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0801-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Aug 13, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Timothy Polin
THEME: Ratios in Physics … the circled words in today’s grid are in pairs, and each pair is a physical unit “over” a physical unit, hence defining a ratio used in physics. The physical unit defined in each ratio is the word that completes the clue:
17A. With 22-Across, fail to cope with difficult circumstances : CRACK UNDER PRESSURE (Pressure = Force/Area)
27A. With 35-Across, highway sign meaning "slow down" : REDUCE SPEED (Speed = Distance/Time)
45A. With 51-Across, Monaco has the world's highest : POPULATION DENSITY (Density = Mass/Volume)

60A. What the three sets of shaded squares in this puzzle represent : PHYSICS FORMULAS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 14m 22s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Delivery specialists, for short : OBS
“Ob.” is an abbreviation for "obstetrics".

14. Chinese calendar figure : RAT
The 12-year cycle in the Chinese Calendar uses the following animals in order:
- Rat
- Ox
- Tiger
- Rabbit
- Dragon
- Snake
- Horse
- Goat
- Monkey
- Rooster
- Dog
- Pig

15. Seagoing vessels : SLOOPS
Sloops and cutters are sailboats, and each has just one mast. One major difference between the two types of vessel is that the mast on a cutter is set much further aft than the mast on a sloop.

20. ___ Diurna (daily Roman notices) : ACTA
The Latin phrase "Acta Diurna" translates literally as “Daily Acts”, but is usually said to mean “Daily Public Records”. The Acta Diurna were official announcements carved in stone and displayed in the public places. These announcements were often the results of legal proceedings or trials. or noteworthy births, marriages or deaths.

23. Tolkien's Dark Lord of Mordor : SAURON
In J. R. R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings”, Sauron is the actual “Lord of the Rings”. Sauron was the Dark Lord Morgoth’s trusted lieutenant.

40. Unit of energy : ERG
An erg is a unit of energy or mechanical work. "Erg" comes from the Greek word "ergon" meaning "work". A dyne is a unit of force. The name "dyne" comes from the Greek "dynamis" meaning "power, force". Ergs and dynes are related to each other in that one erg is the amount of energy needed to move a force of one dyne over a distance of one centimeter.

41. British poet laureate ___ Day-Lewis : CECIL
Cecil Day-Lewis was an Irish poet from County Laois who was appointed Poet Laureate of the UK in 1968. Cecil has a famous son, the actor Daniel Day-Lewis.

43. Ingredient in an Arnold Palmer : ICE TEA
The drink named for golfer Arnold Palmer is made from lemonade and ice tea. The drink named for fellow golfer John Daly is also made from lemonade and ice tea, but with vodka added …

50. The Yoko of "Oh Yoko!" : ONO
"Oh Yoko!" is a song written and performed by John Lennon in 1971, which appears on his iconic album “Imagine”. The title of course refers to Lennon’s wife, Yoko Ono.

56. Hindu noblewoman : RANI
A ranee (also spelled “rani”) is the female equivalent of a raja in India, and is the equivalent of a western queen or princess.

64. Too much : DE TROP
We use the term “de trop” to mean “too much, too many”. In the original French, “de trop” translates as “in excess”.

66. Some Groucho Marx humor : PUNS
Groucho Marx's real name was Julius Henry Marx. By the time Groucho started his successful, post-Hollywood career hosting the quiz show "You Bet Your Life", he was sporting a real mustache. For all his movies, his mustache had been painted on with greasepaint.

68. Greek night goddess : NYX
In Greek mythology, Chaos was the first of the primeval gods born at the creation of the universe. Following Chaos came:
- Gaia, the primordial goddess of the Earth
- Tartaros, the primordial god of the Underworld
- Eros, the primordial god of Love
- Nyx, the primordial goddess of the Night
- Erebus, the primordial god of Darkness
- Aither, the primordial god of Light
- Hemera, the primordial goddess of the Day

Down
1. Black-and-white threats : ORCAS
The taxonomic name for the killer whale is Orcinus orca. The use of the name "orca", rather than "killer whale", is becoming more and more common. The Latin word "Orcinus" means "belonging to Orcus", with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

7. Engine parts : RODS
In an internal combustion engine, it is the (connecting) rods which connect the pistons to the crankshaft.

9. Old D&D co. : TSR
Dungeons & Dragons is a complex role-playing game first published in 1974, by Tactical Studies Rules Incorporated (TSR). Dungeons & Dragons was probably the first of the modern role-playing games to be developed, and the most successful. It is still played by lots of people today, including my nerdy son ...

10. Sif's husband in myth : THOR
In Norse mythology, Sif was the goddess of the Earth. Sif was married to the thunder god Thor.

12. South America's ___ Trail : INCA
The Inca Trail to Machu Picchu originates about 50 miles from Cuzco on the Urubamba River in Peru. It can take travelers about 5 days to trek the full length of the trail, passing through many Incan ruins before reaching the Sun Gate on Machu Picchu mountain. The trail was becoming greatly overused, forcing the Peruvian government to limit the number of people on the trail each day to 500. Book early …

13. Plowman's command : GEE
"Haw!" is a command given to a trained animal that is hauling something (like a horse or an ox). "Haw!" is used to instruct the animal to turn to the left. The equivalent command for a right turn is "Gee!" Just to confuse things, the same commands are used in the British Isles but with the opposite meanings. That must be pretty unsettling for jet-setting plow horses ...

18. Stitch : CARD
A “card”, “stitch” or “riot” is a very amusing person.

26. German direction : OST
“Ost” is German for “east”.

28. Old A. C. Gilbert toy : ERECTOR SET
Oh how I loved my Erector Set as a kid. The version we used growing up was referred to as a Meccano set, as “Meccano” was the brand name used for for the toy sold as “Mechanics Made Easy”. The original Erector Set was developed by inventor Alfred Carlton Gilbert, and first produced in 1913. Back then it was sold as “The Erector/Structural Steel and Electro-Mechanical Builder”.

31. Actor Cage, informally : NIC
Nic Cage was born Nicolas Coppola. Cage is the nephew of director Francis Ford Coppola and actress Talia Shire, both of whom are his father's siblings.

33. California's ___ River : EEL
The Eel River in California was named in 1850 by an explorer Josiah Gregg after he made a trade with some Native Americans, swapping a frying pan for a large catch of eels.

36. What was cool in the '50s? : HEP
The slang term "hep" meaning "cool" has the same meaning as the later derivative term "hip". The origins of "hep" seem unclear, but it was adopted by jazz musicians of the early 1900s.

39. Follower of brown. or auburn. : EDU
Brown University, in Providence, Rhode Island, is one of the eight Ivy League schools. Brown has been around a long time, founded in 1764, years before America declared independence from England. The university took the name of Brown in 1804 after one Nicholas Brown, Jr. gave a substantial gift to the school.

Auburn University in Alabama was chartered in 1856, as the East Alabama Male College. The school was renamed when it was granted university status in 1960.

41. Hunting gear, informally : CAMO
Our term “camouflage” evolved directly from a Parisian slang term “camoufler” meaning “to disguise”. The term was first used in WWI, although the British navy at that time preferred the expression “dazzle-painting”.

43. Golfer Poulter : IAN
Ian Poulter is a golfer from England who for a while was ranked number five in the world.

44. Form a ring around : ENVIRON
"Environ" is the French word for "round" or "round about".

46. City in New Jersey or California : LODI
Lodi, New Jersey was named in honor of the city of Lodi in Italy. One of Lodi’s claims to fame is that it is home to the Satin Dolls go-go bar, which was used for location shoots for the fictional Bada Bing bar in “The Sopranos”.

Lodi, California may not be as well known a wine producer as Sonoma and Napa counties, but has been given the moniker “Zinfandel Capital of the World”.

47. Dominican baseball family name : ALOU
Jesus Alou played major league baseball, as did his brothers Matty and Felipe, and as does Felipe's son, Moises.

52. County bordering Cambridgeshire : ESSEX
Essex is a county in England, referred to as one of the “home counties”.

The home counties are the counties that surround the city of London, outside of London itself. "Home county" is not an official designation but has been in popular use since the 1800s.

53. 10 benjamins : THOU
Benjamin Franklin is featured on one side of the hundred-dollar bill, and Philadelphia's Independence Hall on the other side. There is a famous "error" in the image of Independence Hall. If you look closely at the clock face at the top of the building you can see that the "four" is written in Roman numerals as "IV" as perhaps one might expect. However, on the actual clock on Independence Hall, the "four" is denoted by "IIII".

54. Canticle : HYMN
A canticle is a hymn which is taken from a biblical text other than the Psalms.

57. Colgate product for men : AFTA
Afta Lotion is a brand name of aftershave lotion, belonging to Colgate-Palmolive.

60. Hallucinogenic inits. : PCP
Phencyclidine is a recreational drug usually referred to on the street as PCP or “angel dust”.

