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I am currently on vacation in Ireland, returning on October 9th. I am hoping to complete a blog post each evening, even if it is only the basics (solved grid and clues, plus explanation of theme). I apologize in advance if I am late in posting.

Bill

0531-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 May 13, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Josh Knapp
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 53s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
9. "Titus" director Taymor : JULIE
Julie Taymor is a director of movies, and of opera and theater productions. Taymor’s best known work is the stage musical “The Lion King”. She also directed William Shakespeare’s “Titus Andronicus” on the stage, and brought the play to the big screen as the 199 feature film “Titus”.

"Titus Andronicus" is one of Shakespeare's tragedies, perhaps even the first that he wrote. I've never seen the play and apparently it is very gory, perhaps the reason why it was quite popular in Shakespeare's own lifetime. Over the decades, sensibilities have changed and a result "Titus Andronicus" is performed less often today than his other works.

15. Series of movements : SONATA
The term "sonata" comes from the Latin and Italian word "sonare" meaning "to sound". A sonata is a piece of music that is played, as opposed to a cantata (from Latin and Italian "cantare" meaning "to sing"), a piece of music that is sung.

18. What we may be overseas? : NOUS
“Nous” is the French for “we”.

19. Relative of a bathysphere : DIVING BELL
A bathysphere is a submersible used in exploring the deep sea. The bathysphere is spherical in shape, so as to better resist the high pressure of deep waters. The term “bathysphere” comes from the Greek “bathus” and “sphaira” meaning “deep” and “sphere”. The vessel is simply lowered into the water on a strong cable.

21. Limp Bizkit frontman Fred : DURST
Fred Durst is the vocalist for the rock band Limp Bizkit. Durst chose the band’s name, and he was looking for something that turned people off. Sure enough, any record label interested in the band in its early days asked for a name change!

Limp Bizkit is described as a “nu metal” band, with nu metal being a subgenre of heavy metal. Limp Bizkit has been around since 1994, and that’s all I know …

23. Ingredient in some pastitsio : ZITI
Cylindrical pasta is known in general as “penne”, and there are many variants. For example, Ziti is a particularly large and long tube with square-cut ends.

Pastitsio is a baked pasta dish mainly from Greece, and is a version of the Italian dish known as pasticcio di pasta.

24. Sacha Baron Cohen character : ALI G
Ali G is a fictional character created by British comedian Sacha Baron Cohen. Baron Cohen achieved international fame playing another of his personae, Borat, the protagonist in the 2006 movie "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan".

25. Football stat. : ATT
Attempts (Att.)

26. 21, in blackjack : ACE-TEN
The game of "twenty-one" was first referred to in a book by Cervantes, the author famous for writing "Don Quixote". He called the game "ventiuna" (Spanish for "twenty-one"). Cervantes wrote his story just after the year 1600, so the game has been around at least since then. Twenty-one came to the US but it wasn't all that popular so bonus payments were introduced to create more interest. One of the more attractive bonuses was a ten-to-one payout to a player who was dealt an ace of spades and a black jack. This bonus led to the game adopting the moniker "Blackjack".

29. Earl of Sandwich, e.g. : EPONYM
An eponym is a name for something derived from the name of a person, as in the “sandwich” named for the Earl of Sandwich.

Meats placed between slices of bread was first called a sandwich in the 18th century, named after the Fourth Earl of Sandwich. The Earl was fond of eating "sandwiches" while playing cards at his club.

31. Some charge cards, informally : AMEXES
Amex is short for American Express. In dollar terms, there are more transactions conducted in the US using the Amex card than any other card.

35. Florentine tourist attraction : DAVID
When Michelangelo's famous statue of David was unveiled in 1504, it was at a time when the city-state of the Florentine Republic was threatened by rival states (including Rome). The statue depicts David after he has decided to fight Goliath, and the subject is sporting what is described as a "warning glare". David was originally placed outside the Palazzo della Signoria, the seat of government in Florence, and that warning glare was directed very deliberately in the direction of its enemy, namely Rome.

39. Bellicose figure : ARES
The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of blood-lust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos, Deimos and Eros. The Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

Something described as “bellicose” is warlike or hostile. The term derives from the Latin “bellum” meaning “war”.

44. Guinness measurement : PINT
Guinness is the most popular beer sold in Ireland. The beer is a stout and has that famous creamy white head, a result of mixing the beer with nitrogen as it is poured. You can also buy Guinness that has no nitrogen, which is sold under the name Guinness Export. This carbonated version of the beer has a very different taste, and is my personal favorite.

45. Kool & the Gang's "Get Down ___" : ON IT
The band called Kool & the Gang has been around since the mid-sixties, and is most famous for the hit "Celebration".

51. Instruction for a violinist : ARCO
“Arco” is a musical direction instructing a string player to return to normal bowing technique after a passage played using some other technique (perhaps pizzicato).

53. Hood's support : MERRY MEN
Robin Hood is a figure from English folklore, celebrated in story and song. Some stories suggest that Robin Hood the outlaw was actually a real nobleman, the Earl of Huntington. Robin Hood's famous companion was Maid Marian. Interestingly, the legend of Maid Marian (full name Lady Marian of Leaford) had been around for centuries before she became associated with Robin Hood starting in the 1700s.

55. Stir : THE CAN
The slang word "stir", meaning a prison, probably has its roots in Start Newgate prison in London, where it was a nickname for the establishment.

56. Breather? : AQUALUNG
Jacques-Yves Cousteau started off his career in the French Navy, aiming for a working life in aviation. Because of a car accident, Cousteau had to abandon his first career choice and instead went to sea. Famously, he invented the Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus (SCUBA), also called the aqualung.

57. Gretzky, for most of the 1980s : OILER
The National Hockey League's Edmonton Oilers are so called because they are located in Alberta, Canada ... oil country.

Wayne Gretzky is regarded by many as the greatest ever player of ice hockey, and indeed had the nickname “The Great One”.

Down
1. Big to-do, maybe? : AGENDA
“Agenda”is a Latin word that translates as “things to be done”, coming from the verb “agere” meaning “to do”.

4. Houdini's real name : WEISS
Harry Houdini was the stage name of Hungarian-born escapologist and magician Erik Weisz (later changed to “Harry Weiss”). Many people are under the impression that Houdini died while performing an escape that went wrong, an impression created by the storyline in a couple of movies about his life. The truth is that he died of peritonitis from a burst appendix. It is also true that a few days prior to his death Houdini took a series of punches to his stomach as part of his act, but doctors believe that his appendix would have burst regardless.

6. J. M. W. Turner's "___ Banished From Rome" : OVID
J. M. W. Turner was an English painter, notably of watercolor landscapes. Turner had an uncanny ability to portray light in his works, earning him the moniker “the painter of light”.

7. YouTuber, e.g. : NETIZEN
A netizen is an "Internet citizen", someone with a presence on the Internet.

9. "Fear of Flying" author : JONG
The author Erica Jong’s most famous work is her first: “Fear of Flying”, a novel published in 1973. Over twenty years later she wrote “Fear of Fifty: a midlife memoir”, published in 1994.

12. Many early 20th-century U.S. immigrants : ITALIANS
The highpoint of Italian immigration to the US was the 1910s when over two million immigrants arrived from Italy, About a third of this number eventually returned to their homeland, most working about five years in America.

13. Blend with bergamot : EARL GREY
The Earl Grey blend of tea is supposedly named after Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey who was Prime Minister of the UK from 1830 to 1834. Earl Grey tea has a distinctive flavor that is largely due to the addition of oil from the rind of the bergamot orange.

20. Gossip column subject : ITEM
An unmarried couple known to be involved with each other might appear in the gossip columns. This appearance as "an item" in the papers, led to the use of "item" to refer to such a couple, but only since the very early seventies. Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie were an item in the gossip columns after they met on the set of the 2005 film “Mr. and Mrs. Smith”. Since then, they have unravelled their prior marriages and are now husband and wife with six children.

27. Function of mathematics: Abbr. : COS
The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine, cosine and tangent. Each of these is a ratio, a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The reciprocal of these three functions are secant, cosecant and cotangent. The reciprocal functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine, cosine and tangent.

32. Style played on a guitarrón : MARIACHI
The name "Mariachi", used for a typically Mexican popular band, is said to be a corruption of the French word for "marriage" (i.e. "mariage"). This perhaps dates back to the times of Napoleon II when France had political and cultural influence over Spain.

A guitarrón is a large guitar that is traditionally played in Mariachi bands.

36. ___-pedi : MANI
Manicure and pedicure (mani-pedi)

38. Hush-hush : ON THE QT
“On the qt” is a slang term for “on the quiet”. It has been around since the 1870s.

40. Farrell of "In Bruges" : COLIN
Colin Farrell is a film actor from Dublin, Ireland. Farrell made a name for himself playing in action movies such as “Phone Booth”, “S.W.A.T.” and “The Recruit”.

“In Bruges” is a black comedy movie from 2008 starring Colin Farrell and Brendan Gleeson as two hitmen from Ireland roaming around the city of Bruges in Belgium. Despite the great cast and great location, I didn’t enjoy this one …

47. 1972 hit that begins "What'll you do when you get lonely ...?" : LAYLA
"Layla" is one of the great rock anthems of the seventies, released by Derek and the Dominos in December of 1970. It is a masterpiece of composition, with the first half of the song a great vehicle for the guitar-playing talents of Eric Clapton. The second half is a beautifully melodic piano coda (a coda ... taking up half the length of the track!). To top things off we have the "unplugged" version recorded by Clapton in 1992, a fabulous and inventive variation on the original.

49. "___ leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering": Yoda : FEAR
Yoda is one of the most beloved characters in the "Star Wars" series of films. Yoda's voice was provided by the great modern-day puppeteer Frank Oz of "Muppets" fame.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "You doubt me?" : AM I WRONG?
9. "Titus" director Taymor : JULIE
14. Disappointing screen message : GAME OVER
15. Series of movements : SONATA
16. Start of a court display : EXHIBIT A
17. Commensurate (with) : ON A PAR
18. What we may be overseas? : NOUS
19. Relative of a bathysphere : DIVING BELL
21. Limp Bizkit frontman Fred : DURST
23. Ingredient in some pastitsio : ZITI
24. Sacha Baron Cohen character : ALI G
25. Football stat. : ATT
26. 21, in blackjack : ACE-TEN
28. Have words (with) : SPAR
29. Earl of Sandwich, e.g. : EPONYM
30. What was once yours? : THINE
31. Some charge cards, informally : AMEXES
34. Wee : TEENSY
35. Florentine tourist attraction : DAVID
36. Certainly didn't roar : MEOWED
39. Bellicose figure : ARES
40. Feature of a daredevil circus act : CANNON
41. Dirt collector : MAT
44. Guinness measurement : PINT
45. Kool & the Gang's "Get Down ___" : ON IT
46. Unsolicited manuscripts, informally : SLUSH
48. Get off the ground : TAKE FLIGHT
51. Instruction for a violinist : ARCO
52. It follows a curtain opening : SCENE I
53. Hood's support : MERRY MEN
55. Stir : THE CAN
56. Breather? : AQUALUNG
57. Gretzky, for most of the 1980s : OILER
58. Manages : STEWARDS

Down
1. Big to-do, maybe? : AGENDA
2. Push to the limit : MAX OUT
3. "That cuts me to the quick" : I'M HURT
4. Houdini's real name : WEISS
5. Take the money and run? : ROB
6. J. M. W. Turner's "___ Banished From Rome" : OVID
7. YouTuber, e.g. : NETIZEN
8. It keeps people grounded : GRAVITY
9. "Fear of Flying" author : JONG
10. Brazen : UNABASHED
11. Accessory to a suit : LAPEL PIN
12. Many early 20th-century U.S. immigrants : ITALIANS
13. Blend with bergamot : EARL GREY
15. ___-law : SON-IN
20. Gossip column subject : ITEM
22. Not live : TAPED
27. Function of mathematics: Abbr. : COS
29. It's a living thing : EXISTENCE
30. Much of the Disney Channel's demographic : TEENS
31. Gets comfortable with : ADAPTS TO
32. Style played on a guitarrón : MARIACHI
33. State of stability : EVEN KEEL
34. Shout repeated at a basketball game : TWO
36. ___-pedi : MANI
37. Causes of head-scratching : ENIGMAS
38. Hush-hush : ON THE QT
40. Farrell of "In Bruges" : COLIN
41. Hushed sound : MURMUR
42. Get high : ASCEND
43. Strings along a beach? : THONGS
47. 1972 hit that begins "What'll you do when you get lonely ...?" : LAYLA
49. "___ leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering": Yoda : FEAR
50. "You have a point" : TRUE
54. Naked : RAW


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0530-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 May 13, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Julian Lim
THEME: Change in Direction … each of the themed answers is written backwards, from EAST TO WEST, and each starts with E for east and ends with W for west:
17A. Tidal movement : EBB AND FLOW
23A. Firm last words? : EXIT INTERVIEW
37A. Take one's licks, in a way : EAT CROW
51A. "Be careful!" : EASY DOES IT NOW!

