taipei's land : TAIWAN
52. Nasty, as a remark : SNIDE
53. "The Hunger Games" chaperon : EFFIE
54. Helicopter blade : ROTOR
55. Cousin of karate : JUDO
56. Shirt brand that once had a crocodile symbol : IZOD
58. Humerus neighbor : ULNA
59. Santa's bagful : TOYS
62. Make a knot in : TIE
63. Former jrs. : SRS

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0224-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 24 Feb 13, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Joe DiPietro
THEME: I Surrender! … each of today’s themed clues reads “Back down”. Each themed answer is then a phrase meaning “back down” that is written in the grid backwards, with a turn downwards:
22A. Back down : BEAT A HASTY RETREAT
24A. Back down : CAPITULATE
43A. Back down : HEAD FOR THE HILLS
53A. Back down : PULL OUT
65A. Back down : LOSE ONE'S NERVE
82A. Back down : WITHDRAW
90A. Back down : GIVE SOME GROUND
112A. Back down : CRY UNCLE
115A. Back down : WAVE THE WHITE FLAG
COMPLETION TIME: 46m 20s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … PALTERS (patters), ELIAS (Etias!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Best-selling author who served as a nurse in the Civil War : ALCOTT
The author Louisa May Alcott was raised in Massachusetts. She had quite an education and received lessons from Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Margaret Fuller, all of whom were friends of her family. Alcott’s first book was Flower Fables (1849), which he wrote for Ralph Waldo Emerson’s daughter. The Alcott family were part of the Underground Railroad that helped and housed fugitive slaves. During the Civil War, Alcott worked for a while as a nurse in the Union Hospital in Georgetown, D.C. Her most famous novels are unofficially known as the “Little Women” trilogy, namely “Little Women”, “Little Men” and “Jo’s Boys”.

20. Fever cause : MALARIA
Malaria is a disease passed onto humans by mosquitoes. As a result of the disease, a parasite invades human red blood cells and multiplies causing fever and possibly coma or death. Over 750,000 people died from malaria in 2009, out of 225 million cases reported.

27. Card game declaration : MELD
“Meld” is a term used in several card games, including Pinochle, Canasta and Gin. A meld is a set of matching cards that earn points for a player.

28. Show off one's "guns" : FLEX
“Guns” is a slang term for the biceps.

29. Some seen in mirrors? : ARS
There are three letters R (ar) in the words “mirrors”.

33. Humdinger : PIP
A “humdinger” or a “pip” is someone or something outstanding. Humdinger is American slang dating back to the early 1900s, originally used to describe a particularly attractive woman.

38. Mrs. Miniver's husband in "Mrs. Miniver" : CLEM
“Mrs Miniver” is a 1942 movie starring Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon that is based on a 1940 book of the same name by Jan Struther. The book itself is actually a compilation of newspaper columns that Struther wrote for “The Times” of London. The columns were reflections of daily life in the run up to WWII as seen through the eyes of the fictional “Mrs. Miniver”. When the film was completed, President Roosevelt intervened and had it rushed to theaters as he believed it would help convince the American people that the US needed to intervene in the war raging in Europe.

48. Quarters used in Greenland : IGLOO
The Inuit word for "house" is "iglu", which we usually write as "igloo". The Greenlandic (yes, that's a language) word for "house" is very similar: "igdlo".

50. Kegler's org. : PBA
PBA: the Professional Bowlers Association.

A “kegler” is a person who plays ten-pin bowling. “Kegel” is a German word for “bowling pin”.

51. Honeyed drink : MEAD
Mead is a lovely drink, made from fermented honey and water.

54. Detour signalers : PYLONS
Pylon is another word for a traffic cone.

56. The left, informally : LIBS
The concept of left-right politics started in France during the French Revolution. When members of France's National Assembly convened in 1789, supporters of the King sat to the President's right, and supporters of the revolution to the President's left. The political term's "left" and "right" were then coined in the local media and have been used ever since.

58. Parts of galaxies : NEBULAE
In astronomical terms a nebula is a cloud of dust and ionized gases (“nebula” is the Latin for “cloud”). Many nebulae form as gases collapse in on themselves under the influence of enormous gravitational forces. Ultimately these collapses can result in the creation of new stars.