62. Brit. legislators : MPS
British legislators are Members of Parliament (MPs).


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Delivery specialists, for short : OBS
4. Something groundbreaking : A FIRST
10. Tiny bit of kindling : TWIG
14. Chinese calendar figure : RAT
15. Seagoing vessels : SLOOPS
16. Refine : HONE
17. With 22-Across, fail to cope with difficult circumstances : CRACK UNDER PRESSURE (Pressure = Force/Area)
20. ___ Diurna (daily Roman notices) : ACTA
21. She, in Italy : ESSA
22. See 17-Across : AREA
23. Tolkien's Dark Lord of Mordor : SAURON
25. Belts boxers don't want to receive? : KOS
27. With 35-Across, highway sign meaning "slow down" : REDUCE SPEED (Speed = Distance/Time)
34. Fist-pounding sort : TYRANT
35. See 27-Across : TIME
36. Ritually torments : HAZES
40. Unit of energy : ERG
41. British poet laureate ___ Day-Lewis : CECIL
42. Whimsical outburst : EGAD!
43. Ingredient in an Arnold Palmer : ICE TEA
45. With 51-Across, Monaco has the world's highest : POPULATION DENSITY (Density = Mass/Volume)
50. The Yoko of "Oh Yoko!" : ONO
51. See 45-Across : VOLUME
53. Graceless landing, say : THUD
56. Hindu noblewoman : RANI
59. World Cup chorus : OLES
60. What the three sets of shaded squares in this puzzle represent : PHYSICS FORMULAS
63. Terse invitation : COME
64. Too much : DE TROP
65. Poetic preposition : ERE
66. Some Groucho Marx humor : PUNS
67. Tarnishes : STAINS
68. Greek night goddess : NYX

Down
1. Black-and-white threats : ORCAS
2. Where people get loaded on a train : BAR CAR
3. Center of a square, maybe : STATUE
4. See 29-Down : ASK?
5. Language learner's goal : FLUENCY
6. Particle accelerator particles : IONS
7. Engine parts : RODS
8. Addressing : SPEAKING TO
9. Old D&D co. : TSR
10. Sif's husband in myth : THOR
11. Eroded (away) : WORE
12. South America's ___ Trail : INCA
13. Plowman's command : GEE
18. Stitch : CARD
19. Express : FAST
24. Exposes a secret of : OUTS
26. German direction : OST
28. Old A. C. Gilbert toy : ERECTOR SET
29. With 4-Down, reluctant questioner's opening : DARE I
30. Eroded (away) : ATE
31. Actor Cage, informally : NIC
32. Early 10th-century year : CMI
33. California's ___ River : EEL
36. What was cool in the '50s? : HEP
37. Gone by : AGO
38. Nuke : ZAP
39. Follower of brown. or auburn. : EDU
41. Hunting gear, informally : CAMO
43. Golfer Poulter : IAN
44. Form a ring around : ENVIRON
46. City in New Jersey or California : LODI
47. Dominican baseball family name : ALOU
48. Showing ill humor : SULLEN
49. Like wet paint : SMEARY
52. County bordering Cambridgeshire : ESSEX
53. 10 benjamins : THOU
54. Canticle : HYMN
55. Exercises : USES
57. Colgate product for men : AFTA
58. "Me neither" : NOR I
60. Hallucinogenic inits. : PCP
61. Composition of many a music library : CDS
62. Brit. legislators : MPS


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0731-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Jul 13, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: H. David Goering
THEME: Keyboard Superlatives … today’s themed answers examples of names that can be typed with only letters on one side of a QWERTY keyboard. The first is the longest US place name (city, state) that is typed with only letters on the left of the keyboard, and the second is the longest US place name using only letters on the right:
20A. Southern town whose name is the longest example of 52-Across [on the left] : SWEETWATER, TEXAS
34A. Midwest town whose name is the longest example of 52-Across [on the right] : UNION, OHIO

52A. See 20- and 34-Across : ONE-HANDED TYPING
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 35s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. Periodic table fig. : AT NO
The atomic number of an element is also called the proton number, and is the number of protons found in the nucleus of each atom of the element.

17. Roe source : SHAD
The shad is also known as the river herring. The eggs (roe) of the female shad are prized as a delicacy in the Eastern US.

18. Delhi language : HINDI
New Delhi is the capital city of India. New Delhi resides within the National Capital Territory of Delhi (otherwise known as the metropolis of Delhi). New Delhi and Delhi, therefore, are two different things.

19. Madeline who played Lili Von Shtupp : KAHN
In the 1974 Mel Brooks Western satire "Blazing Saddles", Madeline Kahn played a German seductress-for-hire called Lili von Shtupp.

Madeline Kahn was an American actress best known for her comedic roles, especially those directed by Mel Brooks.

20. Southern town whose name is the longest example of 52-Across [on the left] : SWEETWATER, TEXAS
Sweetwater, Texas was always a railroad town, from a couple of years after it was founded in 1879 until rail passenger service was discontinued in 1969. And so very importantly, Sweetwater, Texas is the city in the US with the longest name, including state, that can be typed using only letters on one side of a QWERTY keyboard.

25. Muhammad's resting place : MEDINA
Medina is a city in western Saudi Arabia. Medina is the second holiest city in the Islamic tradition after Mecca, as it is the burial place of the Prophet Muhammad.

31. Like yesterday's bagels : STALE
The bagel was invented in the Polish city of Kraków in the 16th century. Bagels were brought to this country by Jewish immigrants from Poland who mainly established homes in and around New York City.

34. Midwest town whose name is the longest example of 52-Across [on the right] : UNION, OHIO
Union, Ohio is a city located just outside Dayton. “Union, Ohio” is the longest city name in the US that can be typed out using only letters on the left side of a QWERTY keyboard.

37. Disney World conveyance : TRAM
The Magic Kingdom in Disney World, Florida receives more visitors annually than any other theme park in the whole world. The Magic Kingdom alone received about 17½ million visitors in 2012, and that’s not including the visitors to Epcot, Disney’s Animal Kingdom and Disney’s Hollywood Studios.

45. "Death Becomes ___" : HER
"Death Becomes Her" is a dark comedy released in 1992 that stars Meryl Streep, Goldie Hawn and Bruce Willis. It’s all about two women downing a magic potion in a quest for eternal youth.

47. Female TV dog whose portrayers were all male : LASSIE
We owe the character Lassie to one Eric Knight who wrote a short story that he expanded into a novel called "Lassie Come Home", published in 1940. "Lassie Come Home" was turned into a movie three years later, the first of a very successful franchise. The original Lassie (a female) was played by a dog called Pal, a male dog. In fact, all of the dogs that played Lassie over the years were males, because they looked better on camera, retaining a thick coat even during the summer months.

48. Where Yeltsin ruled : RUSSIA
Boris Yeltsin was elected as the first President of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic in 1991, at a time when Mikhail Gorbachev was President of the Soviet Union. When Gorbachev resigned, and the Soviet Union collapsed, Yeltsin emerged with his position intact. Yeltsin was re-elected in 1996, but his popularity declined in the late 1990s as the populace became discouraged with the country’s economic troubles and with political corruption.

56. Alaska ZIP code starter : NINE
ZIP codes were introduced in 1963. The acronym ZIP stands for Zone Improvement Plan, a name indicating that mail travels more efficiently when the codes are included in the postal address.

62. "___-starter" (résumé cliché) : SELF
A résumé is a summary of a person’s job experience and education and is used as a tool by a job seeker. In many countries, a résumé is equivalent to a curriculum vitae. “Résumé” is the French word for “summary”.

63. Some score marks : RESTS
Rests are marks on a musical score.

64. Derry derrière : ARSE
Well, the word “arse” would never make it into a crossword in the British Isles as it would be considered too rude. I have a similar reaction to the word “shag” as in “The Spy Who Shagged Me”. The film would never have been released with that name in the UK.

Derry is the second-largest city in Northern Ireland, after the capital city of Belfast. "Derry" is the anglicized version of the city's name in Irish. The city's legal name is "Londonderry", a contentious name that was given when the city was granted a royal charter in the 17th century.

Down
1. Mountainous expanses : MASSIFS
“Massif” is a geological term describing a section of the earth’s crust that moves upwards due to the action of tectonic plates. The whole massif retains its structure, with movement taking place at surrounding fault lines. The term “massif” is also used for a group of mountains formed by such geological action. “Massif” is French for “massive”.

2. Crosswise : ATHWART
Something going “athwart” goes transversely, crosswise, In fact, on a small boat, “a thwart” is a seat that stretches from one side to the other.

3. Result of iron deficiency, to a Brit : ANAEMIA
The term “anemia” (or “anaemia” as we write it back in Ireland) comes from a Greek word meaning "lack of blood". Anemia is a lack of iron in the blood, or a low red blood cell count. Tiredness is a symptom of the condition.

5. Start and end of 3-Down, phonetically : SCHWAS
A “schwa” is an unstressed and toneless vowel found in a number of languages including English. Examples from our language are the “a” in “about”, the “e” in “taken” and the “i” in pencil.

6. Scheming Heep : URIAH
Uriah Heep is a sniveling insincere character in the novel "David Copperfield" by Charles Dickens. The character is such a "yes man" that today, if we know someone who behaves the same way, then we might call that person a "Uriah Heep".

12. Biofuel option : ETHANOL
Ethyl alcohol is more usually known as ethanol. Ethanol is the alcohol found in intoxicating beverages, and nowadays is also used as a fuel for cars. It is also found in medical wipes and hand sanitizer, in which it acts as an antiseptic.

21. End of a seat seeker's query : TAKEN
Is this seat taken?

22. Pro ___ : TEM
"Pro tempore" can be abbreviated to "pro tem" or "p.t." "Pro tempore" is a Latin phrase that best translates as "for the time being". It is used to describe a person who is acting for another, usually a superior.

32. Sleuth played by Lorre : MOTO
The mysterious Mr. Moto is a Japanese secret agent who appears in six novels by American author, John P. Marquand. Mr. Moto was famously played by Peter Lorre in a series of eight films released in the 1930s.

39. Weapons stockpile : ARSENAL
Our word "arsenal" comes from the Italian "arzenale", a work adapted from the Arabic for "workshop". There was a large wharf in Venice called the Arzenale that became associated with the storage of weapons and ammunition, and this led to our contemporary usage of "arsenal".

43. The "pigs" in pigs in blankets : WIENERS
What we call a wiener in this country is known as a Vienna sausage in Germany. It was first produced by a butcher from Frankfurt who was living in Vienna, hence the name “Wiener”, which is German for “of Vienna”. Paradoxically, the same sausage is called a Frankfurter in Vienna, as it was created by someone from Frankfurt. It’s all very confusing …

“Pigs in a blanket” are usually hot dogs that have been wrapped and cooked in some kind of dough. Over in Scotland, the same dish is called a “kilted sausage”.

46. Org. in "Argo" : CIA
“Argo” is a 2012 movie that is based on the true story of the rescue of six diplomats hiding out during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. The film was directed by and stars Ben Affleck and is produced by Grant Heslov and George Clooney, the same pair who produced the excellent “Good Night, and Good Luck”. I saw “Argo” a while back and recommend it highly, although I found the scenes of religious fervor pretty frightening …

53. Hill's opposite : DALE
Dales are open valleys, especially in the Lowlands of Scotland and in the North of England. In the same locales, it is common to find dales flanked by “fells”, which are the mountains or hills flanking the valley.