60A. How 17-, 23-, 37- and 51-Across run (in two ways) : EAST TO WEST
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 42s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. "Humbug" preceders : BAHS
The classic 1843 novella "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens has left us with a few famous phrases and words. Firstly, it led to the popular use of "Merry Christmas", and secondly it gave us the word "scrooge" meaning a miserly person. And thirdly, everyone knows that the character Scrooge was fond of using the now famous line "Bah! Humbug!".

14. Polyunsaturated fat source : OLEO
Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France announced a competition to develop a substitute for butter, a substitute that would be more accessible to the lower classes and more practical for the armed forces. In 1869, a French chemist called Hippolyte Mege-Mouries came up with something that he called oleomargarine, which was eventually manufactured under the trade name "margarine". The name "oleomargarine" also gives us our generic term "oleo".

Saturated fats differ from unsaturated fats chemically in that saturated fats have chains of fatty acids that are relatively straight, allowing individual molecules to pack closely together. This close packing largely explains why saturated fats are solid at room temperature. Unsaturated fatty acids on the other hand have "kinks" in the chains of their fatty acids, so that they cannot pack together closely. Unsaturated fats are generally liquid at room temperature. Food manufacturers have learned that humans get sick by consuming saturated fats (i.e. fats from animal sources). So, they market "healthy" vegetable fats (naturally unsaturated and liquid at room temperature) that they have magically transformed in solid fats (like vegetable spreads). All they did was saturate the healthy fats, so that now it solidifies at room temperature, and in your arteries. There should be a law ...

15. ___-Leste (U.N. member since 2002) : TIMOR
Timor is an island in Maritime Southeast Asia. The island is politically divided into West Timor, belonging to Indonesia, and the independent state of East Timor (aka “Timor-Leste”). The name “Timor” comes from a Malay word for “east”, and is used as Timor lies at the eastern end of the Lesser Sunda Islands.

16. "The Sopranos" co-star : ILER
The actor Robert Iler's most famous role was A.J., son of mob leader Tony Soprano in HBO's "The Sopranos". Apparently Iler's screen persona has spilled over into his personal life, as he was arrested for armed robbery of two tourists in 2001 (and pleaded guilty to a lesser charge).

17. Tidal movement : EBB AND FLOW
Tides of course are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon's effect. At spring tides, the sun and the moon's gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

19. Bhagavad ___ (Hindu text) : GITA
The Bhagavad Gita is a Hindu scripture, the title of which translates as “The Song of the Bhagavan”.

21. "La Bamba" performers : LOS LOBOS
Los Lobos are an American Chicano rock band, who released their first LP in 1978 and are still going strong today. The band's name "Los Lobos" translates from Spanish as "The Wolves".

“La Bamba” is a folk song from Veracruz, Mexico that became a huge hit for Ritchie Valens in 1958. The most notable cover version of the Valens hit was recorded by Los Lobos in 1987 as the title track of 1987 movie “La Bamba”.

26. Barbara Eden title role : JEANNIE
Back in 1964, the second most watched show on American television was ABC’s “Bewitched”. Sidney Sheldon was tasked with the job of creating a rival sitcom and he came up with “I Dream of Jeannie”, which first aired in 1965. The censors had a big say in how the story developed. For starters, Jeannie’s skimpy costume was permitted provided Barbara Eden didn’t show off her navel on the screen. Also, Jeannie was only allowed to live with an unmarried man as long as the story made it clear that she slept in a bottle.

29. ___-rock : ALT
I’ll be honest. I really don’t know what alt-rock is, and I can’t seem to work it out. Just an old fuddy-duddy …

30. Something Garfield often takes : NAP
“Garfield” is a comic strip drawn by Jim Davis since 1978. Garfield is an orange tabby cat. Davis named his hero Garfield after his own grandfather.

36. Popular dorm poster subject : CHE
Ernesto "Che" Guevara was born in Argentina, and in 1948 he started to study medicine at the University of Buenos Aires. While at school he satisfied his need to "see the world" by taking two long journeys around South America, the story of which are told in Guevara's memoir later published as "The Motorcycle Diaries". While travelling, Guevara was moved by the plight of the people he saw and their working conditions and what he viewed as capitalistic exploitation. In Mexico City he met brothers Raul and Fidel Castro and was persuaded to join their cause, the overthrow of the US-backed government in Cuba. He rose to second-in-command among the Cuban insurgents, and when Castro came to power Guevara was influential in repelling the Bay of Pigs Invasion and bringing Soviet nuclear missiles to the island. Guevara left Cuba in 1965 to continue his work as a revolutionary. He was captured by Bolivian forces in 1967, and was executed. Fidel Castro led the public mourning of Guevara's death, and soon the revolutionary was an icon for many left-wing movements around the world.

37. Take one's licks, in a way : EAT CROW
The phrase "eat crow", an alternative to "eat humble pie" perhaps refers to the fact that cooked crow may be edible, but is not a great food choice.

43. Triple ___ : SEC
Triple sec is liqueur made from the dried peels of bitter and sweet oranges. I tend to use it in cocktails calling for Grand Marnier or Cointreau, as it is a cheaper alternative and tastes very similar ...

45. Passion : ELAN
Our word "élan" was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours i.e "style" or "flair".

55. "House" actor for the show's entire run : OMAR EPPS
Omar Epps is the actor who played Eric Foreman on the excellent television series "House". Prior to playing Dr. Foreman, Epps had a recurring role playing Dr. Dennis Grant on "ER". And, in another link to the world of medicine, Epps was born in Savannah, Georgia to single mom, Dr. Bonnie Epps.

56. Lady Gaga and others : DIVAS
"Diva" comes to us from Latin via Italian. "Diva" is the feminine form of "divus" meaning "divine one". The word is used in Italy to mean "goddess" or "fine lady", and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

Lady Gaga is the stage name of singer Stefani Germanotta from New York City. I've seen Lady Gaga interviewed on television a few times, and she sure is "unique". Her music is of course out of my league, but she does know how to put on a show.

59. Brightest star in Lyra : VEGA
Vega is the brightest star in the constellation Lyra. Vega (along with Altair and Deneb from other constellations) is also part of the group of three stars that is called the Summer Triangle. Vega is the star at the right-angle of this triangle.

63. Like crème brûlée : EGGY
Crème brûlée is a classic French dessert consisting of a rich custard topped with a crusty layer of caramelized sugar. The name “crème brûlée” translates from French as “burnt cream”.

64. Some campaigns win them : CLIOS
The Clio Awards are the Oscars of the advertising world and are named after Clio, the Greek Muse of History. Clio was also the recorder of great deeds, the proclaimer and celebrator of great accomplishments and a source of inspiration and genius. The Clio Awards were first presented in 1959.

65. "You Are My Destiny" singer : ANKA
Canadian-born Paul Anka's big hit was in 1957, the song entitled "Diana". Anka was the subject of a much-lauded documentary film in 1962 called "Lonely Boy".

68. Accident investigator, for short : NTSB
The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is responsible for the investigation of major accidents involving transportation. Included in this broad definition is the transportation of fluids in pipelines. The organization is independent in that it has no ties to other government agencies or departments so that its investigations can be viewed as "impartial". The NTSB also earns a little money for the US as it hires out its investigation teams to countries who don't have the necessary resources available on their own soil.

Down
2. Conditioner additive : ALOE
Aloe vera has a number of alternate names that are descriptive of its efficacy as a medicine. These include the First Aid plant, Wand of Heaven, Silent Healer and Miracle Plant.

6. Possible coup instigator, for short : CIA
The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is the successor to the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) formed during WWII. The CIA was chartered by the National Security Act of 1947.

8. Men of steel? : ROBOTS
"R.U.R." is a play written in Czech by Karel Capek, first produced in 1921. "R.U.R." is a science fiction work and is remembered in part for introducing the world to the word "robot". The words "automaton" and "android" were already in use, but Capek gave us "robot" from the original Czech "robota" meaning "forced labor".

9. San Joaquin Valley city : FRESNO
Fresno is the largest inland city in the whole state of California. The city was named for the many ash trees that lined the San Joaquin River, as “fresno” is the Spanish for “ash tree”.

11. Out : ALIBI
"Alibi" is the Latin word for "elsewhere" as in, "I claim that I was 'elsewhere' when the crime was committed ... I have an 'alibi'".

22. Actress Balaban of "Last Chance Harvey" : LIANE
Liane Balaban is an actress from Ontario, Canada. Apparently, Balaban is often mistaken for fellow actress Natalie Portman.

24. Trattoria menu heading : VINO
A trattoria is an Italian restaurant. In Italian, a “trattore” is the keeper of an eating house.

26. With 41-Across, co-creator of Captain America and the Hulk : JACK
(41A. See 26-Down : KIRBY)
As writers for the comic book industry, Jack Kirby and Stan Lee worked together a lot throughout the 1960s. The Kirby-Lee team created such icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men and the Hulk.

27. Pre-coll., in education : ELHI
"Elhi" is an informal word used to describe anything related to schooling from grades 1 through 12, i.e. elementary through high school.

34. Finito : OVER
"Finito" is the Italian word for "finished".

37. Poet Elinor : WYLIE
Elinor Wylie was an American poet and novelist who was active in the twenties and thirties.

39. ___-deucey : ACEY
Acey-deucy is a fast-played variant of backgammon. Apparently the game has been a favorite with members of the armed forces since the days of WWI.

47. Many a Sherpa : NEPALI
In the Tibetan language, Sherpa means "eastern people" (sher = east, pa = people). Sherpas are an ethnic group from Nepal, but the name is also used for the local guides who assist mountaineers in the Himalayas, and particularly on Mount Everest.

49. "If you prick ___ we not bleed?": Shak. : US, DO
“If you prick us, do we not bleed?” is a line from Shakespeare’s “The Merchant of Venice”.

In William Shakespeare's “The Merchant of Venice”, Portia is the formidable heroine who takes on the guise of a male lawyer and calls herself "Balthasar". Portia does this to save the life of Antonio, the play’s title character. Portia makes a famous speech that gives us an oft-quoted phrase, “the quality of mercy”:
The quality of mercy is not strain'd,
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath: it is twice blest;
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes...

50. One of the so-called "Four Asian Tigers" : TAIWAN
In the world of global finance, the so-called Asian Tigers are the economies of Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore and Hong Kong.

52. Movado competitor : OMEGA
Omega is a manufacturer of high-end watches based in Switzerland. An Omega watch was the first portable timepiece to make it to the moon.

Movado is a manufacturer of upscale watches in Switzerland. The company name is an Esperanto word, meaning “always in motion”.

54. Actor Davis : OSSIE
Ossie Davis was a very successful African-American actor, but also a director, poet, playwright and social activist. In the CBS sitcom "Evening Shade", Davis played the narrator.

