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0901-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Sep 13, Sunday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: John Farmer
THEME: Persons of Note … seven of the squares in today’s grid have a number, which goes with the down-answer. The family name of the person who is seen on the US banknote corresponding to that square’s number is included in the across-answer:
1A. Star of four Spike Lee films : DENZEL WASHINGTON
7D. "Be right there!" : 1 SEC!

14A. Longtime Ed Asner role : LOU GRANT
17D. Rapper who feuded with Ja Rule and Nas : 50 CENT

88A. Singer at Obama's 2009 inauguration : ARETHA FRANKLIN
43D. 1980s British band : HAIRCUT 100

89A. Baseball All-Star who was also a football Pro Bowler : BO JACKSON
39D. Pop/rock group with a 2002 hit co-written with Mick Jagger : MATCHBOX 20

119A. First film Tarzan : ELMO LINCOLN
95D. Celebratory gesture : HIGH 5

123A. "The Terminator" co-star : LINDA HAMILTON
97D. Does a surfboard stunt : HANGS 10

124A. Neighbor of Archie Bunker : GEORGE JEFFERSON
113D. "Terrible" toddler time : AGE 2

31D. With 33-Down, Skeptic's advice ... or a "noteworthy" hint to seven Across answers in this puzzle : DON'T TAKE ANY OF
33D. See 31-Down : IT AT FACE VALUE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 57m 06s!!!
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Star of four Spike Lee films : DENZEL WASHINGTON
Denzel Washington is an actor from Mount Vernon, just outside New York City. Washington’s big break came with a TV role, playing Dr. Phillip Chandler on “St. Elsewhere” from 1982 to 1988.

Shelton Jackson Lee is the real name of Spike Lee, the film director and producer. Lee's first feature-length film, released in 1986, was "She's Gotta Have It". Lee shot the film in just twelve days, and kept the movie within its relatively small budget of only $175,000. "She's Gotta Have It" grossed over $7 million ...

14. Longtime Ed Asner role : LOU GRANT
Ed Asner is most famous for playing the irascible but lovable Lou Grant on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and on the spin-off drama "Lou Grant". Off-screen, Asner is noted for his political activism. He served two terms as president of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and was very involved in the 1980 SAG strike. When "Lou Grant" was cancelled in 1982, despite decent ratings, there was a lot of talk that the cancellation was a move by the network against Asner personally. In fact one of Asner's activist colleagues, Howard Hesseman (who played Johnny Fever), found that his show "WKRP in Cincinnati" was also cancelled ... on the very same day ...

18. Birds at a ballpark : ORIOLES
The Baltimore Orioles was one of the eight charter teams of MLB's American League, so the franchise dates back to 1901. Prior to 1901, the team has roots in the Minor League Milwaukee Brewers, and indeed entered the American League as the Brewers. In 1902 the Brewers moved to St. Louis and became the Browns. The team didn't fare well in St. Louis, so when it finally relocated to Baltimore in the early fifties the team changed its name completely, to the Baltimore Orioles. The owners so badly wanted a fresh start that they traded 17 old Browns players with the New York Yankees. The trade didn't help the team's performance on the field in those early days, but it did help distance the new team from its past.

19. 1954 film septet : SAMURAI
Akira Kurosawa was an Oscar-winning Japanese film director. His most famous movie to us in the West has to be "The Seven Samurai", the inspiration for "The Magnificent Seven" starring Yul Brynner, and indeed a basis for "Star Wars: The Clone Wars".

22. Gustav Holst septet : PLANETS
Despite the Scandinavian-sounding name, Gustav Holst was born in Britain and was the most English of classical composers. His most famous work is the orchestral suite known as ‘The Planets”. The suite has seven movements, one for each of the planets known at the time (1914-1916) except Earth. Pluto was discovered during Holst’s lifetime, but decades after he had completed his masterpiece.

23. Barista's offering : LATTE
The term “latte” is an abbreviation of the Italian "caffelatte" meaning "coffee (and) milk". Note that in the correct spelling of "latte", the Italian word for milk, there is no accent over the "e". An accent is often added by mistake when we use the word in English, perhaps meaning to suggest that the word is French.

The person who serves coffee in a coffee shop is often called a "barista". "Barista" is the Italian for "bartender".

24. Cable alternative : DSL
The acronym “DSL” originally stood for Digital Subscriber Loop, but is now accepted to mean (Asymmetric) Digital Subscriber Line. DSL is the technology that allows Internet service be delivered down the same telephone line as voice service, by separating the two into different frequency signals.

25. [typo not fixed] : SIC
"Sic" indicates that a quotation is written as originally found, perhaps including a typo. "Sic" is Latin for "thus, like this".

26. Star of a 1981 Broadway revue subtitled "The Lady and Her Music" : HORNE
Lena Horne was an American jazz singer, actress, dancer and civil rights activist. Horne started out her career as a nightclub singer and then began to get some meaty acting roles in Hollywood. However, she ended up on the blacklist during the McCarthy Era for expressing left wing political views. One of Horne's starring roles was in the 1943 movie "Stormy Weather" for which she also performed the title song.

31. Second-in-command: Abbr. : DEP
Deputy (dep.)

32. 41-Across athlete : ELI
(41A. See 32-Across : YALE)
Elihu Yale was a wealthy merchant born in Boston in 1649. Yale worked for the British East India Company, and for many years served as governor of a settlement at Madras (now Chennai) in India. After India, Yale took over his father’s estate near Wrexham in Wales. It was while resident in Wrexham that Yale responded to a request for financial support for the Collegiate School of Connecticut in 1701. He sent the school a donation, which was used to erect a new building in New Haven that was named “Yale” in his honor. In 1718, the whole school was renamed to “Yale College”. To this day, students of Yale are nicknamed “Elis”, again honoring Elihu.

35. "Gossip well told," per Elbert Hubbard : HISTORY
Elbert Hubbard is today best known for having founded the Roycroft artisan community in East Aurora, New York. Hubbard died with his wife off the coast of Ireland in 1915, as they were passengers in the RMS Lusitania, the ocean liner that was sunk by a German U-boat during WWII.

40. Hydrocarbon ending : -ANE
Alkanes are organic compounds. The “smaller” alkanes are gases and are quite combustible. Methane (CH4) is the main component of natural gas with ethane (C2H6) being the second largest component. Propane (C3H8) is another component of natural gas and is heavy enough to be readily turned into a liquid by compression for ease of transportation and storage. Butane (C4H10) is also easily liquefied under pressure and can be used as the fuel in cigarette lighters or as the propellant in aerosol sprays. The heavier alkanes are not gases, and instead are liquids and solids at room temperature.

42. Electrical unit, old-style : MHO
Conductance (measured in mhos) is the inverse of resistance (measured in ohms). The mho has been replaced by the SI unit called the siemens.

45. Webster's second? : VARIANT
A second word called out in a definition in Webster’s dictionary might be a variant spelling of the first.

Not only is Noah Webster's name inextricably linked with his series of dictionaries, but he is also renowned as an advocate for English spelling reform. He argued that "traditional" English is hard to learn, and that it should be simplified and standardized. He published spelling books that were used in schools, and from edition to edition he changed the spelling of words in order to simplify the language. Examples are the use of "s" over "c" in words like "defense" (In Ireland we have defence and defense depending on usage), "-re" became "-er" as in center instead of centre (reversing the influence of French), and he dropped one of the Ls in words like traveler (I learned "traveller"). Mind you, he also spelled "tongue" as "tung", but he didn't get very far with that one.

50. Author Janowitz : TAMA
Tama Janowitz is an American writer. Janowitz was born in San Francisco but has lived much of her life in New York City. In New York she hung around with the likes of Andy Warhol and became well known in literary circles. Her most famous work is a collection of short stories called "Slaves of New York", which was made into a film of the same name in 1989.

52. Bud's place : EAR
I recently read an article on hearing loss that cites a study published in the “Journal of Pediatrics”. According to the study, 12½% of kids between 6 and 19 suffer from a loss of hearing that is directly attributable to the use of earphones set at a dangerously high volume. Personally, I love listening to all sorts of programming using earbuds. I am careful to use “in-ear” types of earphones that are designed to block out external noise so that I can listen to programming at the lowest possible volume, and don’t have to drown out external sounds. My doctor gives me a pat on the back for doing so, and has asked me to spread the word!

