Top Line

Search by Date

DD MMM YY or MMDD-YY

Search by Puzzle Number

e.g. 1225-09, 0704-10, 1025-10 etc.

Daily Solution by Email

Enter your email address

0630-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jun 13, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Alex Vratsanos & Jeff Chen
THEME: Matching Wits … our theme letters today are MW, which we can see drawn by the black squares at the top- and bottom-center of the grid. Our theme answers are all made up of two words beginning with MW:
64A. Piece longer than its name suggests : MINUTE WALTZ
2D. "Hoochie Coochie Man" singer : MUDDY WATERS
6D. West Point subject : MODERN WARFARE
17D. Bang for one's buck : MONEY’S WORTH
30D. 1962 movie for which Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke won Oscars, with "The" : MIRACLE WORKER
52D. Euphemism used often on "The Newlywed Game" : MAKING WHOOPEE
58D. Money raised by members of Congress? : MINIMUM WAGE
68D. Dewar's product : MALT WHISKEY
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 31m 18s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … TANGRAMS (pangrams), CTS (cps)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Coll. senior's exam : GMAT
If you want to get into a business school’s graduate program then you might have to take the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), which will cost you about $250, I believe ...

5. Some S.U.V.'s : GMCS
GMC is a division of General Motors (GM) established in 1901 that started out as "GMC Truck".

9. 1/24 of un jour : HEURE
In French, an hour (heure) is part of a day (jour).

10. ___ Franklin, Grammy-nominated gospel/R&B singer : ERMA
Erma Franklin was an R&B and gospel singer. She was the elder sister of Aretha Franklin. Erma toured with Aretha for a while, and even recorded backup vocals on her sister's big hit "Respect".

14. First name in footwear : THOM
Thom McAn footwear was introduced in 1922 by the Melville Corporation (now CVS Caremark). The brand was named after a Scottish golfer called Thomas McCann. The Thom McAn line is epitomized by the comfortable leather casual and dress shoe, so sales have really been hurt in recent decades by the growing popularity of sneakers.

20. Onetime wrestling great ___ the Giant : ANDRE
André the Giant was a professional wrestler from France, whose real name was André René Roussimoff. He suffered from gigantism, over-production of growth hormone, reaching the height of 6 feet 3 inches by the time he was 12-years-old. But, he used his size to develop a very successful career in the ring.

22. Forced return? : REPO
Repossession (repo)

23. Woman in Conan Doyle's "A Scandal in Bohemia" : ADLER
The character Irene Adler only appeared in one of the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In that story, “A Scandal in Bohemia”, Holmes expresses remarkable admiration for Adler as a woman and as a foe. As a result, derivative works in the Holmes genre often feature Adler as something of a romantic interest for Sherlock.

24. Most common elements : MODES
In the world of statistics, the mode of a set of numbers is the value that appears most often.

26. Target of 2006 United Nations sanctions : IRAN
The UN Security Council imposed sanctions on Iran in 2006 because Iran refused to suspend its uranium enrichment program.

27. Euripides play : MEDEA
Euripides was a great playwright of Ancient Greece, renowned for his tragedies. Euripides was one of the three great writers of tragedy of classical Athens, alongside Aeschylus and Sophocles.

29. Heads of a Northwest tribe? : TOTEM POLE
Totem poles are large sculptures that have been carved from trees. Totem poles are part of the culture of Native Americans in the Pacific Northwest of North America.

34. ___ Selassie : HAILE
Emperor Haile Selassie I ruled Ethiopia until he was removed from power in a revolution in 1974. Selassie died in 1975 under suspicious circumstances and it is widely believed that he was assassinated.

37. "Defending liberty, pursuing justice" org. : ABA
The American Bar Association (ABA) was founded back in 1878 and is a voluntary association for lawyers and law students. The ABA focuses on setting academic standards for law schools and setting ethical codes for the profession.

39. Carlo ___ wine : ROSSI
Carlo Rossi is a brand of wine produced by E & J Gallo. The name was chosen in honor of a salesman working for the winery named Charles Rossi, who was also a member of the Gallo family by marriage. Charles Rossi used to appear in TV ads for the wine in seventies.

43. Collaborative Web site : WIKI
A wiki is a website in which users are allowed to create and edit content themselves. The term “wiki” comes from the name of the first such site, introduced in 1994 and called WikiWikiWeb. “Wiki” is a Hawaiian word for “quick”, and is used because comprehensive content is created very quickly a there are so many collaborators contributing to the site.

46. Bon ___ : MOT
“Bon mot” translates from French as "good word". We use "bon mot" (and sometimes just "mot") to mean a quip, a witticism.

53. Actor Roberts : ERIC
Eric Roberts is an actor from Biloxi, Mississippi. Eric is the older brother of actress Julia Roberts.

55. The Superdome, e.g. : ARENA
The New Orleans Superdome was opened in 1975, and is the largest, fixed-dome structure in the world, covering 13 acres. The seating capacity varies depending on the event being staged, but the Rolling Stones attracted a crowd of more than 87,500 people in 1981. The primary purpose of the structure is to host home games for the New Orleans Saints football team. Famously, in 2005, the Superdome became a shelter of last resort for about 30,000 refugees in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

56. Biblical figure whose name means "help" : EZRA
Ezra the Scribe, also called Ezra the Priest, is the central character in the Book of Ezra in the Hebrew Bible.

57. ___ de Pompadour (figure in Fr. history) : MME
Madame de Pompadour was the very official and well catered-to mistress of Louis XV of France. She lives on in popular culture in a number of ways, including the Pompadour hairstyle. At one time she wore her hair swept back from her forehead, but with a wave that made the front of her hair bulge forward. Her name became associated with the style, and so it remains today. The style became fashionable with so-called rockabilly artists in the later fifties, including one Elvis Presley.

59. Many a person behind the Iron Curtain : SLAV
The Slavic peoples are in the majority in communities covering over half of Europe. This large ethnic group is traditionally broken down into three smaller groups:
- the West Slavic (including Czechs and Poles)
- the East Slavic (including Russians and Ukrainians)
- the South Slavic (including Bulgarians and Serbs)
The term “Iron Curtain” was first used in the context of Soviet influence over Eastern Europe in a speech made by Winston Churchill in 1946. He made that address in the US, at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri.

63. Secretary, e.g. : DESK
A secretary is an antique form of desk, one with drawers in a base, a hinged writing surface and a bookcase on top.

64. Piece longer than its name suggests : MINUTE WALTZ
The marvelous “Minute Waltz” is a solo piano piece composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1847. Chopin’s publisher gave the waltz the “minute” nickname, intending to convey that it was a “short” piece. The intention was never to play the whole waltz in one minute, and in fact it typically takes between one and a half and two and a half minutes to play completely.

67. Second of a Latin trio : AMAS
"Amo, amas, amat: ... "I love, you love, he/she/it loves", in Latin.

73. Bird or fruit : KIWI
Unlike many nicknames for people of a particular country, the name "Kiwi" for a New Zealander isn't offensive at all. The term comes from the flightless bird called the kiwi, which is endemic to New Zealand and is the country's national symbol. "Kiwi" is a Maori word, and the plural (when referring to the bird) is simply "kiwi". However, when you have two or more New Zealanders with you, they are Kiwis (note the "s", and indeed the capital "K"!).

What we call kiwifruit today used to be called a Chinese gooseberry. Marketing folks in the fifties decided to call it a "melonette", and then New Zealand producers adopted the name "kiwifruit".

75. Like a sighting of an ivory-billed woodpecker : RARE
The ivory-billed woodpecker is a very large woodpecker. It is 20 inches long and has a wingspan of 30 inches. The ivory-billed woodpecker is native to the American Southwest. Mainly due to the destruction of its habitat and to hunting, the species may actually be extinct.

83. Seat of Dallas County, Ala. : SELMA
The Alabama city of Selma is noted for the Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches of 1965.

The Bloody Sunday march took place between Selma and Montgomery, Alabama on 7 March 1965. The 600 marchers involved were protesting the intimidation of African-Americans registering to vote. When the marchers reached Dallas County, Alabama they encountered a line of state troopers reinforced by white males who had been deputized that morning to help keep the peace. Violence broke out with 17 marchers ending up in hospital, one nearly dying. Because the disturbance was widely covered by television cameras, the civil rights movement picked up a lot of support that day.

84. Seven-piece puzzles : TANGRAMS
A tangram is a flat puzzle consisting of seven different shapes that must be arrange to form specific shapes. The game was invented in China, and the name for the puzzle in Chinese translates as “seven boards of skill”. The seven shapes are called “tans” hence the name “tangram” name used in English.

86. Adventurer of Greek myth : ARGONAUT
Jason is a hero from Greek mythology, most noted for leading the quest for the Golden Fleece. The Golden Fleece is the fleece of the gold-haired winged ram. For his quest, Jason assembles a group of heroes who were given the name Argonauts, as they journeyed on the ship called the "Argo". The vessel was called the "Argo" in honor of the ship's builder, a man named Argus.

89. Big gobbler : TOM
A male turkey is called a “tom”.

91. Eskimo boot : MUKLUK
Mukluks are soft boots worn by Arctic peoples such as the Inuit and Yupik. The boots are made from reindeer skin or sealskin. The term “mukluk” come from the Yupik “maklak”, the word for “bearded seal”.

93. Hollywood legend Davis : BETTE
I must confess that I have a problem watching movies starring Bette Davis. I think I must have seen her play one of her more sinister roles when I was a kid and it gave me nightmares or something. So, I have never seen the 1950 classic "All About Eve", given that Bette Davis gets top billing. But, the title role of Eve Harrington was played by Anne Baxter, and Ms Baxter's movies I do enjoy. Coincidentally, on the epic television series "Hotel", when Bette Davis became ill, it was Anne Baxter who was chosen to take on her role.

97. It has 31 días : ENERO
In Spanish, the month of January (enero) has 31 days (dias).

99. ___ bar (Hershey product) : HEATH
The Heath candy bar is the invention of brothers Bayard and Everett Heath in the 1920s.

101. Some dinero : PESOS
“Dinero” is a Spanish word for money, as well as a slang term for money here in the US.

109. Four Holy Roman emperors : OTTOS
Otto I through Otto IV were all Holy Roman Emperors.

The Holy Roman Empire (HRE) existed from 962 to 1806 AD and was a territory of varying size over the centuries that centered on the Kingdom of Germany. The HRE was a successor to the western half of the Ancient Roman Empire.

110. Certain singers : ALTI
In choral music, an alto (plural “alti”) is the second-highest voice in a four-part chorus made up of soprano, contr(alto), tenor and bass. The word "alto" describes the vocal range, that of the deepest female singing-voice, whereas the term "contralto" describes more than just the alto range, but also its quality and timbre. An adult male's voice (not a boy's) with the same range as an alto is called a "countertenor".