62. General on a Chinese menu : TSO
General Tso's chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
5. Gobble (down) : SCARF
10. Ordered : BADE
14. Polyunsaturated fat source : OLEO
15. ___-Leste (U.N. member since 2002) : TIMOR
16. "The Sopranos" co-star : ILER
17. Tidal movement : EBB AND FLOW
19. Bhagavad ___ (Hindu text) : GITA
20. Occasioned : LED TO
21. "La Bamba" performers : LOS LOBOS
23. Firm last words? : EXIT INTERVIEW
26. Barbara Eden title role : JEANNIE
28. Triple, quadruple or more : SOAR
29. ___-rock : ALT
30. Something Garfield often takes : NAP
32. Like some stockings : NYLON
36. Popular dorm poster subject : CHE
37. Take one's licks, in a way : EAT CROW
40. "___ been there" : I’VE
41. See 26-Down : KIRBY
43. Triple ___ : SEC
44. Small number : FEW
45. Passion : ELAN
48. Fixes : NEUTERS
51. "Be careful!" : EASY DOES IT NOW!
55. "House" actor for the show's entire run : OMAR EPPS
56. Lady Gaga and others : DIVAS
59. Brightest star in Lyra : VEGA
60. How 17-, 23-, 37- and 51-Across run (in two ways) : EAST TO WEST
63. Like crème brûlée : EGGY
64. Some campaigns win them : CLIOS
65. "You Are My Destiny" singer : ANKA
66. Unsupportive words : NAYS
67. Hook up with : TIE TO
68. Accident investigator, for short : NTSB

Down
1. Big game : BOWL
2. Conditioner additive : ALOE
3. Added up : HELD WATER
4. Moderate : SOFTEN
5. The bus stops here: Abbr. : STN
6. Possible coup instigator, for short : CIA
7. Enjoy a constitutional : AMBLE
8. Men of steel? : ROBOTS
9. San Joaquin Valley city : FRESNO
10. Homophobia, e.g. : BIGOTRY
11. Out : ALIBI
12. Get clean : DETOX
13. Take marks off : ERASE
18. End : DO IN
22. Actress Balaban of "Last Chance Harvey" : LIANE
24. Trattoria menu heading : VINO
25. It's sat upon : REAR
26. With 41-Across, co-creator of Captain America and the Hulk : JACK
27. Pre-coll., in education : ELHI
31. Equipment in some labs : PCS
33. Marriage or divorce : LIFE EVENT
34. Finito : OVER
35. "That's ___ to me" : NEWS
37. Poet Elinor : WYLIE
38. Watch : TEND
39. ___-deucey : ACEY
42. Gives away : BETRAYS
46. Visage : ASPECT
47. Many a Sherpa : NEPALI
49. "If you prick ___ we not bleed?": Shak. : US, DO
50. One of the so-called "Four Asian Tigers" : TAIWAN
51. Like tapestries : WOVEN
52. Movado competitor : OMEGA
53. Disposed to henpecking : NAGGY
54. Actor Davis : OSSIE
57. Puts it to : ASKS
58. Attempt : STAB
61. Stroller rider : TOT
62. General on a Chinese menu : TSO


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0529-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 May 13, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Gary Cee
THEME: Across in Down … we have some answers today that cross each other in the grid, in the format: “across answer” IN “down answer”
14A. With "in" and 2-Down, with respectful humility : HAT (HAT in HAND)
2D. See 14-Across : HAND

19A. With "in" and 12-Down, as a precaution : JUST (JUST in CASE)
12D. See 19-Across : CASE

24A. With "in" and 25-Down, blue ribbon earner : BEST (BEST in SHOW)
25D. See 24-Across : SHOW

53A. With "in" and 41-Down, heir to the throne : NEXT (NEXT in LINE)
41D. See 53-Across : LINE

62A. With "in" and 55-Down, use without proper respect, as a name : TAKE (TAKE in VAIN)
55D. See 62-Across : VAIN

68A. With "in" and 60-Down, prepare for an ambush : LIE (LIE in WAIT)
60D. See 68-Across : WAIT
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 09m 14s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
4. Twain adventurer : SAWYER
Tom Sawyer is of course a favorite character created by Mark Twain. He turns up in four of Twain's books:
- "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer"
- "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"
- "Tom Sawyer Abroad"
- "Tom Sawyer, Detective"

But that's not all, as he appears in at least three works that Twain left unfinished:
- "Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer Among the Indians" (a sequel to "Huckleberry Finn")
- "Schoolhouse Hill"
- "Tom Sawyer's Conspiracy" (a sequel to "Tom Sawyer, Detective")

16. Biblical progenitor of the Edomites : ESAU
According to the Bible, the Edomites were the descendants of Esau. “Edom” translates from Hebrew as “red”, and was the name given to Esau when he at the “red pottage”.

17. Producer of seven U2 albums : ENO
Brian Eno started out his musical career with Roxy Music. However, Eno's most oft-played composition (by far!) is Microsoft's "start-up jingle", the 6-second sound you hear when the Windows operating system is booting up. Eno might have annoyed the Microsoft folks when he stated on a BBC radio show:
I wrote it on a Mac. I’ve never used a PC in my life; I don’t like them.

Irish singer Bono is a Dubliner, born Paul David Hewson. As a youth, Hewson was given the nickname "Bono Vox" by a friend, a Latin expression meaning "good voice", and so the singer has been known as Bono since the late seventies. His band's first name was "Feedback", later changed to "The Hype". The band members searched for yet another name and chose U2 from a list of six names suggested by a friend. They picked U2 because it was the name they disliked least ...

18. "Messiah" composer : HANDEL
George Frideric Handel was the King of the Oratorio. Handel's most famous oratorio is "Messiah", which had its debut performance in Dublin, Ireland back in 1742.

20. Son of Henry Ford : EDSEL
The Edsel brand of automobile was named for Edsel, son of Henry Ford. Sadly, the name "Edsel" has become synonomous with "failure", which was no fault of Edsel himself who had died several years before the Edsel line was introduced.

22. Snack with carne asada, maybe : TACO
Carne Asada translates from Spanish as "roasted meat", and is a roast beef dish.

23. Lode finds : ORES
A lode is metal ore deposit that's found between two layers of rock or in a fissure.

26. Animal with a prehensile snout : TAPIR
All four species of tapir are endangered. Even though the tapir looks much like a pig, it is more closely related to the horse and the rhinoceros. The tapir’s snout is very flexible and can grab hold of foliage that would otherwise be out of reach.

35. Nashville music mecca, for short : OPRY
"The Grand Ole Opry" started out as a radio show in 1925 originally called the WSM "Barn Dance". In 1927, the "Barn Dance" radio show was broadcast in a slot after an NBC production called "Musical Appreciation Hour", a collection of classical works including Grand Opera. In a December show, the host of "Barn Dance" announced, "For the past hour, we have been listening to music taken largely from Grand Opera. From now on we will present the 'Grand Ole Opry'". That name was used for the radio show from then on.

36. Great work : OPUS
The Latin for "work" is “opus”, with the plural being “opera”.

38. Comical Bruce : LENNY
Lenny Bruce was the stage name of comedian Leonard Schneider. Bruce was noted for his edgy style and material on stage, as well as his edgy lifestyle offstage. He was arrested several times and charged with obscenity because of language used in his routines. He was eventually found guilty of one of the charges and sentenced to four months in a workhouse. He was set free on bail while making a much-publicized appeal. Sadly, he died before the appeal process was completed. After his death, the Governor of the New York granted Lenny Bruce a pardon.

39. U.S. broadcaster in 40+ languages : VOA
The US began shortwave propaganda broadcasts in early 1942, just after America entered WWII. The first broadcast to Germany was introduced by the "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" and opened with the words:
Today, and every day from now on, we will be with you from America to talk about the war. The news may be good or bad for us -- We will always tell you the truth.
That first broadcast was called "Stimmen aus Amerika" ("Voices from America"), and gave the fledgling broadcasting operation its name. VOA is still going strong today, and was a station I used to listen to as a teenager back in Ireland in the early seventies …

40. It's solid blue, in pool : TWO-BALL
The more correct name for the game of pool is pocket billiards. The name "pool" arose after pocket billiards became a common feature in "pool halls", places where gamblers "pooled" their money to bet on horse races.

42. Emanation from Babel : DIN
We use the word "babel" now to describe a scene of confusion, lifting the term from the biblical story of the Tower of Babel. The Tower was built in the city of Babylon, and the construction was cursed with a confusion of languages due to the varied origins of all the builders.

43. Give moral guidance : EDIFY
“To edify” is to provide instruction in order to improve spiritually, morally or intellectually. The intent is to “build up” someone's faith or morality, and so “edify” comes from the Latin “aedificare” meaning “to build, construct”. This Latin root also gives us our word “edifice”.

45. South American monkey : TITI
Titis are monkeys found in much of South America that have tails a little bit longer than the length of their heads and bodies.

46. Sonic the Hedgehog's company : SEGA
Sega is a Japanese video game company headquartered in Tokyo. Sega actually started out 1940 in the US as Standard Games and was located in Honolulu, Hawaii. The owners moved the operation to Tokyo in 1951 and renamed the company to Service Games. The name “Sega” is a combination of the first two letters of the words “Se-rvice” and “Ga-mes”.

Sonic the Hedgehog is a title character in a videogame and the mascot of Sega the game developer. Sonic was set up as a rival to Nintendo’s mascot “Mario”.

47. Meat grade below "choice" : SELECT
The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) classifies meat into eight different grades:
- Prime
- Choice
- Select
- Standard
- Commercial
- Utility
- Cutter
- Canner

54. Tel ___ : AVIV
The full name of Israel's second largest city is Tel Aviv-Yafo. Tel Aviv translates into "Spring Mound", a name chosen in 1910.

58. Dogs with dark tongues : CHOWS
The Chow Chow (sometimes just “Chow”) is a breed of dog that originated in China. The Chinese name for the breed is “Songshi Quan”, which translates as “puffy-lion dog”, a rather apt name given its appearance …

66. Lender's security : LIEN
A lien is the right that one has to retain or secure someone's property until a debt is paid.

67. N.F.L. team with the mascot Swoop : EAGLES
The Philadelphia Eagles football team adopted “Swoop” as its mascot in 1998, replacing “Blitz”.

71. Yadda yadda yadda : ETC
"The Yada Yada Yada" is actually the name of the 153rd episode of "Seinfeld". Before "Seinfeld" made "yada yada yada" famous, we were more likely to hear the phrase "yadda yadda", often used by comedian Lenny Bruce for example.

Down
3. Oklahoma tribesmen : OTOS
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

4. Haul (around) : SCHLEP
Our word “schlep” means “to carry, drag”. As one might expect, “schlep” comes from Yiddish, with “shlepen” having the same meaning.

5. Astronomical altar : ARA
The constellation of Ara takes its name from the Latin word for "altar".

6. Deteriorated : WENT TO POT
The phrase “go to pot”, meaning fall into ruin, has been around since the 1500s when it really meant “go to (the) pot”, to be chopped up and boiled for food.

7. Jedi master : YODA
The Jedi are the "good guys" in the "Star Wars" series of movies. The most famous Jedi knights from the films are Obi-Wan Kenobi (played by Alec Guinness, and later Ewan McGregor) and Yoda (voiced by Frank Oz). Well, they're my favorites anyway ...


11. "Uncle!" : I SURRENDER!
The term “uncle”, meaning “stop, I quit”, is a very North American expression. It has been around since the early 1900s but I couldn't unearth its etymology.

21. Site that began as AuctionWeb : EBAY
eBay was founded in 1995 as AuctionWeb as part of a computer programmer’s personal website. One of the first items purchased was a broken laser pointer, for $14.83. The buyer collected broken laser pointers …

27. Student grant named for a senator : PELL
Pell Grants are awarded by the federal government to students in financial need so that they can attend college. The grant is named for Senator Claiborne Pell, who sponsored the bill that introduced aid for students.

29. Lyric poem : EPODE
An epode is a lyric poem made up of couplets in which the first line is long, and the second line much shorter. The form was invented by the Greek poet Archilochus, and was most famously used by the Roman poet Horace.

33. English architect Jones : INIGO
Inigo Jones was a British architect, a native of London. The most famous Jones’s design is probably London’s Covent Garden Square.

34. Tenor Ronan ___ : TYNAN
Ronan Tynan is a classical singer from Ireland who is best known as a member of the Irish Tenors. Tynan is also known as participant in the 1984 and 1988 Paralympics as he has had both his legs amputated below the knee.

37. Duke Ellington classic : SATIN DOLL
Duke Ellington was a bandleader and composer believed by many to have elevated jazz to the same level as other respected genres of music. Ellington tended not to use the word “jazz” to describe his compositions, preferring the term “American Music”.

40. Classic model train brand : TYCO
The Tyco brand of toys was founded in 1926 as Mantua Metal Products by John Tyler. The first products made were scale model trains using die-cast metal. The company introduced the Tyco brand in the fifties, with “Tyco” standing for “Tyler Company”.

46. Jedi foes : SITH
The Sith are characters in the "Star Wars" universe who use the "dark side" of "the Force", and as such are the antithesis of the Jedi Knights. The last made of the six "Star Wars" movies is called "Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith".

48. Deep-sixes : TOSSES
To deep-six something is to toss it, possibly overboard, or to completely destroy it. The derivation of this slang term is from “six feet deep”, not the length of a fathom but rather the traditional depth of a grave.

50. What a gourmand eats to : EXCESS
A gourmand is someone who takes great pleasure in consuming food and drink, often eating and drinking to excess. The related term “gourmet” refers to someone who has a refined palate.

52. Robert who played Mr. Chips : DONAT
Robert Donat was a marvelous actor who starred in two of my favorite films: “The 39 Steps” from 1935 and “Goodbye, Mr. Chips” from 1939.

The fabulous 1939 movie “Goodbye, Mr. Chips” is an adaptation of a novel of the same name by James Hilton. Heading the cast are British actors Robert Donat and Greer Garson. “Goodbye, Mr. Chips” was remade as musical in 1969 starring Peter O’Toole and Petula Clark. I haven’t seen the remake, and frankly am a little scared to do so …

54. Literary Hun king : ATLI
Atli is a character in the Volsunga Saga of 13th century Icelandic lore. It is believed that the Atli character is loosely based on Attila the Hun.