54. Bow-toting god : EROS
Cupid is the god of desire and erotic love in Roman mythology. The Greek counterpart of Cupid is Eros.

55. ___ John's (Domino's competitor) : PAPA
Papa John’s is the third largest takeout and delivery pizza chain in the US, with Pizza Hut and Domino’s taking the top spots.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Term of address from a hat-tipper : MA'AM
5. Changes channels rapidly : SURFS
10. Bumps off : ICES
14. Periodic table fig. : AT NO
15. Staircase sound : CREAK
16. Learn by ___ : ROTE
17. Roe source : SHAD
18. Delhi language : HINDI
19. Madeline who played Lili Von Shtupp : KAHN
20. Southern town whose name is the longest example of 52-Across [on the left] : SWEETWATER, TEXAS
23. Words on either side of "what" : I AM
24. Satisfied sigh : AAH!
25. Muhammad's resting place : MEDINA
26. Pats down : FRISKS
28. Request to a barber : TRIM
30. "___ to mention ..." : NOT
31. Like yesterday's bagels : STALE
32. Stockyard bellows : MOOS
33. Get an eyeful : OGLE
34. Midwest town whose name is the longest example of 52-Across [on the right] : UNION, OHIO
37. Disney World conveyance : TRAM
40. Leaf support : STEM
41. Warming periods : THAWS
45. "Death Becomes ___" : HER
46. Oaf : CLOD
47. Female TV dog whose portrayers were all male : LASSIE
48. Where Yeltsin ruled : RUSSIA
50. Be indisposed : AIL
51. Pod item : PEA
52. See 20- and 34-Across : ONE-HANDED TYPING
56. Alaska ZIP code starter : NINE
57. Courageous one : DARER
58. Department : AREA
59. List-ending abbr. : ET AL
60. Become one on the run : ELOPE
61. Fresh-mouthed : PERT
62. "___-starter" (résumé cliché) : SELF
63. Some score marks : RESTS
64. Derry derrière : ARSE

Down
1. Mountainous expanses : MASSIFS
2. Crosswise : ATHWART
3. Result of iron deficiency, to a Brit : ANAEMIA
4. Manner of doing : MODE
5. Start and end of 3-Down, phonetically : SCHWAS
6. Scheming Heep : URIAH
7. Not buy, say : RENT
8. Lose brilliance : FADE
9. Minor battle : SKIRMISH
10. Ticked off : IRKED
11. Persuading by flattery : COAXING
12. Biofuel option : ETHANOL
13. Able to see, hear, etc. : SENSATE
21. End of a seat seeker's query : TAKEN
22. Pro ___ : TEM
27. Candidate for urban renewal : SLUM
28. Moderated, with "down" : TONED
29. Leeway : ROOM
32. Sleuth played by Lorre : MOTO
33. Reactions to fireworks : OOHS
35. Hawaiian, e.g. : ISLANDER
36. An original eurozone member : ITALY
37. Bathroom fixtures, slangily : THRONES
38. Get back together : REUNITE
39. Weapons stockpile : ARSENAL
42. Ambitious one : ASPIRER
43. The "pigs" in pigs in blankets : WIENERS
44. Channel to the ocean : SEA GATE
46. Org. in "Argo" : CIA
47. Petrol measures : LITRES
49. Library unit : SHELF
50. Like a whiz : ADEPT
53. Hill's opposite : DALE
54. Bow-toting god : EROS
55. ___ John's (Domino's competitor) : PAPA


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0730-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jul 13, Tuesday



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Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Peter A. Collins
THEME: Top 5 Hits … today’s themed answers are the titles of the top 5 greatest songs of all time as determined by “Rolling Stone” magazine, and what a fine collection of five songs it is:
18A. Honor ... and #5 on a list by 40-/46-Across of the 500 greatest songs of all time : RESPECT
22A. Fulfillment ... and #2 on the list : SATISFACTION
34A. With 40- and 46-Across, mossless? ... and #1 on the list : LIKE A
40A. See 34-Across : ROLLING
46A. See 34-Across : STONE
54A. Casual greeting ... and #4 on the list : WHAT'S GOING ON
61A. Pretend ... and #3 on the list : IMAGINE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 10m 20s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … JAG (jug!), ABE (Ube!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Upholstery materials : DAMASKS
Damask was originally a weaving technique associated with the Byzantine and Islamic weaving centers of the Middle Ages. "Damask" comes from the name of Damascus which was a major trading city at that time.

8. Caddy alternative : JAG
Jaguar started out as a manufacturer of sidecars for motorcycles back in 1922, when the company was known as the Swallow Sidecar Company (SS for short). The company changed its name to Jaguar after WWII, because of the unfortunate connotations of the letters "SS" at that time.

The Cadillac Automobile Company was founded in 1902, as an independent company. It was taken over by GM in 1909, and over the next thirty years GM did a great job establishing Cadillac as the luxury car one just had to own.

11. Great Leap Forward leader : MAO
Mao Zedong was born on December 16, 1893 in the Hunan Province of China. As Mao was the son of a peasant farmer, his prospects for education were limited. Indeed he left school at age 13 to work on the family farm but did eventually get to secondary school in Changsha, the provincial capital. In the years following, Mao continued his education in Beijing and actually turned down an opportunity to study in France.

“The Great Leap Forward” was the name given to the government-led campaign to transition China from an agrarian society to a modern communist society in the late fifties and early sixties.

18. Honor ... and #5 on a list by 40-/46-Across of the 500 greatest songs of all time : RESPECT
“Respect” is a song by Otis Redding, and one that he recorded himself in 1965. It became a hit when Aretha Franklin made her famous cover version in 1967. Having said that, the Redding and Franklin versions do have different storylines and musical "feels".

19. Frozen product with blueberry and chocolate chip flavors : EGGO
Eggo is the brand name of a line of frozen waffles made by Kellogg's. When they were introduced in the 1930s, the name "Eggo" was chosen to promote the "egginess" of the batter. "Eggo" replaced the original name chosen, which was "Froffles", created by melding "frozen" and "waffles".

21. Give a dime on the dollar : TITHE
A tithe is a traditional payment of one tenth of a person's annual income and is usually given to a church. Tithing is a practice taught in many traditions, and according to a 2002 survey, about 3% of American adults donate 10% or more of their income to a church.

22. Fulfillment ... and #2 on the list : SATISFACTION
“(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” is a song recorded in 1965 that was a monumental hit for the Rolling Stones. The song was the first number-one hit in the US for the Stones, but back in their homeland of the UK the song had limited airtime as the lyrics were considered too sexually suggestive. The guitar riff at the beginning of “Satisfaction” has to be one of the most recognizable riffs of all time …

28. Gem of a girl? : OPAL
97% of the world’s opals come from Australia, so it’s no surprise perhaps that the opal is the national gemstone of the country. The state of South Australia provides the bulk of the world’s production, about 80%.

29. Belly ache? : ULCER
Until fairly recently, a peptic ulcer was believed to be caused by undue amounts of stress in one's life. It is now known that 70-90% of all peptic ulcers are in fact associated with a particular bacterium.

34. With 40- and 46-Across, mossless? ... and #1 on the list : LIKE A
(40. See 34-Across : ROLLING
46. See 34-Across : STONE)
“Like a Rolling Stone” is a hit written and recorded by Bob Dylan in 1965. “How does it feel …?”

36. River to the Caspian Sea : URAL
The Ural River rises in the Ural Mountains in Russia and flows for half its length through Russian territory until it crosses the border into Kazakhstan, finally emptying into the Caspian Sea.

38. Prohibition, for one : ERA
There were concerted efforts to ban the sale of alcoholic beverages in the US from the 1840s right up until the lobbyists achieved success with ratification of the Eighteenth Amendment to the US Constitution in 1919. While there were several factors that influenced legislators at that time, one was the perceived need to take political power away from German-based brewing industry during WWI.

39. Center of gravity? : VEE
The letter V (vee) is at the center of the word “gravity”.

43. Subdivision part : LOT
Our use of the word “lot” to describe a parcel of land dates back to the 1630s when ownership of the best property in new settlements was decided by castings “lots”.

44. Old French coin : ECU
The ecu was an Old French coin. When introduced in 1640, the ecu was worth three livres (an older coin, called a "pound" in English). The word "ecu" comes from the Latin "scutum" meaning "shield". The original ecu had a coat of arms on it, a shield.

45. One who says "loo" instead of "john" : BRIT
When I was growing up in Ireland, a "bathroom" was a room that had a bath and no toilet. The separate room with the commode was called "the toilet" or sometimes the W.C. (the water closet). Apparently the term closet was used because in the 1800s when homeowners started installing toilets indoors they often displaced clothes and linens in a "closet", as a closet was the right size to take the commode. It has been suggested that the British term "loo" comes from Waterloo (water-closet ... water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure. Another suggestion is that the term comes from the card game of "lanterloo" in which the pot was called the loo!

The use of "john" as a slang term for a toilet is peculiar to North America. "John" probably comes from the older slang term of "jack" or "jakes" that had been around since the 16th century. In Ireland, in cruder moments, we still refer to a toilet as "the jacks".

50. Advertisers' awards : CLIOS
The Clio Awards are the Oscars of the advertising world and are named after Clio, the Greek Muse of History. Clio was also the recorder of great deeds, the proclaimer and celebrator of great accomplishments and a source of inspiration and genius. The Clio Awards were first presented in 1959.

54. Casual greeting ... and #4 on the list : WHAT'S GOING ON
“What’s Going On” is a 1971 hit recorded by Marvin Gaye. The song was inspired by an incident witnessed by one of the writers, Obie Benson of the Four Tops. Benson was present when police responded brutally to an anti-war protest in People’s Park in Berkeley in 1969.

57. Kind of knife : BOWIE
A Bowie knife is a fixed-blade knife that was made famous by Colonel Jim Bowie in the early 1800s. A Bowie knife is one that comes with a sheath and has a crossguard at the end of the hilt. It also has a clip point, meaning that the forward third of the blade appears to be “clipped off”,leaving a sharp point.