111. Noted mausoleum site : AGRA
The most famous mausoleum in the world has to be the Taj Mahal in Agra, India. The Taj Mahal was built after the death of the third wife of Shah Jahan, Mumtaz Mahal (hence the name of the mausoleum). The poor woman died in childbirth delivering the couple's 14th child.

113. Women's Health competitor : SHAPE
“Shape” and “Women’s Health” are magazines.

115. Baghdad's ___ City : SADR
Sadr City is a suburb of Iraq, oft in the news these days. Sadr City is named after the deceased Shia leader Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr.

117. You may be shocked by it : TASER
Victor Appleton wrote a novel for young adults called "Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle". The company that developed the TASER electroshock weapon named its product as a homage to the novel. The acronym TASER stands for "Thomas A. Swift's Electric Rifle". Interesting, eh?

118. Baseball's Slaughter : ENOS
Enos Slaughter has a remarkable playing record in Major League Baseball over a 19-year career. Slaughter's record is particularly remarkable given that he left baseball for three years to serve in the military during WWII.

121. Word before and after "Tovarich" in a "Doctor Zhivago" number : NYET
“Nyet Tovarich, Nyet” is a song from the soundtrack of the movie “Doctor Zhivago”.

"Doctor Zhivago" is of course the epic novel by Boris Pasternak, first published in 1957. I haven't tried to read it but the 1965 film version is a must-see, directed by David Lean and starring Omar Sharif in the title role. The story centers on Yuri Zhivago, a doctor and poet, and how he is affected by the Russian Revolution and the Russian Civil War.

Down
1. Columbus's home : GENOA
Genoa is a seaport in the very north of Italy, in the region known as Liguria. One of Genoa's most famous sons was Christopher Columbus.

2. "Hoochie Coochie Man" singer : MUDDY WATERS
Muddy Waters was a musician from Mississippi who was nicknamed the “father of modern Chicago blues”.

8. 1943 penny composition : STEEL
During WWII there was a shortage of copper, so the US Mint switched to zinc-coated steel for production of one-cent coins in 1943. The coins had all sorts of problems in circulation, so the mint had to change again for the 1944-46 production, using a brass/copper alloy. For obvious reasons, the 1943 coin is called a "steelie", and is the only coin ever issued by the US mint that can be picked up by a magnet.

9. The Three Stooges, e.g. : HAMS
The word "ham", describing a performer who overacts, is apparently a shortened form of "hamfatter" and dates back to the late 1800s. "Hamfatter" comes from a song in old minstrel shows called "The Ham-Fat Man". It seems that a poorly performing actor was deemed to have the "acting" qualities of a minstrel made up in blackface.

If you've seen a few of the films starring "The Three Stooges" you'll have noticed that the line up changed over the years. The original trio was made up of Moe and Shemp Howard (two brothers) and Larry Fine (a good friend of the Howards). This line up was usually known as "Moe, Larry and Shemp". Then Curly Howard replaced his brother when Shemp quit the act, creating the most famous trio, "Moe, Larry And Curly". Shemp returned when Curly had a debilitating stroke in 1946, and Shemp stayed with the troupe until he died in 1955. Shemp was replaced by Joe Besser, and then "Curly-Joe" DeRita. When Larry Fine had a stroke in 1970, it effectively marked the end of the act.

11. Caramel candy brand : ROLO
Rolo was a hugely popular chocolate candy in Ireland when I was growing up. Rolo was introduced in the thirties in the UK, and is produced under license in the US by Hershey. I was a little disappointed when I had my first taste of the American version as the center is very hard and chewy. The recipe used on the other side of the Atlantic calls for a soft gooey center.

15. Purple Heart recipients, e.g. : HEROES
The Purple Heart is a military decoration awarded by the President to members of the US military forces who have been wounded or killed while serving. Today’s Purple Heart was originally called the Badge of Military Merit, an award that was established by George Washington 1782 while he was commander-in-chief of the Continental Army. The Purple Heart is a heart-shaped medal with a gold border bearing a profile of President Washington, and a purple ribbon.

16. It's worn by many Libras : OPAL
Here is the "official" list of birthstones by month, that we tend to use today:
January: Garnet
February: Amethyst
March: Bloodstone or Aquamarine
April: Diamond
May: Emerald
June: Pearl or Moonstone
July: Ruby
August: Sardonyx or Peridot
September: Sapphire or Lapis Lazuli
October: Opal or Pink Tourmaline
November: Topaz or Citrine
December: Turquoise or Zircon (also now, Tanzanite)

19. Many S.A. women : SRAS
Many women in South America (S.A.) speak Spanish and are married, so would be addresses as “senora” (sra.).

30. 1962 movie for which Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke won Oscars, with "The" : MIRACLE WORKER
“The Miracle Worker” is a 1962 movie based on the autobiography of Helen Keller called “The Story of My Life”.

Helen Keller became a noted author despite been deaf and blind, largely through the work of her teacher, Anne Sullivan. Keller was left deaf and blind after an illness (possible meningitis or scarlet fever). when she was about 18 months old. She was to become the first deaf and blind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The relationship between Sullivan and Keller is immortalized in the play and film called “The Miracle Worker”.

38. Still dripping? : BOOZE
Booze might be dripping from a still.

44. "Toy Story 3" role for Michael Keaton : KEN
I haven't seen Pixar's "Toy Story 3", but I hear it is excellent. "Toy Story 3" is so successful that it is now the highest-grossing animated film of all time and has brought in over a billion dollars worldwide. In the movie, Ken is a smooth-talking doll that falls in love with Barbie. Ken is voiced by actor Michael Keaton.

Michael Keaton is an actor from Coraopolis, Pennsylvania. Keaton is perhaps best remembered for roles he played in Tim Burton films. Keaton had the title role in “Beetlejuice” in 1988, and the title role in “Batman” in 1989 and “Batman Returns” in 1992.

45. Muckraker Tarbell : IDA
Ida Tarbell was a teacher and what we would call today an "investigative journalist", although back in her day she was known as a "muckraker". Her most famous work is her 1904 book "The History of the Standard Oil Company". This exposé is credited with hastening the breakup of John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil in 1911.

48. Peruvian volcano El ___ : MISTI
El Misti is a volcano also known as Guaga-Putina that lies in Southern Peru near the city of Arequipa.

50. ___ Schwarz : FAO
FAO Schwarz is perhaps the most famous, and is certainly the oldest toy store in the United States. The FAO Schwarz outlet on Fifth Avenue in New York City has been made very famous by Hollywood. For example, in the New York Store you can see that floor piano that was played by Tom Hanks in the movie “Big”.

52. Euphemism used often on "The Newlywed Game" : MAKING WHOOPEE
“The Newlywed Game” is a television game show in which newly wed couples are tested in their knowledge of each other. The show first appeared in 1966, and was the last network show to premiere in black and white.

54. Frank Sinatra's second : AVA
Ava Gardner is noted for her association with some big movies, but also for her association with some big names when it came to the men in her life. In the world of film, she appeared in the likes of "Mogambo" (1953), "On the Beach" (1959), "The Night of the Iguana" (1964) and "Earthquake" (1974). The men in her life included husbands Mickey Rooney, Artie Shaw and Frank Sinatra. After her marriages had failed (and perhaps before!) she had long term relationships with Howard Hughes and bullfighter Luis Miguel Dominguin whom she met through her friend Ernest Hemingway.

Frank Sinatra was the only child of Italian immigrants living in Hoboken, New Jersey. Like so many of our heroes, Sinatra had a rough upbringing. His mother was arrested several times and convicted of running an illegal abortion business in the family home. Sinatra never finished high school, being expelled for rowdy conduct, and he was arrested on a morals charge as a youth for carrying on with a married woman, which was an offence back then. But he straightened himself out by the time he was twenty, and started singing professionally.

62. 72 in a six-pack, often: Abbr. : OZS
A six-pack of a beverage might contain six 12-ounce containers.

65. Don Ho's instrument, informally : UKE
The ukulele originated in the 1800s and mimicked a small guitar brought to the Hawaiian Islands by Portuguese immigrants.

Don Ho apparently had a pretty liberal arrangement with his wife. When Ho was touring with his two backing singers, Pattie Swallie and Elizabeth Gevara, all three of them shared a room together. He had two children with each of his roommates, giving a total of ten kids including the six he had with his wife. The arrangement was quite open, it seems, with all ten kids visiting each other regularly. To each his own …

66. Sierra ___ : LEONE
The Republic of Sierra Leone is a country in West Africa, lying on the Atlantic Coast. The capital city of Freetown was originally set up as a colony to house the "Black Poor" of London, England. These people were mainly freed British slaves of Caribbean descent who were living a miserable life in the run-down parts of London. Perhaps to help the impoverished souls, perhaps to rid the streets of "a problem", three ships were chartered in 1787 to transport a group of blacks, with some whites, to a piece of land purchased in Sierra Leone. Those who made the voyage were guaranteed British citizenship and protection. The descendants of these immigrants, and others who made the journey over the next 60 years, make up the ethnic group that's today called the Sierra Leone Creole.

68. Dewar's product : MALT WHISKEY
Dewar's is a blended Scotch whisky introduced in 1846 by John Dewar. Dewar's White Label is the company's most popular Scotch, first created in 1899, with a taste that is described as "heather and honey". Dewar's also make some single malts, under the labels Aberfeldy 12 and Aberfeldy 21. Today, Dewar's is owned by Bacardi.

76. They're beside the point: Abbr. : CTS
I think the reference is to cents (cts.), which come beside a decimal point in sums expressed in dollars and cents.

82. Racing vehicle : TOBOGGAN
“Toboggan” came into English from the French Canadian "tabagane", the name for a long sled with a flat bottom. The French Canadian word is probably from the Algonquian word for a sled, "tobakun",

85. Mornings, for short : AMS
The 12-hour clock has been around a long time, and was even used in sundial format in Ancient Egypt. Our use of AM and PM dates back to Roman times, with AM standing for Ante Meridiem (before noon) and PM standing for Post Meridiem (after noon). However, the Romans originally used the AM concept a little differently, by counting backwards from noon. So, 2AM to the Romans would be two hours before noon, or 10AM as we would call it today.

88. Beehive State native : UTE
The Ute is a group of Native American tribes that now resides in Utah and Colorado. The Ute were not a unified people as such, but rather a loose association of nomadic groups.

When Mormon pioneers were settling what is today the state of Utah, they referred to the area as Deseret, a word that means “beehive” according to the Book of Mormon. Today Utah is known as the Beehive State and there is a beehive symbol on the Utah state flag.

100. Bimetallic Canadian coin : TOONIE
“Toonie” is the familiar name for a two-dollar coin in Canada. A kind blog reader pointed out that the one-dollar bill was replaced with the "loonie" coin, a nickname that comes from the "loon" bird that is on one side of the coin. The "toonie" nickname for the two-dollar coin is imitative of the term "loonie", and I suppose might be spelled "two-nie". The toonie replaced the two-dollar bill in 1996. The paper bill cost 6 cents to print and lasted about a year in circulation, whereas the toonie costs 16 cents to mint and should last 20 years. Good move ...