57. Feeling sluggish : LOGY
Something that is “logy” is dull and heavy. “Logy” might come from the Dutch word “log” that means “heavy, dull”.

64. Series ender : ZEE
The letter named "zed" has been around since about 1400, and derives from the Greek letter zeta. The spelling and pronunciation of "zee" used in America today first popped up in the 1670s.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "___ dat?" : WHO
4. Twain adventurer : SAWYER
10. Calorific : RICH
14. With "in" and 2-Down, with respectful humility : HAT (HAT in HAND)
15. Spicy cuisine : CREOLE
16. Biblical progenitor of the Edomites : ESAU
17. Producer of seven U2 albums : ENO
18. "Messiah" composer : HANDEL
19. With "in" and 12-Down, as a precaution : JUST (JUST in CASE)
20. Son of Henry Ford : EDSEL
22. Snack with carne asada, maybe : TACO
23. Lode finds : ORES
24. With "in" and 25-Down, blue ribbon earner : BEST (BEST in SHOW)
26. Animal with a prehensile snout : TAPIR
28. Sand in an hourglass, for time : METAPHOR
32. Smoke and mirrors, say : DECEIT
35. Nashville music mecca, for short : OPRY
36. Great work : OPUS
38. Comical Bruce : LENNY
39. U.S. broadcaster in 40+ languages : VOA
40. It's solid blue, in pool : TWO-BALL
42. Emanation from Babel : DIN
43. Give moral guidance : EDIFY
45. South American monkey : TITI
46. Sonic the Hedgehog's company : SEGA
47. Meat grade below "choice" : SELECT
49. Club providing lots of loft : NINE IRON
51. Coop offspring : BROOD
53. With "in" and 41-Down, heir to the throne : NEXT (NEXT in LINE)
54. Tel ___ : AVIV
56. Gavel wielder's word : SOLD
58. Dogs with dark tongues : CHOWS
62. With "in" and 55-Down, use without proper respect, as a name : TAKE (TAKE in VAIN)
63. Button on an alarm clock : SNOOZE
65. Generation ___ : GAP
66. Lender's security : LIEN
67. N.F.L. team with the mascot Swoop : EAGLES
68. With "in" and 60-Down, prepare for an ambush : LIE (LIE in WAIT)
69. Center of learning: Abbr. : INST
70. Doesn't merely cut : STYLES
71. Yadda yadda yadda : ETC

Down
1. Cry from a thrill ride : WHEE
2. See 14-Across : HAND
3. Oklahoma tribesmen : OTOS
4. Haul (around) : SCHLEP
5. Astronomical altar : ARA
6. Deteriorated : WENT TO POT
7. Jedi master : YODA
8. Not yet inaugurated : ELECT
9. What one might do after a firing : RELOAD
10. Celebrate : REJOICE
11. "Uncle!" : I SURRENDER!
12. See 19-Across : CASE
13. Makeshift housing : HUTS
21. Site that began as AuctionWeb : EBAY
25. See 24-Across : SHOW
27. Student grant named for a senator : PELL
28. Pulls up stakes : MOVES
29. Lyric poem : EPODE
30. Off-road rides : TRAIL BIKES
31. Apply, as lotion : RUB IN
33. English architect Jones : INIGO
34. Tenor Ronan ___ : TYNAN
37. Duke Ellington classic : SATIN DOLL
40. Classic model train brand : TYCO
41. See 53-Across : LINE
44. Impassioned : FERVENT
46. Jedi foes : SITH
48. Deep-sixes : TOSSES
50. What a gourmand eats to : EXCESS
52. Robert who played Mr. Chips : DONAT
54. Literary Hun king : ATLI
55. See 62-Across : VAIN
57. Feeling sluggish : LOGY
59. Get an eyeful : OGLE
60. See 68-Across : WAIT
61. Architect's detail, for short : SPEC
64. Series ender : ZEE


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0528-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 May 13, Tuesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Feyer
THEME: Finish with GE … each of today’s themed answer is a well-known phrase, with -GE added on the end:
17A. Garbage scow that docked with Mir? : SPACE BAR(GE)
20A. Swapping out Sheen for Rose? : CHARLIE CHAN(GE)
35A. Boy Scout's reward for karate expertise? : BREAKING BAD(GE)
54A. Caveman's injury after discovering fire? : ORIGINAL SIN(GE)
59A. Feeling when one's voodoo doll is poked? : EVIL TWIN(GE)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 10:45
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Native Kiwis : MAORI
The Māori are the indigenous people of New Zealand. The Māori are eastern Polynesian in origin and began arriving in New Zealand relatively recently, starting sometime in the late 13th century. The word "māori" simply means "normal", distinguishing the mortal human being from spiritual entities.

Unlike many nicknames for people of a particular country, the name "Kiwi" for a New Zealander isn't offensive at all. The term comes from the flightless bird called the kiwi, which is endemic to New Zealand and is the country's national symbol. "Kiwi" is a Maori word, and the plural (when referring to the bird) is simply "kiwi". However, when you have two or more New Zealanders with you, they are Kiwis (note the "s", and indeed the capital "K"!).

6. Big name in power tools : SKIL
Skil Power Tools sold the first “Skilsaw” back in 1924, for $160. Despite almost a century of inflation, a Skilsaw can be purchased today for a fraction of that original price.

14. Extra Dry brand : ARRID
Arrid is an antiperspirant deodorant brand introduced in the thirties. Slogans associated with Arrid have been "Don't be half-safe - use Arrid to be sure", "Stress stinks! Arrid works!" and "Get a little closer".

15. A, to Mozart : EINE
The composer Mozart’s full name was Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The name “Wolfgang” translates literally as “wolf journey”. Amadeus translates as “Love God!”.

16. Kind of suit worn by a 21-Down : ZOOT
A zoot suit has pants that are fairly loose fitting, except around the cuff at the bottom of the leg. The pants also have a high waist. The jacket of the suit has wide lapels and wide padded shoulders. Zoot-suits were popular in the US in the thirties and forties, and were often associated with the African American, Latino American and Italian American ethnic groups. Over in the UK, the zoot suit was worn by the "Teddy boys" of the fifties and sixties. "Zoot" is probably just a slang iteration of the word "suit".

17. Garbage scow that docked with Mir? : SPACE BAR(GE)
The Russian Mir Space Station was a remarkably successful project, with the station still holding the record for the longest continuous manned presence in space, at just under ten years. Towards the end of the space station's life however, the years began to take their toll. There was a dangerous fire, multiple system failures, and a collision with a resupply ship. The Russian commitment to the International Space Station drained funds for repairs, so Mir was allowed to reenter the Earth's atmosphere and burn up in 2001.

20. Swapping out Sheen for Rose? : CHARLIE CHAN(GE)
Charlie Chan is the main character in a series of novels by Earl Derr Biggers. Chan is a Chinese-American detective working with the Honolulu police department. There have been almost 50 movies made featuring the Charlie Chan character.

24. "That's all ___ wrote" : SHE
No one seems to be very certain of the origin of the phrase “that’s all she wrote”. One popular story though is that it stems from the unfortunate “Dear John” letters that some soldiers received during WWII.

25. Actor Brynner : YUL
Yul Brynner was a Russian-born actor. Brynner was well known for his great performances, but also for his shaved head and his deep rich voice. He first adopted the "hairstyle" while playing the King of Siam in the stage version of "The King and I", and he stuck with it.

30. Roman encyclopedist who died after the eruption of Vesuvius : PLINY
Pliny the Elder and Pliny the Younger were important figures in Ancient Rome. Pliny the Elder was a scientist and historian, the author of "Naturalis Historia", commonly referred to as "Pliny's Natural History". Pliny died in the year 79 AD in an attempt to rescue friends during the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Pliny the Younger was the nephew and adopted son of Pliny the Elder. Pliny the Younger was a noted Roman statesman, orator and writer.

32. "What Do You Do With ___ in English?" ("Avenue Q" song) : A BA
"Avenue Q" is a musical inspired by "Sesame Street", with puppets being used for all the characters on the stage. It's an adult-oriented production, but a parody on the children's show. Some of the characters are clearly knock-offs of "Sesame Street" favorites e.g. Rod and Nicky (Bert and Ernie) and Trekkie Monster (Cookie Monster).

33. Romanov bigwig : TSAR
Peter the Great was perhaps the most successful of the Romanov tsars, famous for modernizing Russia and expanding the country's sphere of influence, creating the Russian Empire. He ruled from 1682 until his death in 1725.

35. Boy Scout's reward for karate expertise? : BREAKING BAD(GE)
I hadn’t seen the AMC drama “Breaking Bad” until recently when my wife borrowed the first and second seasons from our local library. It is a very well written show about a high school teacher stricken by lung cancer who turns to a life of crime to make money. It seems that AMC have a second big hit on their hands after the success of “Mad Men”.

40. Nintendo console : WII
The Wii is the biggest-selling game console in the world.

44. Nahuatl speaker : AZTEC
Nahuatl is a group of languages mainly spoken in Central Mexico.

48. Word before "sum" : ERGO
The great French philosopher Rene Descartes made the famous statement in Latin, "Cogito, ergo sum" ... "I think, therefore I am".

50. Move hastily : HIE
"To hie" is to move quickly, to bolt.

54. Caveman's injury after discovering fire? : ORIGINAL SIN(GE)
In the Christian tradition, “original sin” is the state of sin that exists in all humanity as a result of Adam’s first disobedience in the Garden of Eden. At least according to the Roman Catholic faith, three people were born without original sin: the Virgin Mary, Jesus Christ and John the Baptist.

58. Puerto ___ : RICO
Puerto Rico is located in the northeastern Caribbean (in the Atlantic Ocean), east of the Dominican Republic. The name "Puerto Rico" is Spanish for "rich port". The locals often call their island Borinquen, the Spanish form of "Boriken", the original name used by the natives.

59. Feeling when one's voodoo doll is poked? : EVIL TWIN(GE)
Voodoo is a religion that originated in the French slave colony of Saint-Domingue on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola.

62. Designer Marc : ECKO
Marc Ecko is a fashion designer from New Jersey. Marc was born Marc Milecofsky. In college he became a fan of graffiti and used the name “Ecko” as his tag.

64. Jungian archetype : ANIMA
The concept of anima and animus is found in the Carl Jung school of analytical psychology. The idea is that within each male their resides a feminine inner personality called the anima, and within each female there is a male inner personality known as the animus.

Down
1. "No ___!" (Spanish "Uncle!") : MAS
"No mas!" translates from Spanish as "no more!".

2. Dadaist Hans : ARP
Hans Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn't the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both "Hans" and "Jean" translate into English as "John". In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. He was sent home …

Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

3. Providing hints of the future : ORACULAR
In Ancient Greece and Rome, an oracle was someone believed inspired by the gods to give wise counsel. The word "oracle" derives from the Latin "orare" meaning "to speak", which is the same root for our word "orator".

4. Havens who sang at Woodstock : RICHIE
Richie Havens is a folk singer and guitarist. One of Havens's claims to fame is that he was the opening act at the first Woodstock festival in 1969.

6. Good Housekeeping emblem : SEAL
“Good Housekeeping” is a women’s magazine founded back in 1885. In the early 1900s the magazine started the Good Housekeeping Research Institute, a laboratory tasked with the testing of household devices. Any item proven to have sufficent quality and reliability is given the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval.

7. Soprano ___ Te Kanawa : KIRI
Dame Kiri Te Kanawa is an outstanding soprano from New Zealand who was in great demand for operatic performances in the seventies and eighties.

10. Biblical book once combined with Nehemiah : EZRA
In the Hebrew Bible the Book of Ezra was originally combined with the Book of Nehemiah, with the two being separated in the early days of the Christian Era.

11. Mrs. Woody Allen : SOON-YI
Soon-Yi Previn is the adopted daughter of actress Mia Farrow and pianist/conductor André Previn. After Farrow and Previn divorced, Farrow started seeing famed movie director Woody Allen. That relationship ended when Farrow discovered that Allen was having an affair with her daughter Soon-Yi. Woody Allen and Soon-Yi Previn were married in 1997.

12. 1986 Tom Cruise film : TOP GUN
“Top Gun” is an entertaining action movie released in 1986 starring Tom Cruise and the lovely Kelly McGillis. The movie is all about pilots training at the US Navy’s Fighter Weapons School. A lot of footage was shot on board the Navy’s carrier the USS Enterprise during flight operations. At one point in a day’s shooting, the commander of the Enterprise changed course as needed for normal operations, but this altered the light for the cameras that were filming at the time. Director Tony Scott asked for the course to be changed back, but was informed that a course change would cost the Navy $25,000. Scott wrote out a check there and then, and he got another five minutes of filming with the light he needed.