58. It may extend for many minutes : ARC
An arc is a segment of a curve. The angle covered by an arc may be measured in degrees. One sixtieth of a degree is a “minute”.

59. Thoughtful exercise : YOGA
In the West we tend to think of yoga as a physical discipline, a means of exercise that uses specific poses to stretch and strengthen muscles. While it is true that the ancient Indian practice of yoga does involve such physical discipline, the corporeal aspect of the practice plays a relatively small part in the whole philosophy. Other major components are meditation, ethical behavior, breathing and contemplation.

60. Overseas market : BAZAAR
Our word “bazaar” comes from the Persian “bazar” meaning “market”.

69. ___ de carne asada : TACO
“Carne Asada” translates from Spanish as "roasted meat".

70. Burj Khalifa locale : DUBAI
Burj Khalifa is a spectacular skyscraper in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. It is the tallest man-made structure in the world, and has been so since the completion of its exterior in 2009. The space in the building came onto the market at a really bad time, during the global financial crisis. The building was part of a US$20 billion development of downtown Dubai that was backed by the city government which had to go looking for a bailout from the neighboring city of Abu Dhabi. The tower was given the name Burj Khalifa at the last minute, apparently as a nod to the UAE president Khalifa bi Zayed Al Nahyan who helped to broker the bailout.

72. Joint : REEFER
Marijuana cigarettes have been known as “reefers” since the twenties. It is thought that the term comes from either the Mexican Spanish for a drug addict, “grifo”, or from its resemblance to a rolled sail i.e. a sail that has been “reefed”.

78. Prickly sticker : BUR
The hook-and-loop fastener we now call Velcro was invented in 1941 by Georges de Mestral, a Swiss engineer. Mestral noticed that the seeds of the burdock plant (burrs or burs) stuck to his clothes. Under the microscope he found hooks on the burrs that grabbed hold of loops in his clothing. After years of development, he came up with a way of simulating the natural hook using man-made materials, and Velcro was born.

82. Radar reading : VELOCITY
Scientists have been using radio waves to detect the presence of objects since the late 1800s, but it was the demands of WWII that accelerated the practical application of the technology. The British called their system RDF standing for Range and Direction Finding. The system used by the US Navy was called Radio Detection And Ranging, which was shortened to the acronym RADAR.

84. Steel giant, formerly : USX
US Steel was founded in 1901 with a merger of Carnegie Steel, Federal Steel and National Steel. The resulting company immediately became the world’s first billion-dollar corporation. US Steel reorganized in 1986 and changed its name to USX Corporation, but reverted to the US Steel name in 2001. I think I’m right in saying that the USX name was chosen because US Steel is traded under the symbol “X” on the New York Stock Exchange …

87. End of an argument : QED
QED is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. The QED acronym stands for the Latin "quod erat demonstrandum" meaning "that which was to be demonstrated".

88. Singer at Obama's 2009 inauguration : ARETHA FRANKLIN
I think Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul, had a tough life. Franklin had her first son when she was just 13-years-old, and her second at 15. In 2008, "Rolling Stone" magazine ranked Franklin as number one in their list of the greatest singers of all time.

89. Baseball All-Star who was also a football Pro Bowler : BO JACKSON
Bo Jackson is a former professional baseball and football player. Jackson was named All-Star in both sports, the first athlete to be so honored. Bo Jackson worked alongside R&B guitarist in a famous “Bo Know” advertising campaign for Nike.

90. Edamame source : SOYA
Edamame is a simple dish made of immature soybeans still in the pod. The pods are boiled and then salted before serving, usually as a snack or side dish. The name “edamame” translates as “twig bean”.

92. Cross-state rival of CIN : CLE
The Cleveland Browns football team was a charter member of the All-American Football Conference, formed in 1946. Cleveland is the only NFL city that has never hosted nor sent a team to the Super Bowl.

The NFL’s Cincinnati Bengals team was founded in 1966 as a member of the American Football League (AFL). There was an earlier team called the Bengals in the city, which played from 1937 to 1941. The team used the “Bengal” name because Cincinnati Zoo was home to a very rare Bengal tiger.

93. Arizona's ___ Cienegas National Conservation Area : LAS
The Las Cienegas National Conservation Area is located in the Sonoran desert of Arizona.

97. Home base for many a mission : HOUSTON
NASA’s famous “Mission Control” is located in the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

102. Honorarium : FEE
An “honorarium” is a payment made to a professional for a service that usually does not merit a fee. The term is Latin, and was originally used for a bribe that was paid to be awarded an honorary post.

103. Nirvana's "Come as You ___" : ARE
Nirvana is a rock band, formed in Washington in 1987 by Kurt Cobaine and Krist Novoselic. The band effectively disbanded in 1994 after Cobaine committed suicide.

109. Proust title character : SWANN
"In Search of Lost Time" is a very, very long novel written by Marcel Proust. The novel is divided into seven volumes and was first published in 1913-1927. The first of the volumes is called "Swann's Way".

112. Campers' letters : KOA
Kampgrounds of America (KOA) was founded in 1962 by Montana businessman Dave Drum who opened up his first property along the Yellowstone River. Drum's strategy was to offer a rich package of services including hot showers, restrooms and a store, which he hoped would attract people used to camping in the rough. The original campground was an immediate hit and Drum took on two partners and sold franchises all over the country. There are about 500 KOA sites today.

119. First film Tarzan : ELMO LINCOLN
Actor Elmo Lincoln is most remembered as the first person to portray Tarzan on the big screen. Lincoln starred in the 1918 silent movie “Tarzan of the Apes”. Technically speaking, Lincoln was the second to portray the character, as Gordon Griffith played Tarzan as a child in the same film.

120. White Russian, e.g. : TSARIST
White Russians were members and supporters of the White movement that opposed the Bolsheviks in the Russian Civil War fought from 1917 to 1922. The term “White” was used to denote opposition to the revolutionary Red Army.

121. 1918's Battle of the ___ Forest : ARGONNE
The Meuse-Argonne Offensive (also called the Battle of the Argonne Forest) was an Allied offensive along the entire western front that took place in the last few weeks of WWI. Fought by US and French forces against the Germans, the offensive was the biggest operation launched by the American Expeditionary Force in WWI. The Meuse-Argonne was the deadliest battle in US history, as 26,277 US soldiers lost their lives.

122. Formula One units : LAPS
In motor racing, the designation "formula" is a set of rules that all participants and cars must abide by. The definition of "Formula One" was agreed back in 1946, with the "one" designating that it is the most advanced of the "formulae", and the most competitive.

123. "The Terminator" co-star : LINDA HAMILTON
Linda Hamilton is an actress from Salisbury, Maryland who is best known for portraying Sarah Connor in the first two “Terminator” movies. Hamilton’s second marriage was to film director James Cameron, with whom she worked on “Terminator 2”.

124. Neighbor of Archie Bunker : GEORGE JEFFERSON
George Jefferson was a supporting character in the sitcom “All in the Family”, and a lead character in the spin-off show “The Jeffersons”. The role was played by actor Sherman Hemsley.

Down
1. "I ___ it!" (Skelton catchphrase) : DOOD
Red Skelton was an American comedian who started out in show business as a teenager working with the circus. Skelton had a very successful career on radio before moving to television in the early fifties. His popularity only began to fade in the early seventies, when he had difficulty appealing to younger audiences. Skelton spent less time performing in his latter years, and turned to his other great love ... painting.

2. Bond villain ___ Stavro Blofeld : ERNST
Ernst Stavro Blofeld is a villain in the James Bond universe. Blofeld has been played on the big screen several times by different actors. My favorite is Donald Pleasance in 1967’s “You Only Live Twice”.

3. Popular snack brand : NILLA
As one might expect, Nilla is a shortened from of "vanilla". However, you won't find any vanilla in Nilla cookies or wafers. They have always been flavored with vanillin, synthetic vanilla. Is nothing sacred ...?