101. Writing on the Wall? : POST
I think the reference is to writing on the Facebook Wall, maybe. I don’t do Facebook …

102. A Coen brother : ETHAN
I think it's great to see two brothers working together and being so successful. Joel and Ethan Coen are two movie producers and directors who both live in New York City. The Coen brothers do love the movie-making business and they even married industry "insiders". Ethan's wife is film editor Tricia Cooke, and Joel is married to one of my favorite actresses, the lovely Frances McDormand.

104. Joie de vivre : ELAN
Our word "élan" was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours i.e "style" or "flair".

“Joie de vivre” means "joy of living" in French. We use the phrase to mean the happy, carefree enjoyment of life, like when we finish our crossword puzzles ...

105. Language of Lahore : URDU
Urdu is one of the two official languages of Pakistan (the other being English), and is one of 22 scheduled languages in India. Urdu partly developed from Persian and is written from right to left.

Lahore is a large city in Pakistan, second in size only to Karachi. It is known as the Garden of the Mughals (or in English, Moguls) because of its association with the Mughal Empire. The Mughals ruled much of India from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries.

108. Feds : T-MEN
A T-man is a law-enforcement agent of the US Treasury (T is for Treasury).


Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Coll. senior's exam : GMAT
5. Some S.U.V.'s : GMCS
9. 1/24 of un jour : HEURE
10. ___ Franklin, Grammy-nominated gospel/R&B singer : ERMA
14. First name in footwear : THOM
18. Robs : LOOTS
20. Onetime wrestling great ___ the Giant : ANDRE
21. Shade of black : SOOT
22. Forced return? : REPO
23. Woman in Conan Doyle's "A Scandal in Bohemia" : ADLER
24. Most common elements : MODES
25. Asset : PLUS
26. Target of 2006 United Nations sanctions : IRAN
27. Euripides play : MEDEA
28. Opening words? : SAY ‘AH’
29. Heads of a Northwest tribe? : TOTEM POLE
31. Endings of some courses : ORALS
32. Compose : WRITE
34. ___ Selassie : HAILE
35. What whalers may bring back : YARNS
37. "Defending liberty, pursuing justice" org. : ABA
39. Carlo ___ wine : ROSSI
41. Go kicking and screaming : RESIST
43. Collaborative Web site : WIKI
46. Bon ___ : MOT
47. Fully : TO THE MAX
49. Duplicitous : TWO-FACED
51. They may be epic : POEMS
53. Actor Roberts : ERIC
54. Trouble : ADO
55. The Superdome, e.g. : ARENA
56. Biblical figure whose name means "help" : EZRA
57. ___ de Pompadour (figure in Fr. history) : MME
59. Many a person behind the Iron Curtain : SLAV
61. Dome, e.g. : ROOF
63. Secretary, e.g. : DESK
64. Piece longer than its name suggests : MINUTE WALTZ
67. Second of a Latin trio : AMAS
71. Gang member's "O.K." before a job : I’M IN
73. Bird or fruit : KIWI
74. Canadian interjections : EHS
75. Like a sighting of an ivory-billed woodpecker : RARE
76. Where 84-Across were invented : CHINA
79. Suffix with favor : -ITE
81. Catching ___ : ONTO
83. Seat of Dallas County, Ala. : SELMA
84. Seven-piece puzzles : TANGRAMS
86. Adventurer of Greek myth : ARGONAUT
89. Big gobbler : TOM
90. Dish that may be ladled : STEW
91. Eskimo boot : MUKLUK
93. Hollywood legend Davis : BETTE
94. Crooked : WRY
95. Bridge spot : CHASM
97. It has 31 días : ENERO
99. ___ bar (Hershey product) : HEATH
101. Some dinero : PESOS
103. Disobeyed orders, say : WENT ROGUE
106. Dewy : MOIST
109. Four Holy Roman emperors : OTTOS
110. Certain singers : ALTI
111. Noted mausoleum site : AGRA
112. ___ buddy : BOSOM
113. Women's Health competitor : SHAPE
114. Terminal information : GATE
115. Baghdad's ___ City : SADR
116. ___-length : ANKLE
117. You may be shocked by it : TASER
118. Baseball's Slaughter : ENOS
119. Carpentry fastener : T-NUT
120. Affix, in a way : TIE ON
121. Word before and after "Tovarich" in a "Doctor Zhivago" number : NYET
122. Informal greetings : HEYS

Down
1. Columbus's home : GENOA
2. "Hoochie Coochie Man" singer : MUDDY WATERS
3. In ___ (late, in law) : ARREAR
4. They may be shot at basketball games : TEE SHIRTS
5. Star quality : GLAMOR
6. West Point subject : MODERN WARFARE
7. Frigid : COLD AS ICE
8. 1943 penny composition : STEEL
9. The Three Stooges, e.g. : HAMS
10. Clairvoyant's hurdle : ESP TEST
11. Caramel candy brand : ROLO
12. Shooting off more : MOUTHIER
13. Flummoxed : AT SEA
14. Like porn films : TRIPLE X
15. Purple Heart recipients, e.g. : HEROES
16. It's worn by many Libras : OPAL
17. Bang for one's buck : MONEY’S WORTH
19. Many S.A. women : SRAS
30. 1962 movie for which Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke won Oscars, with "The" : MIRACLE WORKER
33. Likewise : TOO
36. ___ Z : A TO
37. Jazzed : AMPED
38. Still dripping? : BOOZE
40. Gloss : SHEEN
42. "___ be a real shame ..." : IT’D
44. "Toy Story 3" role for Michael Keaton : KEN
45. Muckraker Tarbell : IDA
48. Peruvian volcano El ___ : MISTI
50. ___ Schwarz : FAO
52. Euphemism used often on "The Newlywed Game" : MAKING WHOOPEE
54. Frank Sinatra's second : AVA
57. Year the iPod came out : MMI
58. Money raised by members of Congress? : MINIMUM WAGE
60. Stupefying : AWING
62. 72 in a six-pack, often: Abbr. : OZS
65. Don Ho's instrument, informally : UKE
66. Sierra ___ : LEONE
68. Dewar's product : MALT WHISKEY
69. Medieval museum exhibit : ARMOR
70. Lowdown : SEAMY
72. Nick, maybe : MAR
76. They're beside the point: Abbr. : CTS
77. Magician's prop : HAT
78. Blissed out : IN ECSTASY
80. Tut's relative : TSK
82. Racing vehicle : TOBOGGAN
83. Where one might be in the hot seat? : STEAMBATH
85. Mornings, for short : AMS
86. Some baby sitters : AUNTIES
87. Fundamentally : AT HEART
88. Beehive State native : UTE
92. Gave for a time : LENT TO
96. Posit : ASSERT
98. Where one might be in the hot seat? : ROAST
100. Bimetallic Canadian coin : TOONIE
101. Writing on the Wall? : POST
102. A Coen brother : ETHAN
104. Joie de vivre : ELAN
105. Language of Lahore : URDU
107. They're always done by one : SOLOS
108. Feds : T-MEN


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0629-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Jun 13, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Joe Krozel
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 12m 26s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Bloke : CHAP
“Chap” is an informal term for “lad, fellow”, especially in England. The term derives from “chapman”, an obsolete word meaning “purchaser” or “trader”.

“Bloke” is British slang for a fellow. The etymology of “bloke” seems to have been lost in the mists of time.

11. Big name in folk music : SEEGER
The American folk singer Pete Seeger wrote and co-wrote a lot of classic songs. The list includes “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?”, “If I had a Hammer”, and “Turn, Turn, Turn!”

13. Cubs cap display : LETTER C
The Chicago Cubs is one of only two charter members of the baseball’s National League who are still playing, the other being the Atlanta Braves. The Cubs last won the World Series in 1908, which is a long time ago. In fact, the Cubs have the longest championship drought of any professional sports team in North America.

15. Patroness of Québec : STE ANNE
In the Christian and Muslim traditions, Saint Anne was the mother of Mary and hence grandmother of Jesus Christ. Saint Anne is the patroness of unmarried women, housewives, women in labor and grandmothers. She is also the patron saint of Santa Ana, California and Quebec, Canada.

17. It's said to be the world's fastest field sport : HURLING
Hurling is the national sport of my homeland of Ireland. It’s played with a stick called a hurley and a ball called a sliotar. It’s thought to be the fastest team sport in the world, and certainly has to be the oldest as it predates Christianity and was brought to Ireland by the Celts.

19. Craigslist and others : AD SITES
Craigslist is an online network of communities that features classified advertisements organized geographically. Craigslist was started by Craig Newmark in 1995, originally as an email distribution list for his friends who lived and worked in the San Francisco Bay Area.

22. Rocker with the 1973 #1 hit "Frankenstein" : EDGAR WINTER
Edgar Winter is a singer and multi-talented instrumentalist. He played in the seventies with his band, The Edgar Winter Group. Winter is an albino, and so has no pigment in his skin hair and eyes.

23. Spotted horse : PAINT
“Paint” is another name used for a pinto horse.

A “pinto” is a horse with patchy markings of white mixed with another color. “Pinto” means “painted” in American Spanish.

35. Muscle that rotates a part outward : EVERTOR
“Evertor” is the name given to any muscle that turns a part of the body outwards. An example of “eversion” would be the movement of the sole of the foot outwards, away from its resting position.

38. Wash : DETERGE
To deterge is to cleanse, as in to clean a wound, say.

42. Georgia and neighbors, once: Abbr. : SSRS
The former Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR) of Georgia is now an independent country. Supposedly, the Georgian people were given their name because they especially revered St. George. The flag of Georgia does indeed feature five St. George’s crosses.

Down
2. Member of an ancient people known for warfare with chariots : HITTITE
The HIttites were a people living in Ancient Anatolia (Asia Minor) during the Bronze Age. The Hittite military is noted for the early use of chariots, the design of which can be seen in some Ancient Egyptian drawings.

6. "It is through Art, and through Art only, that we can ___ our perfection": Oscar Wilde : REALISE
If you didn't know Oscar Wilde was Irish, you will when you see the name he was given at birth: Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde!

8. Speed Stick brand : MENNEN
The Mennen Speed Stick was the leading deodorant for men for many years. The Mennen Company was founded by Gerhard Mennen in Newark, New Jersey in 1878.

9. Certain YouTube posting : VLOG
A video blog is perhaps what one might expect, a blog that is essentially a series of video posts. The term “video logging” is often shortened to “vlogging”.

14. Some E.M.T. personnel : CPR TRAINERS
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has for decades involved the simultaneous compression of the chest to pump blood using the heart, and artificial respiration by blowing air into the lungs. Nowadays emergency services are placing more emphasis on heart compressions, and less on artificial respiration.

Emergency medical technician (EMT)

25. Menu heading : ENTREES
Entrée of course means "entry" in French. An entrée can be something that helps one get “a way in", an interview for example perhaps helped along by a recommendation letter. In Europe, even in English-speaking countries, the entrée is the name for the "entry" to the meal, the first course. I found it very confusing to order meals when I first came to America!