61. Pretend ... and #3 on the list : IMAGINE
John Lennon’s magnus opus is his song "Imagine", released in 1971. "Imagine" was quite successful at the time of its release, but sadly, it only became a number one hit when Lennon was murdered in 1980. According to Lennon, the message behind the song is very simple: a world without countries or religion would be a peaceful place.

70. Site of the Missouri State Fair : SEDALIA
Sedalia, Missouri is a city in the center of the state, located about 30 miles south of the Missouri River. Sedalia is home to the Missouri State Fair, and is also home to the Scott Joplin Ragtime Festival. Joplin lived in Sedalia from 1894 to 1907, and worked in the Maple Leaf Club, after which he named his famous composition “Maple Leaf Rag”. Back in 2011, Sedalia was in the news when it was hit by a devastating tornado.

71. Dr. for the neck up : ENT
Ear, Nose and Throat specialist (ENT)

72. Place to get off: Abbr. : STA
Station (Sta.)

Down
3. Debussy's "La ___" : MER
"La Mer" is a lovely group of three symphonic sketches for orchestra by the French composer Claude Debussy. Listen to it, and you can feel yourself at the ocean. "La Mer" is French for "The Sea".

4. Torso muscles, for short : ABS
"Torso" (plural “torsi”) is an Italian word meaning the "trunk of a statue", a word that we imported into English.

5. Gin berries : SLOES
The sloe is the fruit of the blackthorn bush.

6. Martial art : KUNG FU
In the west we sometimes use the term kung fu to mean a particular Chinese martial art. We've gotten the wrong idea though as the term "kung fu" really describes any skill that can be learned through dedication and hard work. So, kung fu can indeed describe a martial art, but by no means exclusively.

7. Martial arts actor Steven : SEAGAL
Steven Seagal is known in the U as a martial artist turned actor. Seagal started his career as an Aikido instructor in Japan and was the first foreigner to operate an Aikido dojo in that country.

9. Actor Vigoda : ABE
Abe Vigoda played Detective Sergeant Phil Fish in television’s "Barney Miller" in the seventies, and even got his own spin-off show called "Fish". On the big screen he played Sal Tessio in “The Godfather” and Grandpa Ubriacco in “Look Who’s Talking”.

11. Part of it might consist of dashes : MEET
There are often 100-meter dashes at an athletics meet.

25. Grosse ___, Mich. : ILE
Grosse Ile, Michigan is an island in the Detroit River, and the most populated island in the whole state. The name “Grosse Ile” comes from the French for “large island”.

26. Hatcher of Hollywood : TERI
Teri Hatcher's most famous role these days is the Susan Mayer character in "Desperate Housewives". I've never seen more than a few minutes of "Housewives" but I do know Teri Hatcher as a Bond girl, as she appeared in "Tomorrow Never Dies".

27. Land on the Persian Gulf : IRAN
The Persian Gulf is in effect an inland sea although it technically is an offshoot of the Indian Ocean. The outlet from the Persian Gulf to the Indian Ocean is one of the most famous maritime “choke points” in the world: the Strait of Hormuz. About 20% of the world’s supply of petroleum passes through the Strait of Hormuz.

32. One going for the big bucks? : BRONCO
A "bronco" (also "bronc") is a horse that is untamed. In Mexican Spanish "bronco" is a word for "horse", and in the original Spanish "bronco" means "rough, rude".

33. Glossy cloth : SATEEN
Sateen is a cotton fabric, with a weave that is "four over, one under" meaning that most of the threads come to the surface giving it a softer feel.

35. Wall St. trader : ARB
"Arb" is short for an arbitrageur, one who profits from the purchase of securities in one market and the subsequent sale in another, hence taking advantage of price discrepancies across markets.

37. Some N.F.L. blockers: Abbr. : LGS
Left Guards (LGs)

41. SeaWorld sight : ORCA
The taxonomic name for the killer whale is Orcinus orca. The use of the name "orca", rather than "killer whale", is becoming more and more common. The Latin word "Orcinus" means "belonging to Orcus", with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

51. Fiona in "Shrek," e.g. : OGRESS
Princess Fiona is the love interest in the “Shrek” series of films.

Before "Shrek" was a successful movie franchise and Broadway musical, it was a children's picture book called "Shrek!" authored and illustrated by William Steig. The title "Shrek!" came from the German/Yiddish word Schreck, meaning "fear" or "terror".

52. Evening bash : SOIREE
"Soir" is the French word for "evening" and a "soirée" is an "evening party". The French word "soirée" has an acute accent over the first "e", but we tend to drop this when using the word in English.

56. 2010 releases from Apple : IPADS
The very exciting iPad isn't Apple's first foray into the world of tablet computing. Apple created great buzz by introducing the Newton MessagePad way back in 1993. This innovative machine was fraught with problems and really died a very slow death, finally being withdrawn from the market in 1998.

63. Org. with air and water standards : EPA
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was set up during the Nixon administration and began operation at the end of 1970.

65. Carrier to Oslo : SAS
SAS was formerly known as Scandinavian Airlines System and is the flag carrier of three countries: Denmark, Norway and Sweden.

66. New Haven scholar : ELI
Eli is the nickname for a graduate of Yale University, a term used in honor of the Yale benefactor Elihu Yale.

The city of New Haven, Connecticut was founded in 1638 by Puritan immigrants from England. New Haven is of course home to Yale University. The city also initiated the first public tree planting program in the country. The large elms included in the program led to New Haven being called “the Elm City”.

67. Vegas casino : RIO
The Rio casino in Las Vegas was opened in 1990, originally targeting the local population as it is located off the famous Strip where most of the tourists hang out. Famously, the Rio opened up the adults-only Sapphire Pool in 2008, a pay-to-enter (only men paid) topless pool club that featured music and dancers. A year later the Sapphire Pool was closed down after there were eleven arrests for drugs and prostitution offences during an undercover police operation.

68. ___ Pedro : SAN
“San Pedro” is Spanish for “Saint Peter”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Upholstery materials : DAMASKS
8. Caddy alternative : JAG
11. Great Leap Forward leader : MAO
14. Pale eye shade : ICE BLUE
15. Candidates for rehab : ABUSERS
17. Who you appear to be : PERSONA
18. Honor ... and #5 on a list by 40-/46-Across of the 500 greatest songs of all time : RESPECT
19. Frozen product with blueberry and chocolate chip flavors : EGGO
21. Give a dime on the dollar : TITHE
22. Fulfillment ... and #2 on the list : SATISFACTION
28. Gem of a girl? : OPAL
29. Belly ache? : ULCER
30. Lessens : EBBS
34. With 40- and 46-Across, mossless? ... and #1 on the list : LIKE A
36. River to the Caspian Sea : URAL
38. Prohibition, for one : ERA
39. Center of gravity? : VEE
40. See 34-Across : ROLLING
43. Subdivision part : LOT
44. Old French coin : ECU
45. One who says "loo" instead of "john" : BRIT
46. See 34-Across : STONE
48. University div. : DEPT
50. Advertisers' awards : CLIOS
53. Almost never : ONCE
54. Casual greeting ... and #4 on the list : WHAT'S GOING ON
57. Kind of knife : BOWIE
60. Excursion : TRIP
61. Pretend ... and #3 on the list : IMAGINE
64. Things felt in a classroom? : ERASERS
69. Goes full tilt : LETS RIP
70. Site of the Missouri State Fair : SEDALIA
71. Dr. for the neck up : ENT
72. Place to get off: Abbr. : STA
73. Time spent with a psychiatrist : SESSION

Down
1. Quick swim : DIP
2. Best pitcher on the team : ACE
3. Debussy's "La ___" : MER
4. Torso muscles, for short : ABS
5. Gin berries : SLOES
6. Martial art : KUNG FU
7. Martial arts actor Steven : SEAGAL
8. Honey container : JAR
9. Actor Vigoda : ABE
10. Vigor : GUSTO
11. Part of it might consist of dashes : MEET
12. Go up, as eyebrows : ARCH
13. Bone: Prefix : OSTE-
16. Chiropractor's target : SPINE
20. Witch, e.g. : OCCULTIST
22. Puzzling no more : SOLVED
23. For one : APIECE
24. Start, as a hobby : TAKE UP
25. Grosse ___, Mich. : ILE
26. Hatcher of Hollywood : TERI
27. Land on the Persian Gulf : IRAN
31. Hold membership : BELONG
32. One going for the big bucks? : BRONCO
33. Glossy cloth : SATEEN
35. Wall St. trader : ARB
37. Some N.F.L. blockers: Abbr. : LGS
41. SeaWorld sight : ORCA
42. Pleasant accent : LILT
47. Heap : TON
49. Sticks in a nest : TWIGS
51. Fiona in "Shrek," e.g. : OGRESS
52. Evening bash : SOIREE
55. Successors : HEIRS
56. 2010 releases from Apple : IPADS
57. Ill temper : BILE
58. Sign : OMEN
59. Word after 60-, 75- or 100- : WATT
62. Point to pick : NIT
63. Org. with air and water standards : EPA
65. Carrier to Oslo : SAS
66. New Haven scholar : ELI
67. Vegas casino : RIO
68. ___ Pedro : SAN


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0729-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Jul 13, Monday



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Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Andrea Carla Michaels
THEME: Body Part Actions … each of today’s themed answers is “doing something to a body part”, and is a common phrase:
20A. Like a sweet story : HEARTWARMING
33A. Like an unbelievable story : EYE-ROLLING
44A. Like a hilarious story : GUT-BUSTING
56A. Like a hilarious story : KNEE-SLAPPING
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 04m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Peak : ACME
The "acme" is the highest point, coming from the Greek word "akme" which has the same meaning.

5. Bolivian capital : LA PAZ
The administrative capital of Bolivia, La Paz, is officially named Nuestra Senora de La Paz (Our Lady of Peace). La Paz is the seat of the Bolivian government, even though the legal capital of the country is Quito.

14. Italy's shape : BOOT
In the Italian Peninsula in Southern Europe, the “boot” is the mainland of Italy, and the the ball being kicked by the boot is the island of Sicily.

15. Addis ___, Ethiopia : ABABA
Addis Ababa is the capital city of Ethiopia. The city is relatively young, having being founded in 1886 by Emperor Menelik II.

