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0401-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Apr 13, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Gary J. Whitehead
THEME: They’re First in April … today’s themed answers are all words or phrases meaning “fool”, which is apt given that today is April Fools Day:
1A. Fool : SCAM
10A. Fool : BOOB
18A. Fool : DUNDERHEAD
22A. Fool : TRICK
37A. Fool : LAUGHING STOCK
54A. Fool : CHEAT
59A. Fool : NINCOMPOOP
66A. Fool : DUPE
68A. Fool : DOPE
COMPLETION TIME: 06m 29s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Classic record label : DECCA
Decca Records started out in 1929 as a British record label. The US branch of Decca was opened up in 1934, but the UK and US entities went their separate ways starting in WWII.

14. Sotto ___ (under one's breath) : VOCE
Sotto voce literally means "under the voice" in Italian, and describes the deliberate lowering of one’s voice for emphasis.

15. Mideast potentate: Var. : AMEER
An emir is a prince or chieftain, most notably in the Middle East. In English, “emir” can also be written as “amir” and “ameer” (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

16. The "A" in Thomas A. Edison : ALVA
Thomas Alva Edison was nicknamed "The Wizard of Menlo Park" by a newspaper reporter, a name that stuck. He was indeed a wizard, in the sense that he was such a prolific inventor. The Menlo Park part of the moniker recognizes the location of his first research lab, in Menlo Park, New Jersey.

24. Facial cover in a Dumas novel : IRON MASK
“The Man in the Iron Mask” is the third part of a novel by Alexandre Dumas called “The Vicomte of Bragelonne: Ten Years Later”. The novel uses characters appearing in the earlier Dumas novel “The Three Musketeers”. In the plot, the musketeers are getting on in years and become involved in the mystery of “the man in the iron mask”, an prisoner locked up in French jails with his identity hidden behind a mask.

28. Many an Albrecht Dürer piece of art : ETCHING
Albrecht Dürer was a German artist, noted for his etchings and engravings as well as for his paintings.

31. ___ Lama : DALAI
The Dalai Lama is a religious leader in the Gelug branch of Tibetan Buddhism. The current Dalai Lama is the 14th to hold the office. He has indicated that the next Dalai Lama might be found outside of Tibet for the first time, and may be female.

37. Fool : LAUGHING STOCK
The term “laughing stock” is used to describe a “fool”. “Laughing stock” evolved from “whipping stock” which in turn came from “whipping post”. The idea is that a laughing stock is the object of frequent abuse, as would be someone tied to a whipping post.

41. New England catch : COD
In the British Isles, the most common fish that is used in traditional “fish and chips” is Atlantic cod. Cod has been overfished all over the world, and is now considered to be an endangered species by many international bodies.

43. Death notices, informally : OBITS
"Obituary" comes from the Latin "obituaris", originally the record of the death of a person, although the literal meaning is "pertaining to death".

46. New Jersey city on the west side of the George Washington Bridge : FORT LEE
Fort Lee, New Jersey is located at the western side of the George Washington Bridge that spans the Hudson River. Fort Lee is known as the birthplace of the motion picture industry. The world’s first movie studio was built there by Thomas Edison, a facility known as the Black Maria.

59. Fool : NINCOMPOOP
The word "nincompoop" meaning an "ass" seems to have been around for quite a while, since the 1670s, but no one appears to know its origins.

64. Comic Jack of old radio and TV : BENNY
The great comedian Jack Benny’s real name was Benjamin Kubelsky. Benny was born in 1894 and passed away in 1974 at the age of 80. Although, when Benny was on stage he always claimed to be just 39 years old!

65. Just ___ (slightly) : A TAD
Back in the 1800s "tad" was used to describe a young child, and this morphed into our usage of "small amount" in the early 1900s. The original use of "tad" for a child is very likely a shortened version of "tadpole".

Down
1. Gracefully slender : SVELTE
“Svelte” comes into English from Latin, via the Italian "svelto" meaning "stretched out". As if I would know anything about svelte ...

2. Like C.I.A. operations : COVERT
The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is the successor to the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) formed during WWII. The CIA was chartered by the National Security Act of 1947.

5. 1910s-'20s art movement : DADA
Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

9. "You ___ Beautiful" : ARE SO
“You Are So Beautiful” is a song written by Dennis Wilson and Billy Preston, first recorded by Preston in 1974. Later the same year, Joe Cocker recorded a slower version of the song that was to become more successful than the original.

10. Grand ___ (vacation island near Florida) : BAHAMA
Grand Bahama is the largest island in the Bahamas chain. Grand Bahama lies only 56 miles off the coast of Florida. The Spanish gave the island the name of “Gran Bajamar”, which means “Great Shallows”.

11. "Bravo!" to a torero : OLE
"Toreador" is an old Spanish word for a bullfighter, but it's a term not used any more in Spain nor in Latin America. In English we use the term "toreador", but in Spanish a bullfighter is a "torero".

23. China's ___ En-lai : CHOU
Zhou Enlai (also Chou En-Lai) was the first government leader of the People's Republic of China and held the office of Premier from 1949 until he died in 1976. Zhou Enlai ran the government for Communist Party Leader Mao Zedong, often striking a more conciliatory tone with the West than that of his boss. He was instrumental, for example, in setting up President Nixon's famous visit to China in 1972. Zhou Enlai died just a few months before Mao Zedong, with both deaths leading to unrest and a dramatic change in political direction for the country.

25. Actor Guinness : ALEC
Sir Alec Guinness played many great roles over a long and distinguished career, but nowadays is best remembered for playing the original Obi-Wan Kenobi in "Star Wars".

29. Classic soda brand : NEHI
The brand of Nehi cola has a name that sounds like “knee-high”, a measure of a small stature. Back in the mid-1900’s, the Chero-Cola company that owned the brand went for a slightly different twist on "knee-high" in advertising. The logo for Nehi was an image of a seated woman’s stockinged legs, with her skirt pulled up to her knees, to hint at “knee-high”.

33. Nelson Mandela's org. : ANC
The African National Congress (ANC) started out as the South African Native National Congress in 1912 with the goal of improving the lot of Black South Africans. After years of turmoil, the ANC came to power in the first open election in 1964.

As a young man, Nelson Mandela led the armed wing of the African National Congress (ANC). Mandela was eventually arrested and admitted to charges of sabotage and was sentenced to life in prison in 1964. He remained behind bars for 27 years, mainly in the infamous prison on Robben Island. As the years progressed, Mandela became a symbol of the fight against apartheid. He was released in 1990, and immediately declared his commitment to peace and reconciliation with South Africa’s white minority population. Mandela was elected president of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) in 1994, an office that he held until 1999.

34. End-of-workweek cry : TGIF
"Thank God It's Friday" (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies.

35. "Happy Motoring" gas brand : ESSO
The brand name Esso has its roots in the old Standard Oil company as it uses the initial letters of "Standard" and "Oil" (ESS-O). The Esso brand was replaced by Exxon in the US, but ESSO is still used in many other countries.

37. Timber wolf : LOBO
The timber wolf is also known as the gray wolf, tundra wolf or lobo.

38. Score after deuce : AD IN
In tennis, if the score reaches "deuce" (i.e. when both players have scored three points), then the first player to win two points in a row wins the game. The player who wins the point immediately after deuce is said to have the "advantage". If the player with the advantage wins the next point then that's two in a row and that player wins the game. If the person with the advantage loses the next point, then advantage is lost and the players return to deuce and try again. If the one of the players is calling out the score then if he/she has the advantage then that player announces "ad in" or more formally "advantage in". If the score announcer's opponent has the advantage, then the announcement is "ad out" or "advantage out". Follow all of that ...?

44. Throat lozenge : TROCHE
A troche is a medicinal lozenge, like a pastille, and is usually circular in shape. “Troche” ultimately derives from the Greek word for “wheel”.

45. Pic of an unborn child : SONO
A sonogram is an image made created using ultrasound. "Ultrasound" is the name given to sound energy that has frequencies above the audible range.

47. Smoothly, in music : LEGATO
Legato is a musical direction, signifying that long and continuous notes should be played very smoothly. The opposite of legato is staccato, notes played in a disconnected form.

48. Winter hat part : EARLAP
Earlaps (or ear flaps) might be attached to a cap.

49. Online investor's site : E*TRADE
E*Trade is mainly an online discount brokerage. It was founded in 1982 in Palo Alto, California, and I used to drive by its headquarters almost every day. The company is now run out of New York City. E*Trade produces those famous Super Bowl ads with the talking babies staring into a webcam.

51. Venomous African snake : MAMBA
The mamba, and most famously the black mamba, is a highly venomous snake that used to be responsible for a great number of fatalities before anti-venoms became available. Mamba venom is a deadly mix of neurotoxins that attack the nervous system, and cardiotoxins that attack the heart so a bite, if left untreated, causes the lungs and the heart to shut down.

53. Ad lights : NEONS
The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

57. 1974 Gould/Sutherland C.I.A. spoof : S*P*Y*S
"S*P*Y*S" is a 1974 comedy starring Elliott Gould and Donald Sutherland as two men mistaken as spies and targeted by the KGB. With all those asterisks in the film's title, one has to assume the movie was intended to capitalize on the success of the 1970 Gould/Sutherland vehicle called "M*A*S*H".