60. Siberian city : OMSK
Omsk is a city in southwest Siberia. It is located over 1400 miles from Moscow and was chosen as the destination for many internal exiles in the mid-1900s. Perhaps the most famous of these exiles was the author Fyodor Dostoyevsky.

61. Jacket decoration : EPAULET
Epaulet (or epaulette) comes from the French, and literally means "little shoulder".

72. Joint committee? : STONERS
Stoner is a slang term for someone who is habitually intoxicated by alcohol or drugs.

77. Talks without sincerity : PALTERS
“To palter” is to talk or act insincerely. The term can also mean “to quibble”, as in negotiating a deal.

86. Pascal's law : LOI
In France, a gendarme (police officer) enforces the loi (law).

Blaise Pascal was an important French mathematician and physicist, who lived in the mid-1600s. In math, his name was given to Pascal's triangle, a triangle of numbers in which each number is the sum of the two numbers above it.

87. Ball partner : ARNAZ
Lucille Ball was at the height of her success while she was married to Desi Arnaz. Lucy had several miscarriages before she gave birth to her first child (Lucie) in 1951, just one month before her fortieth birthday. A year and a half later, while "I Love Lucy" was garnering large audiences, she became pregnant with her second child (Desi, Jr.), a pregnancy that was written into the television show's script. In fact, the day that Lucy gave birth on the show was the same day that she gave birth in real life.

94. Father of Phobos : ARES
The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of blood-lust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos, Deimos and Eros.

95. "Welcome Back, Kotter" guy : VINNIE
“Welcome Back, Kotter” was a sitcom from the late seventies. The title character was a teacher at Buchanan High, one Gabe Kotter who himself had attended the school as a student. Kotter was played by Gabe Kaplan. One of the prominent students in his class Vinnie Barbarino played by a young John Travolta, a role that launched his film career. In recent years you might have seen Gabe Kaplan as co-host of the popular show "High Stakes Poker" on GSN.

97. La ___ Tar Pits : BREA
The La Brea Tar Pits are located right in the heart of the city of Los Angeles. At the site there is a constant flow of tar that seeps up to the surface from underground, a phenomenon that has been around for tens of thousands of years. What is significant is that much of the seeping tar is covered by water. Over many, many centuries animals came to the water to drink and became trapped in the tar as they entered the water to quench their thirsts. The tar then preserved the bones of the dead animals. Today a museum is located right by the Tar Pits, recovering bones and displaying specimens of the animals found there. It's well worth a visit if you are in town …

103. Company making arrangements, for short : FTD
Back in 1910, fifteen florists from around America agreed to fulfill each other's orders using the telegraph system, setting up what they called the Florists' Telegraph Delivery. The concept grew so large that in 1965 the group started to offer international service, and changed its name to Florists' Transworld Delivery (FTD).

105. PBS has a big one : BIRD
The Public Broadcasting System (PBS) was founded in 1970, and is my favorite of the broadcast networks. I love PBS's drama and science shows in particular, and always watch the election results coming in with the NewsHour team. PBS’s Big Bird from “Sesame Street” made a bit of a splash in the last election cycle …

109. Winged : ALAR
"Alar" means "wing-shaped", and comes from the Latin word "alaris" meaning "wing".

111. Big name in '60s peace activism : ONO
John Lennon and Yoko Ono married at the height of the Vietnam War in 1969. The couple decided to use the inevitable publicity surrounding their wedding and honeymoon to promote peace in the world. They honeymooned in the Presidential Suite of the Amsterdam Hilton, inviting the world’s press to join them and to witness their “bed-in”. They spent the week talking about peace, and an end to war. The marriage and bed-in is chronicled by the Beatles in their song “The Ballad of John and Yoko”.

112. Back down : CRY UNCLE
The term “uncle”, meaning “stop, I quit”, is a very North American expression. It has been around since the early 1900s but I couldn't unearth its etymology.

115. Back down : WAVE THE WHITE FLAG
The use of a white flag is recognized as a request for a ceasefire or negotiation. As it is usually the weaker party who wants to initiate negotiation, it is also seen as a sign of surrender.

118. Sheen, in Sheffield : LUSTRE
Sheffield is a city in the north of England, in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Sheffield is famous for its production of steel, for being the setting of the film “The Full Monty” … and for being home to my alma mater, the University of Sheffield!