18. Purchase for an all-nighter : NODOZ
NoDoz and Vivarin are brand names of caffeine pills.

19. ___ fixe : IDEE
An "idee fixe" (a French term) is basically a fixed idea, an obsession.

23. White House grp. that meets in the Situation Room : NSC
The National Security Council (NSC) was created by President Harry S. Truman in 1947. The NSC is chaired by the sitting president and meets in the White House Situation Room.

26. "Revenge of the ___" ("Star Wars" subtitle) : SITH
The Sith are characters in the "Star Wars" universe who use the "dark side" of "the Force", and as such are the antithesis of the Jedi Knights. The last made of the six "Star Wars" movies is called "Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith".

27. Jet-black : EBONY
Ebony is a dark black wood that is very dense, one of the few types of wood that sinks in water. Ebony has been in high demand so the species of trees yielding the wood are now considered threatened. It is in such short supply that unscrupulous vendors have been known to darken lighter woods with shoe polish to look like ebony, so be warned …

The color “jet black” takes its name from the minor gemstone known as jet. The gemstone and the material it is made of takes its English name from the French name: “jaiet”.

28. Fortuneteller's card : TAROT
Tarot cards have been around since the mid-1400s, and for centuries were simply used for entertainment as a game. It has only been since the late 1800s that the cards have been used by fortune tellers to predict the future.

40. Suave or Prell : SHAMPOO
Prell shampoo was introduced by Procter & Gamble in 1947, and was originally a clear green concentrate sold in a tube (like toothpaste).

41. Two-character David Mamet play : OLEANNA
"Oleanna" sounds like a powerful play, written by David Mamet, first performed in 1992. It's a two-person piece, the tale of a university professor and a female student who accuses him of sexual exploitation.

David Mamet is best known as a playwright, and indeed won a Pulitzer for his 1984 play "Glengarry Glen Ross". Mamet is also a successful screenwriter and received Oscar nominations for the films "The Verdict" (1982) and "Wag the Dog" (1997).

43. Magazine whose cover has a red border : TIME
“Time” magazine has a readership of about 25 million, making it the largest circulation weekly news magazine in the world.

47. Deluxe sheet fabric : SATIN
Sateen and satin are two different things (like I'd known the difference!). Sateen is a cotton fabric, with a weave that is "four over, one under" meaning that most of the threads come to the surface giving it a softer feel.

48. Japanese fish dish : SUSHI
Sushi is a Japanese dish that has as its primary ingredient cooked, vinegared rice. The rice is usually topped with something, most often fish, and can be served in seaweed rolls. If you want raw fish by itself, then you have to order "sashimi".

52. Valentine's Day flower : ROSE
Saint Valentine’s Day was chosen by Pope Gelasius I in 496 AD to honor various martyrs with the name Valentine. However, the saints' day was dropped by the Catholic church in 1969, by Pope Paul VI. Try telling that to Hallmark though …

55. Adriatic or Aegean : SEA
The Adriatic is the sea separating Italy from the Balkans.

The Aegean Sea is that part of the Mediterranean that lies between Greece and Turkey. Within the Aegean Sea are found the Aegean Islands, a group that includes Crete and Rhodes.

60. Listing on eBay : ITEM
eBay was founded in 1995 as AuctionWeb as part of a computer programmer’s personal website. One of the first items purchased was a broken laser pointer, for $14.83. The buyer collected broken laser pointers …

62. "Iliad" warrior : AJAX
Ajax was a figure in Greek mythology, and was the cousin of Achilles. Ajaz is an important figure in Homer’s “Iliad”. According to Homer, Ajax was chosen by lot to meet Hector in an epic duel that lasted a whole day. The duel ended in a draw.

The Iliad is an epic poem by the Greek poet Homer, which tells the story of the siege of Ilium (also known as Troy) during the Trojan war.

66. Marcel Marceau, for one : MIME
Marcel Marceau was the most famous mime of all time, a native of Strasbourg in France. Marceau made a cameo appearance in Mel Brooks's "Silent Movie", playing himself. In the scene, Mel Brooks is asking Marceau to appear in his movie (a question asked silently of course, in subtitles), and Marceau turns to the camera and speaks the only word in the whole film, "Non!" (French for "No!"). The mime speaks! Brilliant ...

67. Military group : CADRE
A "cadre" is most commonly a group of experienced personnel at the core of a larger organization that the small group trains or heavily influences. "Cadre" is a French word meaning a "frame". We use it in the sense that a cadre is a group that provides a "framework" for the larger organization.

68. "The Twilight ___" : ZONE
The iconic television series called “The Twilight Zone” first aired in 1959 and then ran for 156 episodes before being pulled in 1964. “The Twilight Zone” was revived for four years in the late eighties, and was also spun-off into a movie by Steven Spielberg in 1983.

69. Ball-___ hammer : PEEN
The peen of a hammer is on the head, and is the side of the head that is opposite the striking surface. Often the peen is in the shape of a hemisphere (as in a Ball-peen hammer), but usually it is shaped like a claw (mainly for removing nails).

71. Jeweled Fabergé objects : EGGS
Fabergé eggs are beautiful jeweled eggs made by the House of Fabergé from 1885 to 1917. The tradition of fabricating the eggs started when Tsar Alexander III commissioned Fabergé to create a jeweled egg for his wife in 1885. After this, the House of Fabergé produced more and more elaborate designs, year after year.

Down
1. "Honest" president : ABE
Abraham Lincoln was born in a one-room log cabin in Hardin County, Kentucky making him the first president born in the West. His formal education was limited to a year and a half of schooling, but fortunately for us, Lincoln was an avid reader and educated himself over the years. Even though he was from a rural area, he avoided hunting and fishing because he did not like to kill animals even for food.

3. "Me?," to Miss Piggy : MOI
The Muppet called Miss Piggy has a pretentious air, and so refers to herself as “moi”. In 1998, Miss Piggy even released her own line of perfume called “Moi”.

4. ___ A Sketch : ETCH
The Etch A Sketch toy was introduced in 1960. The toy was developed in France by inventor André Cassagnes.

5. Neighbor of Maui : LANAI
Lanai is the sixth largest of the Hawaiian Islands. Lanai was first spotted by Europeans just a few days after Captain Cook was killed on the Big Island of Hawaii in 1779. In 1922, the Hawaiian Pineapple Company bought the whole island of Lanai and turned most of it into the world's largest pineapple plantation. Since then, Lanai has been known as "The Pineapple Island".

7. Asian noodle dish with peanuts : PAD THAI
The delicious dish called Pad Thai is a meld of stir-fried rice noodles with tamarind juice, red chili pepper plus a mix of vegetables and possibly tofu, meat or fish. It is usually topped with crushed peanuts, coriander and lime. The name "Pad Thai" translates as "fried Thai style".

9. Drag queen in "La Cage aux Folles" : ZAZA
The musical “La Cage aux Folles” opened on Broadway in 1985. “La Cage aux Folles” is a musical adaptation of the French play of the same name by Jean Poiret that was first staged in 1973. I’ve never had the pleasure of seeing the stage play nor the musical, but I love the wonderful movie adaptation, “The Birdcage”, released in 1996. The film has a very strong cast that includes Robin Williams, Nathan Lane, Gene Hackman and Hank Azaria.

12. John who was the first American to orbit the earth : GLENN
John Glenn is a retired Marine Corps pilot, astronaut and US Senator. As an astronaut, Glenn was the first American to orbit the earth, in 1962, and later became the oldest person to fly in space, in 1998.

13. Poem for the dearly departed : ELEGY
Perhaps the most famous elegy in the English language is that written by Thomas Gray, completed in 1750. His “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” is the source of many oft-quoted phrases, including:
- Celestial fire
- Far from the Madding Crowd
- Kindred spirit

21. Legally prohibit : ESTOP
The legal term "estop" means to block or stop by using some legal device. The word "estop" comes from Old French, in which "estopper" means "to stop up" or "to impede".

23. Bikini blast, briefly : N-TEST
The testing of US nuclear weapons by the US at Bikini Atoll in the middle of 1946 went by the codename "Operation Crossroads". The tests used A-bombs and were designed to measure the effect of blasts on navy vessels. There were three tests planned, but the third had to be cancelled as the Navy couldn't decontaminate the ships used in the second test.

29. "Coffee, Tea ___?" : OR ME
"Coffee, Tea or We?" is a book published in 1967 that was supposedly a memoir written by two stewardesses Trudy Baker and Rachel Jones. In fact though, it was really a work of fiction, written by the ghostwriter Donald Bain. Bain went as far as hiring two Eastern Airlines flight attendants to pose as the authors and promote the book on television.

31. Snooty sort : SNOB
Back in the 1780s, a “snob” was a shoemaker or a shoemaker’s apprentice. By the end of the 18th century the word was being used by students at Cambridge University in England to refer to all local merchants and people of the town. The term evolved to mean one who copies those who are his or her social superior (and not in a good way). From there it wasn't a big leap for “snob” to include anyone who emphasized their superior social standing and not just those who aspired to rank. Nowadays a snob is anyone who looks down on those considered to be of inferior standing.

32. Eskimo home: Var. : IGLU
The Inuit word for "house" is "iglu", which we usually write as "igloo". The Greenlandic (yes, that's a language) word for "house" is very similar: "igdlo".

34. The Olympic rings, e.g. : LOGO
The symbol of the Olympic Games consists of five interlocking rings, with each ring representing one of the five continents involved in the Olympics. The five continents are Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania and America (North and South combined). The symbol was designed in 1912, adopted in 1914, and introduced at the 1920 Games.

37. The "F" and "B" of Samuel F. B. Morse, e.g.: Abbr. : INITS
Samuel Morse was a very accomplished and reputable painter (he was engaged to paint a portrait of President John Adams, for example). In 1825 Morse was in Washington working on a commissioned painting when he received a one-line letter by horse messenger telling him that his wife was ill. He left immediately for his home in New Haven, Connecticut but by the time that Morse arrived his wife had already died and had been buried. This single event spurred him to move from painting to the development of a rapid means of long distance communication, leading to the single-wire telegraph and Morse code.