62. ___ about (wander) : GAD
"To gad about" is to move around with little purpose. The word comes from the Middle English "gadden" meaning "to hurry".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Fool : SCAM
5. Classic record label : DECCA
10. Fool : BOOB
14. Sotto ___ (under one's breath) : VOCE
15. Mideast potentate: Var. : AMEER
16. The "A" in Thomas A. Edison : ALVA
17. Not odd : EVEN
18. Fool : DUNDERHEAD
20. Permit : LET
21. Area including China, Korea and Japan : EAST ASIA
22. Fool : TRICK
24. Facial cover in a Dumas novel : IRON MASK
28. Many an Albrecht Dürer piece of art : ETCHING
31. ___ Lama : DALAI
32. Having a fixed fee, as a calling plan : ONE-RATE
36. Terminus : END
37. Fool : LAUGHING STOCK
41. New England catch : COD
42. Tooth next to a canine : INCISOR
43. Death notices, informally : OBITS
46. New Jersey city on the west side of the George Washington Bridge : FORT LEE
50. Like the Cyrillic and Hebrew alphabets : NON-ROMAN
54. Fool : CHEAT
55. Tethered : ON A LEASH
58. Watchdog's warning : GRR
59. Fool : NINCOMPOOP
62. Grand party : GALA
63. Sound of delight : OOOH!
64. Comic Jack of old radio and TV : BENNY
65. Just ___ (slightly) : A TAD
66. Fool : DUPE
67. Donkeys : ASSES
68. Fool : DOPE

Down
1. Gracefully slender : SVELTE
2. Like C.I.A. operations : COVERT
3. ___ acid (vinegar component) : ACETIC
4. Fraternity members, e.g. : MEN
5. 1910s-'20s art movement : DADA
6. Relatives of ostriches : EMUS
7. Prefix meaning one-hundredth : CENTI-
8. Shingle wood : CEDAR
9. "You ___ Beautiful" : ARE SO
10. Grand ___ (vacation island near Florida) : BAHAMA
11. "Bravo!" to a torero : OLE
12. Eggs in labs : OVA
13. Misbehaving : BAD
19. Watermelon covering : RIND
21. Barely making, with "out" : EKING
23. China's ___ En-lai : CHOU
25. Actor Guinness : ALEC
26. Sent to the ocean floor : SANK
27. Fool : KID
29. Classic soda brand : NEHI
30. :-), in an e-mail : GRIN
33. Nelson Mandela's org. : ANC
34. End-of-workweek cry : TGIF
35. "Happy Motoring" gas brand : ESSO
37. Timber wolf : LOBO
38. Score after deuce : AD IN
39. Caver's light source, maybe : TORCH
40. Straight: Prefix : ORTH-
41. Fool : CON
44. Throat lozenge : TROCHE
45. Pic of an unborn child : SONO
47. Smoothly, in music : LEGATO
48. Winter hat part : EARLAP
49. Online investor's site : E*TRADE
51. Venomous African snake : MAMBA
52. Suisse peaks : ALPES
53. Ad lights : NEONS
56. Top-of-the-line : A-ONE
57. 1974 Gould/Sutherland C.I.A. spoof : S*P*Y*S
59. Auction assent : NOD
60. Note of indebtedness : IOU
61. Queue before Q : NOP
62. ___ about (wander) : GAD


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0331-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Mar 13, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Caleb Madison
THEME: Special Features … today’s themed answers are movie titles, but with an extra letter dropped in to suit the clue. The theme reflects the practice of dropping little inside jokes into media, called “Easter eggs”. Happy Easter, everyone:
23A. Movie about ... an intense blinking contest? : STARE WARS (from “Star Wars”)
28A. ... a housecleaner? : NEAT WORK (from “Network”)
30A. ... a sled racer? : SNOW VOYAGER (from “Now, Voyager”)
44A. ... a bee during a downpour? : STINGIN’ IN THE RAIN (from “Singin’ in the Rain”)
56A. ... actor Jason's fan club? : BATEMAN FOREVER (from “Batman Forever”)
80A. ... Jerry Garcia's band's portraits? : DRAWN OF THE DEAD (from “Dawn of the Dead”)
88A. ... a parent's edicts? : TEEN COMMANDMENTS (from “(The) Ten Commandments”)
100A. ... a king's brilliance? : REGAL GENIUS (from “Real Genius”)
108A. ... a harvester? : GRAIN MAN (from “Rain Man”)
COMPLETION TIME: 33m 53s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … YUP (yep), UNIVAC (ENIVAC!!!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Justice Dept. branch : ATF
The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) is today part of the Department of Justice. The ATF has its roots in the Department of Treasury dating back to 1886 when it was known as the Bureau of Prohibition. "Explosives" was added to the ATF's name when the bureau was moved under the Department of Justice as part of the reorganization called for in the Homeland Security Act of 2002.

9. Gyllenhaal of "Brokeback Mountain" : JAKE
Jake Gyllenhaal's most famous role has to be as co-star with Heath Ledger in "Brokeback Mountain", but he has also had lead roles in big movies like "The Day After Tomorrow", "Jarhead" and "Rendition".

“Brokeback Mountain” is a 2005 movie about the romantic and sexual relationship between two cowboys, played by Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal. Matt Damon was asked to play one of the leads but declined. Damon gave the excuse, “I did a gay movie (The Talented Mr. Ripley), then a cowboy movie (All the Pretty Horses). I can’t follow it up with a gay-cowboy movie!”

13. 1983 film debut of Bill Maher : DC CAB
"D.C. Cab" is a comedy movie released in 1983 starring Mr. T. I don't hear many good things about the film, although there is a special appearance by Irene Cara of "Fame" fame ...

Bill Maher is a stand-up comedian and political commentator. Maher has an HBO television show called “Real Time with Bill Maher” which is essentially a follow-on from the very successful “Politically Incorrect” that started out on Comedy Central.

18. Documentarian Morris : ERROL
Errol Morris is a film director, best known for his excellent 2003 documentary “The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara”.

19. It's found in la mer : SEL
In French, there is salt (sel) found the sea (la mer).

20. Cerberus guards its gates, in myth : HADES
Cerberus is a dog with three heads that appears in both Greek and Roman mythology. Cerberus had the job of guarding the gates of Hades and preventing those who had crossed the River Styx from ever escaping. A sop is a piece of food that has been dipped in some liquid, as one might sop a piece of bread in soup. There is an idiomatic expression, "to give a sop to Cerberus", which means to give someone a bribe, or pay someone off. The idea is that if one could bribe Cerberus, give him a sop to eat, then he would let you pass and escape from Hades.

23. Movie about ... an intense blinking contest? : STARE WARS (from “Star Wars”)
“Stars Wars” fans will be delighted to hear that George Lucas has announced that he will be making “Star Wars Episode VII”, scheduled for release in 2015.

27. Atoms in some light bulbs : ARGONS
A plasma lamp is a light source that generates light by exciting a plasma inside a a glass container, using radio waves to create the plasma of ionized particles. One of the original gases used for such plasmas was argon.

28. ... a housecleaner? : NEAT WORK (from “Network”)
The movie "Network" was released in 1976. It was directed by Sidney Lumet and stars Peter Finch in his final role, for which he won a posthumous Academy Award. That Oscar for Peter Finch was remarkable in that it was the first time the Best Actor award had been won after the actor passed away, and it was also the first time it had been won by an Australian.

30. ... a sled racer? : SNOW VOYAGER (from “Now, Voyager”)
The 1942 movie “Now, Voyager” stars Bette Davis, Paul Henreid and Claude Rains. The film is based on a novel of the same name by Olive Higgins Prouty. Prouty got the title of her book from the Walt Whitman poem “The Untold Want”:
The untold want by life and land ne'er granted,
Now, voyager, sail thou forth, to seek and find.

32. Children's author Silverstein : SHEL
Author Shel Silverstein had a varied career and did a lot more than write books. Silverstein was a poet, composer, cartoonist and screenwriter among other things. One of his successful children's books is "The Giving Tree", which was first published in 1964. "The Giving Tree" tells of a young boy who has a special relationship with a tree in a forest. The message of the book seems to be that the tree provides the little boy with everything he needs.

37. Year "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" came out : MCM
L. Frank Baum (the “L” is for Lyman) is of course famous for writing “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”. Writing early in the 20th century, Baum actually described in his books things that had yet to be invented, like television, laptop computers and wireless telephones.

38. China's Chiang ___-shek : KAI
Chiang Kai-Shek was the leader of the Nationalist Movement in China right through to the end of WWII. The Nationalists lost out in a Civil War to the Communists backed by the Soviet Union after war, and Chiang Kai-Shek and his government were forced to flee to Taiwan. Chiang Kai-shek claimed rule over China from Taiwan until his death in 1975.

44. ... a bee during a downpour? : STINGIN’ IN THE RAIN (from “Singin’ in the Rain”)
In the movie “Singin’ in the Rain”, the wonderful, wonderful dance sequence to the title song was filmed over 2-3 days. Gene Kelly was splashing through puddles and getting rained on while all the time he was sick, with a fever of 103F.

53. Part of E.M.S.: Abbr. : EMER
Emergency Medical Services (EMS).

54. Wall St. Journal listings : IPOS
An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

56. ... actor Jason's fan club? : BATEMAN FOREVER (from “Batman Forever”)
“Batman Forever” is a 1995 superhero film, one in a string of movies featuring the comic book hero Batman. This one has Val Kilmer in the title role, with the two main villains played by Jim Carrey (the Riddler) and Tommy Lee Jones (Two-Face).

Jason Bateman is an actor from Rye, New York who is most associated with the role of Michael Bluth on TV’s “Arrested Development”. Jason’s older sister is Justine Bateman, who played Mallory Keaton on the show “Family Ties”.

64. One might have a ball : DEB
Deb is short for "debutante", which translates from French as "female beginner".

66. Public health agcy. : CDC
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is based in Atlanta, Georgia. The CDC started out life during WWII as the Office of National Defense Malaria Control Activities. The CDC worries about much more than malaria these days ...

72. Device Professor X wears over his head in "X-Men" : CEREBRO
In the “X-Men” universe, Cerebro is a device that can amplify the brainwaves of a user with telepathic capabilities. Cerebro is routinely used to distinguish between mutants and humans.

74. Pop singer Bedingfield : NATASHA
Natasha Bedingfield is a pop singer from England.

80. ... Jerry Garcia's band's portraits? : DRAWN OF THE DEAD (from “Dawn of the Dead”)
Jerry Garcia was one of the founding members of the rock band, the Grateful Dead. Garcia struggled with cocaine and heroin addiction during most of his life, and died of a heart attack in 1995 in a California drug rehabilitation center.