120. Like some oil refineries : YEMENI
Yemen is located on the Arabian Peninsula, lying just south of Saudi Arabia and west of Oman. Yemen is the only state on the peninsula that is a republic (its official name is the Republic of Yemen). Everyone over the age of 18 gets to vote, but only Muslims can hold elected office.

122. Mark, e.g. : GOSPEL
The Gospel of Mark is the second book of the New Testament in the Bible. According to tradition, the gospel was written by Mark the Evanglist, who was a companion to the apostle Peter.

123. Boxer nicknamed "Hands of Stone" : DURAN
Roberto Durán is a retired professional boxer from Panama. He earned the nickname “Manos de Piedra” (Hands of Stone) during his very successful career. Durán retired in 2001 after being involved in a car crash which required life-saving surgery.

Down
5. Four-time baseball All-Star Jose : REYES
José Reyes plays shortstop for the Toronto Blue jays. Reyes is from the Dominican Republic. He is also a “reggaeton” musician and even owns his own record label called EL7 Music.

7. "Is Your Mama a ___?" (children's book) : LLAMA
“Is Your Mama a Llama?” is a children’s book by Steven Kellogg.

11. It's left on a keyboard : TAB
Like most features on our computer keyboards, the tab key is a hangover from the days of typewriters. When using a typewriter, making entries into a table was very tedious as it involved lots of tapping on the spacebar and backspace key. So, a lever was added to typewriters that allowed the operator to "jump" across the page to positions that could be set by hand. Later this was simplified to a tab key, which could be depressed causing the carriage to jump to the next tab stop in much the same way that the modern tab key works on a computer.

12. Loudly lament : ULULATE
A ululation is a high-pitched trill, a sound usually practiced by women in ritual situations. I came across the practice not too long ago as an expression of celebration at an Arab-American wedding.

13. Dos but not don'ts : NOTES
The solfa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

14. Mars candy : TWIX
I remember Twix bars from way back in 1967 when they were introduced in the British Isles. Twix bars made it to the US over a decade later, in 1979.

16. Miss ___ : USA
The Miss USA beauty pageant was founded in 1952 in order to select the American candidate for the Miss Universe competition.

32. "The Hostage" playwright, 1958 : BEHAN
Brendan Behan was an Irish writer and playwright. His most famous work is probably "Borstal Boy", an autobiographical novel. Borstal is a term used in the British Isles for juvenile detention. Behan was quite a character, famous for being a heavy drinker ("a drinker with a writing problem", as he described himself). The drink eventually put him in an early grave, at 41 years old. I used to walk to school in Dublin right past the pub where he spent many hours every day.

39. ___ strip : MOBIUS
A Möbius strip is a surface that has only one side. One is easily made by taking a strip of paper and joining the ends together, but with a twist so that it isn't a regular "band".

42. Berry of "Perfect Stranger" : HALLE
The beautiful and talented actress Halle Berry is the only African American woman to win a best Actress Oscar, which she received for her performance in the 2001 movie "Monster's Ball". She also won a Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Actress in 2005 for playing the title role in "Catwoman", and she very graciously accepted the award in person. Good for her!

45. Apologues : FABLES
An apologue is a moral fable, likely to be one which includes characters who are animals.

47. Yahoo : LOUT
Yahoos were brutish creatures introduced by Irish author Jonathan Swift in "Gulliver's Travels". Their savage, slovenly ways gave rise of the use of "yahoo" in English to describe a lout or Neanderthal.

48. Yahoo! had one in 1996: Abbr. : IPO
Jerry Yang and David Filo called their company "Yahoo!" for two reasons. Firstly, a Yahoo is a rude unsophisticated brute from Jonathan Swift's "Gulliver's Travels". Secondly, Yahoo stands for "Yet another Hierarchical Officious Oracle".

49. Kind of rat : GYM
"Gym rat" is a slang term for someone who spends all of his or her leisure time playing sports or working out at the gym. I’ve never been called a gym rat ...

57. Actress Berger : SENTA
Senta Berger is an actress from Austria, regarded by many as the leading German-speaking actress over the past few decades.

59. Model material, often : BALSA
Balsa is a very fast growing tree that is native to parts of South America. Even though balsa wood is very soft, it is actually classified as a hardwood, the softest of all the hardwoods (go figure!). Balsa is light and strong, so is commonly used in making model airplanes and rafts. Amazingly, in WWII a full-size British plane, the de Havilland Mosquito, was built largely from balsa and plywood. No wonder they called it "The Wooden Wonder" and "The Timber Terror".

