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0501-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 May 13, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Paula Gamache
THEME: May Day Lei Day … May 1 is Lei Day, and so we have a ring of LEI words arranged in a circle in the middle of the grid, defined by the circled letters:
9A. Word heard on 39-/41-Across ALOHA
39A. With 41-Across, annual May 1 celebration LEI
41A. See 39-Across DAY
70A. Performances on 39-/41-Across HULAS
COMPLETION TIME: 15m 02s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Trek ending in Mecca HADJ
“Haji” is the term used for someone who has made a pilgrimage to Mecca, and the term is sometimes also used as a form of address for such a person. The journey itself goes by the name "haj" or "hadj".

5. Boat with a flat bottom SCOW
A scow is a flat-bottomed boat with squared-off ends that's often used for transportation, usually pushed or pulled by a barge. Often a scow can be seen carrying junk or garbage.

9. Word heard on 39-/41-Across ALOHA
The Hawaiian word "Aloha" has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently "aloha" has come to mean "hello" and "goodbye", but only since the mid-1800s.

14. Et ___ ALIA
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact "et al." can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

16. Metallic veins LODES
A lode is metal ore deposit that's found between two layers of rock or in a fissure.

18. Jessica of "Hitchcock" BIEL
Jessica Biel is an actress who was known by television audiences Mary Camden on “7th Heaven”. Biel's first film role was playing Peter Fonda’s granddaughter in “Ulee’s Gold”. Biel’s husband is singer and actor Justin Timberlake.

“Hitchcock” is a 2012 biographical film that gives a comedic slant to the story of famed director Alfred Hitchcock. Anthony Hopkins is in the title role, with an outstanding supporting cast that includes Helen Mirren, Scarlett Johansson, Toni Collette and Jessica Biel. The film’s storyline revolves around the making of the 1960 hit “Psycho”.

19. Hand game choice EVENS
Odds and evens is hand game played to choose between two options. It’s a simpler version of rock, paper, scissors.

20. Hand sanitizer brand PURELL
Purell is a hand sanitizer that uses ethanol as the active ingredient. In fact, Purell contains over 60% ethanol, and there have been stories about the sanitizer being ingested to get at the alcohol, even though the manufacturer deliberately adds a bitter-tasting ingredient to scare off potential drinkers.

22. Halves of sawbucks FIVERS
"Sawbuck" is slang for a ten dollar bill. The term was applied to the bill as the Roman numeral X (ten) resembles the end of sawhorse.

34. Member of the cat family FELID
Cats belong to the biological family Felidae, and so are called felids. Felids fall into two subfamilies: Pantherinae (e.g. tiger and lion) and Felinae (e.g. cougar and domestic cat).

35. Coat color ROAN
A roan horse has an even mixture of white and colored hairs on the body with the head, lower legs, mane and tail having a more solid color.

38. Gray head? LEE
Robert E. Lee is of course renowned as a southern officer in the Civil War. Lee was a somewhat reluctant participant in the war in that he opposed the secession of his home state of Virginia from the Union. At the beginning of the war, President Lincoln invited Lee to take command of the whole Union Army but he declined, choosing instead to stay loyal to his home state.

39. With 41-Across, annual May 1 celebration LEI
41. See 39-Across DAY
What’s known as May Day around the world is also called Lei Day in Hawaii. Lei Day started in the twenties and is a celebration of native Hawaiian culture.

43. "Do Ya" grp. ELO
ELO of course stands for the Electric Light Orchestra, a symphonic rock group from the north of England. ELO’s manager was Don Arden, father of Sharon Osbourne (wife of Ozzy). "Ole ELO" is a compilation album the band released in 1976.

44. 1998 Sarah McLachlan hit ADIA
Apparently the song "Adia", co-written by Sarah McLachlan, was intended as an apology to her best friend ... for stealing her ex-boyfriend and then marrying him!

56. Charlotte ___, Virgin Islands AMALIE
Charlotte Amalie is the capital and largest city in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The city was named after the queen consort of King Christian V of Denmark, Charlotte Amalie of Hesse-Kassel.

58. Clodhopper LUMMOX
The word "lummox" comes from East Anglian slang (northeast of London). The term is probably a contraction of "lumbering ox".

63. "Star Wars" sister LEIA
Princess Leia is Luke Skywalker’s sister in the original "Star Wars" trilogy and was played by Carrie Fisher. Carrie Fisher has stated that she hated the famous "cinnamon bun hairstyle" that she had to wear in the films, as she felt it made her face look too round. She also had to to sit for two hours every day just to get her hair styled. Two hours to get your hair done? It takes me just two seconds ...

67. Debussy's "___ de Lune" CLAIR
“Clair de lune” is the beautiful third movement from Claude Debussy’s piano work called the “Suite bergamasque”. “Clair de lune” is French for “moonlight”.

69. Chekhovian sister of Masha and Irina OLGA
Olga, Masha and Irina were the “Three Sisters” in the play by Anton Chekhov.

Anton Chekhov was a Russian writer of short stories and a playwright, as well as a physician. He wrote four classic plays that are often performed all around the world, namely “The Seagull”, “Uncle Vanya”, “Three Sisters” and “The Cherry Orchard”. All the time Chekhov was writing, he continued to practice medicine. He is quoted as saying “Medicine is my lawful wife, and literature is my mistress.”

70. Performances on 39-/41-Across HULAS
Hula is the name of the Polynesian dance. The chant or song that the dance illustrates, that's known as the mele.

Down
2. Baseball family name ALOU
Jesus Alou played major league baseball, as did his brothers Matty and Felipe, and as does Felipe's son, Moises.

3. J'adore fragrance maker DIOR
Christian Dior was a French fashion designer. As WWII approached, Dior was called up by the French military, imposing a temporary halt to his career in fashion. He left the army in 1942 and for the duration of the war designed clothes for wives of Nazi officers and French collaborators. After the war his designs became so popular that he helped reestablish Paris as the fashion center of the world.

4. King replaced by William and Mary JAMES II
King James II of England and Ireland was also King James VII of Scotland. James II ascended to the throne on the death of his brother Charles II. James was the last Roman Catholic monarch to rule over England, Scotland and Ireland. It was his religion that led to his fall from the throne when was forced to flee from England in 1688. James was replaced by his Protestant daughter and her husband, who ruled together as Mary II and William III (aka William II of Scotland).

6. Feng shui "energy" CHI
Feng shui is the ancient Chinese tradition of arranging objects, buildings and other structures in a manner that is said to improve the lives of the individuals living in or using the space. "Feng shui" translates as "wind-water", a reference to the belief that positive and negative life forces ride the wind and scatter, but are retained when they encounter water.

7. Only partner? ONE
The one and only …

8. Author Tobias WOLFF
Tobias Wolff is an author from Birmingham, Alabama. Noted for his memoirs, Wolff’s most famous work is “This Boy’s Life”, which was adapted into a movie starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Robert De Niro.

9. British academic exam A-LEVEL
The UK's education system was reformed in the fifties with the introduction of the General Certificate of Education (GCE). There were two levels of certification that could be awarded in most subjects. The Ordinary Level (O-Level) was a much less rigorous standard of examination than the Advanced Level (A-Level).

10. "Wouldn't It Be ___?" ("My Fair Lady" song) LOVERLY
“My Fair Lady” is the Lerner and Loewe musical that is based on the George Bernard Shaw play “Pygmalion”.

11. River to the Baltic ODER
The River Oder (Odra in Czech/Polish) rises in the Czech Republic and forms just over a hundred miles of the border between Germany and Poland, before eventually emptying into the Baltic Sea.

21. Tennis great Ivan LENDL
Ivan Lendl is a former professional tennis player from Czechoslovakia. Lendl appeared in eight consecutive US Open finals in the eighties, a record that stands to this day.

23. Turner autobiography I, TINA
"I, Tina" is the 1986 autobiography of Tina Turner. The book was so successful it was adapted into a movie called "What's Love Got to Do With It?" The film version was released in 1993 and starring Angela Bassett as Tina Turner.

Tina Turner is actually a stage name used by Anna Mae Bullock, the "Queen of Rock 'n' Roll". Turner has always loved Europe and moved there in the eighties. She now splits her time between her homes in England, France and Switzerland.

25. Something watched on télévision SERIE
In French, one might watch a television series (télévision serie).

27. Company with a duck in its logo AFLAC
In 1999 Aflac was huge in the world of insurance but it wasn't a household name, so a New York advertising agency was given the task of making the Aflac brand more memorable. One of the agency's art directors, while walking around Central Park one lunchtime, heard a duck quacking and in his mind linked it with "Aflac", and that duck has been "Aflacking" ever since ...

29. Kind of acid used in making soap OLEIC
Oleic Acid is a fatty acid, found in many animal and plants sources, but most notably in olives. As such, “Oleic” means “derived from the olive”.

31. Beer brand owned by Pabst PIELS
The Piels Brewery in Brooklyn was founded by the three Piels brothers back in 1883. It must have been a great place to work, because Piels employees were apparently guaranteed cold beer on tap 24 hours a day by virtue of their union contract.

40. Montaigne work ESSAI
Michel de Montaigne was a prominent writer of the French Renaissance, and is noted for making popular the essay ("essai" in French") as a legitimate genre of literature.

42. Bulldog's place, in brief YALE U
The Yale Bulldogs are the athletic teams of Yale University. The Yale school mascot is “Handsome Dan”, the Yale bulldog.

45. Land on the Adriatic ALBANIA
The Republic of Albania is a country in the Balkans in southeastern Europe. Albania was made a communist state after WWII but became independent again with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990.