“Dawn of the Dead” is a 1978 horror movie all about zombies going after some folks barricaded into a shopping mall. I really don’t do zombies nor horror films ...

85. Air : MIEN
One's mien is one's bearing or manner. "Mien" shares the same etymological root as our word "demeanor".

86. It's west of the International Date Line : ASIA
The International Date Line (IDL) is an imaginary line that runs north-south along the 180-degree line of latitude (with a few deviations). The IDL is located on the opposite side of the Earth to the Prime Meridian, which runs through Greenwich, England. A person flying non-stop around the world from east to west loses one hour each time he or she crosses a time zone. When that person arrives back at his or her starting point, she would have lost 24 hours in total, a full day. So, the traveller has to compensate by moving the calendar forward 24 hours, by adding a day. By convention, this date change is made when crossing the IDL.

87. High clouds : CIRRI
Cirrus clouds are those lovely wispy white strands that are often called "mare's tail".

88. ... a parent's edicts? : TEEN COMMANDMENTS (from “(The) Ten Commandments”)
“The Ten Commandments” is an epic movie directed by Cecil B. DeMille, and released in 1956. The cast is as epic as the film, with Charlton Heston playing the starring role of Moses.

92. ___ Zone : ESPN
ESPN Zone is a chain of restaurants, albeit a small chain as there are only two of them. The original location was in Baltimore, Maryland but it's closed now. There is one ESPN Zone in the entertainment complex in Downtown Los Angeles called L.A. Live, and there is another not too far away (that I've visited) in Downtown Disney in Anaheim.

95. One-named R&B singer : MYA
Mya is an R&B singer-songwriter. I don't know her music, but I did see her get to the runner-up spot on the ninth series of "Dancing with the Stars", beaten out of first place by Donny Osmond (don't ask!).

100. ... a king's brilliance? : REGAL GENIUS (from “Real Genius”)
"Real Genius" is a comedy movie released in 1985, starring Val Kilmer. It's one of those clever-kid-on-a-college-campus films. The final scene is perhaps notable. As the movie closes, the students destroy a professor's house using laser-popped popcorn. The cast of the TV show "Mythbusters" delved into the movie premise, and showed that even though popcorn could indeed be popped by lasers, the popped corn wasn't hard enough to break window-glass, never mind bring a house down.

108. ... a harvester? : GRAIN MAN (from “Rain Man”)
“Rain Man” is an entertaining and thought-provoking film released in 1988 starring Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman. It’s all about a self-possessed yuppie (Cruise, appropriate casting!) who discovers he has a brother who is an autistic savant (Hoffman). Hoffman won the Best Actor Oscar for his performance, and “Rain Man” won the Best Picture award.

113. Kind of bean : PINTO
Pinto beans are so-called because their skins have a mottled (“pinto”) appearance.

114. Who wrote "Wherever Law ends, Tyranny begins" : LOCKE
John Locke was the English philosopher who postulated that the mind is a blank slate (or "tabula rasa") when we are born, and that we fill that slate with our experiences and observations.

115. Hidden DVD feature ... which can be found, literally, in the answers to the italicized clues : EASTER EGG
In a film, book, computer program (or even a crossword!), an “Easter egg” is a hidden message or inside joke that is left intentionally during production. The term “Easter egg” is used for such a device as it evokes the idea of an Easter egg hunt. You can check out thousands of such Easter eggs at www.eeggs.com.

117. City south of Brigham City : OGDEN
Ogden, Utah was the first permanent settlement by people of European descent in what is now the state of Utah.

118. Peptic ___ : ULCER
Until fairly recently, a peptic ulcer was believed to be caused by undue amounts of stress in one's life. It is now known that 70-90% of all peptic ulcers are in fact associated with a particular bacterium.

120. Lucy of "Kill Bill" : LIU
Lucy Liu is an Asian-American actress from Queens, New York. Liu's big break came when she was chosen to play the Ling Woo character in "Ally McBeal". I liked her in the 2000 film "Charlie's Angels" but as I am no fan of Quentin Tarantino, I did not enjoy the movie "Kill Bill". I am having fun watching one of Liu’s latest projects, in which she plays one of the two leads in the TV crime drama “Elementary”.

123. Part of N.B. : NOTA
“Nota bene” is the Latin for "note well"

125. Laurel and Lee : STANS
Stan Laurel was an English comic actor (born Arthur Stanley Jefferson), who made a great career for himself in Hollywood. Laurel ended up at the Hal Roach studio directing films, intent on pursuing a career in writing and directing. However, he was a sometime actor and was asked to step in when another comic actor, Oliver Hardy, was injured and couldn't perform. Laurel and Hardy started to share a stage together during that time and when it was clear they worked so well together, their partnership was born. Oh, and the oft-quoted story that Clint Eastwood is the son of Stan Laurel … that’s just an urban myth.

Stan Lee did just about everything at Marvel Comics over the years, from writing to being president and chairman of the board.

Down
3. Mythological figure often depicted holding a kithara : ERATO
In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of Lyric Poetry.

A kithara was a lyre-like instrument in Ancient Greece. The modern Greek word “kithara” translates as “guitar”.

4. 1945 Best Picture winner, with "The" : LOST WEEKEND
“The Lost Weekend” is an excellent 1945 film starring Ray Milland as an alcoholic writer on a drinking binge for a whole weekend.

8. Recurring Stephen King antagonist Randall ___ : FLAGG
Randall Flagg appears in several of Stephen King’s novels. Flagg is sometimes the main antagonist, but at other times he just makes a cameo appearance. I’m not a fan of the horror genre, so I’ve never bumped into the gentleman …

10. ___ Lovelace, computer pioneer : ADA
Ada Lovelace’s real name was Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace. She was the only legitimate child of Lord Byron, the poet. Lovelace was fascinated by mathematics and wrote about the work done by Charles Babbage in building his groundbreaking mechanical computer. In some of her notes, she proposed an algorithm for Babbage’s machine to compute Bernoulli numbers. This algorithm is recognized by many as the world’s first computer program and so Lovelace is sometimes called the first “computer programmer”.

11. "The Way You Look Tonight" composer : KERN
“The Way You Look Tonight” is a song sung by Fred Astaire to Ginger Rogers in the 1936 movie “Swing Time”. “Swing Time” was composed by Jerome Kern with lyrics by Dorothy Fields, and it won the Best Original Song Oscar.

12. De bene ___ (legal phrase) : ESSE
“De bene esse” is a legal term used to mean “conditionally, provisionally”. The literal translation from Latin is “of well being”.

13. Music genre of Possessed and Deicide : DEATH METAL
Death metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music. Let me check for some death metal titles on my iPod here … nope … none …

14. Hollywood's Russell : CROWE
Russell Crowe is a highly successful actor from New Zealand. Understandably, he doesn’t like people to call him “Australian”, even though it was in Australia that he launched his acting career. Not too long before the 9/11 attacks, the FBI contacted Crowe to inform him that al-Qaeda was plotting to kidnap him as part of a general attack on high-profile “American” icons. For a few months the New Zealander was guarded by Secret Service agents.

15. Two-time Emmy-winning actress for "Taxi" : CAROL KANE
The actress Carol Kane played Andy Kaufman’s wife Simka Gravis, on the iconic sitcom “Taxi”.

16. Observatory subj. : ASTR
Astronomy (Astr.).

20. English king who was a son of William the Conqueror : HENRY I
Henry I of England was a son of William the Conqueror. According to legend, Henry died from eating “a surfeit of lampreys”, or more likely food poisoning. Lampreys look like a cross between a fish and an eel.

24. Smelt ___ : ROE
Smelt is the name given to several types of small fish.

29. Noted American writer in Yiddish : ASCH
Sholem Asch was a Polish-born American novelist and dramatist who published his work in Yiddish. One of his plays was "God of Vengeance", a highly-regarded work performed all over Europe and translated into many languages. It opened on Broadway in 1923, but the adult themes (it was set in a brothel, and featured a lesbian relationship) led to the entire cast being arrested and convicted on obscenity charges.

35. Computer used to predict the 1952 presidential election : UNIVAC
UNIVAC I was the first commercial computer made in the US. It was designed by the inventors of ENIAC, the first electronic computer built for the US government. The first UNIVAC sold went to the US Census Bureau in 1951. UNIVAC was used in 1951 to predict the outcome of the US presidential election scheduled for the following year. The traditional pollsters were predicting a win for Adlai Stevenson, but UNIVAC forecast a landslide win for Eisenhower. UNIVAC proved to be correct.

36. Chemical dropper : PIPET
A pipette (also “pipet”) is tool used in a lab to transport an accurately measured volume of liquid. Back in my day, we would suck up the liquid into the pipette by applying our mouths to the top of the instrument. This could be quite dangerous, as one ended up with a mouthful of something unsavory if one lifted the top of pipette out of the liquid too soon. Nowadays, things are much safer.

40. M.I.T. part: Abbr. : INST
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) moved into its magnificent mile-long campus on the Cambridge side of the Charles River in 1906. The campus was built largely with funds donated by George Eastman, the founder of the Eastman Kodak Company.

46. World banking org. : IMF
The International Monetary Fund (IMF) was established at the end of 1945 with 29 major economies supporting and funding an effort to stabilize economies across the globe after WWII. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., today the IMF has 187 member countries.

47. Prefix with noir : NEO-
A neo-noir film is a contemporary film that incorporates elements of the film noir style of the forties and fifties.

50. Gridiron figure : REF
We never used the word "gridiron" when I was growing up in Ireland (meaning a grill used for cooking food over an open fire). So, maybe I am excused for finding out relatively recently that a football field gridiron is so called because the layout of yard lines over the field looks like a gridiron used in cooking!