38. Comics orphan : ANNIE
The musical “Annie” was based on the Harold Gray comic strip "Little Orphan Annie". There were two subsequent film adaptations, both really quite successful, including one released in 1982 directed by John Huston of all people. "Annie" was Huston's only ever musical.

39. ___ cum laude : MAGNA
When an academic degree is awarded, a level of distinction can be noted depending on the degree of success achieved by the student. There are three types of honor, each with a Latin name:
- cum laude: meaning "with honor" (literally "with praise")
- magna cum laude: meaning "with great honor"
- summa cum laude: meaning "with highest honor"

42. German steel city : ESSEN
I knew a man back in Ireland, a German national from the city of Essen. He had very sad tales to tell from the days of WWII. As a young boy he lost his (socialist) parents during the Nazi purges early in the war. In 1943 he was living with his grandmother and still attending school when he was drafted into the army along with the rest of his class (at 14 years of age). His platoon leader was his school teacher who made a point of tutoring the boys in place of military drilling. One day he was on guard duty with his class/platoon at the dam above the city, and along come the Dam Busters with their bouncing bombs. The raid was successful (from the perspective of the Allies), but he described terrible famine faced by the people below the dam due to flooding of the farmland that surrounded the factories.

46. "___ better to have loved and lost ..." : ‘TIS
Here are some lines from the poem “In Memoriam A.H.H.” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson:
I hold it true, whate'er befall;
I feel it when I sorrow most;
'Tis better to have loved and lost
Than never to have loved at all.

50. "Come up and ___ sometime" : SEE ME
“I’m No Angel” is an 1933 film starring Mae West and a very young Cary Grant who just making a name for himself in Hollywood. “I’m No Angel” gives us some iconic Mae West quotations:
- Come up and see me sometime.
- Beulah, peel me a grape.
- It's not the men in your life that counts, it's the life in your men.
- When I'm good I'm very good. But when I'm bad I'm better.

51. Biceps-flexing guys : HE-MEN
The biceps muscle is made up of two bundles of muscle, both of which terminate at the same point near the elbow. The heads of the bundles terminate at different points on the scapula or shoulder blade. “Biceps” is Latin for “two-headed”.

53. Dizzying designs : OP ART
Op art is also known as optical art, and puts optical illusions to great effect.

54. Boxcars, with dice : SIXES
Boxcars is a slang term for two sixes rolled on a pair of dice, particularly in the game of craps. The idea is that the twelve pips on the dice resemble a pair of boxcars on a freight train.

64. Lee who directed "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" : ANG
Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as "Sense & Sensibility" (my personal favorite), "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon", "Hulk", "Brokeback Mountain" and "Life of Pi".


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Peak : ACME
5. Bolivian capital : LA PAZ
10. Animal house? : CAGE
14. Italy's shape : BOOT
15. Addis ___, Ethiopia : ABABA
16. Temporary calm : LULL
17. More than awesome : EPIC
18. Purchase for an all-nighter : NODOZ
19. ___ fixe : IDEE
20. Like a sweet story : HEARTWARMING
23. White House grp. that meets in the Situation Room : NSC
26. "Revenge of the ___" ("Star Wars" subtitle) : SITH
27. Jet-black : EBONY
28. Fortuneteller's card : TAROT
30. "Yeah, right!" : AS IF!
33. Like an unbelievable story : EYE-ROLLING
36. Circle measure: Abbr. : DIAM
40. Suave or Prell : SHAMPOO
41. Two-character David Mamet play : OLEANNA
43. Magazine whose cover has a red border : TIME
44. Like a hilarious story : GUT-BUSTING
46. Hubbub : TO-DO
47. Deluxe sheet fabric : SATIN
48. Japanese fish dish : SUSHI
52. Valentine's Day flower : ROSE
55. Adriatic or Aegean : SEA
56. Like a hilarious story : KNEE-SLAPPING
60. Listing on eBay : ITEM
61. Mountain-climbing tool : ICE AX
62. "Iliad" warrior : AJAX
66. Marcel Marceau, for one : MIME
67. Military group : CADRE
68. "The Twilight ___" : ZONE
69. Ball-___ hammer : PEEN
70. Shoelace problems : KNOTS
71. Jeweled Fabergé objects : EGGS

Down
1. "Honest" president : ABE
2. Nightstick carrier : COP
3. "Me?," to Miss Piggy : MOI
4. ___ A Sketch : ETCH
5. Neighbor of Maui : LANAI
6. Cancel, as a launch : ABORT
7. Asian noodle dish with peanuts : PAD THAI
8. Take ___ (acknowledge applause) : A BOW
9. Drag queen in "La Cage aux Folles" : ZAZA
10. Go up : CLIMB
11. Sound transmission : AUDIO
12. John who was the first American to orbit the earth : GLENN
13. Poem for the dearly departed : ELEGY
21. Legally prohibit : ESTOP
22. Boxing official : REF
23. Bikini blast, briefly : N-TEST
24. Give a quick greeting : SAY HI
25. Additive to coffee : CREAM
29. "Coffee, Tea ___?" : OR ME
31. Snooty sort : SNOB
32. Eskimo home: Var. : IGLU
34. The Olympic rings, e.g. : LOGO
35. Earsplitting : LOUD
36. Facts and figures : DATA
37. The "F" and "B" of Samuel F. B. Morse, e.g.: Abbr. : INITS
38. Comics orphan : ANNIE
39. ___ cum laude : MAGNA
42. German steel city : ESSEN
45. Underwater missile : TORPEDO
46. "___ better to have loved and lost ..." : ‘TIS
48. Pinch pennies : SKIMP
49. Loosen, as 70-Across : UNTIE
50. "Come up and ___ sometime" : SEE ME
51. Biceps-flexing guys : HE-MEN
53. Dizzying designs : OP ART
54. Boxcars, with dice : SIXES
57. Show of affection from a dog : LICK
58. Open ___ of worms : A CAN
59. Good, long look : GAZE
63. Easy run : JOG
64. Lee who directed "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" : ANG
65. Ballot marks : XES


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0728-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Jul 13, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Andrew Reynolds
THEME: Fast Work … Henry Ford provides our theme today, with lots of themed clues that refer back to his career. Also, we build ourselves a Ford MODEL T using the letters circled in the grid. We start with an M and then add a letter every fourth line, moving the starting M to the left by one letter each time we add something to the end of the word, finally arriving at MODEL T:
62A. Like the 116-Across : MASS-PRODUCED
116A. 5-Down unit : MODEL T
5D. Business titan born July 30, 1863 : HENRY FORD
16D. Feature of a 57-Down : CONVEYOR BELT
57D. 5-Down innovation : ASSEMBLY LINE
78D. 116-Across, colloquially : TIN LIZZIE
85D. Where 5-Down's company gets an "F"? : NYSE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. "30 Rock" or "3rd Rock From the Sun" : SITCOM
“30 Rock” is a sitcom on NBC that was created by the show’s star Tina Fey. Fey is an ex-performer and writer from “Saturday Night Live” and uses her experiences on that show as a basis for the “30 Rock” storyline. “30 Rock” aired its last episode in early 2013.

19. P.G.A. event played on Father's Day : US OPEN
Golf’s US Open Championship is held on the third Sunday of every June, which happens to be Father’s Day. The first US Open was held in 1894, over 36 holes played over one day on a 9-hole course in Newport, Rhode Island.

20. Company in a 2001 merger with Chevron : TEXACO
Texaco gets its name from "The TEXA-s CO-mpany". Today's it's just a brand name owned by Chevron, but it used to be its own operation, founded as the Texas Fuel Company in 1901.

21. Old TV component : TRIODE
A triode is like a diode, in that it had a cathode from which electrons flow to an anode. However, there is a third terminal called a grid, between the cathode and anode. By applying a potential to the grid, the flow of electrons can be regulated.

27. Wordsworth's "___ to Duty" : ODE
William Wordsworth wrote his poem “Ode to Duty” in 1805. In the poem, Wordsworth uses the term “duty” to mean a devotion to things such as childhood hope and an alignment with natural world. I guess the message is “leave the rat race behind”.

29. ___ Peninsula : MALAY
The Malay Peninsula is that long, thin land mass that forms the southern-most part of the Asian mainland. On the peninsula are the countries of Malaysia, Thailand, Burma (Myanmar) and Singapore (an island nation off the southern tip of the peninsula). People of the Malay ethnic group are mainly found on the Malay peninsula.

35. Suffix with green or bean : -ERY
A beanery is an inexpensive restaurant.

42. Cobra's foe : MONGOOSE
The mongoose has no relationship with the "goose" as such, as "mongoose" is derived from "mangus", an Indian name for the beast. The mongoose does indeed eat snakes as part of its diet, along with other small creatures. However, it usually avoids the dangerous cobra, although humans have used the mongoose to fight cobras for sport and entertainment. The mongoose fares well against poisonous snakes because the it is agile and wily, and has a thick skin, literally.

Our word “melee” comes from the French “mêlée”. In both languages the word means a "confused fight".

50. GMC truck : SIERRA
The GMC Sierra truck is also sold as the Chevrolet Silverado.

51. GPS lines: Abbr. : RDS
GPS stands for Global Positioning System. The modern GPS system that we use today was built by the US military who received the massive funding needed because of fears during the Cold War of the use of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles. We civilians all round the world owe a lot to President Ronald Reagan because he directed the military to make GPS technology available to the public for the common good. President Reagan was moved to do so after the Soviet Union shot down KAL flight 007 carrying 269 people, just because the plane strayed accidentally into Soviet airspace.

52. Texas athletic site : ALAMODOME
The Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas opened for business in 1993. The Alamodome was home to the San Antonio Spurs basketball from 1993 to 2002.Today the facility hosts many sporting events, including football and ice hockey games. It is also used as a convention center.

54. Dive, maybe : BAR
The use of the term “dive” to mean a “disreputable bar” dates back to the late 1800s. It is suggested that the term arose because such bars tended to be located in basements and so one had had to “dive” below street level to enter such an establishment.