67. Postseason football game played in Mobile, Ala. : SENIOR BOWL
The Senior Bowl is an annual football game played by collegiate footballers who are NFL draft prospects. The players are divided into two teams from the north and south of the country. The game is played in the Ladd Peebles Stadium in Mobile, Alabama.

70. Author Canetti : ELIAS
Novelist Elias Canetti didn't actually settle in England until he was in his thirties. He was a native of Bulgaria, and as a child also lived in England, Austria, Switzerland and Germany. He wrote in German, even though he spent much of his working life in England, eventually adopting British citizenship. Even then, he spent the last twenty years of his life in Switzerland. His book "Crowds and Power" deals with the behavior of people in crowds and mobs, and the effect of vocal leaders on "packs". Scary stuff, I would say ...

71. Silver's is 107.87: Abbr. : AT WT
The Atomic Weight of an element is the mass of one atom of the element, relative to the mass of an atom of carbon (which is assumed to have an atomic weight of 12).

76. Candy since 1927 : PEZ
PEZ is an Austrian brand name for a particular candy sold in a mechanical dispenser. The name PEZ comes from the first, middle and last letters of "Pfefferminz", the German word for "peppermint".

81. Where you gotta go? : LAV
Our word “lavatory” originally referred to a washbasin, and comes from the Latin “lavatorium”, a place for washing. In the 1600s a "lavatory" came to mean a washroom, and in the 1920s a toilet.

84. Actor Silver : RON
Ron Silver has a long career playing relatively small roles on the big screen and television, with roles in well known films like "Mr. Saturday Night", "Ali", and "Garbo Talks". Notably, Silver was the president of Actors' Equity from 1991 to 2000.

92. Quai d'Orsay setting : SEINE
The Quai d’Orsay in Paris is a quay and street along the left bank of the River Seine. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs is located there, and the French commonly use “Quai d’Orsay” as a nickname for the Ministry.

99. Procrastinator's response : MANANA
The day after today (hoy) is tomorrow (mañana), in Spanish.

102. Ballet dancer's support : BARRE
A “barre” is a handrail used by ballet dancers for warm-up exercises and to provide support when practicing certain moves.

108. Paul Bunyan, e.g. : MYTH
Paul Bunyan is a giant of American myth, a skilled lumberjack.

112. French key : CLE
“Clé” is the French word for “key”.

114. N.C.A.A.'s Gamecocks : USC
The Gamecocks are the varsity sports teams of the University of South Carolina. The moniker comes from the nickname given to the Revolutionary war hero Thomas Sumter who was from South Carolina. Sumter was known as the “Carolina Gamecock” in view of his fierce fighting style.

116. Prince of Broadway : HAL
Hal Prince is a theater producer and director, and is associated with many, big-name Broadway musicals. The list of Prince’s hit shows seems endless, and includes the likes of “Damn Yankees”, “West Side Story”, “Fiddler on the Roof”, “Cabaret” and “Evita”. Hal Prince holds the record for the most Tony Awards won by any individual: twenty-one.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Drummer's accompanier : FIFER
6. Best-selling author who served as a nurse in the Civil War : ALCOTT
12. Made up : UNTRUE
18. Hardens : INURES
20. Fever cause : MALARIA
21. Most bass : LOWEST
22. Back down : BEAT A HASTY RETREAT
24. Back down : CAPITULATE
25. Sinuous swimmer : EEL
26. Grub : EATS
27. Card game declaration : MELD
28. Show off one's "guns" : FLEX
29. Some seen in mirrors? : ARS
30. Foul mood : SNIT
31. Floor vote : AYE
32. Leaning : BIAS
33. Humdinger : PIP
36. Bakers' measures: Abbr. : TSPS
38. Mrs. Miniver's husband in "Mrs. Miniver" : CLEM
40. Scope : EXTENT
42. Sprinkler conduit : HOSE
43. Back down : HEAD FOR THE HILLS
46. Run out : ELAPSE
48. Quarters used in Greenland : IGLOO
50. Kegler's org. : PBA
51. Honeyed drink : MEAD
53. Back down : PULL OUT
54. Detour signalers : PYLONS
56. The left, informally : LIBS
58. Parts of galaxies : NEBULAE
60. Siberian city : OMSK
61. Jacket decoration : EPAULET
64. Handles receptions, say : CATERS
65. Back down : LOSE ONE'S NERVE
68. Gather in bundles : SHEAVE
72. Joint committee? : STONERS
73. [How dare you?!] : SLAP!
77. Talks without sincerity : PALTERS
79. Envelope abbr. : ATTN
80. Like some firs : ALPINE
82. Back down : WITHDRAW
83. Variety : SORT
86. Pascal's law : LOI
87. Ball partner : ARNAZ
88. Downgrade, perhaps : RERATE
90. Back down : GIVE SOME GROUND
94. Father of Phobos : ARES
95. "Welcome Back, Kotter" guy : VINNIE
97. La ___ Tar Pits : BREA
98. Treasures : GEMS
101. Made one : WED
102. Tough situation : BIND
103. Company making arrangements, for short : FTD
105. PBS has a big one : BIRD
107. When repeated, eager : RAH
108. Staffs : MANS
109. Winged : ALAR
110. "I'm ___ you!" : ONTO
111. Big name in '60s peace activism : ONO
112. Back down : CRY UNCLE
115. Back down : WAVE THE WHITE FLAG
118. Sheen, in Sheffield : LUSTRE
119. Advent : ARRIVAL
120. Like some oil refineries : YEMENI
121. Clearly marks : ETCHES
122. Mark, e.g. : GOSPEL
123. Boxer nicknamed "Hands of Stone" : DURAN