18. Cold one : BREWSKI
“Brewskis” and “cold one” are slang terms for “beer”.

21. Cool one, once : HEP CAT
The slang term "hep" meaning "cool" has the same meaning as the later derivative term "hip". The origins of "hep" seem unclear, but it was adopted by jazz musicians of the early 1900s.

22. Garment under a blouse : BRA
The word "brassière" is of course French in origin, but it isn't the word the French use for a "bra". In France what we call a bra is known as a "soutien-gorge", translating to "held under the neck". The word "brassière" is indeed used in France but there it describes a baby's undershirt, a lifebelt or a harness. "Brassière" comes from the Old French word for an "arm protector" in a military uniform ("bras" is the French for "arm"). Later "brassière" came to mean "breastplate" and from there the word was used for a type of woman's corset. The word jumped into English around 1900.

23. Former Virginia senator Chuck : ROBB
Chuck Robb is a former Governor of Virginia and former US Senator. Robb is married to Lynda Bird Johnson Robb, the daughter of former President Lyndon B. Johnson.

28. "Bali ___" ("South Pacific" song) : HAI
The song "Bali Ha'i" is from the musical "South Pacific" by Rodgers and Hammerstein. In the musical, Bali Ha'i is the name of a volcanic island that neighbors the island on which the story takes place.

29. Dadaist Max : ERNST
Max Ernst was a painter and sculptor, a pioneer in the Dada movement and Surrealism. Ernst was born near Cologne in Germany in 1891 and he was called up to fight in WWI, as were most young German men at that time. In his autobiography he writes "Max Ernst died the 1st of August, 1914" a statement about his experiences in the war. In reality, Ernst died in 1976 having lived to the ripe old age of 85.

33. Meditative martial art : TAI CHI
More properly called tai chi chuan, tai chi is a martial art mostly practiced to improve overall health and increase longevity.

37. Like the apparel donned in "Deck the Halls" : GAY
"Don we now our gay apparel …”

The music for “Deck the Halls” is a traditional Welsh tune that dates back to the 16th century. The same tune was used by Mozart for a violin and piano duet. The lyrics with which we are familiar (other than the “tra-la-la”) are American in origin, and were recorded in 19th century.

38. Fragrant white flower : GARDENIA
The genus of flowering plant called gardenia is actually in the coffee family.

43. Palme ___ (Cannes award) : D’OR
The “Palme d’Or” (or “Golden Palm” in English) is the highest award given at the Cannes Film Festival. The Palme d'Or goes to the director of the film selected as the best shown at the festival that year. The palm was selected as an emblem for the award as there is a palm featured on the coat of arms of the Commune of Cannes.

45. City NE of Geneva : ZURICH
Zurich is the largest city in Switzerland, and is famous as a financial center.

46. "Growing Pains" co-star Alan : THICKE
47. "Growing Pains" family name : SEAVER
The Canadian actor Alan Thicke is best known for portraying the patriarch of the Seaver family on the sitcom “Growing Pains”. Thicke was also quite successful as a composer of TV theme songs. Along with his first wife, he co-wrote the theme songs to the sitcoms “Diff’rent Strokes” and “The Facts of Life”.

51. Like a schlimazel : INEPT
“Schlimazel” is a Yiddish word that is used to describe a person who is extremely unlucky and perhaps inept.

53. Egypt's Sadat : ANWAR
Anwar Sadat was the third President of Egypt right up to the time of his assassination in 1981. Sadat won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1978 along with Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin for the role played in crafting the Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty of 1978 at Camp David. It was this agreement that largely led to Sadat's assassination three years later.

55. The "G" in EGBDF : GOOD
In the world of music, EGBDF are the notes on the lines of the treble clef. The notes are often remembered with a mnemonic such as “Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge”.

56. Toon who plays a baritone sax : LISA
Lisa Simpson is Bart's brainy younger sister on TV's "The Simpsons". Lisa is voiced by actress Yeardley Smith.

60. Maker of the Canyon truck : GMC
GMC is a division of General Motors (GM) established in 1901 that started out as "GMC Truck".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Native Kiwis : MAORI
6. Big name in power tools : SKIL
10. Educated guesses: Abbr. : ESTS
14. Extra Dry brand : ARRID
15. A, to Mozart : EINE
16. Kind of suit worn by a 21-Down : ZOOT
17. Garbage scow that docked with Mir? : SPACE BAR(GE)
19. It's fit to be tied : ROPE
20. Swapping out Sheen for Rose? : CHARLIE CHAN(GE)
22. Fall result, maybe : BRUISE
24. "That's all ___ wrote" : SHE
25. Actor Brynner : YUL
26. What an actor plays : ROLE
27. Excite, as an appetite : WHET
30. Roman encyclopedist who died after the eruption of Vesuvius : PLINY
32. "What Do You Do With ___ in English?" ("Avenue Q" song) : A BA
33. Romanov bigwig : TSAR
34. "Rocks" : ICE
35. Boy Scout's reward for karate expertise? : BREAKING BAD(GE)
40. Nintendo console : WII
41. Pepper's partner : SALT
42. Sum : ADD
44. Nahuatl speaker : AZTEC
47. Case for an ophthalmologist : STYE
48. Word before "sum" : ERGO
49. "I am so stupid!" : DUH!
50. Move hastily : HIE
52. Move aimlessly : WANDER
54. Caveman's injury after discovering fire? : ORIGINAL SIN(GE)
58. Puerto ___ : RICO
59. Feeling when one's voodoo doll is poked? : EVIL TWIN(GE)
62. Designer Marc : ECKO
63. Coin of Colombia : PESO
64. Jungian archetype : ANIMA
65. Slough off : SHED
66. Snare : TRAP
67. Undergo a chemical transformation : REACT

Down
1. "No ___!" (Spanish "Uncle!") : MAS
2. Dadaist Hans : ARP
3. Providing hints of the future : ORACULAR
4. Havens who sang at Woodstock : RICHIE
5. Some intellectual property : IDEAS
6. Good Housekeeping emblem : SEAL
7. Soprano ___ Te Kanawa : KIRI
8. Consume : INGEST
9. Bloodletting worm : LEECH
10. Biblical book once combined with Nehemiah : EZRA
11. Mrs. Woody Allen : SOON-YI
12. 1986 Tom Cruise film : TOP GUN
13. Like a cold, hard gaze : STEELY
18. Cold one : BREWSKI
21. Cool one, once : HEP CAT
22. Garment under a blouse : BRA
23. Former Virginia senator Chuck : ROBB
28. "Bali ___" ("South Pacific" song) : HAI
29. Dadaist Max : ERNST
31. Was in the vanguard : LED
33. Meditative martial art : TAI CHI
34. "My goof!" : I BLEW IT!
36. Ram's mate : EWE
37. Like the apparel donned in "Deck the Halls" : GAY
38. Fragrant white flower : GARDENIA
39. Razor feature : EDGE
43. Palme ___ (Cannes award) : D’OR
44. Likes a bunch : ADORES
45. City NE of Geneva : ZURICH
46. "Growing Pains" co-star Alan : THICKE
47. "Growing Pains" family name : SEAVER
48. V-8, e.g. : ENGINE
51. Like a schlimazel : INEPT
53. Egypt's Sadat : ANWAR
55. The "G" in EGBDF : GOOD
56. Toon who plays a baritone sax : LISA
57. Feed, as pigs : SLOP
60. Maker of the Canyon truck : GMC
61. Consume : EAT


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0527-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 May 13, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Doug Peterson
THEME: D-Down Answers … each of today’s themed answers is to down clue, and is comprised of a repeated word:
3D. *Band with the 1983 hit "Hungry Like the Wolf" : DURAN DURAN
6D. *Washington city near the Oregon border : WALLA WALLA
9D. *Affectedly virtuous : GOODY GOODY
27D. *Hit song for the Kingsmen with famously unintelligible lyrics : LOUIE LOUIE
29D. *Joke starter : KNOCK KNOCK
31D. Blackjack player's option ... or a description of the answers to the starred clues? : DOUBLE DOWN
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 06:20
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

9. Davis of "A League of Their Own" : GEENA
As well as being a successful Hollywood actress, Geena Davis is an accomplished archer and came close to qualifying for the US archery team for the 2000 Summer Olympics. Davis is also a member of American Mensa. She is quite the lady ...

14. Academic e-mail address ender : EDU
The .edu domain was one of the seven first generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:
- .com (commercial organizations, but unrestricted
- .info (informational sites, but unrestricted)
- .net (network infrastructures, but unrestricted)
- .mil (US military, restricted)
- .org (other organizations, but unrestricted)
- .gov (US government entities, restricted)
- .int (international organizations governed by treaty, restricted)

16. Director Welles : ORSON
Orson Welles is perhaps best-remembered in the world of film for his role in 1941’s “Citizen Kane”. In the world of radio, Welles is known for 1938’s famous broadcast of “The War of the Worlds”, a broadcast that convinced many listeners that the Earth was indeed being invaded by aliens.

17. Score between birdie and bogey : PAR
Apparently the term "birdie" originated in 1899 at the Atlantic City Country Club in Northfield, New Jersey. A golfer hit his second shot on a par four that stopped inches from the cup after hitting a bird in flight. The golfer tapped the ball in for one-under-par, and his golfing buddies labeled the second shot a "bird". The golfers started to call one-under-par a birdie, and the term spread through the club, and from there around the world ...

The term "Bogey" originated at the Great Yarmouth Golf Club in England in 1890, and was used to indicate a total round that was one over par (and not one over par on a particular hole, as it is today). The name Bogey came from a music hall song of the time "Here Comes the Bogey Man". In the following years it became popular for players trying to stay at par to be "playing against Colonel Bogey". Then, during WWI, the marching tune "Colonel Bogey" was written and named after the golfing term. If you don't recognize the name of the tune, it's the one that's whistled by the soldiers marching in the great movie "The Bridge on the River Kwai".

22. 1950s Ford failures : EDSELS
It was Henry Ford's son Edsel who gave his name to the Edsel brand of automobile, a name that has become synonymous with "failure".

26. Tierra ___ Fuego : DEL
Tierra del Fuego is an archipelago off the southern tip of South America and is the location of the famed Cape Horn. Tierra del Fuego was discovered by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan. He saw native fires on land as he passed by and originally called the location "Land of Smoke" This was later changed to "Land of Fire", or "Tierra del Fuego" in Spanish.

28. Pan in Chinese cookery : WOK
“Wok” is a Cantonese word, the name of the frying pan now used in many Asian cuisines.

30. "Waiting for ___" : GODOT
An Irishman I may be, but I have sat through so many Samuel Beckett plays (the Irish dramatist) and have yet to come away feeling satisfied that I spent my time well. Of course I am in the minority, as his play "Waiting for Godot" was once voted the most significant English language play of the 20th century. Maybe I will try again one day ...

34. Air conditioner meas. : BTU
In the world of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), the power of a heating or cooling unit can be measured in British Thermal Units (BTUs). This dated unit is the amount of energy required to heat a pound of water so that the water's temperature increases by one degree Fahrenheit.

36. "The Tears ___ Clown" : OF A
“The Tears of a Clown” was the biggest hit for Smokey Robinson and the Miracles. The group had gotten together back in 1955 as the Matadors.

38. Modern film genre with dark themes : NEO-NOIR
A neo-noir film is a contemporary film that incorporates elements of the film noir style of the forties and fifties.

41. Clickable address, for short : URL
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

42. Monterrey gold : ORO
Monterrey is a Mexican city, the capital of the state of Nuevo Leon in the northeast of the country. Monterrey is the second largest city in Mexico in terms of area, but third largest in terms of population (the largest area city in the country is Mexico City, and the most populous are Mexico City and Guadalajara).

46. One a woman can't trust : CAD
Our word "cad", meaning "a person lacking in finer feelings", is a shortening of the word "cadet". "Cad" was first used for a servant, and then students at British universities used "cad" as a term for a boy from the local town. "Cad" took on its current meaning in the 1830s.

51. Oscar winner Brynner : YUL
Yul Brynner was a Russian-born actor. Brynner was well known for his great performances, but also for his shaved head and his deep rich voice. He first adopted the "hairstyle" while playing the King of Siam in the stage version of "The King and I", and he stuck with it.

67. Spanish "huzzah!" : OLE!
“Huzzah” is a cheer, originally a sailor’s interjection, possibly accompanying the hoisting of a sail.

68. Prized violin : AMATI
The first of the Amati family to make violins was Andrea Amati, who lived in the 14th century. He was succeeded by his sons, Antonio and Girolamo. In turn, they were succeeded by Girolamo's son, Nicolo. Nicolo had a few students who achieved fame making musical instruments as well. One was his own son, Girolamo, and another was the famed Antonio Stradivari.