47. Pitching stat ERA
The pitching stat earned run average (ERA) measures how many runs a pitcher tends to give up per nine innings.

56. Free speech supporter: Abbr. ACLU
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has its roots in the First World War when it was founded to provide legal advice and support to conscientious objectors.

64. Want ad inits. EEO
Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) is a term that has been around since 1964 when the Equal Employment Commission was set up by the Civil Rights Act.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Trek ending in Mecca HADJ
5. Boat with a flat bottom SCOW
9. Word heard on 39-/41-Across ALOHA
14. Et ___ ALIA
15. "Well, I don't think so" UH, NO
16. Metallic veins LODES
17. Bath, e.g. ROOM
18. Jessica of "Hitchcock" BIEL
19. Hand game choice EVENS
20. Hand sanitizer brand PURELL
22. Halves of sawbucks FIVERS
24. Tends to SEES AFTER
27. Made sacred ANOINTED
30. Treater's declaration I’LL PAY
34. Member of the cat family FELID
35. Coat color ROAN
37. "Egad!" YIPE!
38. Gray head? LEE
39. With 41-Across, annual May 1 celebration LEI
41. See 39-Across DAY
43. "Do Ya" grp. ELO
44. 1998 Sarah McLachlan hit ADIA
46. Appear SEEM
48. Running, poetically AFLOW
50. Bikes CYCLES
52. Pragmatic sorts REALISTS
54. Behave perfectly BE AN ANGEL
56. Charlotte ___, Virgin Islands AMALIE
58. Clodhopper LUMMOX
62. Public spat SCENE
63. "Star Wars" sister LEIA
66. Frat house alternative DORM
67. Debussy's "___ de Lune" CLAIR
68. Look like a creep LEER
69. Chekhovian sister of Masha and Irina OLGA
70. Performances on 39-/41-Across HULAS
71. Long ago YORE
72. Fool (with) MESS

Down
1. Plucked instrument HARP
2. Baseball family name ALOU
3. J'adore fragrance maker DIOR
4. King replaced by William and Mary JAMES II
5. Temporary residence, maybe SUBLET
6. Feng shui "energy" CHI
7. Only partner? ONE
8. Author Tobias WOLFF
9. British academic exam A-LEVEL
10. "Wouldn't It Be ___?" ("My Fair Lady" song) LOVERLY
11. River to the Baltic ODER
12. Female fowl HENS
13. Blockhead ASS
21. Tennis great Ivan LENDL
23. Turner autobiography I, TINA
25. Something watched on télévision SERIE
26. Hoopla ADO
27. Company with a duck in its logo AFLAC
28. Poor NEEDY
29. Kind of acid used in making soap OLEIC
31. Beer brand owned by Pabst PIELS
32. Hatch ___ (conspire) A PLOT
33. Shrieks of pain YEOWS
36. Pitching professionals ADMEN
40. Montaigne work ESSAI
42. Bulldog's place, in brief YALE U
45. Land on the Adriatic ALBANIA
47. Pitching stat ERA
49. The cinema FILMDOM
51. Fishers with pots EELERS
53. Shining AGLARE
55. Nice ___ (prude) NELLY
56. Free speech supporter: Abbr. ACLU
57. Coarse powder MEAL
59. Subversive one MOLE
60. 56-Down and others: Abbr. ORGS
61. Short winter holiday? XMAS
62. Institute, e.g.: Abbr. SCH
64. Want ad inits. EEO
65. Suffix with hotel -IER

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Posted by Bill Butler
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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0430-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Apr 13, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Lynn Lempel
THEME: Ose, Ose, Ose and Ose … each of the themed answers ends with an -OSE suffix, but in each case the suffix is pronounced differently:
40A. What's odd about the ends of the answers to the four starred clues NO TWO SOUND ALIKE
17A. *Triumphs, but barely WINS BY A NOSE
21A. *First capital of California SAN JOSE
54A. *Nonfatal amount of radiation, say LOW DOSE
64A. *Huckster's pitch YOU CAN’T LOSE
COMPLETION TIME: 06m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

11. "The Purloined Letter" writer POE
"The Purloined Letter" is the third of Edgar Allen Poe's short stories to feature Le Chevalier C. Auguste Dupin, Poe's famous detective. The two earlier stories were the celebrated "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" and "The Mystery of Marie Roget".

15. Manhattan cultural landmark THE MET
The Metropolitan Opera of New York City is the largest classical music organization in the country, presenting about 220 performances each and every year. Founded in 1880, the Met is renowned for using technology to expand its audiences. Performances have been broadcast live on radio since 1931, and on television since 1977. And since 2006 you can go see a live performance from New York in high definition on the big screen, at a movie theater near you ...

21. *First capital of California SAN JOSE
San Jose is the third-largest city in California and is located at the heart of Silicon Valley. The city was founded by the Spanish in 1777 and named El Pueblo de San José de Guadalupe. Under Spanish and Mexican rule, the territory of Alta California had its capital in Monterey. When California was made a US state, San Jose was named as the first capital, in 1850. Subsequently, the state legislature met in Vallejo in 1852, Benicia in 1853, and finally settled in Sacramento.

23. Boom's opposite on Wall Street BUST
New York’s famous “Wall Street” was originally named by the Dutch as “de Waal Straat”.

25. Regatta implement OAR
The word "regatta" is Venetian dialect and was originally used to describe boat races among the gondoliers of Venice on the Grand Canal back in the mid-1600s.

26. Family chain with a Grand Slam breakfast DENNY'S
Denny's was the first restaurant I ate at on my initial visit to the US over 30 years ago. I thought I was in heaven. I've changed my opinion a little since then! Denny's is famous for being "always open" (almost), something that blew my mind as a visitor from Ireland back in 1980. Denny's was founded in 1953 in Lakewood, California, and originally went by the name "Denny's Donuts".

33. Belfry occupants BATS
The expression "bats in the belfry" meaning "mad, crazy" conjures up images of bats flying around Gothic bell towers, but actually it's a relatively recent addition to our vernacular. The term is American in origin, and dates back only to the early 1900s. The concept is that someone who is "crazy", with wild ideas flying around his or her head, can be described as having bats (wild ideas) flying around the belfry (head). The terms "bats" and "batty" originated at the same time, and are clearly derivative.

36. African antelope ELAND
A eland is a large African antelope, in fact the largest on the continent.

43. Core component of a PC CPU
The Central Processing Unit (CPU) is the main component on the "motherboard" of a computer. The CPU is the part of the computer that carries out most of the functions required by a program. Nowadays you can get CPUs in everything from cars to telephones.

45. Bacon of "Mystic River" KEVIN
Kevin Bacon is an actor from Philadelphia who appeared first on the big screen in the 1978 comedy “National Lampoon’s Animal House”. That wasn’t to be the big break that Bacon needed though, which came with “Footloose” in 1984. A fun fact about him is that he is the subject of a popular trivia game called “Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon” in which players have to show that a particular actor can be related to Kevin Bacon in fewer than six links, with each link being a movie in which two actors appear together.

“Mystic River” is a 2003 drama film based on a novel of the same name by Dennis Lehane. The movie was directed by Clint Eastwood and stars Sean Penn, Tim Robbins and Kevin Bacon. The film has quite a dark storyline and deals with the difficult subject of pedophilia.

48. Subj. for some green card holders ESL
English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

50. Meas. of brain activity EEG
An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a record of electrical activity caused by the firing of neurons within the brain. The EEG might be used to diagnose epilepsy, or perhaps to determine if a patient is "brain dead".

63. A Gershwin IRA
Ira Gershwin was the lyricist who worked with his brother George to create such American classics as the songs "I Got Rhythm" and "Someone to Watch Over Me", as well as the opera "Porgy and Bess". After George Gershwin died, Ira continued to create great music, working with the likes of Jerome Kern and Kurt Weill.

64. *Huckster's pitch YOU CAN’T LOSE
A huckster is an aggressive peddler of goods. The term derives from the Middle Dutch “hokester”, a word for a peddler.

66. Silent ___ (White House nickname) CAL
President Calvin Coolidge, the only US President to have been born on July 4th, was known as a man of few words. It was while he was serving as Vice-President in the administration of Warren G. Harding, that Coolidge earned the nickname “Silent Cal”. There is a famous story told about Coolidge’s reticence that I would love to think is true, attributed to the poet Dorothy Parker. Sitting beside him at dinner, she remarked to him, "Mr. Coolidge, I've made a bet against a fellow who said it was impossible to get more than two words out of you." His famous reply: "You lose ..."

68. Part of a.m. ANTE
The 12-hour clock has been around a long time, and was even used in sundial format in Ancient Egypt. Our use of AM and PM dates back to Roman times, with AM standing for Ante Meridiem (before noon) and PM standing for Post Meridiem (after noon). However, the Romans originally used the AM concept a little differently, by counting backwards from noon. So, 2AM to the Romans would be two hours before noon, or 10AM as we would call it today.

71. Ivan the Terrible, for one TSAR
The Grand Prince of Moscow, Ivan IV, became known as Ivan the Terrible. The name "terrible" is a translation from Russian, and perhaps creates the wrong impression about the man. The Russian word is "Grozny", which is more akin to "strict" and "powerful" rather than "cruel" or "abominable".

Down
2. Lake ___, 1813 battle site ERIE
The Battle of Lake Erie was fought during the War of 1812 just off the Ohio coast. The outcome of the action was a defeat for the British and control of Lake Erie for the remainder of the war.