4. Actress/screenwriter Kazan : ZOE
The actress Zoe Kazan is a granddaughter of famed film and theater director Elia Kazan.

8. Heap : JALOPY
The origins of our word "jalopy" meaning "dilapidated old motor car" seem to have been lost in time, but the word has been around since the 1920s. One credible suggestion is that it comes from Jalapa, Mexico as the Jalapa scrap yards were the destination for many discarded American automobiles.

9. Poet Khayyám : OMAR
Omar Khayyám was a Persian with many talents. He was a poet as well as an important mathematician, astronomer and physician. A selection of his poems were translated by one Edward Fitzgerald in a collection called "Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyám".

11. Founder of the New York Tribune : GREELEY
Horace Greeley was a newspaper editor and politician. In the media industry, Greeley founded and edited the “New York Tribune”, which was a very influential paper in the 1800s. In an 1865 editorial he wrote the famous words “Go West, young man, go West and grow up with the country.” As a politician, Greeley ran for US President in the 1872 election. He lost that election to Ulysses S. Grant in a landslide. Greeley died not long after the votes were cast, making him the only presidential candidate to have died prior to the counting of electoral college votes.

13. Tiddlywink, e.g. : DISC
Tiddlywinks is a game played by children, and sometimes competitively by adults. The idea is to propel “winks” into a pot using a “squidger”.

14. Peruvian pack : LLAMAS
Many female mammals lick off their newborn. That’s not an option for llamas as their tongues only reach out of their mouths about half an inch. Instead llama dams nuzzle their young and hum to them.

15. Warren of "Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia" : OATES
Warren Oates was an actor who worked a lot with director Sam Peckinpah, including the films “The Wild Bunch” and “Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia”. I mainly remember Oates for playing Sergeant Hulka (the drill sergeant) on the 1981 comedy “Stripes”.

17. Rapper who feuded with Ja Rule and Nas : 50 CENT
Rap star 50 Cent's real name is Curtis James Jackson III, and is from South Jamaica in Queens, New York. 50 Cent had a rough life starting out, first dealing drugs at the age of 12. He dropped his illegal activities to pursue a rap career, but still fell victim to an assailant who pumped nine bullets into him. The alleged shooter was himself shot three weeks later, and died. 50 Cent's alleged attacker was a bodyguard and close friend of Mike Tyson.

28. Women's rooms? : HAREMS
"Harem" is a Turkish word, derived from the Arabic for "forbidden place". Traditionally a harem was the female quarters in a household in which a man had more than one wife. Not only wives (and concubines) would use the harem, but also young children and other female relatives. The main point was that no men were allowed in the area.

30. Actress Belafonte : SHARI
Shari Belafonte is model-turned-actress from New York City. Her most famous role was Julie Gilette on the TV drama “Hotel” in the eighties. Shari is the daughter of singer Harry Belafonte.

36. Colorful songbird : TANAGER
The Scarlet Tanager is a beautiful-looking bird, truly scarlet in color other than its wings and tail. It is in the cardinal family.

39. Pop/rock group with a 2002 hit co-written with Mick Jagger : MATCHBOX 20
Matchbox Twenty is a rock band from Orlando, Florida.

43. 1980s British band : HAIRCUT 100
British pop group Haircut One Hundred had four Top Ten hits in the UK in the early eighties. Never heard of them …

45. Paganini or Rachmaninoff : VIRTUOSO
Niccolò Paganini was a famed Italian violinist and composer. Paganini was perhaps the most celebrated violinist of the 19th century. His most famous composition has to be his Caprice No. 24 in A minor, Op. 1. This work is the basis for many derivative masterpieces by other composers, including the wonderful “Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini” by Rachmaninoff.

Sergei Rachmaninoff was a Russian pianist and composer active in the late Romantic Era. Rachmaninoff emigrated from Russia in 1917, driven away by the Russian Revolution. He eventually settled in the US where he toured as a pianist for many years. Rachmaninoff’s most famous works are probably his “Piano Concerto No. 1” and his “Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini”.

46. "He makes no friend who never made ___": Tennyson : A FOE
Alfred Tennyson was the Poet Laureate during for much of the reign of Queen Victoria. There are many phrases we use today that were first penned by Tennyson, including:
- “‘Tis better to have loved and lost / Than never to have loved at all”
- “Theirs not to reason why, / Theirs but to do and die”

47. Schooner sail : JIB
A jib is a triangular sail that is set at the bow of a sailboat.

By definition, a schooner is sailing vessel with two or more masts, but one on which the foremast is shorter than the rear mast(s).

48. Health org. since 1847 : AMA
The American Medical Association (AMA) was founded in 1847 at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. The first female member was allowed to join the AMA in 1868, but the first African American members weren't admitted until one hundred years later, in 1968.

49. Dickens pen name : BOZ
Charles Dickens used the pen-name Boz early in his career. He had already established himself as the most famous novelist of the Victorian Era when he came to visit America in 1842. He was honored by 3,000 of New York's elite at a "Boz Ball" in the Park Theater.

51. Raiding grp. : ATF
The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) is today part of the Department of Justice. The ATF has its roots in the Department of Treasury dating back to 1886 when it was known as the Bureau of Prohibition. "Explosives" was added to the ATF's name when the bureau was moved under the Department of Justice as part of the reorganization called for in the Homeland Security Act of 2002.

55. Air safety org. : FAA
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was set up in 1958 (as the Federal Aviation Agency). The agency was established at that particular time largely in response to an increasing number of midair collisions. The worst of these disasters had taken place two years earlier over the Grand Canyon, a crash between two commercial passenger airplanes that resulted in 128 fatalities.

64. Uncle ___ : SAM
The Uncle Sam personification of the United States was first used during the War of 1812. The “Uncle Sam” term was so widely accepted that even the Germans used it during WWII, choosing the code word "Samland" for "America" in intelligence communiques.

71. Homemade bomb, for short : IED
Sadly, having spent much of my life in the border areas between southern and Northern Ireland, I am all too familiar with the devastating effects of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs). One has to admire the bravery of soldiers who spend their careers defusing (or attempting to defuse) such devices in order to save the lives and property of others. Of course these days, IEDs are very much in the news in Iraq and Afghanistan.

73. Web site heading : FAQ
Most websites have a page listing answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). There is a link to the NYTCrossword.com FAQ page at the top right of every page.

75. Sanguine : RED
“Sanguine” is such a lovely word, and means cheerfully optimistic. It also means ruddy or red in color, e.g. a sanguine complexion. It comes to English from Latin, via French as "sanguis" is the Latin word for "blood". The interpretation of sanguine as meaning cheerful and optimistic comes from the medieval interpretation of the "four humors" of the body, the four bodily fluids (blood, bile, phlegm and black bile). If blood was the predominant humor in a person, than that individual had a cheerful outlook on life.

91. Acronym for the hearing-impaired : AMESLAN
“Ameslan” is an obsolete abbreviation for “American Sign Language” (ASL).

92. Louis Armstrong instrument : CORNET
Louis Armstrong was born in New Orleans in 1900. Armstrong had a poor upbringing, and only stayed in school till he was 11 years old. The exact origin of Louis’s nickname “Satchmo” seems to be a little unclear. One story is that he used to dance for pennies in New Orleans as a youngster and would hide those pennies in his mouth away from the other kids. For this he earned the nickname “satchel mouth”, which was shortened to “Satchmo”.

94. "___ Republic" : PLATO’S
The greatest work of the Greek philosopher Plato is said by most to be his treatise called “The Republic”. The work takes the form of a Socratic dialogue, meaning that it features Plato’s teacher, Socrates, in dialogue with others discussing the subject matter. Much of the text deals with justice and various forms of government.

95. Celebratory gesture : HIGH 5
The celebratory gesture that we call a “high five” is said to have been invented by former baseball players Dusty Baker and Glenn Burke when they were both playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers in the later 1970s.