26. Hurriedly, in scores : AGITATO
Agitato is a musical direction seen on scores occasionally, and it means “agitated”. The instruction is to play in a restless, agitated style.

27. Sedimentary rocks resembling cemented fish roe : OOLITES
Oolite is a sedimentary rock also called egg stone. Indeed, the term “oolite” comes from the Greek “ooion” meaning egg. The rocks are often round and white (hence the name) and are composed of calcium carbonate.

29. Elvis Presley, notably : SNEERER
Elvis Aron Presley was the younger of two identical twins. His brother was stillborn, delivered 35 minutes before Elvis. The brother was named Jesse Garon Presley. So though born a twin, Elvis was raised as an only child.

31. Fuel line additive : DRY GAS
Dry gas is an additive used to prevent fuel from freezing by absorbing any water present and keeping it in solution. Dry gas is mainly an alcohol, and it is the alcohol that absorbs the water. A lot of gasoline that we buy at the pump already contains 10-15% ethanol,in which case dry gas isn’t beneficial. The term “dry gas” comes from the brand name “Drygas”.

32. One side of a famous NBC feud : LENO
The so called “War for Late Night” of 2010 involved Conan O’Brien and Jay Leno. O’Brien had stayed loyal to NBC on the understanding that he would take over “The Tonight Show” after Jay Leno retired. When Leno’s contract expired in 2009, NBC moved Leno aside, with his agreement, and O’Brien took over. But Leno then hosted a new spot in prime time called “The Jay Leno Show”, and apparently the two shows split the traditional late night audience, much to the annoyance of advertisers. NBC reacted by moving Leno back to the late night slot, and mayhem ensued!


Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Bloke : CHAP
5. Proper partner? : PRIM
9. Expressed out loud : VOICED
11. Big name in folk music : SEEGER
13. Cubs cap display : LETTER C
15. Patroness of Québec : STE ANNE
16. Defeat in a jump-rope competition, say : OUTSKIP
17. It's said to be the world's fastest field sport : HURLING
18. More in need of a bath, say : GRIMIER
19. Craigslist and others : AD SITES
20. Make sense : STAND TO REASON
22. Rocker with the 1973 #1 hit "Frankenstein" : EDGAR WINTER
23. Spotted horse : PAINT
24. Helpers for the deaf : HEARING DOGS
30. Loitering : HANGING AROUND
32. Arrangement of atoms in a crystal structure : LATTICE
33. Accounting department employees : BILLERS
35. Muscle that rotates a part outward : EVERTOR
36. Definitely not a good looker? : EVIL EYE
37. "Standing room only" : NO SEATS
38. Wash : DETERGE
39. Some jazz combos : OCTETS
40. Join up for another collaboration : RETEAM
41. Middling : SO-SO
42. Georgia and neighbors, once: Abbr. : SSRS

Down
1. French hearts : COEURS
2. Member of an ancient people known for warfare with chariots : HITTITE
3. Pretends to be sore : ACTS MAD
4. Christmas no-no : PEEKING
5. Views through a periscope, say : PEERS AT
6. "It is through Art, and through Art only, that we can ___ our perfection": Oscar Wilde : REALISE
7. Furnace part : IGNITOR
8. Speed Stick brand : MENNEN
9. Certain YouTube posting : VLOG
10. Little orange snacks : DRIED APRICOTS
11. Sign over a car : STUDENT DRIVER
12. Rules and ___ : REGS
14. Some E.M.T. personnel : CPR TRAINERS
15. Living like husband and wife : SHARING A BED
21. Unpaid : OWING
24. Really would rather not : HATES TO
25. Menu heading : ENTREES
26. Hurriedly, in scores : AGITATO
27. Sedimentary rocks resembling cemented fish roe : OOLITES
28. Throats : GULLETS
29. Elvis Presley, notably : SNEERER
30. Post-hurricane scenes, e.g. : HAVOCS
31. Fuel line additive : DRY GAS
32. One side of a famous NBC feud : LENO
34. Look : SEEM


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0628-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Jun 13, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ian Livengood & Brad Wilber
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 35m 36s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. Bygone sportscaster with a statue outside Wrigley Field : HARRY CARAY
The announcer Harry Caray was famous for exclaiming "Holy cow!" during baseball games, and used the same phrase for the title of his autobiography.

16. Fan letters? : XOXO
In the sequence XOX, I think the X represents a kiss, and the O a hug. Hugs and kisses ...

17. They may lead to another story : ESCALATORS
Escalators have an advantage over elevators in that they can move larger numbers of people in the same time frame. They can also be placed in just about the same physical space that would be needed for a regular staircase. Patents for escalator-type devices were first filed in 1859, but the first working model wasn't built until 1892 by one Jesse Reno. It was erected alongside a pier in Coney Island, New York, with the second escalator being placed at an entrance to the Brooklyn Bridge. Soon after, Elisha Otis and the Otis elevator company purchased the necessary patents and went into the business.

18. "Popular Fallacies" byline, 1826 : ELIA
Charles Lamb published a famous collection of essays simply entitled "Essays of Elia". Elia was actually a clerk and co-worker of Charles Lamb, whereas Lamb was the author.

“Popular Fallacies” is an 1826 essay by Charles Lamb that appears in the collection called “Essays of Elia”. In “Popular Fallacies”, Lamb listed 16 axioms that he believed fallacious, such as:
- That a bully is always a coward
- That ill-gotten gain never prospers
- That enough is as good as a feast
- That you must love me, and love my dog

22. Overzealous promgoer's choice, maybe : TAILS
A prom is a formal dance held upon graduation from high school (we call them "formals" over in Ireland). The term "prom" is short for "promenade", the name given to a type of dance or ball.

23. Address add-on : Q AND A
After a speaker gives an address, he or she might then participate in a question and answer session (Q&A).

25. Noted press conference rhymer : ALI
Muhammad Ali first used his famous catchphrase “float like a butterfly and sting like a bee” before his world title fight against Sonny Liston in 1964. Back then Ali still went by his birth name of Cassius Clay.

27. Where Achilles was dipped to make him invincible : STYX
Achilles is a Greek mythological figure, the main protagonist of Homer's "Iliad". Supposedly when Achilles was born his mother attempted to make him immortal by dipping him into the River Styx. As he was held by the heel as he was immersed, this became the only vulnerable point on his body. Years later he was killed when a poisoned arrow struck him in the heel, shot by Paris.

31. Ochoa who was the first #1-ranked golfer from Mexico : LORENA
Lorena Ochoa is a retired professional golfer from Mexico who was ranked as the number one female golfer in the world from 2007 to 2010.

32. Waltz component : BOX STEP
In dance, a box step is a step that creates a square or box pattern on the floor. The box step features in several ballroom dances including the rumba and waltz.

36. O, more formally : WINFREY
What can you say about Oprah Winfrey? Born into poverty to a single mother and with a harrowing childhood, Oprah is now the greatest African American philanthropist the world has ever known. Oprah's name was originally meant to be "Orpah" after the Biblical character in the Book of Ruth, and that's how it appears on her birth certificate. Apparently folks had trouble pronouncing "Orpah", so she's now "Oprah".

37. Fee on some out-of-state purchases : USE TAX
Use tax is assessed by many states on out-of-state purchases made by state residents. The use tax is a substitute for the sales tax that would have been levied should the purchase have been made within the state.

38. Bats : ZANY
The expression "bats in the belfry" meaning "mad, crazy" conjures up images of bats flying around Gothic bell towers, but actually it's a relatively recent addition to our vernacular. The term is American in origin, and dates back only to the early 1900s. The concept is that someone who is "crazy", with wild ideas flying around his or her head, can be described as having bats (wild ideas) flying around the belfry (head). The terms "bats" and "batty" originated at the same time, and are clearly derivative.

39. Longtime Capone rival : MORAN
Bugs Moran was a Chicago gangster, the main rival to the slightly more famous Al Capone. Moran tried twice to kill Capone. In the first attempt Moran and his gang shot at Capone from their car as their target was getting out of his own automobile. They missed Capone, and subsequent to the attack he took to driving in an armored vehicle. The second, more famous attempt (in 1926), involved Moran and a fleet of cars driving by Capone's hotel and spraying the lobby in which he was standing. Again, Capone escaped unharmed. Three years later, in February 1929, six members of Moran's gang were lined up against a wall and shot by order of Capone, an incident we now remember as the famous St. Valentine's Day Massacre.

41. Single mom in a 2000s sitcom : REBA
Reba McEntire is a country music singer and television actress. McEntire starred in her own sitcom called "Reba" that aired on the WB and the CW cable channels from 2001 to 2007.

45. Party to the Oslo Accords, for short : PLO
The Oslo Accords grew out of secret negotiations between the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) and Israel in a residence in Oslo in the early nineties. The delegates shared the same house while they conducted 14 meetings. While eating all their meals together at the same table, the negotiators came to respect one another and apparently friendships developed.

48. South Pacific palm : BETEL
The betel nut is something that is chewed, especially in parts of Asia. “Betel nut” is a bit of misnomer, as the nut in question is actually an Areca nut from the Areca palm. For chewing, the Areca nut is wrapped in betel leaves and the whole thing is called a “betel nut”.

51. Walk ostentatiously : SASHAY
To "sashay" is to strut along in a showy manner. “Sashay” is an Anglicized form of the French word “chassé”, a sliding step used in square dancing.

59. Many a John Wayne pic : HORSE OPERA
"Horse opera" was a slang term for a western movie or show.

John Wayne was called Marion Mitchell Morrison at birth, named after his grandfather who was a Civil War veteran. When young Marion was a little boy, a local fireman used to call him "Little Duke" because he was always seen walking with his large dog called "Duke". Marion liked the name "Duke" and so he called himself Duke Morrison for the rest of his life. That said, Duke Morrison also used John Wayne as a stage name.

Down
2. Base for Blackbeard : NASSAU
Nassau, the capital of the Bahamas, used to be called Charles Town. After having been burnt to the ground by the Spanish in 1684, it was rebuilt and named Nassau in honor of King William III of England, a Dutchman from the House of Orange-Nassau (aka William of Orange). Nassau is a favored location for the James Bond series of movies. The city and surroundings feature in "Thunderball", "Never Say Never Again", "Casino Royale" and "For Your Eyes Only".

Blackbeard was the nickname of the celebrated English pirate Edward Teach who plied his trade around the West Indies and up and and down the North American coast.

3. Fictional student at Riverdale High : ARCHIE
Archie Andrews was the main character in a comic book series introduced in 1941 by Archie Comics. Archie was such a successful character that he went on to appear in a radio series, a syndicated comic strip and two television cartoon shows.

5. Actors Talbot and Waggoner : LYLES
Lyle Talbot was an actor probably best known for playing Joe Randolph, the helpful neighbor on “The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet” in the fifties and sixties.