70. First of the five W's : WHO?
The Five Ws (or “Five Ws and one H”) is a journalistic concept used for gathering information. For a story to be complete, six questions need to be answered:
- Who is it about?
- What happened?
- Where did it take place?
- When did it take place?
- Why did it happen?
- How did it happen?

73. Writer Anaïs : NIN
Anaïs Nin was a French author, famous for her journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. Nin also wrote highly regarded erotica and cited D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration. Nin was married to banker and artist Hugh Parker Guiler in 1923. Decades later in 1955, Nin married former actor Rupert Pole, even though she was still married to Guiler. Nin and Pole had their marriage annulled in 1966, but just for legal reasons, and they continued to live together as husband and wife until Nin passed away in 1977.

Down
2. Boise's state : IDAHO
Boise, Idaho is the largest metropolitan area in the state by far. There are a number of stories pertaining to the etymology of the name “Boise”. One is that French trappers named the tree-lined river that ran through the area “la rivière boisée”, meaning “the wooded river”.

3. *Band with the 1983 hit "Hungry Like the Wolf" : DURAN DURAN
Duran Duran is a New Wave band from Birmingham in England. Duran Duran’s success was partially driven by some well-received MTV music videos in the 1980s. The band also worked hard on their image and paid a lot of money for very fashionable clothes in which they performed. As a result, one of Duran Duran’s nicknames is “the prettiest boys in rock”.

6. *Washington city near the Oregon border : WALLA WALLA
The Walla Walla Valley is a wine-growing region in Washington that extends into the northeast of Oregon. The valley is named after the Walla Walla people who lived in the area.

11. Salinger title girl : ESME
J. D. Salinger wrote a short story called "For Esme - with Love and Squalor", originally published in "The New Yorker" in 1950. It is a story about a young English girl called Esme and an American soldier, and is set in WWII.

J. D. Salinger was a very reclusive author, most famous for his novel “Catcher in the Rye”. Salinger fought in WWII after he was drafted into the US Army. He saw action on Utah Beach on D-Day, and in the Battle of the Bulge. He also spent a lot of time interrogating prisoners due to his knowledge of French and German, and he was one of the first Americans to go into a liberated concentration camp. He later spent time in hospital suffering from what was then called combat stress reaction, as he tried to deal with what he saw in the German camps.

12. Christmas song : NOEL
“Noël” is the French word for the Christmas season, ultimately coming from the Latin word for "birth" (natalis). Noel has come to be used as an alternative name for a Christmas carol.

27. *Hit song for the Kingsmen with famously unintelligible lyrics : LOUIE LOUIE
“Louie Louie” is a rock ‘n’ roll classic released in 1963 by the Kingsmen. A few months after the release, there was a complaint by a parent that the lyrics of “Louie Louie” were obscene. The FBI investigated this claim over a two-year period, and found no evidence of any obscenity. However, the obscenity claim does still pop up every now and then.

31. Blackjack player's option ... or a description of the answers to the starred clues? : DOUBLE DOWN
“Double down” is a tactic used in blackjack in which the player can choose to double his or her original bet in exchange for agreeing to stand after receiving exactly one more card.

34. Pear variety : BOSC
Bosc is a cultivar of the European Pear grown in the northwest of the United States. The Bosc is that pear with a skin the color of a potato, with a long neck. I always seem to use the potato as my point of reference. How Irish am I ...?

35. Finger food at a fiesta : TAPA
"Tapa" is the Spanish for "lid", and there is no clear rationale for why this word came to be used for an appetizer. There are lots of explanations cited, all of which seem to involve the temporary covering of one's glass of wine with a plate or item of food to either preserve the wine or give one extra space at the table.

37. Monk's title : FRA
The title "Fra" (brother) is used by Italian monks.

39. The Roaring Twenties, e.g. : ERA
The 1920s are often called the Roaring Twenties, a period of dynamic change across all aspects of life. Things were finally returning to normal after WWI, jazz became popular, some women “broke the mold” by becoming “flappers”, and Art Deco flourished. The whole decade came to a tragic end with the Wall Street Crash of 1929, followed by the Great Depression.

45. Last of a dozen : TWELFTH
Our word “dozen” is used for a group of twelve. We imported it into English from Old French. The modern French word for twelve is “douze”, and a dozen is “douzaine”.

50. Fries lightly : SAUTES
“Sauté” is of course a French word. The literal translation from the French is “jumped” or “bounced”, a reference to the tossing of food while cooking it in a frying pan.

54. Any of the Andes: Abbr. : MTN
The Andes is the longest continuous chain of mountains in the world, running right down the length of the west coast of South America for about 4,300 miles. The highest peak in the range is Mt. Aconcagua, at an elevation of 22,841 feet. Interestingly, the peak of Mt. Chimborazo in Ecuador is the furthest point on the Earth's surface from the center of the planet. That's because of the equatorial "bulge" around the Earth's "waist".

58. Metropolitan region that includes India's capital : DELHI
New Delhi is the capital city of India. New Delhi resides within the National Capital Territory of Delhi (otherwise known as the metropolis of Delhi). New Delhi and Delhi, therefore, are two different things.

59. Old-time music hall : ODEON
In Ancient Greece an odeon was like a small theater, with "odeon" literally meaning "building for musical competition". Odea were used in both Greece and Rome for entertainments such as musical shows and poetry readings.

60. Translucent gem : OPAL
An opal is often described as having a milky iridescence, known as "opalescence".

61. Actress Moore of "G.I. Jane" : DEMI
G.I. Joe was the original "action figure", the first toy to carry that description. G.I. Joe first hit the shelves in 1964. There have been a few movies based on the G.I. Joe figure, but, more famous than all of them I would say is the 1997 movie "G.I. Jane" starring Demi Moore in the title role. I think this movie had some potential, to be honest, but it really did not deliver at all.

66. Obsolescent PC monitor type : CRT
Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) ... there aren't many of them available in stores these days!

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Accomplished : DID
4. Greeted at the door : SAW IN
9. Davis of "A League of Their Own" : GEENA
14. Academic e-mail address ender : EDU
15. Speak grandly : ORATE
16. Director Welles : ORSON
17. Score between birdie and bogey : PAR
18. Neat in appearance : WELL-GROOMED
20. "Nothing left to say" : THAT’S ALL
22. 1950s Ford failures : EDSELS
23. Sharpen : HONE
24. Glum : SAD
25. "In case it's of interest ...," on a memo : FYI
26. Tierra ___ Fuego : DEL
28. Pan in Chinese cookery : WOK
30. "Waiting for ___" : GODOT
34. Air conditioner meas. : BTU
36. "The Tears ___ Clown" : OF A
38. Modern film genre with dark themes : NEO-NOIR
40. Crew team implement : OAR
41. Clickable address, for short : URL
42. Monterrey gold : ORO
43. Suffix with glob : -ULE
44. Three-dimensional : SPATIAL
46. One a woman can't trust : CAD
47. "I'm gone" : BYE
48. Enthusiastic kids' plea : CAN WE?
49. Seek, as permission : ASK
51. Oscar winner Brynner : YUL
53. Stately 33-Down : ELM
55. Letters before an alias : AKA
57. Make over : REDO
60. Small stock purchase : ODD LOT
63. Like a weedy garden : UNTENDED
65. Just going through the motions : PERFUNCTORY
67. Spanish "huzzah!" : OLE!
68. Prized violin : AMATI
69. Signal again, as an actor : RECUE
70. First of the five W's : WHO?
71. Gracefully limber : LITHE
72. Expressed one's disapproval : TSKED
73. Writer Anaïs : NIN


Down
1. Swimming pool statistic : DEPTH
2. Boise's state : IDAHO
3. *Band with the 1983 hit "Hungry Like the Wolf" : DURAN DURAN
4. Piglets' mothers : SOWS
5. Expanses : AREAS
6. *Washington city near the Oregon border : WALLA WALLA
7. "That's adequate" : IT’LL DO
8. Below zero: Abbr. : NEG
9. *Affectedly virtuous : GOODY GOODY
10. Soil problem : EROSION
11. Salinger title girl : ESME
12. Christmas song : NOEL
13. No ifs, ___ or buts : ANDS
19. Wrestling official, briefly : REF
21. Buttonless shirt, informally : TEE
27. *Hit song for the Kingsmen with famously unintelligible lyrics : LOUIE LOUIE
29. *Joke starter : KNOCK KNOCK
31. Blackjack player's option ... or a description of the answers to the starred clues? : DOUBLE DOWN
32. Slick : OILY
33. See 53-Across : TREE
34. Pear variety : BOSC
35. Finger food at a fiesta : TAPA
37. Monk's title : FRA
39. The Roaring Twenties, e.g. : ERA
45. Last of a dozen : TWELFTH
50. Fries lightly : SAUTES
52. Spigoted vessel : URN
54. Any of the Andes: Abbr. : MTN
56. "Based on ___ story" : A TRUE
58. Metropolitan region that includes India's capital : DELHI
59. Old-time music hall : ODEON
60. Translucent gem : OPAL
61. Actress Moore of "G.I. Jane" : DEMI
62. G-rated oath : DRAT
64. Looked at carefully : EYED
66. Obsolescent PC monitor type : CRT


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0526-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 May 13, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Joon Pahk & Jeremy Horwitz
THEME: Made-For-TV Movies … each of today’s themed answers is a melding of the titles of a TV show and a movie:
23A. TV movie about ... where I can easily get a cab? : TAXI STAND BY ME (“Taxi” & “Stand by Me”)
30A. ... where to go in Togo? : OUTHOUSE OF AFRICA (“House” & “Out of Africa”)
47A. ... a Hispanic "hip hip hooray"? : THREE CHEERS, AMIGOS (“Cheers” & “Three Amigos”)
62A. ... trying to get a friar to violate his vow of silence? : SAY ANYTHING, MONK (“Monk” & “Say Anything”)
83A. ... a singing group that meets for bacon and eggs? : BREAKFAST GLEE CLUB (“Glee” & “[The] Breakfast Club”)
97A. ... Skywalker's trendy hygiene products? : COOL HAND SOAP, LUKE (“Soap” & “Cool Hand Luke”)
111A. ... giving a pipsqueak the brush-off? : GET LOST, SHORTY (“Lost” & “Get Shorty”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: Not recorded
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. Baroque French dance : GAVOTTE
The gavotte was originally a folk dance that came from southeastern France where it was was named for the Gavot people who performed the dance. The gavotte became more mainstream in the Baroque period in the French court and so composers such as Johann Sebastian Bach began including gavottes in their instrumental suites.

22. Alma mater of Eli Manning : OLE MISS
Ole Miss is the nickname for the University of Mississippi. The name "Ole Miss" dates back to 1897, the first year a student yearbook was published. The graduating class held a competition to name the yearbook and "Ole Miss" emerged as the winner. The name stuck to the yearbook, and also as a nickname for the school itself.

Eli Manning plays as quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning is quarterback for the Denver Broncos. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, and Archie as also a successful NFL quarterback.

23. TV movie about ... where I can easily get a cab? : TAXI STAND BY ME (“Taxi” & “Stand by Me”)
“Taxi” is a sitcom that aired in the late seventies and early eighties. “Taxi” was the big break for a host of great comic actors including Judd Hirsch, Jeff Conaway, Danny DeVito, Marilu Henner, Tony Danza, Christopher Lloyd and Andy Kaufman.

“Stand by Me” is 1986 film directed by Rob Reiner that is based on a Stephen King novella called “The Body”. The title of the movie comes from the wonderful Ben E. King song of the same name.

27. Kind of pressure involved in water filtration : OSMOTIC
Osmosis is the movement of a solvent (often just water) across a semipermeable membrane. In the process of osmosis, the solvent tends to flow from an area of less concentration to an area of higher concentration. This sense of "absorbing" water effortlessly gives rise to the expression "learning by osmosis".

29. French word with two accents : ETE
One might spend the summer (été) under the sun (le soleil) in France.

30. ... where to go in Togo? : OUTHOUSE OF AFRICA (“House” & “Out of Africa”)
I think that “House” is one of the best shows made by Fox television. It is fun for me to see English actor Hugh Laurie in the title role as coming from the other side of the Atlantic I have been watching him in various comedic roles for decades. Famously he played Bertie Wooster opposite Stephen Fry in P.G. Wodehouse’s “Jeeves & Wooster”, as well as one of the bumbling “bad guys” in “101 Dalmatians” (the version starring Glenn Close).

“Out of Africa” is a Sydney Pollack film released in 1985, starring Robert Redford and Meryl Streep. The storyline is based on the autobiographical book of the same name by Karen Blixen (written under the pen name Isak Dinesen).

Togo is a country on the West African coast, located between Ghana to the west and Benin to the east.