52. Music related to punk rock : EMO
The musical genre of "emo" originated in Washington D.C. in the 80s, and takes its name from "emotional hardcore". Not my cup of tea …

57. Aconcagua setting : ANDES
The Andes is the longest continuous chain of mountains in the world, running right down the length of the west coast of South America for about 4,300 miles. The highest peak in the range is Mt. Aconcagua, at an elevation of 22,841 feet. Interestingly, the peak of Mt. Chimborazo in Ecuador is the furthest point on the Earth's surface from the center of the planet. That's because of the equatorial "bulge" around the Earth's "waist".

62. Vituperate : RANT AT
Vituperation is sustained, abusive language.

70. Exactly : SHARP
10pm exactly, 10pm sharp!

75. Sam Spade, e.g., for short : TEC
Private detective Sam Spade is the main character in Dashiell Hammett's novel "The Maltese Falcon". Famously, Spade was played by Humphrey Bogart in the 1941 film adaptation directed by John Huston.

76. Île de la ___ : CITE
There are two famous islands in the middle of the River Seine in Paris, one being the Île de la Cité, and the other Île Saint-Louis. Île de la Cité is the most renowned of the two, as it is home to the cathedral of Notre Dame.

78. Solo companion : CHEWBACCA
Wookiees are a biped race featured in "Star Wars", the most notable being Chewbacca, the loyal friend and associate of Han Solo.

81. Subject of the Pentagon Papers, informally : NAM
Daniel Ellsberg is a former military analyst, who famously became very disillusioned with the Vietnam War. While still working as an analyst, he made copies of classified documents related to the Johnson administration's conduct of the war. The documents, known as the Pentagon Papers, demonstrated that the administration knew early on that the Vietnam War was essentially "unwinnable" and that continued fighting would lead to higher numbers of casualties than was being projected in the public arena. Ellsberg ended up in court charged with espionage, but all charges were dropped when it was revealed that the Nixon administration had used illegal methods to bolster its case against the defendant.

82. Sugar suffix : -OSE
The sugar we consume as "table sugar" is mainly sucrose that is extracted from sugar cane and sugar beet. We also consume lactose, naturally occurring in milk, and fructose, naturally occurring in fruit. But most of the sugar we eat or drink tends to be prepared commercially, the most famous being high-fructose corn syrup, which is glucose that is industrially processed into a glucose/fructose mix. Don't get me started on the politics of food ...

83. Word at the end of many French films : FIN
“Fin” is the French word for “end”.

85. Fr. title : MME
Madame (Mme.)

89. City SSE of 117-Across : OREM
Orem, Utah was originally known as "Sharon" (a Biblical name), then "Provo Bench", and in 1914 it was given the family name of a local railroad operator called "Orem". Orem gave itself the nickname “Family City USA” and sure enough in 2010, “Forbes” rated Orem the 5th best place in the country to raise a family.

99. Poet Conrad : AIKEN
Conrad Aiken was a novelist and poet. Aiken was named Poet Laureate of the United States in 1950.

102. Ones who wrote in the Ogham alphabet : GAELS
Ogham is an old Irish alphabet that is found on a few hundred surviving monuments located around the country and in parts of western Britain. The oldest of these inscriptions has been dated back to the 4th century.

105. World powerhouse in cricket : INDIA
Cricket is the national game of England. The term “cricket” apparently comes from the Old French word “criquet” meaning “goalpost, stick”.

106. Knoxville sch. : UTENN
The Tennessee Volunteers (the Vols) is the name given to the men's sports teams at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. The women's teams are called the Lady Volunteers.

Tennessee uses the nickname "Volunteer State" as during the War of 1812 volunteer soldiers from Tennessee fought with particular valor, especially during the Battle of New Orleans.

107. Fake-book material : SONGS
A performer can sometimes use what’s called a musical lead sheet to quickly learn a new song. The lead sheet contains just the melody line, basic chords and lyrics. A collection of lead sheets is called a ‘fake book”, a book that allows a singer to “fake” familiarity with a song.

110. Many ages : AEON
Aeon is a variant spelling of "eon". In astronomical terms, an aeon is defined as one thousand million years.

111. iPod ___ : NANO
The iPod Nano is the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There have been five versions of the Nano to date and the current Nano as well as playing tunes is an FM player, records voice memos, and even has a pedometer!

112. Home of Typhon, in myth : ETNA
Typhon was known as the “father of all monsters” in Greek mythology, and he was married to the “mother of all monster”, Echidna. Typhon had a huge human torso with a hundred dragon heads. His lower body was made up of gigantic viper coils. Although all the gods feared Typhon, Zeus finally defeated him and trapped him underneath Mount Etna.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. One-on-ones : DUELS
6. Justice Dept. branch : ATF
9. Gyllenhaal of "Brokeback Mountain" : JAKE
13. 1983 film debut of Bill Maher : DC CAB
18. Documentarian Morris : ERROL
19. It's found in la mer : SEL
20. Cerberus guards its gates, in myth : HADES
21. Wipe out : ERASE
22. Lower : ABASE
23. Movie about ... an intense blinking contest? : STARE WARS (from “Star Wars”)
25. It comes from the heart : AORTA
26. Steaming beverage : LATTE
27. Atoms in some light bulbs : ARGONS
28. ... a housecleaner? : NEAT WORK (from “Network”)
30. ... a sled racer? : SNOW VOYAGER (from “Now, Voyager”)
32. Children's author Silverstein : SHEL
33. "Yikes!" : EEK!
34. "You betcha" : YUP
37. Year "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" came out : MCM
38. China's Chiang ___-shek : KAI
41. Part of a pound : CAGE
44. ... a bee during a downpour? : STINGIN’ IN THE RAIN (from “Singin’ in the Rain”)
51. Up : AWAKE
53. Part of E.M.S.: Abbr. : EMER
54. Wall St. Journal listings : IPOS
55. Handles : TENDS
56. ... actor Jason's fan club? : BATEMAN FOREVER (from “Batman Forever”)
59. Least volatile, perhaps : SAFEST
60. Some patches : IRON-ONS
61. Expert despite little training : NATURAL
63. Brainy person, and proud of it : NERD
64. One might have a ball : DEB
66. Public health agcy. : CDC
67. Senate vote : NAY
68. Verdant : LUSH
72. Device Professor X wears over his head in "X-Men" : CEREBRO
74. Pop singer Bedingfield : NATASHA
76. Low-maintenance potted plant : CACTUS
80. ... Jerry Garcia's band's portraits? : DRAWN OF THE DEAD (from “Dawn of the Dead”)
84. ___ water : IN HOT
85. Air : MIEN
86. It's west of the International Date Line : ASIA
87. High clouds : CIRRI
88. ... a parent's edicts? : TEEN COMMANDMENTS (from “(The) Ten Commandments”)
92. ___ Zone : ESPN
93. "Gag me!" : EWW!
94. Certain extraction : ORE
95. One-named R&B singer : MYA
96. Pitches : ADS
98. Stripped : BARE
100. ... a king's brilliance? : REGAL GENIUS (from “Real Genius”)
108. ... a harvester? : GRAIN MAN (from “Rain Man”)
112. Get hot : ENRAGE
113. Kind of bean : PINTO
114. Who wrote "Wherever Law ends, Tyranny begins" : LOCKE
115. Hidden DVD feature ... which can be found, literally, in the answers to the italicized clues : EASTER EGG
117. City south of Brigham City : OGDEN
118. Peptic ___ : ULCER
119. Nonstop : ON END
120. Lucy of "Kill Bill" : LIU
121. Object : THING
122. Wherewithal : MEANS
123. Part of N.B. : NOTA
124. Back-to-school mo. : SEP
125. Laurel and Lee : STANS

Down
1. Starts of some games : DEALS
2. ___ Outfitters, clothing retailer : URBAN
3. Mythological figure often depicted holding a kithara : ERATO
4. 1945 Best Picture winner, with "The" : LOST WEEKEND
5. Album holder : SLEEVE
6. Evaluate : ASSAY
7. Prefix with fluoride : TETRA-
8. Recurring Stephen King antagonist Randall ___ : FLAGG
9. Vise parts : JAWS
10. ___ Lovelace, computer pioneer : ADA
11. "The Way You Look Tonight" composer : KERN
12. De bene ___ (legal phrase) : ESSE
13. Music genre of Possessed and Deicide : DEATH METAL
14. Hollywood's Russell : CROWE
15. Two-time Emmy-winning actress for "Taxi" : CAROL KANE
16. Observatory subj. : ASTR
17. Bill : BEAK
20. English king who was a son of William the Conqueror : HENRY I
24. Smelt ___ : ROE
29. Noted American writer in Yiddish : ASCH
31. Signs off on : OKS
35. Computer used to predict the 1952 presidential election : UNIVAC
36. Chemical dropper : PIPET
37. The 57-Down, e.g. : MTS
39. Supports : AIDS
40. M.I.T. part: Abbr. : INST
41. Airplane area : CABIN
42. Sentient : AWARE
43. Big snapper? : GATOR
45. More wound up : TENSER
46. World banking org. : IMF
47. Prefix with noir : NEO-
48. [I'm not happy about this ...] : GRR
49. Like some stockings and baseball games : NO-RUN
50. Gridiron figure : REF
52. Music related to punk rock : EMO
57. Aconcagua setting : ANDES
58. Fund : ENDOW
59. Just what the doctor ordered? : SAY AH
62. Vituperate : RANT AT
65. Darken : BEDIM
66. Nook : CRANNY
68. Weekly bar promotion, maybe : LADIES NIGHT
69. ___ manual : USER’S
70. Exactly : SHARP
71. Allowed to enter : HAD IN
72. Wasn't exacting : CUT CORNERS
73. Pond fish : BREAM
75. Sam Spade, e.g., for short : TEC
76. Île de la ___ : CITE
77. Once again : ANEW
78. Solo companion : CHEWBACCA
79. Slew : TON
81. Subject of the Pentagon Papers, informally : NAM
82. Sugar suffix : -OSE
83. Word at the end of many French films : FIN
85. Fr. title : MME
89. City SSE of 117-Across : OREM
90. Son-of-a-gun : DARNED
91. Yield to weariness : SAG
97. Stations : DEPOTS
99. Poet Conrad : AIKEN
101. Mess up : ERR
102. Ones who wrote in the Ogham alphabet : GAELS
103. New Mexico State athlete : AGGIE
104. Helping hand, paradoxically : LEG UP
105. World powerhouse in cricket : INDIA
106. Knoxville sch. : UTENN
107. Fake-book material : SONGS
108. Down : GLUM
109. Part of a play : ROLE
110. Many ages : AEON
111. iPod ___ : NANO
112. Home of Typhon, in myth : ETNA
116. ___ for life : SET


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0330-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Mar 13, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Gareth Bain
THEME: None
COMPLETION TIME: 40m 30s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. In-box material for some agents : SCRIPTS
Talent agents get a lot of scripts in their in-boxes, potential jobs for their clients.