Lyle Waggoner is a veteran of "The Carol Burnett Show", and the actor who played the part of Steve Trevor in the "Wonder Woman" TV series. Before his stint on "Wonder Woman", he also worked as a model and has the distinction of being the first centerfold for "Playgirl".

6. Disney villain : SCAR
Among the group of lions at the center of “The Lion King” story, young Simba is the heir apparent, the lion cub destined to take over as leader of the pride. His uncle is jealous of Simba, and plots with a trio of hyenas to kill Simba, so that he can take his position. The uncle was originally named Taka (according to books) but he was given the name Scar after being injured by a buffalo.

7. Monopoly token : HAT
There are eight tokens included in the game of Monopoly as of 2013. These are the wheelbarrow, battleship, racecar, thimble, boot, Scottie dog, top hat and cat. The latest to be introduced was the cat in 2013, replacing the iron. The battleship and the cannon (aka howitzer, now retired) had been added to the Monopoly game as part of a recycling exercise. The pieces were intended for the game "Conflict" released in 1940, but when Parker Bros. pulled "Conflict" off the market due to poor sales, they added their excess battleships and cannons to Monopoly.

9. Pitch producer : LARYNX
The voice box or larynx is where pitch and volume of sound are manipulated when we talk.

10. Dissolved, as bacteria exposed to antibodies : LYSED
Lysis is the destruction of cells by dissolution. The cell is usually dissolved by the action of an enzyme, such as lysozyme found in saliva.

11. "Double" or "triple" move : AXEL
An Axel is a forward take-off jump in figure skating. It was first performed by Norwegian Axel Paulsen at the 1882 World Figure Skating championships.

12. Certain medieval combatant : POLE-AXER
A pollaxe (also “poleax”) is a medieval weapon. As one might expect, it is an axe on a pole. The pole could be anything from 4 to 8 feet in length.

13. Rhett Butler's "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn," e.g. : EXIT LINE
In Margaret Mitchell’s novel “Gone with the Wind”, when Rhett Butler finally walks out on Scarlett O’Hara he utters the words “My dear, I don’t give a damn”. Most of us are more familiar with the slightly different words spoken by Clark Gable in the film adaption of the story: “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.”

21. State with Leipzig and Dresden : SAXONY
Saxony was the name given at different times in history to states along the Elbe river in central Europe. As the various states broke up, they spawned many duchies that retained the name "Saxe". The most famous of these duchies was probably Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, two united duchies in Germany that ceased to exist after WWII. A notable branch of the Saxe-Coburg and Gotha House is the British Royal Family, as Queen Victoria was married to Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha King George V of the United Kingdom changed the name of the family to the House of Windsor in a politically sensible move during WWI.

Leipzig is a city in Germany located just under 100 miles south of Berlin. The name “Leipzig” comes from the Slavic word ”Lipsk” which means “settlement where the linden trees stand”. Linden trees are also called lime trees and basswood trees.

Dresden was almost completely destroyed during WWII, especially as a result of the famous firebombing of the city in 1945. Restoration work in the inner city in recent decades led to it being designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site However, in 2006 when the city built a highway bridge close to the city center, UNESCO took Dresden off the list. This marked the only time a European location lost World Heritage status.

23. Stick in a cabinet : Q-TIP
Cotton swabs were originally marketed under the name "Baby Gays", but this was changed in 1926 to "Q-Tips", with the Q standing for "quality".

24. Objectivist Rand : AYN
Ayn Rand was a Russian-American novelist born Alisa Rosenbaum. Rand's two best known works are her novels "The Fountainhead" published in 1943 and "Atlas Shrugged" in 1957. Back in 1951, Rand moved from Los Angeles to New York City. Soon after, she gathered a group of admirers around her with whom she discussed philosophy and shared drafts of her magnum opus, "Atlas Shrugged". This group called itself "The Collective", and one of the founding members was none other than future Federal Reserve chairman, Alan Greenspan.

27. X-ray ___ : SPEX
X-Ray Spex (as opposed the novelty item “x-ray specs”) was a punk band from England that formed in 1976 and finally broke up in 2008. Their most famous hit was the first song they recorded: “Oh Bondage Up Yours!”

29. Chihuahua cry : ARF
Chihuahua is a state in northern Mexico that shares a border with Texas and New Mexico. Chihuahua is the largest state in the country, so has the nickname "El Estado Grande". The state takes its name from the Chihuahuan Desert which lies largely within its borders. And of course the Chihuahua breed of dog takes its name from the state.

33. Common number of gondoliers : ‘O SOLE MIO
"'O sole mio" is a famous Italian song from Naples, written in 1898. The song's lyrics are usually sung in the original Neapolitan, as opposed to Italian. The title translates from Neapolitan into "My Sun" (and not into "O, My Sun" as one might expect). It's a love song of course, sung by a young man declaring that there is a sun brighter than that in the sky, the sun that is his lover's face. Awww ...

34. Intern's duty, maybe : XEROXING
Xerox was founded in 1906 in Rochester, New York and originally made photographic paper and equipment. Real success came for the company in 1959 when it introduced the first plain-paper photocopier. Xerox named Ursula Burns as CEO in 2009, the first African American woman to head up a S&P 100 company. Burn was also the first woman to succeed another female CEO (replacing Anne Mulcahy).

40. Mississippi site of Machine Gun Kelly's last known bank robbery : TUPELO
Tupelo is a city in northeast Mississippi. Tupelo is perhaps best known as the birthplace of of Elvis Presley.

Machine Gun Kelly was the nickname of Prohibition era gangster George Barnes. Despite his image as a tough guy, Machine Gun Kelly proved to be a model prisoner when he was finally captured by the authorities. He spent the last 21 years of his life in jail, much of that time at Alcatraz. His less than brutal demeanor in prison earned him the new nickname of “Pop Gun Kelly”.

42. Emission of ripening fruit : ETHENE
Ethylene (also called ethene) has a gazillion uses, including as an anesthetic and an aid to hastening the ripening of fruit. It's most common use though is as a major raw material in the manufacture of plastics (like polyethylene).

44. Actress Milano of "Charmed" : ALYSSA
Alyssa Milano is an actress who started her career at a very young age. She played Samantha Micelli on “Who’s the Boss”, the daughter of the character played by Tony Danza.

47. Marked acidity : LOW PH
As we all recall from chemistry class, a pH of 7 is considered neutral, and water is the primary example of a substance with a pH equal to seven. Anything less than 7 is an acid, and anything above 7 is a base.

48. Earl Scruggs's instrument : BANJO
Earl Scruggs and Lester Flatt are the musicians who founded the bluegrass band called the Foggy Mountain Boys in 1948.

50. The E.P.A. issues them: Abbr. : STDS
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was set up during the Nixon administration and began operation at the end of 1970.

54. Dial unit : BAR
Dial was the first antibacterial soap introduced in the US. It was given the name “Dial” as it was touted as offering “round-the-clock” protection against any odors caused by perspiration.

55. "Encore!," to a diva : BIS
“Bis” is the Italian for “twice” and is used on a musical score as a direction to repeat a passage. “Bis” is also used as a request for an additional performance, an encore.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Mobile home? : SNAIL SHELL
11. Made fun of, in a way : APED
15. Bygone sportscaster with a statue outside Wrigley Field : HARRY CARAY
16. Fan letters? : XOXO
17. They may lead to another story : ESCALATORS
18. "Popular Fallacies" byline, 1826 : ELIA
19. Not so apple-cheeked : ASHIER
20. "Sure, I'm game" : YES, LET'S
22. Overzealous promgoer's choice, maybe : TAILS
23. Address add-on : Q AND A
25. Noted press conference rhymer : ALI
26. What some swatches preview : HUES
27. Where Achilles was dipped to make him invincible : STYX
28. Representer of time, often : X-AXIS
30. Part of a publicity agent's job : SPIN
31. Ochoa who was the first #1-ranked golfer from Mexico : LORENA
32. Waltz component : BOX STEP
36. O, more formally : WINFREY
37. Fee on some out-of-state purchases : USE TAX
38. Bats : ZANY
39. Longtime Capone rival : MORAN
40. Lodging for a night out? : TENT
41. Single mom in a 2000s sitcom : REBA
45. Party to the Oslo Accords, for short : PLO
46. In the loop, with "in" : CLUED
48. South Pacific palm : BETEL
49. Business that may be a zoning target : SEX SHOP
51. Walk ostentatiously : SASHAY
52. Drop : OMIT
53. Some contemporary ads : WEB BANNERS
56. Chance upon : FIND
57. Unlikely pageant winners : PLAIN JANES
58. Muddles : FOGS
59. Many a John Wayne pic : HORSE OPERA

Down
1. Scabbard : SHEATH
2. Base for Blackbeard : NASSAU
3. Fictional student at Riverdale High : ARCHIE
4. Train track parts : I-RAILS
5. Actors Talbot and Waggoner : LYLES
6. Disney villain : SCAR
7. Monopoly token : HAT
8. Spanish occupational suffix : -ERO
9. Pitch producer : LARYNX
10. Dissolved, as bacteria exposed to antibodies : LYSED
11. "Double" or "triple" move : AXEL
12. Certain medieval combatant : POLE-AXER
13. Rhett Butler's "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn," e.g. : EXIT LINE
14. Nanny's order : DO AS I SAY
21. State with Leipzig and Dresden : SAXONY
23. Stick in a cabinet : Q-TIP
24. Objectivist Rand : AYN
27. X-ray ___ : SPEX
29. Chihuahua cry : ARF
30. Stop : STANCH
31. What a brush may pick up : LINT
32. Ices : BUMPS OFF
33. Common number of gondoliers : ‘O SOLE MIO
34. Intern's duty, maybe : XEROXING
35. Stop: Abbr. : STA
36. Magician's prop : WAND
38. Lightning bolt shape : ZEE
40. Mississippi site of Machine Gun Kelly's last known bank robbery : TUPELO
41. Close again, as a change purse : RESNAP
42. Emission of ripening fruit : ETHENE
43. Ending with flag or pall : BEARER
44. Actress Milano of "Charmed" : ALYSSA
47. Marked acidity : LOW PH
48. Earl Scruggs's instrument : BANJO
50. The E.P.A. issues them: Abbr. : STDS
51. Cogent : SANE
54. Dial unit : BAR
55. "Encore!," to a diva : BIS


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0627-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Jun 13, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Sean Dobbin
THEME: Hidden Ballplayers’ Stuff … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase that can be read as something belonging to a ballplayer:
20A. California ballplayer's pound? : GIANT’S QUID (from “giant squid”)
26A. Missouri ballplayer's connection? : CARDINAL’S IN (from “cardinal sin”)
45A. Michigan ballplayer's rubbish : TIGER’S TRIPE (from “tiger stripe”)
55A. Pennsylvania ballplayer's joint? : PIRATE’S HIP (from “pirate ship”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 13m 08s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Apple grower? : BEATLE
The Beatles founded their own record label in 1968, Apple Records. When singles were released, the A-side had the image of a Granny Smith apple on the label, with the B-side label showing the midsection of the same apple cut in half. Cute ...