3. Ship of 1492 NINA
The ship we know as the Niña was actually the nickname of a ship actually called the Santa Clara. The nickname "Niña" probably came from the name of her owner, Juan Niña of Moguer.

6. Schmoozes CHATS
“To schmooze” is to chat intimately, a word that comes from the Yiddish “schmusen” meaning ‘to chat” .

7. Stimpy's TV pal REN
“The Ren and Stimpy Show” ran on Nickelodeon from 1991 to 1996. Not my cup of tea ...

8. Half of an old radio comedy duo AMOS
"Amos 'n' Andy" was originally a radio sitcom that was on the air from the twenties right up to the fifties. It was about Amos Jones and Andy Brown, two farm workers from outside Atlanta who head to Chicago to make good for themselves. They eventually start up the Fresh Air Taxi Company. The show was somewhat groundbreaking for the time, as it depicted African Americans for the first time in positions of influence as business owners. There was a TV adaptation that aired from 1951 to 1953 and ran in syndication right up to 1966. I have never seen/heard the show, but it sounds like it is a classic ...

9. Small plateau MESA
"Mesa" is the Spanish for "table" and is of course is how we get the term "mesa" that describes a geographic feature. "What's the difference between a butte and a mesa?" I hear you cry! Both are hills with flat tops, but a mesa has a top that is wider than it is tall. A butte is a much narrower formation, taller than it is wide.

10. Pro at shorthand STENO
Stenography is the process of writing in shorthand. The term comes from the Greek "steno" (narrow) and "graphe" (writing).

18. Nickname of Haiti's Duvalier, ousted in 1986 BABY DOC
Jean-Claude Duvalier was President of Haiti from 1971 to 1986. Jean-Claude had the nickname “Baby Doc”, a moniker that inherited from his father François “Papa Doc” Duvalier. Baby doc was a brutal a ruler as his father, which led to his overthrow in 1986 in a popular uprising.

The dictatorial President of Haiti known as "Papa Doc" was in fact a medical doctor. Francois Duvalier graduated with a medical degree from the University of Haiti in 1934, and even spent a year studying public health at the University of Michigan. It was his grateful patients who used to call him Papa Doc. When he came to power as President, he was less caring, and ruled with an iron fist until he died in office in 1971.

24. Margarita need TEQUILA
No one seems to know for sure who first created the cocktail known as a Margarite. The most plausible and oft-quoted is that it was invented in 1941 in Ensenada, Mexico. The barman mixed the drink for an important visitor, the daughter of the German ambassador. The daughter’s name was Margarita Henkel, and she lent her name to the new drink. The basic recipe for a margarita is a mixture of tequila, orange-flavored liqueur (like Cointreau) and lime juice.

26. Dame Judi of film DENCH
Dame Judi Dench is an outstanding English actress, known for decades in her home country mainly as a stage and television actress. Dench’s film career took off in the nineties with a relatively trivial role as “M” in the James Bond series of films. Since then she has played leading roles in several excellent movies including “Shakespeare in Love”, “Mrs. Brown” and “Notes on a Scandal”.

32. Rogue CAD
Our word "cad", meaning "a person lacking in finer feelings", is a shortening of the word "cadet". "Cad" was first used for a servant, and then students at British universities used "cad" as a term for a boy from the local town. "Cad" took on its current meaning in the 1830s.

34. Polynesian carvings TIKIS
A tiki is a large carving of wood or stone resembling a human form, found in Polynesian cultures. The carvings often mark out boundaries of sites sacred to the locals.

37. Teetotalers they're not SOTS
Our word "sot" comes from the Old English "sott", meaning a fool. The word "sot" started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

41. Mystery novelist Grafton SUE
Sue Grafton writes detective novels, and her "alphabet series" features the private investigator Kinsey Millhone. She started off with "A Is for Alibi" in 1982 and is working her way through the alphabet, most recently publishing "U Is for Undertow" in 2009. What a clever naming system!

51. "The Naked Maja" and other paintings GOYAS
Francisco Goya was a Spanish painter, often called the last of the Old Masters and the first of the moderns. Two of Goya's most famous works are "The Nude Maja" and "The Clothed Maja".

57. Continental coin EURO
The European Union (EU) today stands at a membership of 27 states. The Euro is the official currency of only 16 of the 27. The list of states in the EU that don't use the Euro includes the UK, Denmark and Sweden.

61. Org. with a national center named for Billie Jean King USTA
The United States Tennis Association (USTA) facility at Flushing Meadow is known as the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. The center is host to the annual US Open Tennis Championships.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Signature pieces? PENS
5. Gets outta there fast SCRAMS
11. "The Purloined Letter" writer POE
14. Song heard at 15-Across ARIA
15. Manhattan cultural landmark THE MET
16. Finale END
17. *Triumphs, but barely WINS BY A NOSE
19. Moonshine holder JUG
20. Natural seasoning SEA SALT
21. *First capital of California SAN JOSE
23. Boom's opposite on Wall Street BUST
25. Regatta implement OAR
26. Family chain with a Grand Slam breakfast DENNY'S
30. List shortcut: Abbr. ETC
33. Belfry occupants BATS
36. African antelope ELAND
37. Baseball catcher's stance SQUAT
39. It might be given to a waiter or a police investigator TIP
40. What's odd about the ends of the answers to the four starred clues NO TWO SOUND ALIKE
43. Core component of a PC CPU
44. Little doll CUTIE
45. Bacon of "Mystic River" KEVIN
46. Spice's cousin HERB
48. Subj. for some green card holders ESL
49. Hate with a passion DETEST
50. Meas. of brain activity EEG
52. Big do AFRO
54. *Nonfatal amount of radiation, say LOW DOSE
58. Botch LOUSE UP
63. A Gershwin IRA
64. *Huckster's pitch YOU CAN’T LOSE
66. Silent ___ (White House nickname) CAL
67. Shape of many a ski chalet A-FRAME
68. Part of a.m. ANTE
69. Animal roaming the Rockies ELK
70. Shopaholics' hangouts STORES
71. Ivan the Terrible, for one TSAR

Down
1. What dogs "shake hands" with PAWS
2. Lake ___, 1813 battle site ERIE
3. Ship of 1492 NINA
4. Bratty talk SASS
5. Phonograph needle STYLUS
6. Schmoozes CHATS
7. Stimpy's TV pal REN
8. Half of an old radio comedy duo AMOS
9. Small plateau MESA
10. Pro at shorthand STENO
11. Disparaging PEJORATIVE
12. Unpleasant duty ONUS
13. Periphery EDGE
18. Nickname of Haiti's Duvalier, ousted in 1986 BABY DOC
22. Quick punch JAB
24. Margarita need TEQUILA
26. Dame Judi of film DENCH
27. Get right to the honeymoon, say ELOPE
28. Activity led by a park ranger, perhaps NATURE WALK
29. Opposite of SSE NNW
31. Something whistled TUNE
32. Rogue CAD
34. Polynesian carvings TIKIS
35. Utterly exhausted SPENT
37. Teetotalers they're not SOTS
38. "Eat in" alternative TAKE OUT
41. Mystery novelist Grafton SUE
42. Tennis judge's cry LET
47. River bottom BED
49. Unmanned aircraft DRONES
51. "The Naked Maja" and other paintings GOYAS
53. "Hot" lover FLAME
54. Itchy dog's woe LICE
55. Spoken ORAL
56. Tenderhearted SOFT
57. Continental coin EURO
59. Venetian blind section SLAT
60. Immense time spans EONS
61. Org. with a national center named for Billie Jean King USTA
62. Equal PEER
65. "Wheels" CAR

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Posted by Bill Butler
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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0429-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Apr 13, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: C. W. Stewart
THEME: Food for Actors … each of the themed answer’s is an actor’s family name with a food that rhymes with that name:
17A. Actor Charlie's favorite food? : SHEEN’S BEANS
24A. Actress Hilary's favorite food? : SWANK’S FRANKS
31A. Actress Veronica's favorite food? : LAKE’S CAKES
45A. Actor Brad's favorite food? : PITT’S GRITS
50A. Actor Dudley's favorite food? : MOORE’S S’MORES
63A. Actress Goldie's favorite food? : HAWN’S PRAWNS
COMPLETION TIME: 06m 12s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Snake that a snake charmer charms : COBRA
“Cobra” is the name given to a group of snakes, some of which are in different animal families. The term "cobra" is reserved for those snakes that can expand their neck ribs to create a hood. The name “cobra” is an abbreviated form of “cobra de capello” which translates from Portuguese as “snake with hood”.

Snake charmers don’t actually hypnotize their cobras, but they do train them. The snake is trained to “follow” the movement of end of the pungi, the instrument that the charmer uses in the act. The snake presents no danger to the charmer or the audience, as it is typically defanged or has it’s mouth partially stitched up so that only the tongue can be moved in and out. Not a very nice practice ...

11. It follows "//" in a URL : WWW
The World Wide Web was effectively the invention of English computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee. The key to Berner-Lee’s invention was bringing together two technologies that already existed: hypertext and the Internet. I for one am very grateful ...

14. Like a limbo champion : AGILE
The limbo dance originated on the island of Trinidad in the Caribbean. The name "limbo" is an alteration of our word "limber", which isn't surprising given what one has to do to get under that bar!