15. Stock pantomime character : PIERROT
A pierrot is character appearing often in pantomimes, particularly of the French variety. A pierrot is a man dressed in white, in a loose blouse with large buttons down the center. He also wears heavy white makeup, and behaves somewhat like a buffoon.

16. Decorative server : SAMOVAR
The samovar originated in Russia, and is often a very elegant water boiler, usually for making tea. As such, there is often an attachment on top of a samovar to keep a teapot warm.

23. A cyclone is a big one : LOW
A cyclone is a weather system, something like a tropical storm. It is composed of air circulating rapidly around a low pressure center. In the northern hemisphere, cyclones circulate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas in the southern hemisphere they circulate clockwise.

24. Wisconsin port : KENOSHA
Kenosha, Wisconsin is a city on the western shore of Lake Michigan. Given its location, Kenosha has strong ties with both Milwaukee and Chicago. The name Kenosha is an anglicized form of “gnozhé”, the Native American name for an early settlement in the area that translates as “place of the pike”.

32. Writer of the lines "Pigeons on the grass alas. / Pigeons on the grass alas" : STEIN
“Pigeons on the grass alas” is the most famous aria in the opera “Four Saints in Three Acts. The opera was composed by Virgil Thomson with a libretto by Gertrude Stein.

Gertrude Stein was a great American writer who spent most of her life in France. Gertrude Stein met Alice B. Toklas in Paris in 1907 and the two were life partners until Stein died in 1946. Cleverly, Stein published her own memoirs in 1933 but called the book "The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas". It was to become her best selling title.

35. "The Mikado" weapon : SNEE
"Snick or snee" is the name given to cut and thrust while fighting with a knife. The phrase is rooted in a pair of Dutch words and it gave its name to a "snee", a light sword-like knife.

"The Mikado" is a wonderful comic opera by Gilbert and Sullivan, set in the exotic location of Japan. "Mikado" is a former term for the "Emperor of Japan".

36. Emperor who built the Domus Aurea : NERO
Following the great fire of 64 AD in Rome, many large homes on the slopes of Palatine Hill in the center of the city were burned to the ground. The emperor Nero cleared the area completely and used the land to construct an extravagant villa called the Domus Aurea (Latin for “Golden House”).

37. Gerontologist's study : THE AGING PROCESS
Gerontology is the study of all aspects of aging, including the biology, psychology and sociology. Geriatrics is the study of diseases encountered in older adults.

43. Watching the big game, say : ON SAFARI
"Safari" is a Swahili word, meaning "journey" or "expedition".

46. Like Rome, it's said : ETERNAL
The Italian capital of Rome is known as “The Eternal City”, a name given by ancient Roman poets and writers.

48. Blue, in a way: Abbr. : DEM
On political maps, red states are Republican and blue states Democrat. The designation of red and blue states is a very recent concept, only introduced in the 2000 presidential election by TV journalist, the late Tim Russert. In retrospect, the choice of colors is surprising, as in other democracies around the world red is usually used to describe left-leaning socialist parties (the reds under the bed!), and blue is used for conservative right-wing parties. In election cycles, swing/battleground states are often depicted in purple, the color formed by mixing red and blue.

56. Symbol of elasticity, in economics : ETA
Elasticity in the world of economics is a mathematical concept. An elastic variable is one that might be varied by changing something else. For example, in some markets one can lower the price of goods and thereby increase the volume of sales. Sometimes variables are inelastic. For example, sales volume might be described as inelastic if chaning the price has no effect.

57. Paper work : ORIGAMI
The Japanese word “origami” is derived from ori (folding) and kami (paper).

Down
1. Door-to-door delivery : SPIEL
A spiel is a lengthy speech or argument designed to persuade, like a sales pitch. "Spiel" comes to us from German, either directly ("spiel" is the German for "play") or via the Yiddish "shpil".

2. Important part of mayo : CINCO
The celebration known as Cinco de Mayo is observed all over the US and in parts of Mexico. Cinco de Mayo is not, as some believe, Mexico’s Independence Day. Independence is celebrated on September 16, whereas Cinco de Mayo is of course celebrated on September 5th. Cinco de Mayo commemorates the Mexican victory over the French at the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862.

4. N.Y.C. line : IRT
The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the original private operator of the New York Subway when it opened in 1904. The city took over ownership of the system in 1940, but the lines originally operated by the IRT are still known by the IRT moniker.

5. Alpha senior? : PROM KING
The alpha (leader) in the senior class of a high school might be crowned prom king.

6. One side in the Revolutionary War : TORIES
During the American Revolution, those advocating Independence were known as Patriots. Those who stayed loyal to Britain were called Loyalists or Tories.

12. Iris's location : UVEA
The uvea is the middle of the three layers that make up the eyeball.

The iris is the colored part of the eye with an aperture in the center that can open or close depending on the level of light hitting the eye.

13. Orangish gem : SARD
Sard is a reddish-brown gem that is often referred to as Carnelian, although generally sard is harder and darker. Sard probably takes its name from the Persian word "sered" meaning yellowish-red.

14. Wall St. manipulators : ARBS
"Arb" is short for an arbitrageur, one who profits from the purchase of securities in one market and the subsequent sale in another, hence taking advantage of price discrepancies across markets.

21. 1968 #2 hit with the lyric "My love for you is way out of line" : YOUNG GIRL
“Young Girl” is a very catchy and dramatic song released in 1968 by Gary Puckett & the Union Gap. The song tells the story of a man who is heartbroken to discover that the love of his life is underage.

26. Mustang competitor : MIATA
I've always liked the looks of the Mazda Miata, probably because it reminds me so much of old British sports cars. The Miata is built in Hiroshima, Japan.

The Ford Mustang car was introduced in 1964. Back then the Mustang wasn’t a brand new design, but was based on the Ford Falcon. The Mustang was the first of the “pony cars”, American models that are compact, affordable, and sporty in image and performance.

28. Inti worshipers : INCAS
Inti was the sun god worshiped by the Incas. Images depicting Inti are featured on the national flags of several nations, including Argentina and Uruguay.

29. End of a dictionary : ZEES
The letter named "zed" has been around since about 1400, and derives from the Greek letter zeta. The spelling and pronunciation of "zee" used in America today first popped up in the 1670s.

30. At one time in the past? : ERST
Erstwhile means "in the past" or "once upon a time".

32. Town in '44 headlines : ST LO
Saint-Lô is a town in Normandy that was occupied by Germany in 1940. Saint-Lo stood at a strategic crossroads and so there was intense fighting there during the Normandy invasion of 1944. After a prolonged bombardment, very little of the town was left standing.

33. Gracile : THIN
Something described as “gracile” is “gracefully slender”.

38. "Kiss Me, Kate" song : I HATE MEN
"Kiss Me, Kate" is a musical written by Cole Porter first produced on Broadway in 1948. Cole Porter had a string of successes in the twenties and thirties including "Gay Divorce" and "Anything Goes", but he found his career in decline in the forties. "Kiss Me, Kate" proved to be a dramatic come back, and was the only one of his shows that ran for more than 1,000 performances on Broadway.

44. XX : FEMALE
In most mammalian species, including man, females have two identical sex chromosomes (XX) and males two distinct sex chromosomes (XY). As a result it is the males who determine the sex of the offspring. However, in birds the opposite is true and so females determine the sex of the chicks.

45. Annie once played by Ethel Merman : OAKLEY
“Annie Get Your Gun” is an Irving Berlin musical, first performed on Broadway in 1946. The show is a fictionalized account of the life of sharpshooter Annie Oakley. It was written as a vehicle for Ethel Merman, and when she sang the hit tune “There’s No Business Like Show Business”, she apparently brought down the house.

Ethel Merman was an actress and singer, one noted for having a very powerful voice. Merman was married and divorced four times, the last time to the actor Ernest Borgnine albeit for only 32 days in 1964.

47. Iridescent material : NACRE
Nacre is another name for mother-of-pearl. Nacre is the strong iridescent material laid down by some mollusks on the inside of their shells, and it's also what makes up pearls. The creature lays down nacre as a defensive mechanism, protecting the soft tissue of its body from the rough surface of the outer shell. Similarly, it uses nacre to encapsulate harmful debris or a parasite that penetrates the shell, and that's how a pearl is formed.

48. Messing around on TV? : DEBRA
Debra Messing’s most famous role is Grace, in the television series “Will & Grace”.

49. Members of les Nations Unies : ETATS
In French, members of the United Nations (les Nations Unies) are sovereign states (états).

53. Privateer who captained the Blessed William : KIDD
William Kidd was a Scottish privateer who went by the name “Captain Kidd”. Although Kidd was a privateer, someone authorized by the government to attack foreign shipping, he was eventually arrested and executed for piracy. There is common opinion held today that the charges against Kidd were actually trumped up.

54. Quaint shout : EGAD
“Egad” developed as a polite way of saying "oh God" in the late 1600s and is an expression of fear or surprise somewhat like "good grief!"