15. Boy who pulls the sword from the stone in "The Sword in the Stone" : ARTHUR
“The Sword in the Stone” is a novel by T. H. White that was adapted into a Disney animated film of the same name. The novel tells the story of legendary King Arthur as a young boy.

16. Barack Obama, for one : LEO
Babies born from July 23 to August 22 each year fall under the star sign of Leo.

Despite rumors to the contrary, I am pretty sure that Barack Hussein Obama II was indeed born in Hawaii. President Obama was born on August 4, 1961 at Kapi'olani Maternity & Gynecological Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii.

17. Women's soccer star Wambach : ABBY
Abby Wambach is professional soccer player who currently turns out for the Western New York Flash in the National Women’s Soccer League. Wambach has been playing for the US national team since 2003 and holds the record for the number of goals scored in international competition, by males or females.

18. Oceanus and Hyperion : TITANS
The Titans were a group of twelve older deities in Greek mythology. In the celebrated Battle of the Titans, they were overthrown by the Olympians, who were twelve younger gods.

Oceanus was a mythical Titan deity personifying the so-called “World Ocean”, the interconnected oceans and seas of the world. The ancient Greeks and Romans believed that the world was encircled by one enormous river.

Hyperion was one of the Titan deities and was the personification of the Earth.

19. ___ Search (former name for Bing) : MSN
Bing is the search engine from Microsoft. Bing is the latest name for an engine that Microsoft used to call Live Search, Windows Live Search and MSN Search.

20. California ballplayer's pound? : GIANT’S QUID (from “giant squid”)
Today’s San Francisco Giants baseball team was founded in 1883 as the New York Gothams. The team’s name was changed to the Giants in 1885, and the franchise moved to San Francisco in 1958.

“Quid” is a slang term for a pound sterling (i.e. a UK pound). It’s not certain where the term comes from, but it is possibly derived somehow from the Latin phrase “quid pro quo” meaning “this for that”.

22. "A fickle food," to Emily Dickinson : FAME
On a recent trip around the country, my wife and I had a very disappointing stop in Amherst, Massachusetts intending to visit the old home of Emily Dickinson. We hadn't done our homework and failed to note that the home was only open for tours on certain days of the week, and not the day we were there (so be warned!). Emily Dickinson wrote nearly 1800 poems in her lifetime, with less than a dozen published before she died in 1886. Emily's younger sister discovered the enormous collection, and it was published in batches over the coming decades. Try this one for size:
Fame is a fickle food
Upon a shifting plate
Whose table once a
Guest but not
The second time is set
Whose crumbs the crows inspect
And with ironic caw
Flap past it to the
Farmer’s corn
Men eat of it and die

23. Stadium recorder : SKYCAM
Skycam is a brand name, which now tends to be used generically. “Skycam” refers to that TV camera mounted on cables over say a football field that allows for some very cool shots as the camera seems to swoop down to the play to follow the action, almost like it's part of a video game.

24. Día de los Santos Reyes month : ENERO
In Spanish, the Three Kings Day (Día de los Santos Reyes) is in January (enero).

26. Missouri ballplayer's connection? : CARDINAL’S IN (from “cardinal sin”)
The St. Louis Cardinals were originally called the "Brown Stockings", changing their name to the "Perfectos" in 1899. The new name obviously didn't go down well with the locals, as the owners changed it one year later to the Cardinals.

The cardinal sins of Christian ethics are also known as the seven deadly sins. The seven deadly sins are:
- wrath
- greed
- sloth
- pride
- lust
- envy
- gluttony

36. Texas city that's headquarters for J. C. Penney : PLANO
Plano, Texas is located in the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area. Settlers chose the name “Plano” in the 1840s. “Plano” is Spanish for “flat”, a reference to the terrain in the area.

JC Penney’s department stores started out as the Golden Rule Store, founded by James Cash Penney and two partners in 1902 in Kemmerer, Wyoming. That first store is still operating today in Kemmerer. Sam Walton used to work for Penney’s in Des Moines, Iowa, before moving on to found the Walmart empire.

37. Actors Ken and Lena : OLINS
Ken Olin was one of the stars on the hit television series "Thirtysomething", playing Michael Steadman. After "Thirtysomething", Olin moved behind the camera and is now a producer and director.

The lovely Lena Olin is a Swedish actress, clearly someone who had acting in her blood. Her mother was the actress Britta Holmberg and her father the actor and director Stig Olin. Olin had a very successful career in Sweden, often working with the great Ingmar Bergman. Olin's breakthrough international and English-speaking role was playing opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" released in 1988. Way back in 1974, the lovely Miss Olin was crowned Miss Scandinavia in a beauty pageant for Nordic women held in Helsinki, Finland.

39. Rap sheet abbr. : AKA
A rap sheet is a criminal record. “Rap” is a slang term dating back to the 1700s that means “blame, responsibility” as in “to take the rap”. This usage morphed into “rap sheet” in the early 1900s.

Also known as (aka)

41. Band with the 1984 hit "My Oh My" : SLADE
Slade is a favorite band from my youth, a rock band from the north of England who made it big during the seventies. One of Slade’s hallmark marketing techniques was a deliberate misspelling of their song titles. Some of those titles are: “Merry Xmas Everybody”, “Gudbuy T’Jane” and my personal favorite “Cum On Feel the Noize”.

44. Junk mail encl., sometimes : SASE
A self-addressed stamped envelope (SASE) might bear a row of stamps.

45. Michigan ballplayer's rubbish : TIGER’S TRIPE (from “tiger stripe”)
The origins of the Detroit Tigers baseball team's nickname seems a little unclear. One story is that it was taken from the Detroit Light Guard military unit who were known as "The Tigers". The Light Guard fought with distinction during the Civil War and in the Spanish-American War. Sure enough, when the Detroit baseball team went into the Majors they were formally given permission to use "The Tigers" name by the Detroit Light Guard.

“Tripe” is the lining of an animal’s stomach that is used as food (mainly the stomach of a cow). The term came to mean something of no value in the late 1800s.

48. Total mess : SNAFU
SNAFU is an acronym standing for Situation Normal: All Fouled Up (well, that's the "polite" version!). As you might imagine, the term developed in the US Army, during WWII.

54. Tae ___ do : KWON
Taekwondo is the national sport of Korea. "Tae" means "to strike or break with foot"; "kwon" means "to strike or break with fist"; "do" means "way" or "art". Along with judo, taekwondo is one of only two martial arts included in the Olympic Games.

55. Pennsylvania ballplayer's joint? : PIRATE’S HIP (from “pirate ship”)
The Pittsburgh Pirates (nicknamed the Bucs or Buccos) joined baseball’s National League in 1887 just six years after the league was formed. The Pirates played in the first ever World Series, in 1903, and actually won their first World Series in 1909.

59. Gaming inits. : NES
The Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) was sold in North America from 1985 to to 1995. The NES was the biggest selling gaming console of the era.

60. The Penguin's player in "Batman Returns" : DEVITO
Danny DeVito’s big break as an actor came with the role of Louie De Palma on the sitcom “TaxI”. After parlaying his success on television into some major comic roles on the big screen, DeVito turned to producing. He co-founded the production company Jersey Films which made hit movies such as “Pulp Fiction” and “Garden State”. DeVito has been married to actress Rhea Perlman for over 30 years, recently reconciling with her after an announcement that they planned to divorce.

The Penguin is an enemy of Batman in the comic book series and its spinoffs. The villain first appeared in 1941 and was inspired by the advertising mascot of Kool cigarettes at that time, a penguin with a hat and cane. Famously, the Penguin was played by Burgess Meredith in “Batman” TV series in the 1960s. The character was also portrayed by Danny DeVito in the 1992 film “Batman Returns”.

62. "The Book of ___" (2010 film) : ELI
2010’s "The Book of Eli" is one of those "end of the world" type movies, with Denzel Washington playing a tough guy traveling across what is left of the United States after some apocryphal event.

63. 1974 foreign-language hit : ERES TU
We have a big event across Europe every year called the Eurovision Song Contest. Each nation enters one song in competition with each other, and then voters across the whole continent decide on the winner. That's how ABBA got their big break when they won in 1974 with "Waterloo". In 1972, Spain's entry was "Eres tu" (the Spanish for "You Are") sung by the band Mocedades. "Eres tu" came second in the competition, but should have won in my humble opinion.

64. Sons of ___ (ethnic pride group) : ERIN
I think that “Sons of Erin” is a name used by several groups located around the world, mainly in the US, who are dedicated to promoting Irish heritage.

65. Trains in Chicago : ELS
The Chicago "L" is the second largest rapid transit system in the US, with the New York City Subway being the largest. The "L" is also the second oldest, again with the New York City Subway system having the honor of being around the longest. Note that the official nickname for the system is the "L" (originally short for "elevated railroad"), although the term "El" is also in common use (especially in crosswords as "ELS"). The L is managed by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA).

Down
2. Father of a 1980s craze : RUBIK
What was originally called the “Magic Cube” became better known as Rubik’s Cube, named for its inventor Ernő Rubik. Rubik's Cube is the world’s biggest selling puzzle game, with over 350 million sold in just over 30 years.

4. Popular quintet that included two former Mouseketeers : ‘N SYNC
'N Sync was a boy band from Orlando, Florida that was formed in 1995. The name of the group came from a comment by the mother of band member Justin Timberlake, who said the boys voices sounded "in sync". But, it's also true that the letters of the name 'N Sync are the last letters of the given names of the five band members:
- Justin Timberlake
- Chris Kirkpatrick
- Joey Fatone
- Lance "Lansten" Bass
- JC Chasez
‘N Sync band members Justin Timberlake and JC Chasez had both been cast members on “The Mickey Mouse Club”.

5. Cricket player : BATSMAN
Cricket is the national game of England. The term “cricket” apparently comes from the Old French word “criquet” meaning “goalpost, stick”.

6. La Salle of "Coming to America" : ERIQ
Eriq La Salle played Dr. Peter Benton on "ER", and is best known in film for his portrayal of Darryl in the 1998 comedy "Coming to America".

7. Aleutian island : ATTU
Attu is the westernmost island in the Aleutian chain, and so is the westernmost part of Alaska. Japanese forces took the island in October 1942, eventually landing as many as 2,900 soldiers there. In May 1943, the US Army retook the island in twenty days of fighting that is now called the Battle of Attu, the only land battle to take place on US soil during WWII. I am very proud of my father-in-law, who served in the Aleutians in WWII ...

9. Joan who once co-hosted "Good Morning America" : LUNDEN
The journalist and author Joan Lunden was co-host of ABC’s “Good Morning America” from 1980 to 1997. “Lunden” is actually a stage name as Joan was born with the family name Blunden.

11. One way to prepare pollo : AL MARSALA
“Pollo al Marsala” is the Italian name for dish we tend to call “chicken Marsala”. Chicken Marsala is a French-Italian dish made from chicken cooked with mushrooms in Marsala wine.