58. Robed ruler : EMIR
An emir is a prince or chieftain, most notably in the Middle East. In English, “emir” can also be written as “amir” and “ameer” (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

59. Seminary subj. : REL
Originally, a seminary was where plants were raised from seeds, as “semen” is the Latin word “seed”. The first schools labelled as seminaries were established in the late 1500s. Those first schools were more likely to be academies for young ladies back then, rather than for trainee priests.

60. New newt : EFT
Newts wouldn't be my favorite animals. They are found all over the world living on land or in water depending on the species, but always associated with water even if it is only for breeding. Newts metamorphose through three distinct developmental stages during their lives. They start off as larvae in water, fertilized eggs that often cling to aquatic plants. The eggs hatch into tadpoles, the first developmental form of the newt. After living some months as tadpoles swimming around in the water, they undergo another metamorphosis, sprouting legs and replacing their external gills with lungs. At this juvenile stage they are known as efts, and leave the water to live on land. A more gradual transition takes place then, as the eft takes on the lizard-like appearance of the adult newt.

61. Cons : HAS
To “have” someone is to “con” him or her.

67. Common pg. size : LTR
Like so many things it seems, our paper sizes here in North America don't conform with the standards in the rest of the world. ISO standard sizes used elsewhere have some logic behind them in that the ratio of width to length is usually one to the square root of two. This mathematical relationship means that when you cut a piece of paper in two each half preserves the aspect ratio of the original, which can be useful in making reduced or enlarged copies of documents. Our standard size of "letter" (8.5 x 11 inches) was determined in 1980 by the Reagan administration to be the official paper size for the US government. Prior to this, the "legal" size (8.5 x 14 inches) had been the standard, since 1921.

69. Auto safety feature, for short : ABS
The first anti-lock braking system (ABS) was actually developed for use on aircraft, in 1929. The system reduced braking distances for aircraft by 30% because pilots were able to apply a full braking force immediately on landing instead of applying gradual pressure to avoid skidding.

77. Seventh letter : ETA
Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character "H".

82. Strong-smelling cheese : STILTON
Stilton is a lovely village in Cambridgeshire in England, and is the original home of the delicious blue cheese called Stilton.

88. How many Playboy bunnies dress : SCANTILY
Playboy Bunnies are waitresses at a Playboy Club. Playboy Bunnies wear costumes that are reminiscent of the Playboy rabbit mascot, with a collar, cuffs and a fluffy tail.

92. "No ___!" : MAS
"No mas!" translates from Spanish as "no more!".

95. N.F.L. owner who moved the Cleveland Browns to Baltimore in 1996 : ART MODELL
Art Modell was the team owner for the Cleveland Browns from 1961-1995 and for the Baltimore Raven from 1996-2004.

97. She outwitted Sherlock : IRENE
The character Irene Adler only appeared in one of the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In that story, “A Scandal in Bohemia”, Holmes expresses remarkable admiration for Adler as a woman and as a foe. As a result, derivative works in the Holmes genre often feature Adler as something of a romantic interest for Sherlock.

102. Versailles resident : ROI
Versailles is a city located just 10 miles from the center of Paris. It is famous of course as home to the magnificent Palace of Versailles.

105. Polo ground? : ORIENT
Marco Polo was a merchant from Venice and a famous traveler throughout Asia. Polo journeyed with his father and uncle on an epic tour of Central Asia and China that lasted 24 years. Marco tends to be the member of the party we remember today though, because it was he who documented their travels in a book called "Il Milione".

106. Gargoyle features, often : SPOUTS
Gargoyles are fabulous carvings placed on the side of a building. The gargoyle includes an internal spout which is designed to convey water collected on the roof away from the walls of the building. The term “gargoyle” comes from the French “gargouille” which can mean “throat, gullet”.

109. Showy shrub : AZALEA
Azaleas are very toxic to horses, sheep and goats, but strangely enough cause no problem for cats or dogs. And if you go to Korea you might come across "Tug Yonju", which is azalea wine made from the plant's blossoms.

114. "Feeling Good" chanteuse : SIMONE
Nina Simone was the stage name of Eunice Waymon. Simone was very much associated with jazz music, although she really wanted to be a classical musician early in her career, inspired by a love for the music of Bach.

116. 5-Down unit : MODEL T
The Ford Model T was the first really affordable car that was offered for sale, and it was produced from 1908 to 1927. It was the Model T that ushered in the era of assembly line production, which greatly cut down the cost of manufacture. The Model T's engine was designed to run on petrol, kerosene or ethanol.

117. Consumer Reports employee : TESTER
“Consumer Reports” is a monthly magazine that has been published by Consumers Union since 1936. Consumers Union was established as a non-profit organization with the mission to “test products, inform the public, and protect customers.”

Down
2. Bear, in Baja : OSO
Baja California is both the most northern, and the most western, of the Mexican states.

3. 2012 Emmy winner for Outstanding Drama Series : HOMELAND
“Homeland” is a psychological drama shown on Showtime about a CIA officer who is convinced that a certain US Marine is a threat to the security of the United States. The show is based on a series from Israeli television called “Hatufim” (Prisoners of War”). I watched the first season of “Homeland” not too long ago, and recommend it …

4. "L'Africaine," e.g. : OPERA
"L'Africaine" (“The African Woman” in English) is a grand opera by German composer Giacomo Meyerbeer. The opera deals with fictitious events in the life of explorer Vasco da Gama.

5. Business titan born July 30, 1863 : HENRY FORD
The industrialist Henry Ford was born in Michigan, and was the son of an Irish immigrant from County Cork. Ford’s most famous vehicle was the one that revolutionized the industry: the Model T. Ford’s goal with the Model T was to build a car that was simple to drive and and easy and cheap to purchase and repair. The Model T cost $825 in 1908, which isn’t much over $20,000 in today’s money.

7. Grp. that rarely meets during the summer : PTA
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

10. Light show light : LASER BEAM
The term “laser” comes from an acronym, “Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation” (LASER). It has been pointed out that a more precise name for laser technology is “Light Oscillation by Stimulated Emission of Radiation”, but the resulting acronym isn't quite so appealing, namely LOSER …

12. Hip-hop's ___ Def : MOS
Mos Def is the stage name of actor and rapper Dante Terrell Smith-Bay. Mos Def is one of the few rap stars who is really making a name for himself in the world of movies. He received critical acclaim for roles in 2003's "The Italian Job" , 2005's "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy", and a featured role in an episode of television's "House".

13. Blasted : STEWED
Blasted, stewed, very drunk …

14. "Garfield" waitress : IRMA
“Garfield” is a comic strip drawn by Jim Davis since 1978. Garfield is an orange tabby cat. Davis named his hero Garfield after his own grandfather.

26. Genetic enzyme : RNASE
RNase is short for Ribonuclease. In general, enzyme names usually end with the suffix -ase, with the prefix indicating what the enzyme acts on. In the case, RNase is an enzyme that breaks down RNA, an important clean up operation in cells removing RNA that is no longer needed.

28. Fictional character with steel pincers for hands : DR NO
"Dr. No" may have been the first film in the wildly successful James Bond franchise, but it was the sixth novel in the series of books penned by Ian Fleming. Fleming was inspired to write the story after reading the Fu Manchu tales by Sax Rohmer. If you've read the Rohmer books or seen the films, you'll recognize the similarities between the characters Dr. No and Fu Manchu.

41. Tobiko, in Japanese cuisine : ROE
Tobiko is the Japanese name for the roe of flying fish. We sometimes come across tobiko in California rolls.

44. A Beatle : STARR
Ringo Starr's real name is Richard Starkey. Before he joined the Beatles (replacing drummer Pete Best), Starkey played with the Raving Texans. It was with the Raving Texans that he adopted the name "Ringo Starr", because he wore a lot of rings and he thought it sounded "cowboyish". Back then his drum solos were billed as "Starr Time".

47. He wrote "I exist, that is all, and I find it nauseating" : SARTRE
John-Paul Sartre was a leading French philosopher, as well as a writer and political activist. Sartre was one of the few people to have been awarded a Nobel Prize and to have then refused to accept it. He was named winner of the prize for Literature in 1964, for his first novel "Nausea". Before his win, Sartre knew that his name was on the list of nominees so he wrote to the Nobel Institute and asked to be withdrawn from consideration. The letter somehow went unread, so he found himself having to refuse the award after he had been selected.

50. Hook's hand : SMEE
In J. M. Barrie's play and novel about Peter Pan, Smee is one of Captain Hook's pirates and is Hook's right-hand man. Smee is described by Barrie as being "Irish" and "a man who stabbed without offence". Nice guy!

52. Wake-up times, for short : AMS
The 12-hour clock has been around a long time, and was even used in sundial format in Ancient Egypt. Our use of AM and PM dates back to Roman times, with AM standing for Ante Meridiem (before noon) and PM standing for Post Meridiem (after noon). However, the Romans originally used the AM concept a little differently, by counting backwards from noon. So, 2AM to the Romans would be two hours before noon, or 10AM as we would call it today.

53. Tolkien creatures : ORCS
According to the author Tolkien, Orcs are small humanoids that live in his fantasy world of Middle-earth (also called “Mordor”). They are very ugly and dirty, and are fond of eating human flesh.

56. Many a Dream Act beneficiary : LATINO
The DREAM Act is proposed legislation that has been floating Washington around since 2001. The bill provides permanent residency to some immigrants who are deemed to be of good character and who have fulfilled certain conditions mainly related to education or to public service. The acronym DREAM stands for “Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors”.

58. Latin 101 verb : ESSE
“Esse” is the Latin for “to be”. “Sum” means “I am” and “erat” means “he, she was”.

64. Northeast university town : ORONO
The town of Orono is home to the University of Maine, founded in 1862. The college is actually located on an island (Marsh island) lying between the Penobscot and Stillwater rivers. The town of Orono is named after Joseph Orono, a chief of the Penobscot Nation.

65. Getup : DUDS
“Duds” is an informal word for clothing, coming from the word “dudde” that was used around 1300 as the name for a cloak.

66. Pac-12 player : UTE
The Runnin' Utes are the basketball team of the University of Utah. The team was given the nickname the Runnin' Redskins back when Jack Gardner was the head coach from 1953 to 1971. The "Runnin'" part of the name was chosen because Gardner was famous for playing quick offenses. The "Redskins" name was later dropped in favor of the less controversial "Utes".