40. Arriviste : UPSTART
An arriviste is a pushy, ambitious person. The word "arriviste" is French, from the verb "arriver" meaning "to arrive". The idea is that an arriviste is an upstart, someone intent on "arriving" in society.

41. Greek vowels : IOTAS
Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet. We use the word "iota" to portray something very small as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

42. Network with the slogan "Not Reality. Actuality" : TRUTV
truTV is a Turner Broadcasting cable network, launched in 1991 as Court TV. The name was changed to truTV in 2008.

44. "Me and Bobby ___" (posthumous Janis Joplin #1) : MCGEE
Janis Joplin recorded the song “Me and Bobby McGee” just a few days before she died in 1970. The song was released anyway, and it became Joplin’s only number one single. There have been just two posthumous number one singles, Joplin's “Me and Bobby McGee”, and Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ on) the Dock of the Bay”.

47. ... a Hispanic "hip hip hooray"? : THREE CHEERS, AMIGOS (“Cheers” & “Three Amigos”)
The wonderful sitcom "Cheers" ran for eleven seasons on NBC, from 1982 to 1993. "Cheers" spawned an equally successful spin-off show called "Frasier", which also ran for eleven seasons and often featured guest appearances of characters from the original "Cheers". The Cheers bar was styled on the Bull & Finch Pub in Boston (in which I've had a pint of Guinness two!). The owner of the Bill & Finch cleverly agreed to the initial interior and exterior shots, charging only one dollar. Since then he has made millions from selling "Cheers" memorabilia, and also from increased trade.

“Three Amigos” is a 1986 comedy film starring Steve Martin, Chevy Chase and Martin Short as three silent movie stars who are mistaken for real western heroes by a Mexican village, a parody on the storylines in “Seven Samurai” and “The Magnificent Seven”.

53. Cousin ___ : ITT
In the television sitcom "The Addams Family", the family had a frequent visitor called Cousin Itt. Itt is a short man with long hair that runs from his head to the floor. Cousin Itt was played by Italian actor Felix Silla.

54. Nikkei unit : YEN
The Nikkei is a stock market index for the Tokyo Stock Exchange that has been published by the “Nikkei” newspaper since 1950.

57. Janis's cartoon husband : ARLO
The comic strip "Arlo and Janis" is written by Jimmy Johnson. It was first published in 1985. The lead characters are named after the musicians Arlo Guthrie and Janis Joplin.

58. NBC newsman Holt : LESTER
Lester Holt is a television journalist. Holt is anchor for the weekend editions of the shows “Today” and “Nightly News” on NBC.

61. Specter of the Senate, once : ARLEN
Arlen Specter was the US Senator for Pennsylvania, famous for switching from the Republican to the Democratic Party in 2009. In 2010 he lost the Democratic primary and his seat went to Pat Toomey, a Republican. Spector developed a reputation for himself of being hard to work with over the years, earning the nickname "Snarlin' Arlen".

62. ... trying to get a friar to violate his vow of silence? : SAY ANYTHING, MONK (“Monk” & “Say Anything”)
“Monk” is a comedy cop show in which the title character is an ex-San Francisco Police Department detective who is recovering from a nervous breakdown.

“Say Anything...” is a much-respected 1989 film high-school romantic comedy/drama film starring John Cusack and Ione Skye.

68. Trade talk : ARGOT
"Argot" is a French term, the name given in the 17th century to "the jargon of the Paris underworld". Nowadays argot is the set of idioms used by any particular group, the "lingo" of that group.

72. Farfalle and orzo : PASTAS
“Farfalle” is commonly referred to as “bow-tie pasta”. The name comes from the Italian “farfalla” meaning “butterfly”.

Orzo is pasta that has been formed into granular shapes, much like barley. And indeed, "orzo" is the Italian word for "barley".

76. Old French line : ROIS
There was a line of kings (rois) in France.

77. Comment that might get the response "de rien" : MERCI
"Rien" is the French word for "nothing". "De rien" translates literally from the French as "of nothing", and is used to mean "you're welcome" or "don't mention it". The Spanish have the same expression "de nada", also translating to "of nothing" and used the same way.

82. Livy's "I love" : AMO
Titus Livius (aka Livy) was a Roman historian who lived from 59 BC to AD 17. Livy wrote the definitive history of Rome at that time.

83. ... a singing group that meets for bacon and eggs? : BREAKFAST GLEE CLUB (“Glee” & “[The] Breakfast Club”)
A glee club is a choir group, usually of males, that sings short songs known as “glees”. A glee is a song scored for three or more voices that is performed unaccompanied.

The TV show called "Glee" has proven to be very popular. The storyline focuses on a high school glee club in Lima, Ohio.

“The Breakfast Club” is a fabulous teen drama film (a genre which I usually avoid like the plague) released in 1985. It is directed by John Hughes, and stars Judd Nelson, Emilio Estevez, Anthony Michael Hall, Molly Ringwald and Ally Sheedy as the students at a Saturday school detention class.

89. Russians, e.g. : SLAVS
The Slavic peoples are in the majority in communities covering over half of Europe. This large ethnic group is traditionally broken down into three smaller groups:
- the West Slavic (including Czechs and Poles)
- the East Slavic (including Russians and Ukrainians)
- the South Slavic (including Bulgarians and Serbs)

90. "Stoutly-built" Dickens villain : SIKES
Bill Sikes is the nasty criminal associate of Fagin in the Charles Dicken’s novel “Oliver Twist”.

"Oliver Twist" is of course a novel by Charles Dickens. It is a popular tale for adaptation to the big screen. There are two silent film versions, released in 1909 and 1922, and the first talkie version was released in 1933 with many to follow. The latest "Oliver" for the big screen is a 2005 Roman Polanski production.

91. Concave object of reflection? : INNIE
One might reflect on one’s navel or belly button, which might be an innie or an outie …

97. ... Skywalker's trendy hygiene products? : COOL HAND SOAP, LUKE (“Soap” & “Cool Hand Luke”)
“Soap” is a sitcom from the late seventies and early eighties that parodied daytime soap operas. At the time, “Soap” was quite a controversial show. It was condemned by several religious bodies for what were regarded as violent and perverted storylines.

“Cool Hand Luke” is a prison drama from 1967 starring Paul Newman in the title role. The film was an adaptation of Donn Pearce’s novel of the same name. One of the most quoted lines from any movie comes from “Cool Hand Luke”, namely: “What we’ve got here is a failure to communicate …”

101. Boxer, e.g., in brief : DEM
Barbara Boxer has been a US Senator representing California since 1993. When elected in 1992, she broke the record for the most popular votes in a US Senate election, receiving almost 7 million votes.

104. Drinks served in flutes : MIMOSAS
Where I come from, the cocktail known in North America as a mimosa is called a Buck's Fizz, named after the club where it was introduced in 1921. The mimosa came along a few years later, apparently first being served in the Paris Ritz. If you want to make a mimosa, it's a 50-50 mix of champagne and orange juice, and it is very tasty ...

105. Parliament constituent? : NICOTINE
The Parliament brand of cigarettes has been produced by Philip Morris, since 1931.

111. ... giving a pipsqueak the brush-off? : GET LOST, SHORTY (“Lost” & “Get Shorty”)
“Lost” is a television drama that ran for six seasons, finishing up in 2010. The show followed the adventures of survivors of a plane crash who get stranded on what seem to be a deserted tropical island. Things then get a bit weird, I hear. I didn’t watch “Lost”, but it seems to be one of those shows that folks really love or really hate …

“Get Shorty” is a 1995 crime-comedy with a great cast that includes John Travolta, Gene Hackman, Rene Russo and Danny DeVito. That said, the storyline is a little too zany for me so I didn’t really enjoy it …

115. Yasir Arafat, by birth : CAIRENE
Yasser (also Yasir) Arafat was born in Cairo in 1929, the son of two Palestinians and the second-youngest of seven children. Arafat was beaten by his father as a child and so did not have a good relationship with him. Arafat did not attend his father's funeral, nor did he visit his grave. The beatings were apparently administered because the young Arafat was repeatedly attending religious services in the Jewish quarter of Cairo. Arafat's explanation was that he wanted to "study the mentality" of the Jewish people.

117. Archbishop of Canterbury's headdress : MITRE
The Archbishop of Canterbury is the leader of the Church of England.

118. Fabulously rich ancient king : CROESUS
Croesus was the king of Lydia from 560 to 547 BC. He was noted for his fabulous wealth. As a result, the name “Croesus” entered the English language as a synonym for a wealthy man in expressions such as “rich as Croesus” and “richer than Croesus”.

119. White Castle offerings : SLIDERS
White Castle is a chain of fast food hamburger restaurants. White Castle is famous for its small hamburgers called “sliders”. From 1929, when the chain was founded, until 1941, sliders were sold for five cents. They go for something more like eighty cents these days, I am told ...

Down
4. Pennsylvania's Flagship City : ERIE
Erie is a city in the very north of Pennsylvania, right on the southern shore of Lake Erie. The city takes its name from the Erie Native American tribe that resided in the area.

5. Mtg. : SESS
A meeting (mtg.) is a session (sess.).

6. Whale of an exhibition : SHAMU
Shamu was the name of the third orca, or killer whale, ever to be featured in a public exhibition. Shamu starred in a popular SeaWorld show in San Diego in the sixties. After she died in 1971, her name lived on as the name "Shamu" is still used by SeaWorld for its killer whale shows. That original Shamu was retired after she grabbed and refused to let go of the leg of one of her trainers.

7. Miles Davis ___ (cool jazz group) : NONET
When Miles Davis introduced his nine-man group (nonet) in 1948, he chose a relatively unusual lineup that included a French horn and a tuba.

10. With 69-Down, 1990s-2000s sitcom star : RAY
(69. See 10-Down : ROMANO)
Ray Romano is a comic actor and standup comedian from Queens, New York. Romano is perhaps best-known as the star of the sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond”.

12. Santiago's milieu in a Hemingway novel : THE SEA
If you've read Ernest Hemingway's "The Old Man And The Sea" (probably first at school, like me) you'll likely remember it as a quick read as it is a novella, although it might be better described as a "long short story". It was first published in 1952, the last major work that Hemingway had published in his lifetime. That first publication was as a story in "Life Magazine", and it was such a hit that the magazine sold 5 million copies in the first two days. "The Old Man and the Sea" won a Pulitzer in 1952 and two years later the title was cited when Hemingway was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

14. Prince Valiant's love : ALETA
Aleta is the the wife of Prince Valiant in the long-running comic strip. Edward, Duke of Windsor, called the "Prince Valiant" comic strip the "greatest contribution to English Literature in the past one hundred years". I'm not so sure ...

16. Original opening to Homer's "Odyssey"? : OMICRON
The first letter in the “Odyssey”, if written in Greek, would by “omicron”. The name of the Greek letter “omicron” translates as “little O” (o-micron). This compares with the Greek letter “omega” which translates as “big O” (o-mega).

17. Hermano del padre o de la madre : TIO
In Spanish, an uncle (tio) is the brother of the father or the mother (hermano del padre o de la madre).

18. The Tigers of the Ohio Valley Conf. : TSU
The Tigers and Lady Tigers are the athletic teams of Tennessee State University (TSU) in Nashville.

19. Ogee's shape : ESS
An ogee is like an s-curve. Specifically it is a figure consisting of two arcs that curve in opposite directions (like an S) but both ends of the curve end up parallel to each other (which is not necessarily true for an S).

28. Neighbor of Alg. : MOR
The country of Morocco is located in North Africa, but lies just nine miles south of Spain. The two continents are separated by the Mediterranean Sea at the Straits of Gibraltar.

34. Nickname for Clara Bow : IT GIRL
Clara Bow was a fabulous star of silent film, with her most famous movie being "It" from 1927. Clara Bow's performance was so celebrated in the movie that she was forever to be known as the "It-girl". The term "it" was a euphemism for "sex appeal", and that is what Clara Bow was known to "exude". Bow applied her red lipstick in the shape of a heart, and women who copied this style were said to put on a "Clara Bow".

35. Jerseys and such : CATTLE
Jersey cattle were originally bred on the island of Jersey in the Channel Islands, off the coast of France. If you've seen Elsie the Cow, the mascot of Borden in the US, then you've seen a Jersey cow.

36. Actor Kutcher : ASHTON
Ashton Kutcher played the character Michael Kelso on Fox’s “That ‘70s Show”. Kelso was Kutcher’s breakthrough acting role. Kutcher is now appearing on the sitcom “Two and a Half Men”, having replaced the “disgraced” Charlie Sheen. In 2009, Kutcher became the first user on Twitter to get over 1 million followers. I wasn’t one of them ...