17. Actor Charlie's favorite food? : SHEEN’S BEANS
Charlie Sheen’s real name is Carlos Irwin Estévez, and he is of course the youngest son of actor Martin Sheen. Charlie was the highest paid actor on television in 2010, earning $1.8 million per episode on the sitcom “Two and a Half Men”. Then of course he blew it and got fired from the show amid stories of alcohol and drug abuse and domestic violence. I bet his co-stars were pretty tweaked about the show being cancelled, and pretty happy that it was given a second lease of life …

22. Jagged, as a leaf's edge : EROSE
An edge that is "erose" is irregularly notched or indented.

24. Actress Hilary's favorite food? : SWANK’S FRANKS
The actress Hilary Swank had her first major role in “The Next Karate Kid” released in 1994, in which she played the first female student of the sensei Mr. Myagi.

What we call a wiener in this country is known as a Vienna sausage in Germany. It was first produced by a butcher from Frankfurt who was living in Vienna, hence the name “Wiener”, which is German for “of Vienna”. Paradoxically, the same sausage is called a Frankfurter in Vienna, as it was created by someone from Frankfurt. It’s all very confusing …

31. Actress Veronica's favorite food? : LAKE’S CAKES
The actress Veronica Lake was perhaps best known for playing the femme fatale on the big screen in the forties. She was also known for wearing a “peekaboo” hairstyle in her early movies. The look came about by accident when a stray lock of hair fell over her face during a publicity shoot. The photo was well received, and so Lake adopted her trademark hairstyle. Sadly, Lake’s career fell apart in the fifties, and she arrested for disorderly conduct several times. The Hollywood star was even reduced to working as a barmaid in a New York hotel.

39. Prefix with duct : OVI-
Oviducts are the non-mammalian equivalents of the Fallopian tubes. Eggs travel from the ovaries, along the oviduct (there are usually two oviducts, but sometimes only one) and are released into some other organ or anatomical structure depending on species.

45. Actor Brad's favorite food? : PITT’S GRITS
Brad Pitt’s first major role was as the cowboy hitchhiker in the 1991’s “Thelma and Louise”. Pitt’s life offscreen garners as much attention as his work onscreen, it seems. The tabloids revel in the series of high-profile relationships in which he has been involved. He was engaged to Gwyneth Paltrow for a while, married to Jennifer Aniston, and he now lives with Angelina Jolie.

50. Actor Dudley's favorite food? : MOORE’S S’MORES
The comic actor Dudley Moore was perhaps most famous in his homeland of the UK as half of a groundbreaking comedy duo called simply Peter Cook and Dudley Moore. Relatively late in his career, Moore broke into Hollywood with a supporting role in “Foul Play” (1978) and a leading role in “10” (1979) and “Arthur” (1981). Moore was also a highly accomplished piano player and gave many concert performances.

S'mores are a treat peculiar to North America, usually eaten around a campfire. A s'more consists of a roasted marshmallow and a layer of chocolate sandwiched between two graham crackers. The earliest written reference to the recipe is in a 1927 publication called "Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts". Girl Scouts always did corner the market on cookies and the like!

57. Bern's river : AARE
The Aar (also called the "Aare" in German) is the longest river entirely in Switzerland. A famous spot along the Aar is the Reichenbach Falls in the center of the country, actually a series of waterfalls near the city of Meiringen. These falls are renowned in the world of literature as it was here that Sherlock Holmes fell to his supposed doom with his nemesis Professor Moriarty (in "The Adventure of the Final Problem").

Bern (or Berne) is the capital city of Switzerland. The official language of the city is German, but the language most spoken in Bern is a dialect known as Bernese German.

63. Actress Goldie's favorite food? : HAWN’S PRAWNS
I remember watching the ditsy Goldie Hawn character on "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In". Hawn used to give great performances on the show, convincing everyone that she was the stereotypical dumb blonde. Well, what a career she was to carve out for herself!

67. Architect Jones : INIGO
Inigo Jones was a British architect, a native of London. The most famous Jones’s design is probably London’s Covent Garden Square.

68. Native of the 49th state : ALEUT
The Aleuts live on the Aleutian Islands of the North Pacific, and on the Commander Islands at the western end of the same island chain. The Aleutian Islands are part of the United States, and the Commander Islands are in Russia.

70. Attach, as a corsage : PIN ON
“Corsage” is a word we imported from French in the late 15th century. Back then we used it to mean “the size of the body”. By the early 1800s a corsage was a bodice, or the body of a woman’s dress. At the beginning of the 20th century, the French term “bouquet de corsage” was being used for a “bouquet worn on the bodice”, and this has been shortened simply to “corsage”.

Down
2. Turkish title : AGHA
"Aga" (also "agha") is a title that was used by both civil and military officials in the Ottoman Empire.

3. Funeral stand : BIER
Biers are the special stands on which one rests a coffin for a service, or perhaps if the corpse is to lie in state. A bier may have wheels on it so that it can be used to transport the coffin to the graveside. The original biers were just flat pieces of wood on which the body was placed, covered with a shroud. Nowadays, we place the body in a casket, and then onto the bier.

5. Japanese money : YEN
The Korean Won, the Chinese Yuan, and the Japanese Yen (all of which are Asian currencies) take their names from the Chinese written character that represents "round shape".

7. Much-advertised vacuum cleaner : ORECK
The Oreck Corporation is named after founder David Oreck and is a manufacturer of vacuum cleaners and air purifiers. The company started out selling vacuum cleaners by mail, a new concept in 1963. David Oreck himself appears regularly as a spokesman in the company's ads and infomercials.

12. ___ broom : WHISK
A whisk broom is a broom with a short handle that is used to brush clothes. I think that the brush used by a baseball umpire to sweep off home plate is also a whisk broom.

23. Speakeasy owner's fear : RAID
A speakeasy is an establishment that sells alcoholic drinks illegally. Speakeasies were very big in the US in the days of Prohibition. The obvious etymology, of a speakeasy owner asking his or her customers to “speak easy” so as not to draw attention to the authorities, is thought to have originated in 1888 in McKeesport just outside Pittsburgh.

32. Items worn by Dracula and Superman : CAPES
"Dracula" is a novel written by the Irish author Bram Stoker, and first published in 1897. Dracula wasn't the first vampire of literature, but he certainly was the one who spawned the popularity of vampires in theater, film and television, and indeed more novels. Personally, I can't stand vampire fiction ...

Superman’s comic book creators gave their title character’s alter-ego the name “Clark Kent” by melding the names of Clark Gable and Kent Taylor, two leading men of the cinema. However, they modeled Clark’s character more on the silent film actor Harold Lloyd.

33. Bee: Prefix : API-
"Apis" is the Latin word for "bee".

34. Frontiersman Carson : KIT
Kit Carson was a frontiersman who moved west from Missouri when he was just 16 years old. Kit Carson’s life was immortalized in the novels of John C. Fremont, an explorer who hired Carson as a guide for his travels through California, Oregon and Nevada. Carson later served with the US Army. He is thought to be the only American to have achieved the rank of general without being able to read or write.

35. Treelike creature in "The Lord of the Rings" : ENT
Ents are those tree-like creatures that live in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth in his series of books "The Lord of the Rings". “Ent” is an Old English word for “giant”.

50. Augusta's home : MAINE
As well as being the easternmost US state capital, Augusta, Maine is the third smallest, with a population of under 20,000.

54. Director Welles : ORSON
Orson Welles is perhaps best-remembered in the world of film for his role in 1941’s “Citizen Kane”. In the world of radio, Welles is known for 1938’s famous broadcast of “The War of the Worlds”, a broadcast that convinced many listeners that the Earth was indeed being invaded by aliens.

60. Letter-shaped fastener : T-NUT
A T-nut is so called because it has a t-shape when viewed from the side.

61. Grounded trans-Atlantic fliers, for short : SSTS
The most famous Supersonic Transport (SST) was the Concorde, a plane that's no longer flying. Concorde had that famous "droop nose". The nose was moved to the horizontal position during flight to create the optimum aerodynamic shape thereby reducing drag. It was lowered during taxi, takeoff and landing, so that the pilot had better visibility. The need for the droop nose was driven largely by the delta-shaped wings. The delta wing necessitates a higher angle of attack at takeoff and landing than conventional wing designs, so the pilot needed the nose lowered so that he or she could see the ground.

64. Singer DiFranco : ANI
Ani DiFranco is a folk-rock singer and songwriter. DiFranco has also been labeled a "feminist icon", and in 2006 won the "Woman of Courage Award" from National Organization of Women.

65. Genre for Eazy-E and Heavy D : RAP
Eazy-E was the stage name of rapper Eric Lynn Wright. Eazy-E had a pretty liberal lifestyle, fathering seven children with six different women. In 1995, he died due to complications from AIDS. He was only 32 years old.