96. Alaska town that is mile 0 of the Iditarod Trail : SEWARD
The city of Seward, Alaska was named for Secretary of State William Seward, who fought for and negotiated the purchase of Alaska from Russia. Seward is the southerly terminus of the Iditarod Trail, known historically as the Seward-to-Nome Mail Trail.

97. Does a surfboard stunt : HANGS 10
A surfer performs the maneuver “Hanging Ten” by positioning the board so that the back is covered by the wave, and then walking to the front of the board and “hanging” his or her “ten” toes over the nose of the board.

98. 1913 Literature Nobelist from India : TAGORE
Rabindranath Tagore was a polymath from Bengal in India. Tagore was the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, which he did in 1913.

99. Douglas Hofstadter's "___, Escher, Bach" : GODEL
Douglas Hofstadter is an American academic, and a winner of a Pulitzer Prize for his book “Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid”, first published in 1979.

100. Amtrak bullet train : ACELA
The Acela Express is the fastest train routinely running in the US, getting up to 150 mph at times. The service runs between Boston and Washington D.C. via Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York. The brand name "Acela" was created to evoke "acceleration" and "excellence".

105. Scratching (out) : EKING
To "eke out" means to "make something go further or last longer". For example, you could eke out your income by cutting back on expenses. I always have a problem with the commonly cited definition of “eke out” as “barely get by”. Close but no cigar, I say ...

106. "Meditation XVII" writer : DONNE
John Donne is one of England's most celebrated poets, working at the start of the 17th century. He spent much of his life in poverty and even spent a short time in prison for having married his wife without procuring the appropriate permissions. After his release, his wife bore him 12 children in 16 years, passing away a few days after the twelfth child was born.

108. N.R.A. piece?: Abbr. : NATL
The NRA is the National Rifle Association, an organization that has been around since 1871. The NRA has had some celebrity presidents, including US President Ulysses S. Grant. It's often said that the NRA is the most powerful lobbying group in Washington.

110. Vegas casino with a musical name : ARIA
Aria is one of the newer casinos on the Las Vegas Strip. “Popular Mechanics” magazine described Aria as “the most technologically advanced hotel ever built”.

111. Newsweek, e.g., now : EMAG
“Newsweek” was a weekly American news magazine launched in 1933. The magazine ran into financial trouble starting in 2008 and eventually had to cease publication of a print version at the end of 2012. “Newsweek” continues to do business in an all-digital format as “Newsweek Global” after a merger with the news website “The Daily Beast”.

116. Auden's "___ Walked Out One Evening" : AS I
The noted poet W. H. Auden was born and raised in England, but eventually became a US citizen. As well as hundreds of poems, Auden also wrote librettos for operas, including Igor Stravinsky's “The Rake’s Progress”.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Star of four Spike Lee films : DENZEL WASHINGTON
8. Exercised on a track : JOGGED
14. Longtime Ed Asner role : LOU GRANT
18. Birds at a ballpark : ORIOLES
19. 1954 film septet : SAMURAI
20. White: Fr. : BLANC
21. Away, in a way : ON LEAVE
22. Gustav Holst septet : PLANETS
23. Barista's offering : LATTE
24. Cable alternative : DSL
25. [typo not fixed] : SIC
26. Star of a 1981 Broadway revue subtitled "The Lady and Her Music" : HORNE
27. Add one's views : CHIME IN
29. Style : TASTE
31. Second-in-command: Abbr. : DEP
32. 41-Across athlete : ELI
34. How his-and-hers towels are sold : AS A SET
35. "Gossip well told," per Elbert Hubbard : HISTORY
37. Comebacks : RETORTS
39. Bud : MAC
40. Hydrocarbon ending : -ANE
41. See 32-Across : YALE
42. Electrical unit, old-style : MHO
45. Webster's second? : VARIANT
47. Quick punch : JAB
50. Author Janowitz : TAMA
52. Bud's place : EAR
53. Strike turf before the ball, in golf : HIT IT FAT
54. Bye line? : I’M OFF
56. Olympic venues : STADIA
58. It may extend for many minutes : ARC
59. Thoughtful exercise : YOGA
60. Overseas market : BAZAAR
62. Tease : FLIRT
63. Unspecified degrees : NTHS
65. Comic strip cries : EEKS
67. Waltzed through : ACED
69. ___ de carne asada : TACO
70. Burj Khalifa locale : DUBAI
72. Joint : REEFER
76. Fashion label ___-Picone : EVAN
78. Prickly sticker : BUR
79. Letter with a limited amount of space : ROOMER
81. Savvy : AWARE
82. Radar reading : VELOCITY
84. Steel giant, formerly : USX
85. Chug : DOWN
87. End of an argument : QED
88. Singer at Obama's 2009 inauguration : ARETHA FRANKLIN
89. Baseball All-Star who was also a football Pro Bowler : BO JACKSON
90. Edamame source : SOYA
92. Cross-state rival of CIN : CLE
93. Arizona's ___ Cienegas National Conservation Area : LAS
94. Hot prospects, say : PHENOMS
97. Home base for many a mission : HOUSTON
99. Like Victorian streets : GASLIT
102. Honorarium : FEE
103. Nirvana's "Come as You ___" : ARE
104. Paid to play : ANTED
107. It has 135-degree angles : OCTAGON
109. Proust title character : SWANN
111. See 115-Across : EGG
112. Campers' letters : KOA
114. ___ by chocolate (popular dessert) : DEATH
115. Certain 111-Across specification : AA LARGE
117. Ghostly sound : MOANING
119. First film Tarzan : ELMO LINCOLN
120. White Russian, e.g. : TSARIST
121. 1918's Battle of the ___ Forest : ARGONNE
122. Formula One units : LAPS
123. "The Terminator" co-star : LINDA HAMILTON
124. Neighbor of Archie Bunker : GEORGE JEFFERSON

Down
1. "I ___ it!" (Skelton catchphrase) : DOOD
2. Bond villain ___ Stavro Blofeld : ERNST
3. Popular snack brand : NILLA
4. Actress/screenwriter Kazan : ZOE
5. Stretchiness : ELASTICITY
6. Assesses : LEVIES
7. "Be right there!" : 1 SEC!
8. Heap : JALOPY
9. Poet Khayyám : OMAR
10. Artillery crewman : GUNNER
11. Founder of the New York Tribune : GREELEY
12. Have something : EAT
13. Tiddlywink, e.g. : DISC
14. Peruvian pack : LLAMAS
15. Warren of "Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia" : OATES
16. Free : UNTIE
17. Rapper who feuded with Ja Rule and Nas : 50 CENT
19. Round figure : SPHERE
20. Second-tier, among celebs : B-LIST
28. Women's rooms? : HAREMS
30. Actress Belafonte : SHARI
31. With 33-Down, Skeptic's advice ... or a "noteworthy" hint to seven Across answers in this puzzle : DON'T TAKE ANY OF
33. See 31-Down : IT AT FACE VALUE
36. Colorful songbird : TANAGER
38. Brazilian greeting : OLA
39. Pop/rock group with a 2002 hit co-written with Mick Jagger : MATCHBOX 20
42. Story coloring? : MEDIA BIAS
43. 1980s British band : HAIRCUT 100
44. Big deliveries? : ORATORY
45. Paganini or Rachmaninoff : VIRTUOSO
46. "He makes no friend who never made ___": Tennyson : A FOE
47. Schooner sail : JIB
48. Health org. since 1847 : AMA
49. Dickens pen name : BOZ
51. Raiding grp. : ATF
53. Polish the old-fashioned way : HAND RUB
55. Air safety org. : FAA
57. ___-rock : ALT
61. Apotheosizes : REVERES
64. Uncle ___ : SAM
66. Wrap (up) : SEW
68. Hollow : DALE
71. Homemade bomb, for short : IED
73. Web site heading : FAQ
74. Before, in verse : ERE
75. Sanguine : RED
77. Recently : NOT LONG AGO
80. Met, as a challenge : ROSE TO
83. "U.S.A." is part of one : CHANT
86. Ended up? : WON
91. Acronym for the hearing-impaired : AMESLAN
92. Louis Armstrong instrument : CORNET
94. "___ Republic" : PLATO’S
95. Celebratory gesture : HIGH 5
96. Alaska town that is mile 0 of the Iditarod Trail : SEWARD
97. Does a surfboard stunt : HANGS 10
98. 1913 Literature Nobelist from India : TAGORE
99. Douglas Hofstadter's "___, Escher, Bach" : GODEL
100. Amtrak bullet train : ACELA
101. Sign of approval : STAMP
105. Scratching (out) : EKING
106. "Meditation XVII" writer : DONNE
108. N.R.A. piece?: Abbr. : NATL
110. Vegas casino with a musical name : ARIA
111. Newsweek, e.g., now : EMAG
113. "Terrible" toddler time : AGE 2
116. Auden's "___ Walked Out One Evening" : AS I
118. Often-partnered conjunction : NOR


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0831-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Aug 13, Saturday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Josh Knapp
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 31m 21s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. TV host who won a Best Comedy Album Grammy : JIMMY FALLON
Jimmy Fallon was a cast member for a number of years on “Saturday Night Live” before getting his own talk show in 2009, “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon”.