Down
1. Try to shoot : FIRE AT
2. Lays to rest : INTERS
3. Slick ones? : FUEL SPILLS
4. Go wrong : ERR
5. Four-time baseball All-Star Jose : REYES
6. Itch scratcher's utterance : AAH
7. "Is Your Mama a ___?" (children's book) : LLAMA
8. Capable of seeing in the dark : CAT-EYED
9. Certain grilling : ORAL EXAM
10. One to one, for example : TIED
11. It's left on a keyboard : TAB
12. Loudly lament : ULULATE
13. Dos but not don'ts : NOTES
14. Mars candy : TWIX
15. Good name, informally : REP
16. Miss ___ : USA
17. Common abbr. after a comma : ETC
19. Cut off : STANCH
20. What's the big idea? : MASTER PLAN?
23. Circus support : STILT
28. Vertical stabilizer : FIN
32. "The Hostage" playwright, 1958 : BEHAN
33. Blooming tree : POPLAR
34. Publishes : ISSUES
35. Slightest complaint : PEEP
37. Lost, as a tail : SHOOK
39. ___ strip : MOBIUS
41. Rounds begin on the first one : TEE
42. Berry of "Perfect Stranger" : HALLE
44. Ages : EON
45. Apologues : FABLES
47. Yahoo : LOUT
48. Yahoo! had one in 1996: Abbr. : IPO
49. Kind of rat : GYM
52. Inside look? : DECOR
55. Dish out : SERVE
57. Actress Berger : SENTA
59. Model material, often : BALSA
62. Pressure group? : PEERS
63. Play a flute : TOOTLE
66. Lay to rest : ENTOMB
67. Postseason football game played in Mobile, Ala. : SENIOR BOWL
68. World : SPHERE
69. Extreme aversion : HATRED
70. Author Canetti : ELIAS
71. Silver's is 107.87: Abbr. : AT WT
73. Garnish, possibly : SPRIG
74. Keep at awhile : LINGER OVER
75. Got ___ on (nailed) : AN A
76. Candy since 1927 : PEZ
78. Healthy : SOUND
81. Where you gotta go? : LAV
82. Take a card : DRAW
84. Actor Silver : RON
85. Frivolous types : TRIFLERS
89. Demonstrates : EVINCES
91. Be rewarded for good service : GET A TIP
92. Quai d'Orsay setting : SEINE
93. Coarse : EARTHY
96. Entrances : INS
99. Procrastinator's response : MANANA
100. Welcome through the door : SHOW IN
102. Ballet dancer's support : BARRE
104. A disk can be slipped in one : DRIVE
106. Was a little too fond : DOTED
108. Paul Bunyan, e.g. : MYTH
109. Do with a pick, maybe : AFRO
112. French key : CLE
113. Crackpot : NUT
114. N.C.A.A.'s Gamecocks : USC
115. Not keep up : LAG
116. Prince of Broadway : HAL
117. Native of Australia : EMU

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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