Heavy D was the stage name of singer Dwight Myers, a Jamaican-born American rap artist. Heavy D died in 2011 from a pulmonary embolism, at just 44 years of age. He had just taken a flight from Europe back to the US and developed deep vein thrombosis in one of his legs. Part of the clot broke off and traveled to his lung where it killed him. My wife developed deep vein thrombosis from prolonged sitting on a plane some years ago. She is very careful to keep moving around now when she flies, and for good reason …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Talkative : GABBY
6. Snake that a snake charmer charms : COBRA
11. It follows "//" in a URL : WWW
14. Like a limbo champion : AGILE
15. Neighborhoods : AREAS
16. "Got it!" : AHA!
17. Actor Charlie's favorite food? : SHEEN’S BEANS
19. Concert engagement : GIG
20. Golf scorecard numbers : PARS
21. Choose : PICK
22. Jagged, as a leaf's edge : EROSE
24. Actress Hilary's favorite food? : SWANK’S FRANKS
27. Lowlife : SLIME
30. Going ___ (fighting) : AT IT
31. Actress Veronica's favorite food? : LAKE’S CAKES
36. Dull-colored : DRAB
39. Prefix with duct : OVI-
40. Access, as a resource : TAP INTO
42. "I'll take that as ___" : A NO
43. Cushions : PADS
45. Actor Brad's favorite food? : PITT’S GRITS
47. Days of long ago : YORE
49. Freeway divisions : LANES
50. Actor Dudley's favorite food? : MOORE’S S’MORES
56. Lies next to : ABUTS
57. Bern's river : AARE
58. Meowers : CATS
62. Charged particle : ION
63. Actress Goldie's favorite food? : HAWN’S PRAWNS
66. Prefix with natal : NEO-
67. Architect Jones : INIGO
68. Native of the 49th state : ALEUT
69. Approx. figure : EST
70. Attach, as a corsage : PIN ON
71. Attention getters : PSSTS

Down
1. [Oh, my stars!] : GASP!
2. Turkish title : AGHA
3. Funeral stand : BIER
4. "Well, I'll be!" : BLESS ME!
5. Japanese money : YEN
6. Home in the woods : CABIN
7. Much-advertised vacuum cleaner : ORECK
8. Birds' bills : BEAKS
9. Sprinted : RAN
10. State as fact : ASSERT
11. Pioneers' convoy : WAGON TRAIN
12. ___ broom : WHISK
13. Hourly workers' pay : WAGES
18. Hot tub : SPA
23. Speakeasy owner's fear : RAID
25. Direction in which the sun sets : WEST
26. Goes on a hunger strike, say : FASTS
27. Spill (over) : SLOP
28. Volcanic emission : LAVA
29. "No, seriously" : I KID YOU NOT
32. Items worn by Dracula and Superman : CAPES
33. Bee: Prefix : API-
34. Frontiersman Carson : KIT
35. Treelike creature in "The Lord of the Rings" : ENT
37. Opening bet : ANTE
38. One who's in charge : BOSS
41. Give the eye : OGLE
44. Arrange from A to Z, say : SORT
46. Scamps : RASCALS
48. Forward, as a package : RESHIP
50. Augusta's home : MAINE
51. Orchestra winds : OBOES
52. Admitted at the door : SAW IN
53. Tropical fruit : MANGO
54. Director Welles : ORSON
55. Member of the House, for short : REP
59. Bowls over : AWES
60. Letter-shaped fastener : T-NUT
61. Grounded trans-Atlantic fliers, for short : SSTS
64. Singer DiFranco : ANI
65. Genre for Eazy-E and Heavy D : RAP

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0428-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Apr 13, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Patrick Berry
THEME: Soft T’s … today’s themed answers are well-known phrases with a “T” sound softened to a “TH” sound:
23A. What faking a stomachache might entail? : CREATIVE WRITHING (from “creative writing”)
30A. Gun belts, holsters and nightstick straps? : THE LEATHER OF THE LAW (from “the letter of the law”)
45A. Dismounts like an expert gymnast? : GETS OFF LITHELY (from “gets off lightly”)
66A. Women's pants with pictures of wood shop tools? : LATHE BLOOMERS (from “late bloomers”)
86A. Become a new person by washing up? : BATHE AND SWITCH (from “bait and switch”)
95A. Unpopular ophthalmologist's implement? : A SCYTHE FOR SORE EYES (from “a sight for sore eyes”)
108A. What the giggling supporter of the Salem witch trials was told? : NO LAUGHING MATHER (from “no laughing matter”)
COMPLETION TIME: 36m 57s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

9. Typical Busby Berkeley film : MUSICAL
Busby Berkeley was a Hollywood film director and choreographer. It was Berkeley who was most associated with the elaborate musicals that featured lots of showgirls posing together in complex geometric patterns. Those were the days …

16. They're often wasted : SOTS
Our word "sot" comes from the Old English "sott", meaning a fool. The word "sot" started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

21. Athena turned her into a spider : ARACHNE
In Greek and Roman mythology, Arachne was a mortal woman who was a great weaver. Arachne boasted that her weaving was greater than that of the goddess Pallas Athena (or Minerva in Roman myth), and this was proven true in a contest. As a result, Arachne was turned into a spider. “Arachne” is the Greek word for spider.

26. "Blueberries for ___" (classic children's book) : SAL
“Blueberries for Sal” is a children’s storybook by Robert McCloskey.

27. With 91-Across, 1976 album with a palindromic title : OLE
(91. See 27-Across : ELO)
ELO of course stands for the Electric Light Orchestra, a symphonic rock group from the north of England. ELO’s manager was Don Arden, father of Sharon Osbourne (wife of Ozzy). "Ole ELO" is a compilation album the band released in 1976.

29. Ship that sailed "the ocean blue" : NINA
In fourteen hundred ninety-two
Columbus sailed the ocean blue.

He had three ships and left from Spain;
He sailed through sunshine, wind and rain.

He sailed by night; he sailed by day;
He used the stars to find his way ...

42. Loan-insuring org. : FHA
The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) was set up in 1934 to insure loans made lenders for the building and purchase of homes. The FHA was created in response to the bank failures of the Great Depression, with the intent of creating a more favorable environment for lending.

43. Architectural designer Maya : LIN
Maya Lin is a Chinese American born in Athens Ohio, and is an artist and architect. Her most famous work is the moving Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Lin was only 21-years-old when she won a public design competition in 1981 to create the memorial. Although her design is very fitting, sadly Lin was not a popular choice for the work given her Asian heritage. As she said herself, she probably would not have been picked had the competition been judged with the knowledge of who was behind each submission.

44. QB with a statue at Sun Life Stadium : MARINO
Dan Marino played his whole football career with the Miami Dolphins. Marino is widely regarded as one of the game’s greatest quarterbacks, even though he never played on a team that won the Super Bowl.

54. "___ Andy's Ballyhoo" ("Show Boat" song) : CAP’N
“Show Boat” is a musical by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein, first staged in New York in 1927. It is based on a 1926 novel of the same name by Edna Ferber. The story is about a show boat called the “Cotton Blossom”. Show boats were floating theaters which navigated the rivers of the US from the 1870s to the 1930s, moving from town to town with the performers living on board.

61. Group with a Grand Lodge : ELKS
The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (BPOE) was founded in 1868, and is a social club that has about a million members today. It started out as a group of men getting together in a "club" in order to get around the legal opening hours of taverns in New York City. The club took on a new role as it started to look out for poor families of members who passed away. The club now accepts African Americans as members (since the seventies) and women (since the nineties), but atheists still aren't welcome.

62. Bach's "___, meine Freude" : JESU
"Jesu, meine Freude" is a funeral motet composed by Johann Sebastian Bach.

63. Contraction in a patriotic song : O’ER
The words "o'er the ramparts we watched" come from "The Star Spangled Banner" written by Francis Scott Key.

The lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner” were written first as a poem by Francis Scott Key, inspired by the bombarding by the British of the American forces at Fort McHenry that he witnessed during the Battle of Baltimore in September 1814. The words were then set to the tune of a popular British drinking song penned by John Stafford Smith called "The Anacreontic Song", with the Anacreontic Society being a men's club in London.

64. Actress Wright of "Mrs. Miniver" : TERESA
Teresa Wright was an actress from Harlem in New York City. Wright won an Oscar in 1942 for Best Supporting Actress in “Mrs. Miniver”. That same year she was nominated for Best Actress for her starring role opposite Gary Cooper in “Pride of the Yankees”.

65. Growth ring? : LEI
"Lei" is the Hawaiian word for "garland, wreath", although in more general terms a "lei" is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

66. Women's pants with pictures of wood shop tools? : LATHE BLOOMERS (from “late bloomers”)
Bloomers are trousers that gathered at the ankles, which a woman used to wear under a skirt.

79. City near Turin : ASTI
Asti is in the Piedmont region of northwest Italy. The region is perhaps most famous for its Asti Spumante sparkling white wine.

80. Author/media observer Michael : WOLFF
Michael Wolff is an author and journalist. As a journalist he writes a regular column for “Vanity Fair” magazine. His most recent book is a 2008 biography of Rupert Murdoch called “The Man Who Owns the News”.

84. 1992 Olympic tennis gold medalist : CAPRIATI
Jennifer Capriati is a retired American tennis player, and former World Number One. She had all sorts of success playing tennis as a child, and turned professional when she was just 13 years old ...

92. Pres. advisory grp. : NSC
The National Security Council (NSC) was created by President Harry S. Truman in 1947. The NSC is chaired by the sitting president and meets in the White House Situation Room.

101. What a fist might represent : ROCK
Rock-paper-scissors is a hand game played by two people, at least here in North America. Back in Ireland we called the game “scissors-paper-stone”. The game is often used as a way to choose between two options or two people.

102. Wall St. event : IPO
An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

104. It had a hub at J.F.K. : TWA
Trans World Airlines (TWA) was a big carrier in the US, but was perhaps even more recognized for its extensive presence in Europe and the Middle East. For many years, especially after the collapse of Pan-Am, TWA was considered the unofficial flag carrier for the US. The company started in 1930, the product of a forced merger of Transcontinental Air Transport and Western Air Express. The Transcontinental and Western Air that resulted (the original meaning of the acronym TWA) was what the Postmaster General wanted, a bigger airline to which the Postal Service could award airmail contracts.

The Idlewild Golf Course was taken over by the city of New York in 1943 and construction started on a new airport to serve the metropolis and relieve congestion at La Guardia. The Idlewild name still persists, even though the airport was named after Major General Alexander E. Anderson from the first days of the project. When the facility started operating in 1948 it was known as New York International Airport, Anderson Field. It was renamed to John F. Kennedy International Airport in 1963, one month after the President was assassinated.