60. Part of a barn : MOW
In a barn, the “mow” is the place where grain and feed is stored.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. In-box material for some agents : SCRIPTS
8. Red, white and blue group : TEAM USA
15. Stock pantomime character : PIERROT
16. Decorative server : SAMOVAR
17. Ahead : IN STORE
18. Wise words : PROVERB
19. Prefix with car : ECO-
20. Boglike : MIRY
22. Puts one's foot down : TREADS
23. A cyclone is a big one : LOW
24. Wisconsin port : KENOSHA
26. Bad start? : MIS-
27. Put to work : UTILIZED
32. Writer of the lines "Pigeons on the grass alas. / Pigeons on the grass alas" : STEIN
35. "The Mikado" weapon : SNEE
36. Emperor who built the Domus Aurea : NERO
37. Gerontologist's study : THE AGING PROCESS
40. You might hear a children's song in one : LILT
41. Some fairy story villains : HAGS
42. Dispatch : HASTE
43. Watching the big game, say : ON SAFARI
45. Army missions : OPS
46. Like Rome, it's said : ETERNAL
48. Blue, in a way: Abbr. : DEM
51. Defiant response : MAKE ME!
55. Skating spot, maybe : LAKE
56. Symbol of elasticity, in economics : ETA
57. Paper work : ORIGAMI
59. Server of food that may be steamed, fried or raw : CLAM BAR
61. Went in tandem? : PEDALED
62. Many are found on beaches : RESORTS
63. Gets down : SADDENS
64. Nonsense : EYEWASH

Down
1. Door-to-door delivery : SPIEL
2. Important part of mayo : CINCO
3. Plant more crops in : RESOW
4. N.Y.C. line : IRT
5. Alpha senior? : PROM KING
6. One side in the Revolutionary War : TORIES
7. Serious : STERN
8. Common 31-Down: Abbr. : TSP
9. Saltier : EARTHIER
10. Neither good nor evil : AMORAL
11. Dance element : MOVE
12. Iris's location : UVEA
13. Orangish gem : SARD
14. Wall St. manipulators : ARBS
21. 1968 #2 hit with the lyric "My love for you is way out of line" : YOUNG GIRL
25. Dance elements : STEPS
26. Mustang competitor : MIATA
28. Inti worshipers : INCAS
29. End of a dictionary : ZEES
30. At one time in the past? : ERST
31. Prescribed amount : DOSE
32. Town in '44 headlines : ST LO
33. Gracile : THIN
34. Ones unable to swim straight? : EELS
35. Bag : SNARE
38. "Kiss Me, Kate" song : I HATE MEN
39. "Gimme a break!" : OH PLEASE!
44. XX : FEMALE
45. Annie once played by Ethel Merman : OAKLEY
47. Iridescent material : NACRE
48. Messing around on TV? : DEBRA
49. Members of les Nations Unies : ETATS
50. Reed section? : MARSH
51. Items in buckets : MOPS
52. Forte : AREA
53. Privateer who captained the Blessed William : KIDD
54. Quaint shout : EGAD
58. They may be checked at an airport : IDS
60. Part of a barn : MOW


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0329-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Mar 13, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Josh Knapp
THEME: Really Bad Guys … we have a mini-theme today, with two answers referring to a third:
26A. Cackling loon with a white coat : MAD SCIENTIST
36A. Goal for many a 26- or 43-Across : WORLD DOMINATION
43A. Mighty heavy : SUPERVILLAIN
COMPLETION TIME: 23m 09s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Verbal shrug : MEH
“Meh!” is one of those terms unfamiliar to me outside of crosswords. It is a modern colloquialism meaning “I’m not great, but not bad”.

14. Pointy-headed sort? : AXE
I guess the idea is that an axe has a pointy head.

15. Whom Turkey's Weeping Rock is said to represent : NIOBE
In Greek mythology, when her children were killed, Niobe fled to Mt. Sipylus where she was turned into stone and wept for eternity. There is in fact a Niobe's Rock on Mt. Sipylus that resembles a female face, and so is known as "The Weeping Rock".

16. Cliff hanger? : AERIE
An aerie is the nest of an eagle.

17. One of two in a plane : DIMENSION
The dimension of an object is defined as the minimum number of coordinates needed to specify each point in the object. Therefore a line is one-dimensional, as you only need an x-coordinate to specify a particular point on the line. A plane is two-dimensional, as you need both an x-coordinate and a y-coordinate to locate a point on the plane. The inside of a solid object is then three-dimensional, needing an x-, y- and z-coordinate to specify a point, say within a cube.

19. Autodom's ZR1, for one : VETTE
The Chevrolet Corvette was introduced to the world in 1953, and was named after the small maneuverable warship called a corvette. The Corvette has legs. It is the only American sports car that has been around for over 50 years.

20. Writer Moore or Moorehead : ALAN
Alan Moore is an English writer of graphic novels, a term that Moore himself introduced in order to differentiate his work from “comic books”.

25. Brother : FRIAR
Friars and nuns differ from each other in that monks lived cloistered, self-sufficient lives that are very simple. Friars live simple lives in the service of a community, and depend on that community’s financial support.

34. Dungeons & Dragons weapon : MACE
Dungeons & Dragons is a complex role-playing game first published in 1974, by Tactical Studies Rules Incorporated (TSR). Dungeons & Dragons was probably the first of the modern role-playing games to be developed, and the most successful. It is still played by lots of people today, including my nerdy son ...

41. Its products often have Allen wrenches included : IKEA
Did you know that IKEA was founded by Ingvar Kamprad in 1943 when he was just 17-years-old??!! IKEA is an acronym that stands for Ingvar Kamprad Elmtaryd Agunnaryd (don't forget now!). Elmtaryd was the name of the farm where Ingvar Kamprad grew up, and Agunnaryd is his home parish in Sweden.

The Allen wrench (or “Allen key”, as we call it back in Ireland) is a successful brand of hex wrench that was trademarked in 1943 by the Allen Manufacturing Company of Hartford , Connecticut. However, the hex wrench had in fact been around since the mid-to-late 1800s.

47. "My Name Is Earl" co-star Suplee : ETHAN
The actor Ethan Suplee is best-known for playing the title characters bumbling brother on the sitcom “My Name Is Earl”. Suplee recently slimmed down, achieving a total weight loss of over 200 pounds. Good for you, Ethan …

56. Victimizer of Cassio : IAGO
Iago is the schemer in Shakespeare's "Othello". Iago is a soldier who fought alongside Othello and feels hard done by, missing out on promotion. He hatches a plot designed to discredit his rival Cassio by insinuating that Cassio is having an affair with Desdemona, Othello's wife. By the end of the play it's Iago himself who is discredited and Othello (before committing suicide) apologizes to Cassio for having believed Iago's lies. Heavy stuff ...

57. "I Know Who Killed Me" star, 2007 : LOHAN
I think that actress Lindsay Lohan’s big break was in the Disney remake of “The Parent Trap” in 1998. I’ve really only enjoyed one of Lohan’s films though, “Freaky Friday” from 2003 in which she stars alongside the fabulous Jamie Lee Curtis.

“I Know Who Killed Me” is a horror film released in 2007 that stars Lindsay Lohan playing identical twins. Lohan also played identical twins in 1998’s remake of “The Parent Trap”.

64. The out crowd? : NERDS
Dweeb, squarepants, nerd, they're all not-nice terms that mean the same thing: someone excessively studious and socially inept.

65. "Annie" characters : ENS
There are a couple of letters N in the word “Annie”.

Down
4. "Larry's Country Diner" channel : TNN
“Larry’s Country Diner” is a country music variety show that airs on TNN.

7. Strauss wrote a concerto in D for it : OBOE
Richard Strauss wrote his Oboe Concerto near the end of his life, in 1945. The idea for the concerto came from American oboist John de Lancie, who was with an Army unit that took control of the Bavarian town in which Strauss lived at the end of WWII.

11. One preparing an oil pan? : ART CRITIC
The idea here is that an art critic might “pan” (severely criticize) a particular oil painting.

12. ___ bread : PITA
Pita is a lovely bread in Middle-Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines. Pita bread is usually round, and has a "pocket" in the center. The pocket is created by steam that puffs up the dough during cooking leaving a void when the bread cools. The pockets were a big hit in the seventies when someone came up with the idea of using them for fillings hence creating pita sandwiches or "pita pockets".

22. Act the coxcomb : PREEN
A coxcomb is a bit of fop or a dandy. The term comes from “cockscomb”, the comb or crest sported by a cockerel.

28. R. J. Reynolds brand : CAMEL
The advertising mascot for Camel cigarettes was officially known as "Old Joe", but was popularly known as "Joe Camel". Joe originated in the seventies, in an advertising campaign that ran only in Europe where sometimes he was depicted wearing a French Foreign Legion cap. He was imported to the US in 1988 on the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the Camel brand. The big controversy surrounding the use of the camel character was that a 1991 study found that 5-6 year old children could recognize Joe Camel more readily than either Mickey Mouse or Fred Flintstone. Also, soon after Old Joe was introduced in the US, the Camel brand's share of the illegal market to underage smokers went up from 1% to just under 33%.

30. Fox ratings : TENS
A “fox” is a good-looking woman, someone who might be rated a “ten”. Not terms I would use, so don’t shoot the messenger …

31. Stiff bristles : AWNS
Awns are hair or bristle-like structures found in numerous species of plants. In some species, like barley, the awns can contain photosynthetic tissue.

32. ___ Matsuhisa, celebrity chef and restaurateur : NOBU
Nobu Matsuhisa is celebrity chef from Japan. Nobu was invited to open a Japanese restaurant in Lima, Peru in 1973, and while in South America developed his own Peruvian-Japanese fusion cuisine. He moved to the US a few years later, and now there “Nobu” and “Matsuhisa” restaurants all over the world.

33. Small cannon balls : GRAPESHOT
Grapeshot is a type of ammunition used for cannonfire. Grapeshot is made up of small metal balls or slugs wrapped in a canvas bag. When fired, the grapeshot spreads out like the pellets coming out of a shotgun.