18. Beast in a Marco Polo tale : ROC
The mythical roc is a huge bird of prey, reputedly able to carry off and eat elephants. The roc was said to come from the Indian subcontinent. The supposed existence of the roc was promulgated by Marco Polo in the accounts that he published of his travels through Asia.

Marco Polo was a merchant from Venice and a famous traveler throughout Asia. Polo journeyed with his father and uncle on an epic tour of Central Asia and China that lasted 24 years. Marco tends to be the member of the party we remember today though, because it was he who documented their travels in a book called "Il Milione".

19. Old station name : ESSO
The brand name Esso has its roots in the old Standard Oil company as it uses the initial letters of "Standard" and "Oil" (ESS-O). The Esso brand was replaced by Exxon in the US, but ESSO is still used in many other countries.

20. Abbr. in a birth announcement : LBS
The unit of mass that we know today as a “pound” is descended from the old Roman unit of weight known as a “libra”. That “libra” connection is why we abbreviate pound to “lb”. The name “pound” though comes from the Latin “pondo” meaning “weight”.

21. Request in pool or beer pong : RERACK
The more correct name for the game of pool is pocket billiards. The name "pool" arose after pocket billiards became a common feature in "pool halls", places where gamblers "pooled" their money to bet on horse races.

The game of beer pong is also known as “Beirut”. Beer pong reputedly originated as a drinking game in the fraternities of Dartmouth College in the fifties, when it was played with paddles and a ping pong net on a table. The origin of the “Beirut” name is less clear, but it probably was coined in while the Lebanese Civil War was raging in late seventies and the eighties.

23. Hudson River school? : SHADS
The shad is also known as the river herring. The eggs (roe) of the female shad are prized as a delicacy in the Eastern US.

The Hudson River flows through eastern New York State from Henderson Lake in the Adirondacks to the Port of New York and New Jersey. The river is named for the English explorer Henry Hudson who explored it in 1609.

28. Prizes given to good docs? : OSCARS
There is an Academy Award for the Best Documentary Feature.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is the organization that gives the annual Academy Awards also known as the "Oscars". The root of the name "Oscar" is hotly debated, but what is agreed is that the award was officially named "Oscar" in 1939. The first Academy Awards were presented at a brunch in 1929 with an audience of just 29 people. The Awards ceremony is a slightly bigger event these days ...

31. "Kazaam" star, informally : SHAQ
Shaquille O'Neal is one of the heaviest players ever to have played in the NBA (weighing in at around 325 pounds). Yep, he's a big guy ... 7 foot 1 inch tall.

“Kazaam” is a 1996 family movie about a genie who grants three wishes to a young boy. Kazaam is the name of the genie, and is played by basketball legend Shaquille O’Neal. The film was directed by Paul Michael Glaser who played Starsky on “Starsky and Hutch” in the seventies. No one seemed to like the “Kazaam” movie.

37. Beast hunted by Hemingway in "Green Hills of Africa" : KUDU
The kudu is a species of antelope.

“Green Hills of Africa” is a nonfiction book by Ernest Hemingway. In the book, Hemingway recounts his travels with his wife on a month-long safari in East Africa.

38. Work set mostly in Cyprus : OTHELLO
Shakespeare’s “Othello” was first performed in 1604. The main characters in the play are:
- Othello, a general in the army of Venice
- Desdemona, Othello’s wife
- Cassio, Othello’s trusted ensign
- Iago, the villain of the piece

Cyprus is an island nation in the Mediterranean Sea, a member of the European Union. Cyprus is a divided island, with the Republic of Cyprus controlled about 605 of its area. The remaining 40% calls itself the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, and is occupied by Turkish forces.

42. Wilde wrote "De Profundis" in one : GAOL
If you didn't know Oscar Wilde was Irish, you will when you see the name he was given at birth: Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde!

“De Profundis” is a long letter that Oscar Wilde wrote while imprisoned in Reading Gaol having been convicted of sodomy. The letter is addressed to Lord Alfred Douglas, Wilde’s lover, although the prison authorities would not allow it to be mailed. The letter was sent to Douglas after Wilde was released from prison. It was published five years after Wilde died under the title “De Profundis”, words from Psalm 129.

43. Lion runner : MAC
Lion is the name of the operating system that runs on Apple’s Macintosh line of computers.

46. Rash application : ALOE
Aloe vera has a number of alternate names that are descriptive of its efficacy as a medicine. These include the First Aid plant, Wand of Heaven, Silent Healer and Miracle Plant.

51. 1-Across's home, once: Abbr. : SNL
“Saturday Night Live” (SNL).

52. Resistance figure : OMEGA
The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm's Law.

61. Many a donor, in brief : ALUM
An "alumnus" (plural ... alumni) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is "alumna" (plural ... alumnae). The term comes into English from Latin, in which alumnus means foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or an alumnus.

62. Go around, but not quite go in : RIM
In sports like basketball and golf, “to rim” is to roll around the rim of the basket or golf cup without falling in.

63. W.W. II defense : MAGINOT LINE
The Maginot Line was a fortified line built in the 1930s by France along her borders with Germany. The French built a similar fortification along the border with Italy called the Alpine Line. The Maginot Line was pretty much useless at the start of WWII as the Germans just went around it and invaded France through Belgium. It was French minister,André Maginot who convinced the government to build the fortifications, and so the resulting “line” was named in his honor.

66. Sun ___ : TZU
Sun Tzu was a Chinese general in the 6th century BC who wrote a famous treatise called
"The Art of War(fare)". I've even seen the principles in Sun Tzu's book applied to modern business.

67. Fall fallout, some believe : ORIGINAL SIN
In the Christian tradition, “original sin” is the state of sin that exists in all humanity as a result of Adam’s first disobedience in the Garden of Eden. At least according to the Roman Catholic faith, three people were born without original sin: the Virgin Mary, Jesus Christ and John the Baptist.

69. Scorsese film before "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore" : MEAN STREETS
“Mean Streets” is a crime drama co-written and directed by Martin Scorsese, and released in 1973. The leads in the movie are played Robert De Niro and Harvey Keitel.

"Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore" is a 1974 film directed by Martin Scorsese about a widow and her son travelling across the American Southwest in search of a better life. Ellen Burstyn plays the mother, and the supporting cast includes a very yoiung Jodie Foster in one of her first big screen roles.

Down
1. "The Two ___" ("Chinatown" sequel) : JAKES
“The Two Jakes” is the 1990 sequel to the hit 1974 film “Chinatown” “The Two Jakes” stars Jack Nicholson, who also directs.

3. Quick set : MENSA
If you ever had to learn Latin, as did I, "mensa" was probably taught to you in Lesson One as it's the word commonly used as an example of a first declension noun. Mensa means "table". The Mensa organization for folks with high IQs was set up in Oxford, England back in 1946. To become a member, one is required to have an IQ that is in the top 2% of the population.

7. Source of the word "alcohol" : ARABIC
Back in the 1500s, “alcohol” was the name given to a fine powder produced by sublimation. “Alcohol” came from the Arabic “al-kuhul”, a term for a fine powder used to darken the eyelids. Over time, “alcohol” was used to describe any sublimated substance, and then any pure spirit. The term was extended to mean the intoxicating agent in wine in the 1700s.