107. Founding member of OPEC : IRAN
The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) was founded in 1960 at a conference held in Baghdad, Iraq that was attended by Iraq, Kuwait, Iran, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Nine more countries joined the alliance soon after, and OPEC set up headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland and then Vienna, Austria in 1965. The basic aim of OPEC was to wrench control of oil prices from the oil companies and to put it in the hands of the sovereign states that own the natural resource.

108. What the giggling supporter of the Salem witch trials was told? : NO LAUGHING MATHER (from “no laughing matter”)
Cotton Mather was a New England Puritan minister who played a central role in the Salem witch trials.

115. Defender of the West : NATO
NATO is the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. NATO was founded not long after WWII in 1949 and is headquartered in Brussels, Belgium. The first NATO Secretary General was Lord Ismay, Winston Churchill's chief military assistant during WWII. Famously, Lord Ismay said the goal of NATO was "to keep the Russians out, the Americans in, and the Germans down."

116. It keeps things moving : INERTIA
Newton’s first law of motion states that a body that is moving maintains the same velocity unless it is acted upon by an external force. That resistance to changing velocity is known as “inertia”.

120. Arsenic ___ (ratsbane) : TRIOXIDE
Ratsbane is rat poison, particularly arsenic trioxide.

Down
2. Pasternak heroine : LARA
The heroine of Boris Pasternak’s epic novel “Doctor Zhivago” is Lara. The Lara character was inspired by Pasternak’s mistress Olga Ivinskaya.

3. Pitcher Hershiser : OREL
Orel Hershiser is big into poker now that he has retired from Major League Baseball. Hershiser lives in Las Vegas and when he isn't working for ESPN, apparently he is at the poker tables.

4. Disco ___ : ERA
Discotheques started up during WWII in Occupied France. American-style music (like jazz and jitterbug dances) was banned by the Nazis, so French natives met in underground clubs that they called discotheques where records were often played on just a single turntable. After the war, these clubs came out into the open. One famous Paris discotheque was called "Whiskey a Gogo". In that Paris disco, non-stop music was played using two turntables next to a dance-floor, and this concept spread around the world.

6. Certain Ivy Leaguer : ELI
Eli is the nickname for a graduate of Yale University, a term used in honor of the Yale benefactor Elihu Yale.

8. One-named singing star with the surname Adkins : ADELE
The English singer Adele Adkins goes by the stage name "Adele". Adele describes her musical style as “heartbroken soul”. Not too long ago, Adele wrote and performed the theme song for the latest James Bond film, “Skyfall”.

10. Central Swiss canton : URI
Supposedly William Tell came from Uri, a canton in the German part of Switzerland. Altdorf is the capital of Uri and is the city where William Tell shot the apple off his son's head, at least according to legend.

11. "Gymnopédies" composer : SATIE
Erik Satie was a French composer most famous for his beautiful composition, the three "Gymnopédies". I have tried so hard to appreciate other works by Satie but I find them so very different from the minimalist simplicity of "Gymnopédies".

12. Blood of the Greek gods : ICHOR
Ichor is a golden fluid that is the blood of the gods in Greek mythology.

13. Trouser fabric : CHINO
Chino is a twill cloth most often used to make hard-wearing pants. The pants have come to be referred to as chinos. Chino cloth was originally developed for use by the military, but quickly became popular with civilians.

14. ___ Taylor : ANN
There was no such woman as "Ann Taylor" associated with the Ann Taylor line of clothes. The name was chosen by the marketing professionals because "Ann" was considered to be "very New England" back in 1954 when the stores first opened, and "Taylor" suggested that clothes were carefully "tailored".

17. First name in aviation : ORVILLE
Wilbur was the older of the two Wright brothers, and he was born in 1867 in Millville, Indiana. By the time that Orville was born in 1871, the family was living in Dayton, Ohio. The Wrights spent a few years of their youth back in Richmond, Indiana, before settling in Dayton for the rest of their lives. The brothers both died in Dayton; Wilbur in 1912 and Orville in 1948.

24. Use a flying shuttle : WEAVE
The flying shuttle was a crucial development in weaving that help usher in the era of the powered spinning machines.

30. Common chords : TRIADS
A triad is a group of three, and specifically in music is a chord made up of three notes.

32. Grandson of Adam and Eve : ENOS
Enos was the son of Seth and the grandson of Adam and Eve.

33. Moon larger than Mercury : TITAN
Titan is the largest moon of Saturn. Titan is unusual in many ways, including the fact that it is the only known satellite in the solar system that is has its own atmosphere (our own moon does not, for example). Titan is the second largest moon in the solar system, after Ganymede that orbits Jupiter. Titan is so large that it has a greater volume than Mercury, the solar system’s smallest planet.

34. Physiology Nobelist Walter Rudolf ___ : HESS
Walter Rudolf Hess was a physiologist from Switzerland. Hess was a co-winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1949. He was so honored for his work in Maping the areas of the brain that are involved in controlling internal organs.

39. New releases? : PAROLEES
The term "parole" is a French word that we use in English, with the French "parole" meaning "word, speech". Of particular interest is the French phrase "parole d'honneur" which translates as "word of honor". In the early 1600s we started using "parole" to mean a promise by a prisoner of war not to escape, as in the prisoner giving his "word of honor" not to run off. Over time, parole has come to mean conditional release of a prisoner before he or she has served the full term of a sentence.

51. "Law & Order: SVU" actor : ICE-T
Rapper Ice-T must be sick of having his name come up as an answer in crossword puzzles. Maybe he should have stuck to his real name, Tracy Marrow? Then again, maybe not … Ice-T has been interested in acting for decades and made his film debut in the 1984 movie about break-dancing called “Breakin’”. He has also played Detective Fin Tutuola in the TV show “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” since the year 2000.

55. Historic multistory dwellings : PUEBLOS
A pueblo is a Native American village in the American Southwest.

60. They were big in the '50s : TAILFINS
In the automotive world, tailfins were first introduced on the 1948 Cadillac, by GM designer Harley Earl.

68. Gymnast Gaylord : MITCH
Mitch Gaylord is a gymnast from Van Nuys, California. Gaylord won a gold medal in the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. He was the first US gymnast to score a perfect 10.0 in an Olympic competition. After retiring from the sport, Gaylord worked as a stunt double for Chris O’Donnell when he played Robin in “Batman Forever”.

69. "Essays of ___" : ELIA
Charles Lamb published a famous collection of essays simply entitled "Essays of Elia". Elia was actually a clerk and co-worker of Charles Lamb, whereas Lamb was the author.

72. "Music in the Key of Love" composer : TESH
John Tesh is a pianist and composer, as well as a radio and television presenter.

75. Forces (upon) : FOISTS
To foist something is to pass it off as genuine or real. "Foist" comes from the Dutch word meaning "take in hand". The original concept came from playing dice, in which one die was held surreptitiously in one hand.

79. Bygone Chevy van : ASTRO
The Chevrolet Astro is a minivan that GM made from 1985 to 2005. The same car was also sold as the GMC Safari.

88. Many a Bach composition : TOCCATA
A toccata is a virtuoso piece of music, usually written for a keyboard or plucked string instrument, one that has fast-moving passages that emphasize the dexterity of the performer's fingers. It is a piece of music with an "improvisatory feel", a piece that seems very spontaneous in form. The name "toccata" comes from the Italian word "toccare" meaning "to touch".

89. Long little doggie : CORGI
The Welsh corgi is a herding dog, and one of the oldest breeds in Britain. Corgis aren’t speedy enough to do their job by running around livestock like collies, and instead nip at the heels.

94. Thomas who wrote "Little Big Man" : BERGER
Thomas Berger is a novelist best known for his 1964 novel “Little Big Man”, which was made into a 1970 movie starring Dustin Hoffman and Faye Dunaway.

97. Cabinet members? : FILES
One might find files in a filing cabinet.

98. Some MoMA works : OP ART
Op art is also known as optical art, and puts optical illusions to great effect.

The founding of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City was very much driven by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, the wife of John D. Rockefeller, son of the oil magnate. Working with two friends, Abby managed to get the museum opened in 1929, just nine days after the Wall Street Crash. The MoMA's sculpture garden bears the name of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and has done so since 1949.

100. Bond villain ___ Stavro Blofeld : ERNST
Ernst Stavro Blofeld is a villain in the James Bond universe. Blofeld has been played on the big screen several times by different actors. My favorite is Donald Pleasance in 1967’s “You Only Live Twice”.

106. Funny Johnson : ARTE
Arte Johnson, as well being a frequent judge on "The Gong Show", played the German soldier on "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In". His character's famous catchphrase was, "Very interesting, but ..."

108. "Little Birds" author : NIN
Anaïs Nin was a French author, famous for her journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. Nin also wrote highly regarded erotica and cited D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration. Nin was married to banker and artist Hugh Parker Guiler in 1923. Decades later in 1955, Nin married former actor Rupert Pole, even though she was still married to Guiler. Nin and Pole had their marriage annulled in 1966, but just for legal reasons, and they continued to live together as husband and wife until Nin passed away in 1977.

110. Massive memory unit, informally : GIG
In the world of computers, a "bit" is the basic unit of information. It has a value of 0 or 1. A "byte" is a small collection of bits (usually 8), the number of bits needed to uniquely identify a character of text. The prefix giga- means 10 to the power of 9, so a gigabyte is 1,000,000,000 bytes.