37. Ottoman relative : DIVAN
Ottomans and divans are essentially couches without backs or arms.

38. Capital ENE of Fiji : APIA
Apia is the capital city, and in fact the only city, of the Pacific island-nation of Samoa. The harbor of Apia is famous for a very foolish incident in 1889 involving seven naval vessels from Germany, the US and Britain. A typhoon was approaching so the safest thing to do was to head for open water away from land, but no nation would move its ships for fear of losing face in front of the others. Six of the ships were lost in the typhoon as a result and 200 American and German sailors perished. The British cruiser HMS Calliope barely managed to escape from the harbor and rode out the storm safely.

The island nation of Fiji is an archipelago in the South Pacific made up of over 330 islands, 110 of which are inhabited. Fiji was occupied by the British for over a century and finally gained its independence in 1970.

39. Wine colorer : TANNIN
A substance that is astringent is a chemical compound that tends to shrink or constrict body tissues. Some red wines can have an astringent taste, a dry and puckering feeling, because of the presence of tannins. Tannins occur naturally in plants, probably as a defensive measure against predators who shy away from the astringent. The word "tannin" comes from an Old German word for oak or fir tree, as in "Tannenbaum".

44. Second-simplest hydrocarbon : ETHANE
The main component in natural gas is methane, with the second most voluminous constituent being ethane. Both methane and ethane are combustible, and so traditionally the methane and ethane from natural gas were burned together to generate heat. However, since the sixties, ethane has been used as a valuable starter material for the production of ethylene, itself a raw material for polyethylene and other plastics. So, these days the ethane is extracted at a refinery before the natural gas is bottled as a fuel.

45. They may be found in preserves, informally : RHINOS
There are five types of rhinoceros that survive today, and the smaller Javan Rhino is the most rare. The rhinoceros is probably the rarest large mammal on the planet, thanks to poaching. Hunters mainly prize the horn of the rhino as it is used in powdered form in traditional Chinese medicine.

46. Part of the total : ADDEND
“Addend” is short for addendum, and is the name given to any set of numbers that is to be added.

53. Isle near Mull : IONA
Although the small island of Iona lies just off the west coast of Scotland, it was the site of a monastery built in the Middle Ages by a monk from Ireland names Colm Cille (also known as Columba). Colm Cille and his followers were sent into exile from the Irish mainland and settled in Iona, as at that time the island was part of an Irish kingdom. This monastery in Iona expanded its influence over the decades and founded other institutions all over Ireland and Great Britain. It is believed that the famous Book of Kells may have been written, or at least started, at the monastery on Iona. Iona is also the burial site for Macbeth, King of Scotland who was immortalized in Shakespeare’s fictional account of the king’s life.

The Isle of Mull (sometimes called just “Mull”) is part of the Inner Hebrides, which lie off the west coast of Scotland.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Verbal shrug : MEH
4. Beat : THROB
9. Greets the good guy, maybe : CLAPS
14. Pointy-headed sort? : AXE
15. Whom Turkey's Weeping Rock is said to represent : NIOBE
16. Cliff hanger? : AERIE
17. One of two in a plane : DIMENSION
19. Autodom's ZR1, for one : VETTE
20. Writer Moore or Moorehead : ALAN
21. Where people drop off on the line? : SLEEPER CAR
23. Killer bees, e.g. : MENACE
25. Brother : FRIAR
26. Cackling loon with a white coat : MAD SCIENTIST
31. Steam up : ANGER
34. Dungeons & Dragons weapon : MACE
35. With 40-Across, "Inside ___" (postgame show) : THE
36. Goal for many a 26- or 43-Across : WORLD DOMINATION
40. See 35-Across : NBA
41. Its products often have Allen wrenches included : IKEA
42. Dueling count : PACES
43. Mighty heavy : SUPERVILLAIN
47. "My Name Is Earl" co-star Suplee : ETHAN
48. One working on steps : DANCER
52. Means of dropping a line : FISHING ROD
56. Victimizer of Cassio : IAGO
57. "I Know Who Killed Me" star, 2007 : LOHAN
58. Offensive play in 35-/40-Across : GIVE-AND-GO
60. "That's ___!" ("Don't!") : A NO-NO
61. Flip : UPEND
62. Secured : GOT
63. Track lineup : GATES
64. The out crowd? : NERDS
65. "Annie" characters : ENS

Down
1. ___ President : MADAM
2. Many a booted ruler : EXILE
3. One who might do the heavy lifting : HE-MAN
4. "Larry's Country Diner" channel : TNN
5. Greeted the bad guy, maybe : HISSED
6. Churn : ROIL
7. Strauss wrote a concerto in D for it : OBOE
8. Doing good : BENEFICIAL
9. Spineless response to pressure : CAVE IN
10. Examine as a wolf would : LEER AT
11. One preparing an oil pan? : ART CRITIC
12. ___ bread : PITA
13. Forward-thinking type : SEER
18. Protective cover : ENAMEL
22. Act the coxcomb : PREEN
24. Real character : CARD
27. Strong proof : SMOKING GUN
28. R. J. Reynolds brand : CAMEL
29. What's under an arch : SHOE
30. Fox ratings : TENS
31. Stiff bristles : AWNS
32. ___ Matsuhisa, celebrity chef and restaurateur : NOBU
33. Small cannon balls : GRAPESHOT
37. Ottoman relative : DIVAN
38. Capital ENE of Fiji : APIA
39. Wine colorer : TANNIN
44. Second-simplest hydrocarbon : ETHANE
45. They may be found in preserves, informally : RHINOS
46. Part of the total : ADDEND
49. Mooch : CADGE
50. Impel : EGG ON
51. Natural life support system : ROOTS
52. Tire : FLAG
53. Isle near Mull : IONA
54. Strong-smelling, say : RIPE
55. Supervising : OVER
59. Pop-ups, e.g. : ADS


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0328-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Mar 13, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Randolph Ross
THEME: States at the Beginning … today we have a rebus puzzle, with some squares containing the two-letter abbreviation for the original thirteen colonies:
Virginia (VA)
Massachusetts (MA)
New Hampshire (NH)
Maryland (MD)
Connecticut (CT)
Rhode Island (RI)
Delaware (DE)
North Carolina (NC)
South Carolina (SC)
New Jersey (NJ)
New York (NY)
Pennsylvania (PA)
Georgia (GA)

35A. Fourth of July celebrants : AMERICAN CITIZENS
7D. Old group whose members are all represented in this puzzle : THIRTEEN COLONIES
COMPLETION TIME: 34m 27s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. Waikiki warbler : DON HO
Don Ho apparently had a pretty liberal arrangement with his wife. When Ho was touring with his two backing singers, Pattie Swallie and Elizabeth Gevara, all three of them shared a room together. He had two children with each of his roommates, giving a total of ten kids including the six he had with his wife. The arrangement was quite open, it seems, with all ten kids visiting each other regularly. To each his own …

19. 1974 John Carpenter sci-fi film : DARK STAR
“Dark Star” is a sci-fi comedy released in 1974. Director John Carpenter described the movie as “‘Waiting for Godot’ in space”. That means I won’t be watching “Dark Star” …

21. Baudelaire ou Rimbaud : POETE
Charles Baudelaire was a French poet, noted not only for his own work but also for translating the work of American poet Edgar Allen Poe.

Arthur Rimbaud was a poet from France who was active in the latter half of the 19th century. Rimbaud was described by Victor Hugo as “an infant Shakespeare”.

23. Escamillo of "Carmen," e.g. : TOREADOR
"Toreador" is an old Spanish word for a bullfighter, but it's a term not used any more in Spain nor in Latin America. In English we use the term "toreador", but in Spanish a bullfighter is a "torero".

Georg Bizet was a French composer active in the Romantic era. Bizet's most famous work has to be his opera "Carmen". "Carmen" initially received a lukewarm reception from the public, even though his fellow composers had nothing but praise for it. Sadly Bizet died at only 36 years of age, before he could see "Carmen's" tremendous success.

32. Sneaker brand : PUMA
Puma is a German company that sells athletic shoes worldwide, but is most famous for producing soccer boots.

35. Fourth of July celebrants : AMERICAN CITIZENS
On 11 June 1776, the Continental Congress appointed a committee of five people to draft a declaration of independence. Included in the five were John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. Adams persuaded the other committee members to give Jefferson the task of writing the first draft. A resolution of independence was passed by the Congress on 2 Jul 1776. The final draft of the declaration was approved by the Congress two days later, on July 4th. John Adams wrote a letter to his wife that included an assertion that July 2nd (the date of the resolution of independence) would become a great American holiday. Of course Adams was wrong, and it was actually the date the Declaration of Independence was finalized that came to be celebrated annually.

41. ___-European : INDO
The Indo-European languages are a large group that includes most of the major languages of Europe, the Iranian plateau and South Asia. The Indo-European is the largest grouping of languages in the world.

42. Priebus's predecessor as Republican Party chairman : STEELE
Michael Steele served as Chairman of the Republican National Committee from 2009 to 2011 and was the first African American to fill the post.

The current Chairman of the Republican National Committee (RNC) is Reince Priebus. Prior to serving as chairman, Priebus was general counsel for the RNC.

43. Author Sinclair : UPTON
Upton Sinclair was a prolific American author, with almost 100 books to his name. Sinclair's most famous work is probably “The Jungle”, a 1906 novel about the meat packing industry. Revelations in "The Jungle" contributed to the Meat Inspection Act being passed by Congress a few months after the book was published. Sinclair also wrote “Oil”, published in 1927, which was the basis of the 2007 film “There Will Be Blood” that stars Daniel Day-Lewis.

44. Impressionist Frank : CALIENDO
Frank Caliendo is a comedian and impressionist who made a name for himself on “MADtv”. Caliendo also had a show of his own for while called “Frank TV”.

47. Tolkien baddie : ORC
According to Tolkien, Orcs are small humanoids that live in his fantasy world of Middle-earth(also called “Mordor”). They are very ugly and dirty, and are fond of eating human flesh.