9. Velázquez's "___ Meninas" : LAS
“Las Meninas” is a painting by Diego Velázquez, the name of which translates to “The Maids of Honor”. “Las Meninas” is the most famous painting owned by the Museo del Prado in Madrid.

Diego Velázquez was a Spanish painter during the Baroque period. He was a member of the court of King Philip IV in the first half of the 17th century, and as such was commissioned to paint many portraits and scenes of historical importance.

10. Repute : ODOR
The term “odor” can be used to mean “esteem, repute”. I guess something that smells, has an “odor”, does have a good reputation.

11. Orange and blue wearer, for short : NY MET
The New York Mets baseball team was founded in 1962, a replacement for two teams that the city had lost, namely the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants. For several years the Mets played very poorly, finishing no better than second-to-last in their division. Then of course along came the “Miracle Mets” who beat the Baltimore Orioles in 1969 to claim the World Series in a huge upset.

12. It opens during the fall : PARACHUTE
The term “parachute” was coined by Frenchman François Blanchard, from “para-” meaning “defence against” and “chute” meaning “a fall”.

13. Some trade barriers : BLOCKADES
“Embargo” and “blockade” are two similar yet different terms. An embargo is a legal prohibition of trade with a particular country, whilst a blockade is an act of war, a militarily enforced prevention of the movement of goods and services. The term "embargo" came into English from Spanish, in the late 16th century.

14. Nada : JACK SQUAT
“Squat” is a slang term for “nothing”. “Squat” and the variant “Jack squat”, probably have a distasteful derivation that is related to a bodily function.

26. Humphries of the N.B.A. : KRIS
Kris Humphries is a basketball player with the Brooklyn Nets. Humphries was married for a short time to TV personality Kim Kardashian in 2011/2012.

29. Southern site of an 1865 battle : SELMA
The Battle of Selma was fought towards the end of the Civil War, in Selma, Alabama.
In 1865, Selam had strong defenses, but lacked the men needed to make good use of them. The Union soldiers broke through the defensive line in several places and the Confederates surrendered the city in less than a day.

32. Wrap session? : TOGA PARTY
In Ancient Rome the classical attire known as a toga (plural “togae”) was usually worn over a tunic. The tunic was made from linen, and the toga itself was a piece of cloth about twenty feet long made from wool. The toga could only be worn by men, and only if those men were Roman citizens. The female equivalent of the toga was called a "stola".

33. Slant one's words, in a way : ITALICIZE
Italic type leans to the right. The style is known as "italic" because the stylized calligraphic form of writing originated in Italy, probably in the Vatican.

48. Self-titled debut album of 1991 : ALANIS
Alanis Morissette is a Canadian singer-songwriter. After releasing two pop albums in Canada, in 1995 she recorded her first album to be distributed internationally. Called "Jagged Little Pill", it is a collection of songs with more of a rock influence. The album was a huge success, the highest-selling album of the 1990s, and the highest-selling debut album by any artist at any time (selling over 30 million units).

53. "Au Revoir, Les Enfants" writer/director : MALLE
"Au revoir, les enfants" ("Goodbye, Children") is a French film released in 1987. The film is based on real events from the childhood of director Louis Malle who witnessed a Gestapo raid on his school. During the raid, three Jewish students and a Jewish teacher were taken and transported to Auschwitz, where they were gassed upon arrival.

54. Sporty Lotus model : ELISE
The Elise is a roadster that was released by British auto manufacturer Lotus Cars in 1996. The car was named for Elisa, the granddaughter of Lotus chairman at the time, Romano Artioli.

56. Accord indicators : AMENS
The word “amen” is translated as “so be it”. “Amen” is said to be of Hebrew origin, but it is likely to be also influenced by Aramaic and Arabic.

64. 1998 Angelina Jolie biopic : GIA
Gia Carangi was a fashion model, often described as the world’s first supermodel. Carangi was from Philadelphia, and had her first modelling jobs appearing in newspaper ads. She started to abuse heroin in 1980, at 20 years of age. She contracted AIDS, and died at 26 years old. Carangi was one of the first famous women to succumb to the disease, in 1986. HBO made a biopic about Carangi’s life called “Gia” in 1998. Angelina Jolie plays the title role.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. TV host who won a Best Comedy Album Grammy : JIMMY FALLON
12. Vegan lunch option, informally : PBJ
15. Cry used to pump up a crowd : ARE YOU READY?
16. Following : A LA
17. Fortune : KING’S RANSOM
18. Beast in a Marco Polo tale : ROC
19. Old station name : ESSO
20. Abbr. in a birth announcement : LBS
21. Request in pool or beer pong : RERACK
23. Hudson River school? : SHADS
25. "Eww!" : ICK!
27. Soundtrack to many a bomb-defusing scene : TICKS
28. Prizes given to good docs? : OSCARS
31. "Kazaam" star, informally : SHAQ
32. Crying need? : TISSUE
36. A wedge might come out of it : PIE
37. Beast hunted by Hemingway in "Green Hills of Africa" : KUDU
38. Work set mostly in Cyprus : OTHELLO
40. Herbal quaff : SAGE TEA
42. Wilde wrote "De Profundis" in one : GAOL
43. Lion runner : MAC
45. Unlike a showboat : MODEST
46. Rash application : ALOE
47. Reception opening : A TOAST
49. Hull sealer : PITCH
51. 1-Across's home, once: Abbr. : SNL
52. Resistance figure : OMEGA
57. Like pickle juice : ACETIC
59. Dated : SAW
61. Many a donor, in brief : ALUM
62. Go around, but not quite go in : RIM
63. W.W. II defense : MAGINOT LINE
66. Sun ___ : TZU
67. Fall fallout, some believe : ORIGINAL SIN
68. Short agreement : YEP
69. Scorsese film before "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore" : MEAN STREETS

Down
1. "The Two ___" ("Chinatown" sequel) : JAKES
2. Like 1-Across, by descent : IRISH
3. Quick set : MENSA
4. "Oh no!" : MY GOD!
5. His, modern-style? : YOS
6. Roll up and bind : FURL
7. Source of the word "alcohol" : ARABIC
8. Glass protector : LENS CAP
9. Velázquez's "___ Meninas" : LAS
10. Repute : ODOR
11. Orange and blue wearer, for short : NY MET
12. It opens during the fall : PARACHUTE
13. Some trade barriers : BLOCKADES
14. Nada : JACK SQUAT
22. On the line : RISKED
24. Dangerous thing to sell : SOUL
26. Humphries of the N.B.A. : KRIS
29. Southern site of an 1865 battle : SELMA
30. Weak spots : SEAMS
32. Wrap session? : TOGA PARTY
33. Slant one's words, in a way : ITALICIZE
34. Picture with a lot of gunplay : SHOOT ‘EM UP
35. Game controller button : SELECT
39. Cholesterol-lowering food : OATS
41. First-choice : GO-TO
44. Hand over (to) : CONSIGN
48. Self-titled debut album of 1991 : ALANIS
50. Sign at a game : HI, MOM
53. "Au Revoir, Les Enfants" writer/director : MALLE
54. Sporty Lotus model : ELISE
55. Put one's foot down, in a way? : GUN IT
56. Accord indicators : AMENS
58. Protection : CARE
60. "I ___ tell" : WON’T
64. 1998 Angelina Jolie biopic : GIA
65. 49-Across source : TAR


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0830-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Aug 13, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: David Steinberg
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 20m 05s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. First female candidate to win the Ames Straw Poll : MICHELE BACHMANN
Michele Bachmann has been a member of the US House of Representatives since 2007, representing a district that includes suburbs of the Twin Cities in Minnesota. Bachmann is a vocal supporter of the Tea Party movement and founded the House Tea Party Caucus in 2010. She ran for the Republican nomination for president in the 2012 race, winning the Ames Straw Poll along the way.