111. Miss America she's not : HAG
The Miss America beauty pageant started out as a marketing ploy in the early twenties to attract tourists to the Atlantic City boardwalk after Labor Day.

112. Noninvasive med. procedure : MRI
A CT (or "CAT") scan produces (via computer manipulation) a three dimensional image of the inside of an object, usually the human body. It does so by taking a series of two dimensional x-ray images while rotating the camera around the patient. The issue with CT scans is that they use x-rays, and high doses of radiation can be harmful causing damage that is cumulative over time. An MRI on the other hand (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), uses powerful magnetic fields to generate its images so there is no exposure to ionizing radiation (such as X-rays). We used MRI equipment in our chemistry labs at school, way back in the days when the technology was still called Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI). Apparently the marketing folks didn't like the term "nuclear" because of its association with atomic bombs, so now it's just called MRI.

114. Cowpoke moniker : TEX
Cowpoke is a term used nowadays for any cowboy, but it was originally limited to the cowboys who prodded cattle onto railroad cars using long poles.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Coating on some facial tissues : ALOE VERA
9. Typical Busby Berkeley film : MUSICAL
16. They're often wasted : SOTS
20. Drove fast : BARRELED
21. Athena turned her into a spider : ARACHNE
22. Riverbank basker, informally : CROC
23. What faking a stomachache might entail? : CREATIVE WRITHING (from “creative writing”)
25. At any point : EVER
26. "Blueberries for ___" (classic children's book) : SAL
27. With 91-Across, 1976 album with a palindromic title : OLE
28. Fluoride, for one : ION
29. Ship that sailed "the ocean blue" : NINA
30. Gun belts, holsters and nightstick straps? : THE LEATHER OF THE LAW (from “the letter of the law”)
38. In advance : UP-FRONT
41. Contend : VIE
42. Loan-insuring org. : FHA
43. Architectural designer Maya : LIN
44. QB with a statue at Sun Life Stadium : MARINO
45. Dismounts like an expert gymnast? : GETS OFF LITHELY (from “gets off lightly”)
50. Uses a keyless entry system? : BREAKS IN
52. Promise : ASSURANCE
53. They go places : ROADS
54. "___ Andy's Ballyhoo" ("Show Boat" song) : CAP’N
56. Move briskly : TROT
57. Engaged in battle : HAD AT
61. Group with a Grand Lodge : ELKS
62. Bach's "___, meine Freude" : JESU
63. Contraction in a patriotic song : O’ER
64. Actress Wright of "Mrs. Miniver" : TERESA
65. Growth ring? : LEI
66. Women's pants with pictures of wood shop tools? : LATHE BLOOMERS (from “late bloomers”)
70. Word before pole or jump : SKI
71. Sci-fi author ___ del Rey : LESTER
73. Take to sleep with, say : BED
74. Good at scheming : WILY
75. Four-legged newborn : FOAL
76. Drained of color : ASHEN
77. Time for TV debuts : FALL
79. City near Turin : ASTI
80. Author/media observer Michael : WOLFF
81. They don't face the street : SIDE DOORS
84. 1992 Olympic tennis gold medalist : CAPRIATI
86. Become a new person by washing up? : BATHE AND SWITCH (from “bait and switch”)
90. "I've got something to say" : LISTEN
91. See 27-Across : ELO
92. Pres. advisory grp. : NSC
93. Buddy : BRO
94. Men in a lineup : BATTERS
95. Unpopular ophthalmologist's implement? : A SCYTHE FOR SORE EYES (from “a sight for sore eyes”)
101. What a fist might represent : ROCK
102. Wall St. event : IPO
103. Sound of frustration : GRR!
104. It had a hub at J.F.K. : TWA
107. Founding member of OPEC : IRAN
108. What the giggling supporter of the Salem witch trials was told? : NO LAUGHING MATHER (from “no laughing matter”)
115. Defender of the West : NATO
116. It keeps things moving : INERTIA
117. Squad leader : SERGEANT
118. Make mouseholes, maybe : GNAW
119. Retiree's accumulation : NEST EGG
120. Arsenic ___ (ratsbane) : TRIOXIDE

Down
1. Elementary school group? : ABCS
2. Pasternak heroine : LARA
3. Pitcher Hershiser : OREL
4. Disco ___ : ERA
5. Hound doc : VET
6. Certain Ivy Leaguer : ELI
7. Rise up : REVOLT
8. One-named singing star with the surname Adkins : ADELE
9. Render imperfect : MAR
10. Central Swiss canton : URI
11. "Gymnopédies" composer : SATIE
12. Blood of the Greek gods : ICHOR
13. Trouser fabric : CHINO
14. ___ Taylor : ANN
15. Journey segment : LEG
16. All-too-public spat : SCENE
17. First name in aviation : ORVILLE
18. Painted thing, sometimes : TOENAIL
19. Lacking meat : SCRAWNY
24. Use a flying shuttle : WEAVE
30. Common chords : TRIADS
31. Rush-hour din : HONKS
32. Grandson of Adam and Eve : ENOS
33. Moon larger than Mercury : TITAN
34. Physiology Nobelist Walter Rudolf ___ : HESS
35. E equivalent : F-FLAT
36. Watery : THIN
37. Cooks up : HATCHES
38. Sidewalk cafe sight : UMBRELLA
39. New releases? : PAROLEES
40. Bizarre : FREAKISH
45. Grind : GNASH
46. Bone: Prefix : OSTEO-
47. Plows leave them : FURROWS
48. Back again : FRO
49. Catch : HEAR
51. "Law & Order: SVU" actor : ICE-T
55. Historic multistory dwellings : PUEBLOS
58. Like ghost towns : DESOLATE
59. Show polite interest in, say : ASK AFTER
60. They were big in the '50s : TAILFINS
62. Place for tips : JAR
63. Seasoned : OLD
64. Seriously annoy : TRY
66. Willing to let things slide : LENIENT
67. In the hold, say : BELOW
68. Gymnast Gaylord : MITCH
69. "Essays of ___" : ELIA
72. "Music in the Key of Love" composer : TESH
75. Forces (upon) : FOISTS
77. One standing around the house, maybe : FENCE
78. Mention parenthetically : ADD
79. Bygone Chevy van : ASTRO
80. Form letters : WRITE
82. Recipe amount : DASH
83. Saucy fare : RIBS
85. Be in the game : PLAY
86. Comportment : BEARING
87. Late finisher : ALSO-RAN
88. Many a Bach composition : TOCCATA
89. Long little doggie : CORGI
94. Thomas who wrote "Little Big Man" : BERGER
96. "... see what I mean?" : Y’KNOW?
97. Cabinet members? : FILES
98. Some MoMA works : OP ART
99. Maze answer : ROUTE
100. Bond villain ___ Stavro Blofeld : ERNST
104. Cuisine with curry : THAI
105. Proceed : WEND
106. Funny Johnson : ARTE
108. "Little Birds" author : NIN
109. Possible lunch hour : ONE
110. Massive memory unit, informally : GIG
111. Miss America she's not : HAG
112. Noninvasive med. procedure : MRI
113. In former days : AGO
114. Cowpoke moniker : TEX

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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0427-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Apr 13, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Chris A. McGlothlin
THEME: None
COMPLETION TIME: 39m 13s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … LOYALISTS (royalists!), KRANEPOOL (Kranepoor)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. Legendary lutist : ALAN-A-DALE
According to the legend of Robin Hood, Alan-a-Dale was a member of Robin's outlaw band of Merry Men. Based on the legend, Alan-a-Dale was a wandering minstrel.

16. TV host Chung : ALEXA
Alexa Chung is a television presenter from England who now is pursuing a career in the US. These days, she can be seen on MTV. So, I won’t be spotting her any time soon …

17. Asia Minor, e.g. : PENINSULA
Asia Minor is also known as Anatolia. It is the geographic part of Asia that protrudes out into the west, towards Europe, and is roughly equivalent to modern-day Turkey.

18. Dumps : JILTS
To "jilt" someone with whom you have a relationship is to drop them suddenly or callously. "Jilt" is an obsolete noun that used to mean "harlot" or "loose woman".

22. One highly unlikely to react : RARE GAS
The noble gases (also “rare gases”) are those elements over on the extreme right of the Periodic Table. Because of their "full" complement of electrons, noble gases are very unreactive. The six noble gases that occur naturally are helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon and radon.

28. Character in "Unforgiven" : CAPITAL U
The first character in the word “Unforgiven” is a capital U.

30. 2011 All-Star pitcher Correia : KEVIN
Kevin Correia is a professional baseball player who pitches for the Minnesota Twins.

32. He was born "all over like an hairy garment" : ESAU
Esau, was the grandson of Abraham and the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When Esau was born, the event was described, “Now the first came forth, red all over like a hairy garment”. Esau is portrayed later in life as being very different from his brother, as a hunter and someone who loves the outdoor life.

34. Trail rider's concoction : GORP
“Gorp” is the name sometimes used for trail mix, particularly by hikers. It’s not really known for sure how this name came about, but some say it stands for “good old raisins and peanuts” or perhaps “gobs of raw protein”.

35. Gov. Cuomo's purview : NYS
Andrew Cuomo won the gubernatorial election for the State of New York in 2010. Andrew is the son of former Governor of New York, Mario Cuomo. Andrew was also married for 13 years to Kerry Kennedy, a daughter of Robert F. Kennedy.