75. Ending with cyto- : PLASM
The word "protoplasm" comes from the Greek, meaning first (protos) thing formed (plasma). It is the name given to the cell contents, everything that is surrounded by the plasma membrane. The protoplasm in most cells is divided into two parts, the cytoplasm which surrounds the nucleus, and the nucleoplasm found within the nucleus.

76. Space rock, maybe : METEOROID
A shooting star is what we call the visible path of a meteoroid as is it enters the earth’s atmosphere. Almost all meteoroids burn up, but if one is large enough to survive and reach the ground, we call it a meteorite. The word “meteor” comes from the Greek “meteōros” meaning “high in the air”.

78. 116-Across, colloquially : TIN LIZZIE
“Tin LIzzie” was a familiar name used for the Ford Model T.

84. Pearl Buck heroine : O-LAN
Pearl S. Buck's novel "The Good Earth" won a Pulitzer in 1932, and helped Buck win the Nobel Prize for literature a few years later. The story tells of life in a Chinese village and follows the fortunes of Wang Lung and his wife O-Lan. Although "The Good Earth" has been around for decades, it hit the bestseller list again in 2004 when it was a pick for Oprah's Book Club.

85. Where 5-Down's company gets an "F"? : NYSE
The Ford Motor Company is denoted on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) by the later “F”.

88. Casting source for some H'wood comedies : SNL
NBC first aired a form of "Saturday Night Live" (SNL) in 1975 under the title "NBC's Saturday Night". The show was actually created to give Johnny Carson some time off from "The Tonight Show". Back then "The Tonight Show" had a weekend episode, and Carson convinced NBC to pull the Saturday or Sunday recordings off the air and hold them for subsequent weeknights in which Carson needed a break. NBC turned to Lorne Michaels and asked him to put together a variety show to fill the vacant slot, and he came up with what we now call "Saturday Night Live".

91. Harvey of "Taxi Driver" : KEITEL
Harvey Keitel is an actor from New York City who grew up in Brighton Beach. He is best known for playing “tough guy” roles, as he did in “Reservoir Dogs”, “Pulp Fiction” and “Taxi Driver”.

"Taxi Driver" is a remarkable 1976 movie directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Robert De Niro. The film is remarkable for some great performances, but also for sparking an attempt on the life of President Ronald Reagan. Would-be assassin John Hinkley, Jr. tried to kill the President in order to impress Jodie Foster, with whom he had been obsessed since seeing her performance in the film as child prostitute Iris Steensma.

94. "The Big Bang Theory" co-creator Chuck : LORRE
Chuck Lorre created many great sitcoms that have stood the test of time. Included in the list of his shows are “Grace Under Fire”, “Cybil”, “Dharma & Greg”, “Two and a Half Men” and “The Big Bang Theory”. Lorre is famous for the “vanity cards” that appear for a few seconds at the end of his shows. The cards include a message directly from Lorre, perhaps an observation on life, and maybe something quite controversial. CBS has had to censor several of Lorre’s vanity cards, but you can read the uncensored versions on his website.

98. Lots : REAMS
A ream is 500 sheets of paper. As there were 24 sheets in a quire, and 20 quires made up a ream, there used to be 480 sheets in a ream. Ever since that standard was changed to 500, a 480-sheet packet of paper has been called a "short ream".

101. Status quo ___ : ANTE
"Status quo ante" is a Latin term meaning “the way things were before”. The phrase is used in the Law to describe the returning of a situation to the state in which it previously existed.

104. Brewery fixture : OAST
An oast is a kiln used for drying hops as part of the brewing process. Such a structure might also be called an "oast house".

106. Cooke of soul : SAM
Sam Cooke was a soul singer from Clarksdale, Mississippi. Cooke is considered by many to have been one of the founders of the soul genre. Cooke’s impressive list of hits includes “You Send Me”, Chain Gang” and “Twistin’ the Night Away”. Cooke was only 33 years old when he died. He was shot after a drunken brawl by a motel manager in what was deemed by the courts to be a justifiable homicide.

108. Bygone flier : SST
The most famous supersonic transport (SST) is the retired Concorde. Concorde was developed and produced under an Anglo-French treaty by France’s Aérospatiale and the UK’s British Aircraft Corporation (BAC).

111. ___ Lingus : AER
Aer Lingus is my favorite airline! Well, the service isn't that great, but when I get on board an Aer Lingus plane I feel like I am back in Ireland. Aer Lingus is the national airline of Ireland, with "Aer Lingus" being a phonetic spelling of the Irish "aer-loingeas" meaning "air fleet". These days Aer Lingus can only lay claim to the title of Ireland's oldest airline as it is no longer the biggest. That honor goes to the controversial budget airline called Ryanair.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Holiday cheer : HO HO HO
7. Early round : PRELIM
13. "30 Rock" or "3rd Rock From the Sun" : SITCOM
19. P.G.A. event played on Father's Day : US OPEN
20. Company in a 2001 merger with Chevron : TEXACO
21. Old TV component : TRIODE
22. See 36-Across : MOMENT
23. Tickles : AMUSES
24. Corrects : EMENDS
25. Bobble : ERROR
27. Wordsworth's "___ to Duty" : ODE
28. Short race? : DWARVES
29. ___ Peninsula : MALAY
31. Opposite of eternally : NEVERMORE
35. Suffix with green or bean : -ERY
36. With 22-Across, shortly : IN A
37. Accident marker : FLARE
39. Subject of many a war : BOUNDARY
42. Cobra's foe : MONGOOSE
44. Melee : SET-TO
45. Whole ___ : FOODS
48. Stamp, perhaps : ENDORSE
49. Express : STATE
50. GMC truck : SIERRA
51. GPS lines: Abbr. : RDS
52. Texas athletic site : ALAMODOME
54. Dive, maybe : BAR
55. Molding material : CLAY
58. Robed ruler : EMIR
59. Seminary subj. : REL
60. New newt : EFT
61. Cons : HAS
62. Like the 116-Across : MASS-PRODUCED
67. Common pg. size : LTR
68. "___ magic" : IT’S
69. Auto safety feature, for short : ABS
70. Dead-end jobs, perhaps : RUTS
71. Eye affliction : STYE
72. Pizza order : PIE
73. A computer may be in it : SLEEP MODE
77. Seventh letter : ETA
79. Con : INMATE
81. Narrow valleys : GLENS
82. Strong-smelling cheese : STILTON
86. Lord or lady : NOBLE
87. "Nifty!" : NEATO!
88. How many Playboy bunnies dress : SCANTILY
89. Generosity : LARGESSE
91. Rise : KNOLL
92. "No ___!" : MAS
93. Furtive : SLY
95. N.F.L. owner who moved the Cleveland Browns to Baltimore in 1996 : ART MODELL
97. She outwitted Sherlock : IRENE
99. ___ greens : COLLARD
102. Versailles resident : ROI
103. Is a poor night watchman, say : DOZES
105. Polo ground? : ORIENT
106. Gargoyle features, often : SPOUTS
109. Showy shrub : AZALEA
112. Showy : ORNATE
113. Greets the day : ARISES
114. "Feeling Good" chanteuse : SIMONE
115. Hide-and-seek cheater : PEEKER
116. 5-Down unit : MODEL T
117. Consumer Reports employee : TESTER

Down
1. Run smoothly : HUM
2. Bear, in Baja : OSO
3. 2012 Emmy winner for Outstanding Drama Series : HOMELAND
4. "L'Africaine," e.g. : OPERA
5. Business titan born July 30, 1863 : HENRY FORD
6. Not conned by : ONTO
7. Grp. that rarely meets during the summer : PTA
8. Take off : REMOVE
9. Give off : EXUDE
10. Light show light : LASER BEAM
11. Put away : ICE
12. Hip-hop's ___ Def : MOS
13. Blasted : STEWED
14. "Garfield" waitress : IRMA
15. Balcony, e.g. : TIER
16. Feature of a 57-Down : CONVEYOR BELT
17. More curious : ODDER
18. Unkempt : MESSY
26. Genetic enzyme : RNASE
28. Fictional character with steel pincers for hands : DR NO
29. Give the silent treatment? : MIME
30. Before long, poetically : ANON
32. Before, poetically : ERE
33. Words to live by : MOTTO
34. Exposed : OUTED
38. Failed investment : LOSS
40. Off course : AFIELD
41. Tobiko, in Japanese cuisine : ROE
43. Bloody : GORY
44. A Beatle : STARR
46. Poorly insulated, say : DRAFTY
47. He wrote "I exist, that is all, and I find it nauseating" : SARTRE
49. Bobble : SLIP
50. Hook's hand : SMEE
52. Wake-up times, for short : AMS
53. Tolkien creatures : ORCS
55. Impressive golf shot : CHIP IN
56. Many a Dream Act beneficiary : LATINO
57. 5-Down innovation : ASSEMBLY LINE
58. Latin 101 verb : ESSE
62. Get down pat : MASTER
63. Up to the task : ABLE
64. Northeast university town : ORONO
65. Getup : DUDS
66. Pac-12 player : UTE
71. Winter sprinkle : SALT
74. Discharge : EGEST
75. Ending with cyto- : PLASM
76. Space rock, maybe : METEOROID
77. List ender : ET AL
78. 116-Across, colloquially : TIN LIZZIE
80. Like : A LA
82. Shrew : SCOLD
83. Bit of TV real estate : TIMESLOT
84. Pearl Buck heroine : O-LAN
85. Where 5-Down's company gets an "F"? : NYSE
87. Bookworm, maybe : NERD
88. Casting source for some H'wood comedies : SNL
90. Hose holder : GARTER
91. Harvey of "Taxi Driver" : KEITEL
93. Cone filler : SCOOP
94. "The Big Bang Theory" co-creator Chuck : LORRE
96. Extinguish : DOUSE
98. Lots : REAMS
100. Tip for a reporter, maybe : LEAK
101. Status quo ___ : ANTE
104. Brewery fixture : OAST
106. Cooke of soul : SAM
107. For : PRO
108. Bygone flier : SST
110. Phoenix-to-Albuquerque dir. : ENE
111. ___ Lingus : AER


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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