42. Texter's ta-ta : TTYL
Talk To You Later (TTYL)

43. Syngman of South Korea : RHEE
Syngman Rhee was born in Korea, but received much of his education in the US, including a Ph.D. from Princeton. The very much westernized Rhee returned to Korea in 1910, a Korea that by then had been annexed by Japan. Soon after he found himself President of a Provisional Government of Korea based in Shanghai, but was eventually ousted for misuse of power. After WWII, Rhee was installed as President, heavily backed by the United States. However, Rhee's rule proved to be more like tyranny and during the Korean War his relationship with the US Government became very strained. He stayed in power until 1960 when student revolts became popular enough to force him out of office. The CIA flew him out of the country and he went into exile in Hawaii, where a few years later he died of a stroke.

44. VHF unit : MHZ
Megahertz (MHz)

VHF radio frequencies are divided into a number of “channels” in the US. Channel 16 is reserved as the international distress, safety and calling channel. Someone wishing to communicate via VHF radio with another party uses channel 16 to make immediate contact and to determine which other channel the parties will use to continue the conversation. In other words, they use channel 16 as briefly as possible and then clear it for any potential emergency traffic.

45. Jobs's job, once : CEO
Steve Jobs certainly was a business icon in Silicon Valley. I don't think it is too surprising to learn that the brilliant Jobs didn't even finish his college education, dropping out of Reed College in Oregon after only one semester. Steve Jobs co-founded Apple in 1976, but in 1985 he was basically fired from his own company during the computer sales slump of the mid-eighties. Jobs then founded NeXT Computer, a company focused on supplying workstations to the higher education and business markets. Apple purchased NeXT in 1996, and that's how Jobs found himself back with his original company.

48. Grant for filmmaking? : CARY
Cary Grant was an actor from England who made it big, really big in Hollywood. “Cary Grant” is a stage name, chosen by Archibald Leach. There’s a great moment in the film “His Girl Friday” when Grant says the line “I never had so much fun since Archie Leach died”, an inside joke.

49. Start to matter? : ANTI-
In the world of particle physics, antimatter is made up of particles that have the same mass as particles of ordinary matter, but with the opposite charge and quantum spin. Mixing matter and antimatter causes the annihilation of both, with a release of energy equal to the mass of the particles according to Einstein’s equation E=mc2.

52. Hellhound of Norse mythology : GARM
In Norse mythology, Garmr (also “Garm”) is a blood-stained watchdog that is guarding Hel’s gate.

57. Torah holders : ARKS
The Torah ark is found in a synagogue, and is the ornamental container in which are stored the Torah scrolls.

59. General ___ chicken : TSO’S
General Tso's chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

61. Standard part of a limerick : ANAPEST
Anapest is the name given to a metrical foot in poetry, which has two short syllables followed by one long syllable. Indeed, the name "anapest" is a good example, when pronounced an-a-pest. Here is a better example of a verse using anapest, so let's all say it out loud together! "'Twas the night before Christmas and all through the house".

No one knows for sure how the verse known as a limerick got its name, although there does seem to be agreement that the name does indeed come from the city or county of Limerick in Ireland.

63. James who died three years before winning a Pulitzer : AGEE
James Agee was a noted American film critic and screenwriter. Agee wrote an autobiographical novel "A Death in the Family" that won him his Pulitzer in 1958, albeit posthumously. He was also one of the screenwriters for the 1951 classic movie “The African Queen”.

64. "A Doll's House" wife : NORA
"A Doll's House" is probably the most famous play by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. The play deals with the feminist awakening of the lead character, Nora Helmer. "A Doll's House" is sometimes referred to as the "first true feminist play".

66. Worker's weekend whoop : TGIF
"Thank God It's Friday" (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies.

67. Anthony's partner in radio : OPIE
“The Opie & Anthony Show” is a talk show broadcast on XM and Sirius satellite radio. Hosts of the show are Opie Hughes and Anthony Cumia. I’ve turned into a bit of grouch in my old age, and I must admit that I find broadcasts like “The Opie & Anthony Show” very puerile and offensive. Past features in the show include “Whip ‘em Out Wednesdays”, “Voyeur Bus” and “T&A with O&A”. You get the idea …

70. Day, to da Vinci : GIORNO
In Italian, an hour (ora) is 1/24 of a day (un giorno).

Leonardo da Vinci was perhaps the most diversely talented person who ever contributed to society. He was a gifted painter, sculptor, architect, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer and writer. Da Vinci’s mural “The Last Supper” is the most reproduced work of art in the world.

77. ___ Piggle-Wiggle (children's character) : MRS
“Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle” is a series of children’s book by Betty MacDonald. MacDonald also wrote a famous and humorous memoir called “The Egg and I” which described her adventures as a young wife on a chicken farm.

79. French high-speed rail inits. : TGV
The TGV is France’s high-speed rail service. The acronym “TGV” stands for “Train à Grande Vitesse” or “High-Speed Train”).

80. Literary inits. : RLS
Robert Louis Stevenson was a Scottish author, famous for his novels “Treasure Island”, “Kidnapped” and “The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde”.

83. Retro dos : BEEHIVES
That distinctive "beehive" hairstyle is also called a B-52, because the round beehive-shape also resembles the bulbous nose of a B-52 bomber! The style originated in 1958 and is credited to Margaret Vinci Heldt, the owner of a hair salon in downtown Chicago. I'm not a fan of the beehive, but I do have to say that Audrey Hepburn carried it off in "Breakfast at Tiffany's", as did Dusty Springfield in her heyday.

86. "Homeland" org. : CIA
“Homeland” is a psychological drama shown on Showtime about a CIA officer who is convinced that a certain US Marine is a threat to the security of the United States. The show is based on a series from Israeli television called “Hatufim” (Prisoners of War”). I’m going to have to check this one out ...

88. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Artis : GILMORE
Artis Gilmore is a former basketball player, who played in both the ABA and NBA. Gilmore is nicknamed "The A-Train".

92. Positive ends : ANODES
The two terminals of a battery are called the anode and the cathode. Electrons travel from the anode to the cathode creating an electric current.

93. '60s activist org. : SDS
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) was an activist group in the sixties. The SDS organized the largest student strike in the history of the United States on 26 April 1968, with about a million students staying away from class that day. The “Students for a Democratic Society” name was revived in 2006 with the foundation of a new US-based student organization with left wing beliefs. Today’s SDS was founded by a pair of high school students from Greenwich Village, New York.

94. Oklahoma Indians : OSAGES
The Osage Nation originated in the Ohio River valley in what we now call Kentucky. They were forced to migrate west of the Mississippi by the invading Iroquois tribe. Most of the tribe members now live in Osage County, Oklahoma.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Friends in a pub : MATES
6. Openly disdain : SNEER AT
13. Baroque French dance : GAVOTTE
20. Cognizant : AWARE
21. Relaxing soak : HOT BATH
22. Alma mater of Eli Manning : OLE MISS
23. TV movie about ... where I can easily get a cab? : TAXI STAND BY ME (“Taxi” & “Stand by Me”)
25. "I'm not kidding" : SERIOUS
26. Mind-numbing : TIRESOME
27. Kind of pressure involved in water filtration : OSMOTIC
29. French word with two accents : ETE
30. ... where to go in Togo? : OUTHOUSE OF AFRICA (“House” & “Out of Africa”)
37. Home run pace : TROT
40. Arriviste : UPSTART
41. Greek vowels : IOTAS
42. Network with the slogan "Not Reality. Actuality" : TRUTV
44. "Me and Bobby ___" (posthumous Janis Joplin #1) : MCGEE
46. Pants measure : LENGTH
47. ... a Hispanic "hip hip hooray"? : THREE CHEERS, AMIGOS (“Cheers” & “Three Amigos”)
53. Cousin ___ : ITT
54. Nikkei unit : YEN
55. Epitome of thinness : RAZOR
56. Greet silently : NOD AT
57. Janis's cartoon husband : ARLO
58. NBC newsman Holt : LESTER
60. Step : STAIR
61. Specter of the Senate, once : ARLEN
62. ... trying to get a friar to violate his vow of silence? : SAY ANYTHING, MONK (“Monk” & “Say Anything”)
68. Trade talk : ARGOT
71. Soak : GOUGE
72. Farfalle and orzo : PASTAS
76. Old French line : ROIS
77. Comment that might get the response "de rien" : MERCI
78. Follower of Las Vegas or New York : STRIP
81. Back : AGO
82. Livy's "I love" : AMO
83. ... a singing group that meets for bacon and eggs? : BREAKFAST GLEE CLUB (“Glee” & “[The] Breakfast Club”)
87. Bursts (in) : BARGES
89. Russians, e.g. : SLAVS
90. "Stoutly-built" Dickens villain : SIKES
91. Concave object of reflection? : INNIE
92. Not mixing well? : ASOCIAL
96. School orgs. : PTAS
97. ... Skywalker's trendy hygiene products? : COOL HAND SOAP, LUKE (“Soap” & “Cool Hand Luke”)
101. Boxer, e.g., in brief : DEM
104. Drinks served in flutes : MIMOSAS
105. Parliament constituent? : NICOTINE
108. "How touching" : I’M MOVED
111. ... giving a pipsqueak the brush-off? : GET LOST, SHORTY (“Lost” & “Get Shorty”)
115. Yasir Arafat, by birth : CAIRENE
116. State symbol of Massachusetts : ELM TREE
117. Archbishop of Canterbury's headdress : MITRE
118. Fabulously rich ancient king : CROESUS
119. White Castle offerings : SLIDERS
120. Comparatively foxy : SLYER

Down
1. Lacking shine : MATTE
2. Expect : AWAIT
3. Ones going to Washington? : TAX RETURNS
4. Pennsylvania's Flagship City : ERIE
5. Mtg. : SESS
6. Whale of an exhibition : SHAMU
7. Miles Davis ___ (cool jazz group) : NONET
8. Fig. on a terminal monitor : ETD
9. Die down : EBB
10. With 69-Down, 1990s-2000s sitcom star : RAY
11. Tops : AT MOST
12. Santiago's milieu in a Hemingway novel : THE SEA
13. Become lenient : GO SOFT
14. Prince Valiant's love : ALETA
15. Checks out : VERIFIES
16. Original opening to Homer's "Odyssey"? : OMICRON
17. Hermano del padre o de la madre : TIO
18. The Tigers of the Ohio Valley Conf. : TSU
19. Ogee's shape : ESS
24. Binge : TOOT
28. Neighbor of Alg. : MOR
31. Even more vast : HUGER
32. Phone abbr. : OPER
33. Exploits : USES
34. Nickname for Clara Bow : IT GIRL
35. Jerseys and such : CATTLE
36. Actor Kutcher : ASHTON
38. Numbered rd. : RTE
39. Binge : OVEREAT
42. Texter's ta-ta : TTYL
43. Syngman of South Korea : RHEE
44. VHF unit : MHZ
45. Jobs's job, once : CEO
46. You might choose something by it : LOT
48. Grant for filmmaking? : CARY
49. Start to matter? : ANTI-
50. Bellyache : MOAN
51. "Gotcha, man" : I DIG
52. Hellhound of Norse mythology : GARM
57. Torah holders : ARKS
59. General ___ chicken : TSO’S
60. ___-goat : SHE
61. Standard part of a limerick : ANAPEST
63. James who died three years before winning a Pulitzer : AGEE
64. "A Doll's House" wife : NORA
65. "Do not like" : YUCK
66. Worker's weekend whoop : TGIF
67. Anthony's partner in radio : OPIE
68. Language from which "cotton" and "candy" are derived : ARABIC
69. See 10-Down : ROMANO
70. Day, to da Vinci : GIORNO
73. Has an adult conversation? : TALKS DIRTY
74. Feverish fit : AGUE
75. Doesn't just tear up : SOBS
77. ___ Piggle-Wiggle (children's character) : MRS
78. Engine problem : STALL
79. French high-speed rail inits. : TGV
80. Literary inits. : RLS
83. Retro dos : BEEHIVES
84. Where the world's 100 tallest mountains are found : ASIA
85. It's an affront : SLAP
86. "Homeland" org. : CIA
88. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Artis : GILMORE
92. Positive ends : ANODES
93. '60s activist org. : SDS
94. Oklahoma Indians : OSAGES
95. "I Never Played the Game" memoirist : COSELL
96. Prominent beefcake features : PECS
98. "I'd like to see ___" : A MENU
99. Surname appearing nine times in a list of Indy 500 winners : UNSER
100. Long-tailed beach fliers : KITES
102. ___ nous : ENTRE
103. Urban ___, 2004 and 2012 undefeated college football coach : MEYER
106. ___ law : OHM’S
107. Sweat : TOIL
108. Former railroad regulatory agcy. : ICC
109. Blemish : MAR
110. Italian mine? : MIO
112. "I did NOT need to hear that" : TMI
113. Former Ford model : LTD
114. Cinnabar, e.g. : ORE


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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