Marsala is a seaport lying in the very west of Sicily. If you visit Marsala, you'll find what's called "vintage" Marsala wine, a "regular" red wine. If you buy a bottle of Marsala at your local store though, it will be a fortified wine, wine with a higher alcohol content.

12. Where Ronald Reagan worked as a sports announcer : DES MOINES
The city of Des Moines is the capital of Iowa, and takes its name from the Des Moines River. The river in turn takes its name from the French "Riviere des Moines" meaning "River of the Monks". It looks like there isn't any "monkish" connection to the city's name per se. "Des Moines" was just the name given by French traders who corrupted "Moingona", the name of a group of Illinois Native Americans who lived by the river. However, others do contend that French Trappist monks, who lived a full 200 miles from the river, somehow influenced the name.

21. Washington's Sea-___ Airport : TAC
Sea-Tac Airport is more fully known as Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Sea-Tac is the main hub for Alaska Airlines.

28. Westernmost city on the African mainland : DAKAR
The Republic of Senegal is a country on the far western coast of Africa. For many years Senegal was a French colony, gaining independence in 1960. The capital of Senegal is Dakar, a city located on the Cap-Vert Peninsula that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean.

29. Hassan Rowhani, for one : IRANI
Hassan Rouhani (also “Rowhani”) is the president-elect of Iran, having won the election held on 15 June 2013. Rouhani will take over from President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

34. Like vicuñas : ANDEAN
The vicuña is a South American camelid that lives in the Andes. The vicuña produces very little wool, and that wool can only be collected every three years. So, vicuña wool is very expensive due to the shortage of supply.

38. One doing the lord's work : SERF
A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. "Serf" comes from the Latin "servus", meaning "slave".

51. Airport named for a naval war hero : O’HARE
O'Hare International is the fourth busiest airport in the world. The original airport was constructed on the site between 1942 and 1943, and was used by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the manufacture of planes during WWII. Before the factory and airport were built, there was a community in the area called Orchard Place, so the airport was called Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field. This name is the derivation of the airport's current location identifier: ORD (OR-chard D-ouglas). Orchard Place Airport was renamed to O'Hare International in 1949 in honor of Lieutenant Commander Edward O'Hare who grew up in Chicago. O'Hare was the US Navy's first flying ace and a Medal of Honor recipient in WWII. As an aside, Edward O'Hare's father was a lawyer for Al Capone who helped get the famous gangster convicted on tax evasion.

52. Some BMW vehicles : MINIS
The original mini was a fabulous car, one that I drove all over Ireland in my youth. It had a unique front-wheel-drive layout that took up very little space, allowing for a lot of room (relatively speaking) for passengers and baggage. One space-saving trick was to mount the engine transversely, so it sits rotated 90 degrees from the norm. That engine had a capacity of only 848cc. In 1961, a Mini Cooper model was introduced, a sporty version of the Mini. The Mini Cooper was a phenomenal hit, especially after repeated wins in the Monte Carlo Rally. The Mini marque has been owned by BMW since 1994.

56. Composer Charles : IVES
Charles Ives was one of the great classical composers, probably the first American to be so recognized. Sadly, his work largely went unsung (pun intended!) during his lifetime, and was really only accepted into the performed repertoire after his death in 1954.

60. Justice Department div. : DEA
The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) was set up in 1973 while President Nixon was in office.


Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Kind of muffin : BRAN
5. Apple grower? : BEATLE
11. Interject : ADD
14. Wagon trails have them : RUTS
15. Boy who pulls the sword from the stone in "The Sword in the Stone" : ARTHUR
16. Barack Obama, for one : LEO
17. Women's soccer star Wambach : ABBY
18. Oceanus and Hyperion : TITANS
19. ___ Search (former name for Bing) : MSN
20. California ballplayer's pound? : GIANT’S QUID (from “giant squid”)
22. "A fickle food," to Emily Dickinson : FAME
23. Stadium recorder : SKYCAM
24. Día de los Santos Reyes month : ENERO
26. Missouri ballplayer's connection? : CARDINAL’S IN (from “cardinal sin”)
31. Baby's word : DADA
35. Around : NEAR
36. Texas city that's headquarters for J. C. Penney : PLANO
37. Actors Ken and Lena : OLINS
39. Rap sheet abbr. : AKA
40. Corporate department : SALES
41. Band with the 1984 hit "My Oh My" : SLADE
42. Fires : CANS
44. Junk mail encl., sometimes : SASE
45. Michigan ballplayer's rubbish : TIGER’S TRIPE (from “tiger stripe”)
48. Total mess : SNAFU
49. "Time is money" and others : AXIOMS
54. Tae ___ do : KWON
55. Pennsylvania ballplayer's joint? : PIRATE’S HIP (from “pirate ship”)
59. Gaming inits. : NES
60. The Penguin's player in "Batman Returns" : DEVITO
61. There may be one for "8 items or less" : LANE
62. "The Book of ___" (2010 film) : ELI
63. 1974 foreign-language hit : ERES TU
64. Sons of ___ (ethnic pride group) : ERIN
65. Trains in Chicago : ELS
66. Out : ABSENT
67. Trial balloon : TEST

Down
1. Crows : BRAGS
2. Father of a 1980s craze : RUBIK
3. Held in check : AT BAY
4. Popular quintet that included two former Mouseketeers : ‘N SYNC
5. Cricket player : BATSMAN
6. La Salle of "Coming to America" : ERIQ
7. Aleutian island : ATTU
8. Spicy cuisine : THAI
9. Joan who once co-hosted "Good Morning America" : LUNDEN
10. Hosp. units : ERS
11. One way to prepare pollo : AL MARSALA
12. Where Ronald Reagan worked as a sports announcer : DES MOINES
13. Ready to serve : DONE
21. Washington's Sea-___ Airport : TAC
22. Guys : FELLAS
25. Drops off, maybe : NAPS
27. Not take it lying down : REACT
28. Westernmost city on the African mainland : DAKAR
29. Hassan Rowhani, for one : IRANI
30. Bad thing to pick : NOSE
31. Biblical verb : DOST
32. "No problems here" : ALL IS WELL
33. Result of an exam : DIAGNOSIS
34. Like vicuñas : ANDEAN
38. One doing the lord's work : SERF
43. Said quickly : SPAT OUT
46. Top-notch : SUPERB
47. Program file suffix : EXE
50. Exposed sandbar, maybe : ISLET
51. Airport named for a naval war hero : O’HARE
52. Some BMW vehicles : MINIS
53. Tuckered out : SPENT
54. Attack at close range, maybe : KNEE
56. Composer Charles : IVES
57. Knoll : RISE
58. Memo abbr. : ATTN
60. Justice Department div. : DEA


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0626-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Jun 13, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: David Steinberg & Bernice Gordon
THEME: 99 - 16 … today’s theme answers are common terms, but two have AGE added at the end and two have AGE removed from the end. This theme reflects the remarkable ages of the two crossword setters of this puzzl. David Steinberg is 16 years old and Bernice Gordon is 99 years young:
38A. 83, for the creators of this puzzle ... or a hint to the ends of 17-, 25-, 51- and 60-Across : AGE DIFFERENCE

17A. Result of someone yelling "Fire!" in a crowded theater? : EXIT RAMPAGE (exit ramp + age)
25A. Looting of a legislature? : DIET PILLAGE (diet pill + age)
51A. What an exploding microwave can make? : INSTANT MESS (instant message - age)
60A. Exemption from playing an instrument at school? : MUSICAL PASS (musical passage - age)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 15m 10s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. "Per aspera ad ___" : ASTRA
“Per aspera ad astra” is a Latin phrase usually translated as “a rough road leads to the stars”.

11. Creamy concoction : NOG
It's not really clear where the term "nog" comes from although it might derive from the word "noggin", which was originally a small wooden cup that was long associated with alcoholic drinks.

14. Joy of "The View" : BEHAR
Joy Behar is a comedian, and co-host of the hit talk show “The View”.

16. Magnetite or cinnabar : ORE
Iron ore comes in a number of different forms, like magnetite (the most magnetic of all minerals) and hematite (the most commonly exploited iron ore).

Cinnabar is the ore from which mercury is extracted.

20. Sam of "Jurassic Park" : NEILL
Sam Neill is a very talented actor from New Zealand. I really enjoyed Neill in a 1983 television miniseries about a British spy operation during WWI. He is perhaps better-known for his roles in the movies “Omen III”, “Dead Calm”, "Jurassic Park” and “The Hunt for Red October”.

"Jurassic Park" is a 1990 novel by Michael Crichton, adapted into a hugely successful movie by Steven Spielberg in 1993. One of the main premises of the novel is that dinosaur DNA could be harvested from mosquitoes trapped in amber (fossilized tree resin), the DNA coming from the dinosaur blood consumed by the mosquitoes. The dinosaur DNA is then sequenced and used to create clones of the original beasts. A clever idea, but apparently not very practical from what I've read ...

25. Looting of a legislature? : DIET PILLAGE (diet pill + age)
The Imperial Diet was a general assembly of the estates of the former Holy Roman Empire. The most famous of these assemblies was the Diet of Worms, a 16th-century meeting that took place in the small town of Worms on the Rhine River in Germany. The main item on the agenda was discussion of the 95 theses of Martin Luther. Luther was summoned to the meeting and found to be guilty of heresy.

29. Laker legend Bryant : KOBE
Kobe Bryant plays basketball for the LA Lakers. Kobe Bryant got his name from a menu would you believe? His parents were in a Japanese restaurant and liked the name of "Kobe" beef, the beef that comes from the area around the city of Kobe on the island of Honshu in Japan.

33. Drink that cures all ills : ELIXIR
An elixir is a solution of alcohol and water that is used to deliver a medicine. The term “elixir” can also be used to mean a medicine that has the power to cure all ills.

42. Blue Grotto locale : CAPRI
The island of Capri off the coast of Southern Italy has been a tourist resort since the days of ancient Rome. Capri is home to the famous Blue Grotto, a sea cave that is illuminated with sunlight that's colored blue as it passes through the seawater into the cave.

43. Spanish charger : EL TORO
In Spanish, the bull (el toro) might be charging at a bullfight.

45. Belle's caller : BEAU
A beau is the boyfriend of a belle, a young lady.

48. O.K. Corral lawman : EARP
The famous Earp brothers of the Wild West were Wyatt, Virgil and Morgan. All three brothers participated in what has to be the most celebrated gunfight in the history of the Old West, the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona. Strangely enough, the fight didn't happen at the O.K. Corral, but took place six doors down the street in a vacant lot next to a photography studio.

50. "Idylls of the King" woman : ENID
"Idylls of the King" is a cycle of twelve poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson that retells the tale of King Arthur. One of the "idylls" is the story of Geraint and Enid. Tennyson’s Enid gave her name to the city of Enid, Oklahoma.