The city of Ames, Iowa is famous for holding the Ames Straw Poll in advance of most presidential elections. The poll in question is used to gauge the level of support for two or more Republican candidates, although non-Republicans are allowed to cast a vote. To vote one has to be an Iowa resident and one must buy a ticket to the fundraising dinner at which the vote is taken. The event gets a lot of coverage, so it boosts the local economy as journalists hit the town. It is a very successful fundraiser for the Republican Party in Iowa as well, but the usefulness of the straw poll in predicting the eventual winner of the nomination is less clear. There have been five straw polls since 1979, and just 2 out of 5 times the poll winner went on to capture the party's nomination.

17. It airs in the morning, ironically : THE LATE LATE SHOW
“The Late Late Show” is a late-night (actually “early morning”) talk show aired by CBS. The show is produced by Worldwide Pants Incorporated, the production company owned by David Letterman. “The Late Late Show” debuted in 1995 with Tom Snyder hosting. The current host is the very funny Scottish comedian Craig Ferguson. Ferguson came to the attention of the American viewing audience playing the office boss, Nigel Wick, on “The Drew Carey Show”.

18. Case builders: Abbr. : ATTS
Attorney (att.)

19. Copy from a CD : RIP
“Ripping” is the process of copying audio or video onto a hard disk. Ripping isn’t the same as direct copying as the process involves changing the format of the audio or video content.

21. Show featuring special agents : NCIS
NCIS is the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, which investigates crimes in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The service gives its name to the CBS TV show "NCIS", a spin-off drama from "JAG" in which the main "NCIS" characters were first introduced. The big star in "NCIS" is the actor Mark Harmon.

22. Red Cloud, e.g. : SIOUX
Red Cloud was a chief of the Oglala Lakota Native American people. Red Cloud led his tribe in battles with the US Army in the Wyoming and Montana territories between 1866 and 1868, a conflict that the Army came to call Red Cloud’s War.

24. Player of the bad teacher in "Bad Teacher" : DIAZ
The Hollywood actress Cameron Diaz started out her professional life as a model. Diaz’s first acting role was in the 1994 film “The Mask”, starring alongside Jim Carrey.

“Bad Teacher” is a 2011 comedy starring Cameron Diaz as a middle school teacher trying to skate by in her teaching job while she earns enough money for breast enlargement surgery.

27. Possible rank indicator : EPAULET
Epaulet (or epaulette) comes from the French, and literally means "little shoulder".

29. Overseas relig. title : STE
Sainte (ste.)

30. Big name in car monitors : ONSTAR
The OnStar system started back in 1995, a joint venture between GM, EDS and Hughes. The product itself was launched in 1996. Today, OnStar is only available on GM cars, although it used to be offered on other makes of car through a licensing agreement. OnStar is a subscription service that packages vehicle security, telephone, satellite navigation and remote diagnostics. You've seen the ads, I am sure.

46. Colorful cover-ups : SERAPES
"Serape" is the English pronunciation and spelling of the Spanish word "zarape". A zarape is like a Mexican poncho, a soft woolen blanket with a hole in the middle for the head. Most serapes have colorful designs that use traditional Mayan motifs.

48. Brandy letters : VSO
Cognac is a most famous variety of brandy named after the town of Cognac in the very west of France. To be called cognac, the brandy must be distilled twice in copper pot stills and aged at least two years in very specific French oak barrels. It is the length of this aging that defines the various grades of cognac (and other brandies):
- VS: Very Special ... at least 2 years storage
- VSOP: Very Special (or Superior) Old Pale ... at least 4 years storage
- XO: Extra Old ... at least 6 years
- VSO: Very Superior Old ... 12-17 years

51. Misses abroad: Abbr. : SRTAS
Señorita (Srta.) is Spanish and mademoiselle (Mlle.) is French for “Miss”.

52. Newborn abroad : BEBE
In French speaking countries a “bébé” (baby) is cared for by its “mère” (mother).

53. ___ Hedin, discoverer of the Trans-Himalaya : SVEN
Sven Hedin was an explorer from Sweden who made four separate expeditions to Central Asia. He discovered a mountain range running parallel to the main Himalayas that were originally named the Hedin Range in his honor. Those mountains today are known as the Trans Himalaya.

55. Folman who directed the 2013 film "The Congress" : ARI
Ari Folman is a movie director and screenwriter from Israel. The multi-talented Folman also composes film scores.

56. Comcast Center hoopster : TERP
The sports teams of the University of Maryland are called the Maryland Terrapins, or "the Terps" for short. The name dates back to 1932 when it was coined by the the university's president at the time, Curly Byrd. He took the name from the diamondback terrapins that are native to the Chesapeake Bay.

57. Alternative to a breakfast burrito : HUEVOS RANCHEROS
Huevos rancheros is a classic Mexican dish of eggs prepared in as they might be in rural Mexico. “Huevos rancheros” translates as “rancher’s eggs”. The eggs are fried and served on corn tortillas and topped with tomato-chili sauce.

Down
1. Yellowstone setting: Abbr. : MST
Mountain Standard Time (MST)

Yellowstone National Park was the first National Park to be established in the world, when it was designated as such by President Grant in 1872. What a great tradition it started! The American National Parks truly are a treasure.

2. Odysseus, e.g. : ITHACAN
Ithaca is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. Ithaca featured in Homer’s “Odyssey” as it was the home of the mythological hero Odysseus.

“The Odyssey” is one of two epic poems from ancient Greece that is attributed to Homer. “The Odyssey” is largely a sequel to Homer’s other epic, “The Iliad”. “The Odyssey” centers on the heroic figure, Odysseus, and his adventures on his journey home to Greece following the fall of Troy.

3. Dopes : CRETINS
“Cretin” is a slang term meaning “idiot”, and not a term that I like at all. “Cretin” was a medical term in the 1900s that derived from Alpine French dialect. Congenital hypothyroidism was particularly associated with an area in the French Alps and manifested itself as impaired physical and mental development, a condition known as "cretinism".

6. Re-serve judgment? : LET
In tennis, a let service is one in which the balls lands fairly but after hitting the top of the net. A let service is retaken.

7. Female adviser : EGERIA
In Roman mythology, Egeria was a water nymph, and counselor to the second king of Rome, Numa Pompilius. Egeria's name has come to be used as a general term for a female advisor.

8. Ill-humored : BILIOUS
The term “bilious” means “relating to bile”. It has come to mean ”ill-humored”.

9. Norwegian Star port of call : ACAPULCO
The Mexican city of Acapulco is on the southwest coast of the country, in the state of Guerrero. The name “Acapulco” translates from the local language into “at the big reeds”.

The Norwegian Star is a huge cruise ship operated by Norwegian Cruise Line. If she was much bigger, it wouldn’t be able to use the Panama Canal. The Norwegian Star went into service in 2001.

10. Old oscilloscope part, briefly : CRT
Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) ... there aren't many of them available in stores these days!

An oscilloscope is an electronic instrument that visually shows the variation in voltage of an electrical signal.

13. Its adherents are in disbelief : ATHEISM
The term “atheism”, meaning “disbelief in the existence of a god or gods”, comes from the Greek “atheos” meaning “without god”.

14. Formula one? : NEONATE
A neonate is newborn infant.

15. Neighbor of Victoria: Abbr. : NSW
New South Wales (NSW) is the most populous state in Australia and is home to Sydney, the most populous city in the country. New South Wales was founded in 1788. When the British took over New Zealand in 1840, for a while New Zealand was actually governed as part of New South Wales.

Victoria is the most densely populated state in Australia, with most inhabitants living in the state capital of Melbourne. Just like the Australian state of Queensland, Victoria was named for Queen Victoria, the British monarch at the time the state was founded.

21. Top kick, for one: Abbr. : NCO
“Top kick” is a slang term for a “first sergeant”.

An NCO is a non-commissioned officer in the armed forces. Usually such an officer is one who has earned his or her rank by promotion through the enlisted ranks. A good example would be a sergeant.

22. Puck and others : SPRITES
Puck is a mischievous sprite in old English folklore. Puck is also a character in William Shakespeare’s play “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”.