49. Washington player : NATIONAL
The Washington Nationals baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005 becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series, one being the Mariners and the other the Nats.

54. Year "Othello" was first performed : MDCIV
Shakespeare’s “Othello” was first performed in 1604. The main characters in the play are:
- Othello, a general in the army of Venice
- Desdemona, Othello’s wife
- Cassio, Othello’s trusted ensign
- Iago, the villain of the piece

57. Fiats : DICTA
A "fiat" is an arbitrary rule that is imposed, and is the Latin for "let it be done".

58. Novelist Ferber : EDNA
Edna Ferber won the Pulitzer for her novel "So Big", which was made into a film a few times, most famously in 1953 starring Jane Wyman.

61. Maiden name preceder : NEE
"Née" is the French word for "born" when referring to a female. The male equivalent is "né".

63. ___-culotte : SANS
A “sans-culotte” is a revolutionary extremist. The term originated with the politically active urban laborers during the French Revolution. These laborers made up the majority of the Revolutionary Army and wore “pantalons” (pants) as opposed to the fancier “culottes” (silk knee-breeches) of the bourgeois classes.

Down
2. Soft seat : SOFA
"Sofa" is a Turkish word meaning "bench".

3. "___ Majesty's Secret Service" : ON HER
"On Her Majesty's Secret Service" is the sixth of the James Bond films, and the only one to star George Lazenby in the leading role. He wasn't a great choice for 007 ...

5. Company that makes Turf Builder : SCOTTS
Scotts Miracle-Gro Company was founded in 1868 by one Orlando Scott, initially selling seed to the agricultural industry. In the early 1900s, Scotts started to sell to homeowners, mainly supplying lawn seed. The company merged with the gardening company Miracle-Gro in 1955.

6. Cutting-edge product? : ATRA
Fortunately for crossword setters, the Atra razor was introduced by Gillette in 1977. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

7. Old group whose members are all represented in this puzzle : THIRTEEN COLONIES
The original thirteen colonies collaborated to set up a Continental Congress that led to the declaration of independence in 1776. There was a larger set of colonies in British America at that time, but the remainder opted to stay loyal to the Crown. The loyal colonies were the British West Indies, Newfoundland, the Province of Quebec, Nova Scotia, and East and West Florida.

8. Like a cool cat : HEP
The slang term "hep" meaning "cool" has the same meaning as the later derivative term "hip". The origins of "hep" seem unclear, but it was adopted by jazz musicians of the early 1900s.

12. Tom who followed Johnny Carson on NBC : SNYDER
Tom Snyder was a news anchor and radio/television personality who worked for NBC and CBS in the seventies and eighties. Snyder was best known for his late night appearances hosting “The Tomorrow Show” and “The Late Late Show”.

21. "Jar of Hearts" singer Christina : PERRI
Christina Perri is a singer-songwriter from Philadelphia. Perri’s big hit was “Jar of Hearts” released in 2010, which was helped along when it was showcased on the TV show “So You Think You Can Dance”.

24. Relating to songbirds : OSCINE
The adjective "oscine" describes birds belonging to the suborder Oscine, a group that includes most songbirds.

26. Places for sweaters : SPAS
The word "spa" migrated into English from Belgium, as Spa is the name of a municipality in the east of the country that is famous for its healing hot springs. The name "Spa" comes from the Walloon word "espa" meaning "spring, fountain".

27. N.F.C. South city : TAMPA
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers joined the NFL in 1976 along with the Seattle Seahawks as expansion teams. The Bucs had a tough start in the NFL, losing their first 26 games. Things went better in the early eighties, but then the team went through 14 consecutive losing seasons. Their luck changed again though, and they won the Super Bowl at the end of the 2002 season.

29. Not for tweens, say : R-RATED
The term "tween" is now used to describe preadolescence, the years between 10 and 12 years of age.

36. Sponsor of an annual science competition : INTEL
Intel is the world’s largest manufacturer of semiconductor chips. The company was founded in 1968, and the name “Intel” is a derived from the term "int(egrated) el(ectronics)".

37. ___ brothers (Hollywood duo) : COEN
I think it's great to see two brothers working together and being so successful. Joel and Ethan Coen are two movie producers and directors who both live in New York City. The Coen brothers do love the movie-making business and they even married industry "insiders". Ethan's wife is film editor Tricia Cooke, and Joel is married to one of my favorite actresses, the lovely Frances McDormand.

38. Numbers needed for letters : ZIP CODES
ZIP codes were introduced in 1963. The acronym ZIP stands for Zone Improvement Plan, a name indicating that mail travels more efficiently when the codes are included in the postal address.

42. Best-selling thriller author Daniel ___ : SILVA
Daniel Silva is a bestselling thriller author from Michigan. Silva’s first novel was a “New York Times” bestseller called “The Unlikely Spy”. Silva followed up with a string of hit novels featuring her hero, an art restorer named Gabriel Allon.

43. Geller with claims of paranormal powers : URI
Uri Geller's most famous performance is perhaps his uncomfortable failure on "The Tonight Show" with Johnny Carson in 1973. Carson "hi-jacked" Geller on live television by providing him with spoons to bend and watches to start, none of which had been available to Geller before the show aired. Clever!

44. ___ Yards : CAMDEN
Oriole Park is home to the Baltimore Orioles baseball team. The full name of the stadium is Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

46. Cleo of jazz : LAINE
Cleo Laine is a jazz singer from England who is noted for her remarkable range of nearly four octaves. Laine is the only female performer to have received Grammy nominations in each of the classical, jazz and popular music categories. My favorite of her recordings is “He Was Beautiful”, which is also known as "Cavatina" and is a version of the theme from the film “The Deer Hunter”.

47. Several Holy Roman emperors : OTTOS
Otto I through Otto VI were all Holy Roman Emperors.

The Holy Roman Empire (HRE) existed from 962 to 1806 AD and was a territory of varying size over the centuries that centered on the Kingdom of Germany. The HRE was a successor to the western half of the Ancient Roman Empire.

51. Masked assassin : NINJA
The ninjas were around in Japan at the time of the samurai, but were a very different type of warrior. The ninjas were covert operatives, specializing in the use of stealth to accomplish their missions. As they were a secretive cadre they took on a mystical reputation with the public, who believed they had the ability to become invisible or perhaps walk on water.

53. Wise alternative : LAY’S
Lay's potato chips were introduced in 1938 by Herman W. Lay. Lay started selling his chips out the trunk of his car, travelling all over the US. In those days the chips were pretty much handmade, but Lay put an end to that in 1942. He invented the first continuous potato processor in 1948, and chips started to take over the world!

The Wise Potato Chip Company was founded in 1921 by Earl Wise, Sr.

56. 7 on an old phone : PRS
In days gone by, telephone keypads had three letters written below each of the numbers 2 through 9. These eight numerical keys only allowed for 24 letters, so two letters had to be omitted, namely Q and Z. So, the 7-key has the letters PRS and 9-key the letters WXY.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Beginning with : AS OF
5. Criticize harshly : SCATHE
10. Aging equipment? : VATS
13. Waikiki warbler : DON HO
14. It's often the last choice : OTHER
15. Full of salt : BRINY
16. Table : DEFER
17. Sets off : TRIPS
18. Didn't just mislead someone : LIED
19. 1974 John Carpenter sci-fi film : DARK STAR
21. Baudelaire ou Rimbaud : POETE
22. Inarticulate comebacks : OHS
23. Escamillo of "Carmen," e.g. : TOREADOR
26. Hot spot : STOVE
29. Vacation destination : RESORT
30. Smooth, in a way : PAVE
31. Come and go : RECUR
32. Sneaker brand : PUMA
35. Fourth of July celebrants : AMERICAN CITIZENS
39. Bridge : SPAN
40. Backstage : NOT ON
41. ___-European : INDO
42. Priebus's predecessor as Republican Party chairman : STEELE
43. Author Sinclair : UPTON
44. Impressionist Frank : CALIENDO
47. Tolkien baddie : ORC
48. Have ___ (live it up) : A BALL
49. Washington player : NATIONAL
54. Year "Othello" was first performed : MDCIV
55. Cheerleader's asset : SPIRIT
57. Fiats : DICTA
58. Novelist Ferber : EDNA
59. Playground retort : ARE SO!
60. Relish : ENJOY
61. Maiden name preceder : NEE
62. Fills the tank, with "up" : GASSES
63. ___-culotte : SANS

Down
1. Extra : ADDED
2. Soft seat : SOFA
3. "___ Majesty's Secret Service" : ON HER
4. Pay : FORK OVER
5. Company that makes Turf Builder : SCOTTS
6. Cutting-edge product? : ATRA
7. Old group whose members are all represented in this puzzle : THIRTEEN COLONIES
8. Like a cool cat : HEP
9. Hectic places in hosps. : ERS
10. Not the same : VARIED
11. Connect with : TIE TO
12. Tom who followed Johnny Carson on NBC : SNYDER
15. Swell : BLOAT
20. Yonder yacht : SHE
21. "Jar of Hearts" singer Christina : PERRI
24. Relating to songbirds : OSCINE
25. Blowout victory : ROUT
26. Places for sweaters : SPAS
27. N.F.C. South city : TAMPA
28. It takes the cake : OVEN
29. Not for tweens, say : R-RATED
32. Locked (up) : PENT
33. Reverse : UNDO
34. Trowel user : MASON
36. Sponsor of an annual science competition : INTEL
37. ___ brothers (Hollywood duo) : COEN
38. Numbers needed for letters : ZIP CODES
42. Best-selling thriller author Daniel ___ : SILVA
43. Geller with claims of paranormal powers : URI
44. ___ Yards : CAMDEN
45. Start of "The Alphabet Song" : ABCDE
46. Cleo of jazz : LAINE
47. Several Holy Roman emperors : OTTOS
50. Heed the alarm : ARISE
51. Masked assassin : NINJA
52. Do something about : ACT ON
53. Wise alternative : LAY’S
55. It's a long story : SAGA
56. 7 on an old phone : PRS


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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