36. "Bless ___" (1941 hit song) : ‘EM ALL
“Bless ‘Em All” is a song written in England in 1917 that also goes by the name “The Long and the Short and the Tall”.
Bless 'em all,
Bless 'em all.
The long and the short and the tall,
Bless all those Sergeants and WO1's,
Bless all those Corporals and their blinkin'’ sons,
Cos' we're saying goodbye to 'em all.
And back to their Billets they crawl,
You'll get no promotion this side of the ocean,
So cheer up my lads bless 'em all

37. Slow march, maybe : DIRGE
An elegy is a mournful poem or funeral song, also known as a dirge. Perhaps the most famous elegy in the English language is that written by Thomas Gray, completed in 1750. His “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” is the source of many oft-quoted phrases, including:
- Celestial fire
- Far from the Madding Crowd
- Kindred spirit


38. Player in a pocket : IPOD NANO
The iPod Nano is the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There have been five versions of the Nano to date and the current Nano as well as playing tunes is an FM player, records voice memos, and even has a pedometer!

40. Holy smoker? : CENSER
A censer is a vessel in which incense is burned during religious services.

41. Title character singing in the "Tea for Two" duet : NANETTE
The 1925 musical "No, No, Nanette" spawned two famous songs: "Tea for Two" and "I Want to Be Happy".

50. "Allahu ___" (Iraqi flag phrase) : AKBAR
The Iranian flag in use today was adopted in 1980, a product of the Iranian Revolution. The flag is a tricolor composed of horizontal bands of green, white and red. Included in the green and red bands are the repeated words “Allahu Akbar”, which translates as “God is great”.

51. Drill command involving a rifle : ORDER ARMS!
Two examples of drill commands are “Present, arms!”, at which point the soldiers being drilled present a rifle or hand salute. The command “Order, arms!” instructs the soldiers to ring their rifle or hand back to their sides.

52. Whoopi's first leading film role : CELIE
Whoopi Goldberg played Celie Harris Johnson in Steven Spielberg's "The Color Purple", the 1985 screen adaptation of the novel of the same name by Alice Walker.

53. One who doesn't click in a clique : ODD MAN OUT
A "clique" is a small, exclusive group of people. The term of course comes to us from France, where it has the same meaning. In French it somehow evolved in meaning from the original "clique" meaning a sharp noise, or as we would say today, a "click".

Down
2. Olive genus : OLEA
Oleum (plural: olea) is the Latin word for "oil". The term oleum is used for a whole host of pharmaceutical oils, extracted from both plant and animal sources.

4. Old-time actress Bennett : ENID
Enid Bennett was an actress from Australia who made a name for herself in the age of silent movies. Bennett’s most famous role was Maid Marian in 1922, which she played opposite Douglas Fairbanks.

6. Ill-fated line of the 1950s : EDSELS
It was Henry Ford's son Edsel who gave his name to the Edsel brand of automobile, a name that has become synonymous with "failure".

8. "The Producers" sex kitten : ULLA
The sex kitten married to Leo Bloom in the Mel Brooks musical “The Producers” is called Ulla, although her full name is Ulla Inga tor Hansen Benson Yansen Tallen Hallen Svaden Swanson Bloom!

“The Producers” is a 1968 satirical movie written and directed by Mel Brooks, the first film he ever directed. Brooks adapted the movie into a hugely successful Broadway musical that won a record 12 Tony Awards. The original leads in the stage show, Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick, then appeared in a 2005 movie adaptation of the musical version of the original film!

11. Biblically named Michigan college : OLIVET
Olivet College in Olivet, Michigan opened to students in 1844. The school is affiliated with the United Church of Christ.

14. Common religious artwork : LAST SUPPER
Leonardo da Vinci's famous mural "The Last Supper" can be seen on an end wall of the dining hall in the monastery of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Milan, Italy. If you want to see it in person, you have to make a reservation ahead of time, and once you get there, you're only allowed 15 minutes viewing time. The mural is a very, very popular tourist attraction ...

23. "Scratch thee but with ___ ...": Shak. : A PIN
“Scratch thee but with a pin ...” is a line from William Shakespeare’s play “As You Like It”.

27. Source of 13-Down eggs : EMU
Emu eggs are very large, with a thick shell that is dark-green in color. One emu egg weighs about the same as a dozen chicken eggs.

28. With 33-Across, "The Voice" vocal coach : CEE LO
33. See 28-Down : GREEN
Cee Lo Green is the stage name of rapper Thomas DeCarlo Callaway. Apparently Green is one of the coaches for the contestants on the singing TV show “The Voice”. That’s all I need to know …

30. Ed whose entire 18-season career was with the Mets : KRANEPOOL
Ed Kranepool is a former Major League Baseball player who spent his entire career with the New York Mets. Kranepool was a member of the team known as the “Miracle Mets” who won the 1969 World Series. He hit a homerun in game 5 of the series.

33. Common B-school requirement : GMAT
A “B-school” is a business school.

If you want to get into a business school’s graduate program then you might have to take the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), which will cost you about $250, I believe ...

34. Spirit in a sling : GIN
A sling is a cocktail made of brandy, whiskey or gin, sweetened and flavored with lemon. The most famous version of the sling is the Singapore Sling, invented by a bartender at the Raffles Hotel in Singapore. I am proud to report that I once had a Singapore Sling in Raffles Hotel, many moons ago …

36. In the log, say : ENTERED
The word "logbook" dates back to the days when the captain of a ship kept a daily record of the vessel's speed, progress etc. using a "log". A log was a wooden float on a knotted line that was dropped overboard to measure speed through the water.

37. Right-handed : DEXTRAL
Someone or something described as "sinistral" is left-handed. Someone right-handed is "dextral".

42. Blouse with a sailor collar : MIDDY
A middy blouse is a loose blouse with a sailor collar that might be worn by a woman or a child. The term “middy” comes from “midshipman”.

45. Great Seal word : ORDO
The Latin phrase “novus ordo seclorum” means "new order of the ages”. These words appear on the reverse of the Great Seal of the United States, a device used to authenticate some US federal documents. “Novus ordo seclorum” also appears on the back of one-dollar bills. The phrase itself is lifted from one of the works of the ancient Roman poet Virgil.

46. Legal scholar Guinier : LANI
Lani Guinier was the first African-American woman to achieve tenure at Harvard Law School.

49. Former faves of jet-setters : SSTS
The most famous Supersonic Transport (SST) was the Concorde, a plane that's no longer flying. Concorde had that famous "droop nose". The nose was moved to the horizontal position during flight to create the optimum aerodynamic shape thereby reducing drag. It was lowered during taxi, takeoff and landing, so that the pilot had better visibility. The need for the droop nose was driven largely by the delta-shaped wings. The delta wing necessitates a higher angle of attack at takeoff and landing than conventional wing designs, so the pilot needed the nose lowered so that he or she could see the ground.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Stopped living the high life? : SOBERED UP
10. One paid to get shot : MODEL
15. Legendary lutist : ALAN-A-DALE
16. TV host Chung : ALEXA
17. Asia Minor, e.g. : PENINSULA
18. Dumps : JILTS
19. Trail rider's accessory : SADDLEBAG
20. Public : OVERT
21. Draft pick : ALE
22. One highly unlikely to react : RARE GAS
24. Geneses : ONSETS
28. Character in "Unforgiven" : CAPITAL U
29. French verse : POEME
30. 2011 All-Star pitcher Correia : KEVIN
31. Flow controller : TAP
32. He was born "all over like an hairy garment" : ESAU
33. See 28-Down : GREEN
34. Trail rider's concoction : GORP
35. Gov. Cuomo's purview : NYS
36. "Bless ___" (1941 hit song) : ‘EM ALL
37. Slow march, maybe : DIRGE
38. Player in a pocket : IPOD NANO
40. Holy smoker? : CENSER
41. Title character singing in the "Tea for Two" duet : NANETTE
42. Not be a wallflower : MIX
43. Scrape : GRATE
44. 0-0 : POINTLESS
50. "Allahu ___" (Iraqi flag phrase) : AKBAR
51. Drill command involving a rifle : ORDER ARMS!
52. Whoopi's first leading film role : CELIE
53. One who doesn't click in a clique : ODD MAN OUT
54. Graph revelation, possibly : TREND
55. Nonrevolutionaries : LOYALISTS

Down
1. Easy marks : SAPS
2. Olive genus : OLEA
3. Ring : BAND
4. Old-time actress Bennett : ENID
5. Went long : RAN LATE
6. Ill-fated line of the 1950s : EDSELS
7. Beefy Provençal stew : DAUBE
8. "The Producers" sex kitten : ULLA
9. Landscaping alternative to sand : PEA GRAVEL
10. Study principally : MAJOR IN
11. Biblically named Michigan college : OLIVET
12. They don't do it all themselves : DELEGATORS
13. Monster : EXTRA LARGE
14. Common religious artwork : LAST SUPPER
23. "Scratch thee but with ___ ...": Shak. : A PIN
24. Bill starter : OPENING ACT
25. Snoop : NOSY PARKER
26. Like unsurprising temperatures : SEASONABLE
27. Source of 13-Down eggs : EMU
28. With 33-Across, "The Voice" vocal coach : CEE LO
30. Ed whose entire 18-season career was with the Mets : KRANEPOOL
33. Common B-school requirement : GMAT
34. Spirit in a sling : GIN
36. In the log, say : ENTERED
37. Right-handed : DEXTRAL
39. Hold up : DETAIN
40. Its patrons are usually kept in the dark : CINEMA
42. Blouse with a sailor collar : MIDDY
45. Great Seal word : ORDO
46. Legal scholar Guinier : LANI
47. Symbol of love : EROS
48. Sanitization target : SMUT
49. Former faves of jet-setters : SSTS


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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