57. Prop in "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" : APPLE
In the original Brothers Grimm fairy tale called "Snow White", the seven dwarfs were not given any names. The names were added for the 1937 classic Disney film "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs". The seven dwarfs are:
- Doc (the leader of the group)
- Grumpy (that would be me, according to my wife ...)
- Happy
- Sleepy
- Bashful
- Sneezy
- Dopey

66. Dander : IRE
The phrases "to get one's Irish up" and "to get one's dander up" mean to get riled up, to get angry. I guess we are always picking on the poor Irish!

67. Cain's eldest son : ENOCH
Enoch was the great-grandfather of Noah, and the great-grandson of Adam. Cain was Enoch’s father.

68. Home unlikely to have air-conditioning : IGLOO
The Inuit word for "house" is "iglu", which we usually write as "igloo". The Greenlandic (yes, that's a language) word for "house" is very similar: "igdlo".

69. Six-time All-Star Ron : CEY
Ron Cey played third base for the Dodgers, the Cubs and the As.

Down
1. Five simoleons : ABE
The US five-dollar bill is often called an “Abe”, as President Lincoln’s portrait is on the front.

“Simoleon” is a slang term for a dollar that dates back to the late 1800s. No one seems to sure where the term originated.

2. Number between quinque and septem : SEX
“Quinque, sex, septum” is Latin for “five, six, seven”.

5. Secret alternative : ARRID
Arrid is an antiperspirant deodorant brand introduced in the thirties. Slogans associated with Arrid have been "Don't be half-safe - use Arrid to be sure", "Stress stinks! Arrid works!" and "Get a little closer".

Secret is an antiperspirant/deodorant made by Procter & Gamble, first introduced in 1956 as a cream that was applied with the fingers (ick!). There followed a roll-on version in 1958, a spray in 1964 and the solid stick in 1978.

6. Source of the saying "Brevity is the soul of wit" : HAMLET
“Hamlet” is William Shakespeare’s longest play, and was also one of most popular of the playwright's works during his lifetime.

7. Skill at picking things up? : ESP
Extrasensory Perception (ESP)

8. Letters between names : AKA
Also known as (aka)

9. Chillax, with "out" : VEG
“Chillax” is a slang term meaning “chill and relax”. Who’da thunk it …?

10. Tom of "The Seven Year Itch" : EWELL
"The Seven Year Itch" is a 1955 movie by Billy Wilder, based on a stage play of the same name by George Axelrod. "The Seven Year Itch" stars Marilyn Monroe, and Tom Ewell as the guy with "the itch". Perhaps the most famous scene in the film is the one with Monroe standing over a subway grate allowing the updraft to billow the skirt of her white dress above her knees. The manoeuvre was meant to cool her down, but I think it had the opposite effect on some in the audience! The phrase "seven year itch" had been used by psychologists to describe declining interest in staying monogamous after seven years of marriage.

11. Winter Olympics powerhouse : NORWAY
Norway has been ranked as the country in the world with the highest standard of living almost every year since 2001. Norway is rich in natural resources and has a relatively low population. The people benefit from a comprehensive social security system, subsidized higher education for all citizens and universal health care. And Norway is famous for her success at the Winter Olympic Games, having won more gold medals than any other nation in the world.

12. County name in California, Florida and New York : ORANGE
Orange County in the Greater Los Angeles Area is the smallest county in Southern California, yet is the sixth most populous county in the US. The county seat is Santa Ana.

Orange County, Florida is in the center of the state. The name was changed from Mosquito County to the more friendly Orange County in honor of the county’s main product.

Orange County, New York is in the southern part of the state. The county was named in honor of William III of Orange when it was established in 1683.

13. One blowing off steam : GEYSER
The Great Geysir in Iceland is the first known geyser to have been discovered and documented. The name "Geysir" comes from the Icelandic and Old Norse word "geysa" meaning "to gush". It is the Great Geysir that gives us our English word "geyser".

18. Iran's ___ Khamenei : ALI
Ali Khamenei has been the Supreme Leader of Iran since 1989.

22. Pasta preference : AL DENTE
The Italian expression "al dente" literally means "to the tooth" or "to the bite" and is used to describe not only pasta, but also vegetables that are cooked so that they are tender yet still crisp.

23. Onetime White House nickname : IKE
When the future president was growing up, the Eisenhower family used the nickname “Ike” for all seven boys in the family, as “Ike” was seen as an abbreviation for the family name. “Big Ike” was Edgar, the second oldest boy. “Little/Young Ike” was Dwight, who was the third son born. Dwight had no sisters.

26. 1993 Tom Cruise legal thriller : THE FIRM
"The Firm" is the book that brought John Grisham his first success, although it was the second novel that he wrote. The first was "A Time to Kill", which garnered a lot more attention after "The Firm" took off. Personally, my favorite of his novels is "Runaway Jury". “The Firm” was made into a 1993 film with Tom Cruise playing the lead. The film didn't deliver as well as the book, I thought ...

Tom Cruise’s real name is Tom Cruise Mapother IV. Cruise was born in Syracuse, New York, which is one of my favorite cities in the US, because that’s where I met my wife-to-be …

34. Home of the Salmon River Mtns. : IDA
The Salmon River Mountains in Idaho cover much of the central part of the state. The range forms part of the central Rocky Mountains.

37. Corona ___ Mar, Calif. : DEL
Corona del Mar is a town in the city of Newport Beach, California. “Corona del Mar” translates from Spanish as “Crown of the Sea”.

41. 1813's Battle of Lake ___ : ERIE
The Battle of Lake Erie was fought during the War of 1812 just off the Ohio coast. The outcome of the action was a defeat for the British and control of Lake Erie for the remainder of the war.

44. Ben Jonson wrote one "to Himself" : ODE
Ben Jonson was a contemporary of William Shakespeare, and just like Shakespeare, Jonson was a dramatist, poet and actor. Jonson's work was very well received from 1605 to 1620, but his reputation began to wane in the 1620s. He wrote a play called "The New Inn" which was received so badly, the actors were hissed off the stage. Immediately afterwards, Jonson wrote about the failure in his poem "Ode to Himself".

47. Benson of "Pretty Little Liars" : ASHLEY
Ashley Benson is an actress from Anaheim, California who is best known for playing Abigail Deveraux on the daytime soap “Days of Our Lives”. She can now be seen on the mystery TV show “Pretty Little Liars” playing Hanna Marin.

54. Bowler's woe : SPLIT
Bowling has been around for an awfully long time. The oldest known reference to the game is in Egypt, where pins and balls were found in an ancient tomb that is over 5,000 years old. The first form of the game to come to America was nine-pin bowling, which had been very popular in Europe for centuries. In 1841 in Connecticut, nine-pin bowling was banned due to its association with gambling. Supposedly, an additional pin was added to get around the ban, and ten-pin bowling was born.

58. Women drivers' grp. : LPGA
The Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) was founded in 1950 by a group of 13 lady golfers, and today it is the oldest ongoing women’s sports professional organization in the US.

61. Colorful card game : UNO
In my youth I remember being taught a great card game, by a German acquaintance of mine, called Mau Mau. Years later I discovered that Uno is basically the same game, but played with a purpose-printed deck instead of the regular deck of playing cards that's used for Mau Mau. I hear that Mau Mau is derived from the game called Crazy Eights.

64. Bar fixture : SOT
Our word "sot" comes from the Old English "sott", meaning a fool. The word "sot" started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

65. ___ milk : SOY
What are known as soybeans here in the US are called “soya beans” in most other English-speaking countries. So, I drink soy milk here in America, but when I am over in Ireland I drink "soya milk".


Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "Per aspera ad ___" : ASTRA
6. Big throw : HEAVE
11. Creamy concoction : NOG
14. Joy of "The View" : BEHAR
15. Slightly off balance : ASKEW
16. Magnetite or cinnabar : ORE
17. Result of someone yelling "Fire!" in a crowded theater? : EXIT RAMPAGE (exit ramp + age)
19. Starfish appendage : RAY
20. Sam of "Jurassic Park" : NEILL
21. They might be manicured : LAWNS
23. "That's revolting!" : ICK!
25. Looting of a legislature? : DIET PILLAGE (diet pill + age)
29. Laker legend Bryant : KOBE
31. Skin-and-bones : THIN
32. Salon employee : DYER
33. Drink that cures all ills : ELIXIR
36. Skirt : ELUDE
38. 83, for the creators of this puzzle ... or a hint to the ends of 17-, 25-, 51- and 60-Across : AGE DIFFERENCE
42. Blue Grotto locale : CAPRI
43. Spanish charger : EL TORO
45. Belle's caller : BEAU
48. O.K. Corral lawman : EARP
50. "Idylls of the King" woman : ENID
51. What an exploding microwave can make? : INSTANT MESS (instant message - age)
55. What follows a bee? : CEE
56. Survey option : OTHER
57. Prop in "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" : APPLE
59. 0 : NIL
60. Exemption from playing an instrument at school? : MUSICAL PASS (musical passage - age)
66. Dander : IRE
67. Cain's eldest son : ENOCH
68. Home unlikely to have air-conditioning : IGLOO
69. Six-time All-Star Ron : CEY
70. Beardless dwarf : DOPEY
71. Scrumptious : TASTY

Down
1. Five simoleons : ABE
2. Number between quinque and septem : SEX
3. Be a dreamer : THINK BIG
4. Evaluate : RATE
5. Secret alternative : ARRID
6. Source of the saying "Brevity is the soul of wit" : HAMLET
7. Skill at picking things up? : ESP
8. Letters between names : AKA
9. Chillax, with "out" : VEG
10. Tom of "The Seven Year Itch" : EWELL
11. Winter Olympics powerhouse : NORWAY
12. County name in California, Florida and New York : ORANGE
13. One blowing off steam : GEYSER
18. Iran's ___ Khamenei : ALI
22. Pasta preference : AL DENTE
23. Onetime White House nickname : IKE
24. Common part of a Happy Meal : COLA
26. 1993 Tom Cruise legal thriller : THE FIRM
27. Carpet surface : PILE
28. Toughen : INURE
30. Carry out : EXECUTE
34. Home of the Salmon River Mtns. : IDA
35. Mature : RIPEN
37. Corona ___ Mar, Calif. : DEL
39. Beer bash venue : FRAT
40. Palms, e.g. : CONCEALS
41. 1813's Battle of Lake ___ : ERIE
44. Ben Jonson wrote one "to Himself" : ODE
45. Not quite human, maybe : BIONIC
46. Whole : ENTIRE
47. Benson of "Pretty Little Liars" : ASHLEY
49. Keen : PEACHY
52. Ready for a duel, say : ARMED
53. Apt rhyme of "aah" : SPA
54. Bowler's woe : SPLIT
58. Women drivers' grp. : LPGA
61. Colorful card game : UNO
62. Soak (up) : SOP
63. Winter coat? : ICE
64. Bar fixture : SOT
65. ___ milk : SOY


Return to top of page


The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

Adsense Wide Skyscraper

About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

Blog Archive