23. Some exact likenesses : XEROXES
Xerox was founded in 1906 in Rochester, New York and originally made photographic paper and equipment. Real success came for the company in 1959 when it introduced the first plain-paper photocopier. Xerox named Ursula Burns as CEO in 2009, the first African American woman to head up a S&P 100 company. Burn was also the first woman to succeed another female CEO (replacing Anne Mulcahy).

25. Part of Queen Elizabeth's makeup? : ZED
There is a letter Z (“zee” or “zed”) in the name “Elizabeth”.

The letter named "zed" has been around since about 1400, and derives from the Greek letter zeta. The spelling and pronunciation of "zee" used in America today first popped up in the 1670s.

Princess Elizabeth became queen Elizabeth II in 1952 when her father, King George VI died. The Princess was on an official visit to Kenya when her husband broke the news to her, that she had become queen. When she was crowned in 1953 in Westminster Abbey, it was the first coronation to be televised. Queen Elizabeth's reign is currently the second longest in the history of the UK. She is closing in on the record of Queen Victoria who reigned longest, for almost 64 years.

31. Kind of cross : TAU
Tau is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet, the letter which gave rise to our Roman "T". Both the letters tau (T) and chi (X) have long been symbolically associated with the cross.

33. They may be returned with regrets: Abbr. : MSS
An editor has to wade his or her way through a manuscript (MS) that has been submitted.

35. 458 Spider and F12 Berlinetta : FERRARIS
Enzo Ferrari was an Italian race car driver, and founder of the Ferrari car manufacturer. Ferrari died in 1988, and in 2003 the company named the Enzo Ferrari model after its founder.

43. Modern mouse hole? : USB PORT
Universal Serial Bus (USB) is an industry standard dealing with how computers and electronic devices connect and communicate, and deal with electrical power through those connections.

47. Emulates Homer : PAINTS
Winslow Homer was an American landscape painter and illustrator active in the second half of the 19th century. His most famous work is probably the oil painting depicting a man and three boys sailing, which bears the title “Breezing Up (A Fair Wind)”, and which can be seen in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D. C.

50. Actor Burton : LEVAR
LeVar Burton's has two major television roles on his resume. He played Kunta Kinte in the fabulous miniseries "Roots" shown in 1977. He then had a long run portraying Geordi La Forge on the best of the Star Trek TV shows, "Star Trek: The Next Generation".

52. Competitor of Lauren and Klein : BEENE
Geoffrey Beene was an American fashion designer. He had an impressive list of clients that included First Ladies Lady Bird Johnson, Pat Nixon and Nancy Reagan.

Ralph Lauren is an American fashion designer, born Ralph Liftshitz in the Bronx, New York. Lauren started off working as a salesman for Brooks Brothers after spending two years in the US Army. He then opened a necktie store, featuring his own tie designs. The ties were sold under the name "Polo", which became Lauren's most famous brand. Other Lauren brands are Purple Label and Black Label.

Calvin Klein is an American fashion designer, born in the Bronx in New York City. Klein's biography entitled "Obsession" takes its name from one of the most famous brands in his line of fragrances.

54. Numerical prefix : NONA-
The prefix “nona-” is used to denote the number nine or ninth. An example is “nonagon”, a nine-sided polygon.

56. First name in footwear : THOM
Thom McAn footwear was introduced in 1922 by the Melville Corporation (now CVS Caremark). The brand was named after a Scottish golfer called Thomas McCann. The Thom McAn line is epitomized by the comfortable leather casual and dress shoe, so sales have really been hurt in recent decades by the growing popularity of sneakers.

57. "Two, three, four" lead-in : HUP
A drillmaster can often be heard saying “hup, two, three, four …”

58. Org. with a clenched fist logo : SDS
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) was an activist group in the sixties. The SDS organized the largest student strike in the history of the United States on 26 April 1968, with about a million students staying away from class that day. The “Students for a Democratic Society” name was revived in 2006 with the foundation of a new US-based student organization with left wing beliefs. Today’s SDS was founded by a pair of high school students from Greenwich Village, New York.

59. Org. created right after the cold war : CIS
The Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) is a loose association of countries that were former soviet republics. The CIS was formed in 1991 by Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, with six other states joining the alliance later.

60. MS-DOS component: Abbr. : SYS
MS-DOS (short for Microsoft Disk Operating System) was the main operating system used by IBM-compatible PCs in the eighties and for much of the nineties.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. First female candidate to win the Ames Straw Poll : MICHELE BACHMANN
16. War paths : STRATEGIC ROUTES
17. It airs in the morning, ironically : THE LATE LATE SHOW
18. Case builders: Abbr. : ATTS
19. Copy from a CD : RIP
20. Understood : SEEN
21. Show featuring special agents : NCIS
22. Red Cloud, e.g. : SIOUX
24. Player of the bad teacher in "Bad Teacher" : DIAZ
26. Rear : CAN
27. Possible rank indicator : EPAULET
29. Overseas relig. title : STE
30. Big name in car monitors : ONSTAR
32. Beat it : SCRAMMED
34. "Keep dreaming!" : AS IF!
36. Word after a splat : OOPS
37. Like some lovers' hearts : AFLUTTER
41. Strikes : XES OUT
45. She may be fawning : DOE
46. Colorful cover-ups : SERAPES
48. Brandy letters : VSO
49. Grilling test : ORAL
51. Misses abroad: Abbr. : SRTAS
52. Newborn abroad : BEBE
53. ___ Hedin, discoverer of the Trans-Himalaya : SVEN
55. Folman who directed the 2013 film "The Congress" : ARI
56. Comcast Center hoopster : TERP
57. Alternative to a breakfast burrito : HUEVOS RANCHEROS
61. Big source for modern slang : URBAN DICTIONARY
62. Some critical comments from co-workers : PEER ASSESSMENTS

Down
1. Yellowstone setting: Abbr. : MST
2. Odysseus, e.g. : ITHACAN
3. Dopes : CRETINS
4. Knocks off : HALTS
5. Control tower info : ETAS
6. Re-serve judgment? : LET
7. Female adviser : EGERIA
8. Ill-humored : BILIOUS
9. Norwegian Star port of call : ACAPULCO
10. Old oscilloscope part, briefly : CRT
11. Turns over in one's plot? : HOES
12. Was reflective : MUSED
13. Its adherents are in disbelief : ATHEISM
14. Formula one? : NEONATE
15. Neighbor of Victoria: Abbr. : NSW
21. Top kick, for one: Abbr. : NCO
22. Puck and others : SPRITES
23. Some exact likenesses : XEROXES
25. Part of Queen Elizabeth's makeup? : ZED
27. Certain league divisions : EASTS
28. Forerunners of discs : TAPES
31. Kind of cross : TAU
33. They may be returned with regrets: Abbr. : MSS
35. 458 Spider and F12 Berlinetta : FERRARIS
37. Production : ADO
38. Definitely : FOR SURE
39. Give some space, say : LEAVE BE
40. Grind : RAT RACE
42. Stormed : OVERRAN
43. Modern mouse hole? : USB PORT
44. Ring bearer, maybe : TOE
47. Emulates Homer : PAINTS
50. Actor Burton : LEVAR
52. Competitor of Lauren and Klein : BEENE
54. Numerical prefix : NONA-
56. First name in footwear : THOM
57. "Two, three, four" lead-in : HUP
58. Org. with a clenched fist logo : SDS
59. Org. created right after the cold war : CIS
60. MS-DOS component: Abbr. : SYS


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0829-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Aug 13, Thursday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Timothy Polin
THEME: Eye of the Storm … there’s a note with today’s puzzle:
A certain three-letter word, appropriate to this puzzle's theme, goes in the unnumbered center square.
That three-letter word is EYE, and is used as part of the four answers that fill a cross (+) at the center of the grid:
34A. Piercing gaze : GIMLET EYE
35A. Ingredient in a witch's potion : EYE OF NEWT
7D. Giant Ferris wheel on the Thames : LONDON EYE
43D. Enlightening experience : EYEOPENER
Four answers give us a hint that the EYE is at the center of a storm:
17A. Exonerated boxer who is the subject of a Bob Dylan song : HURRICANE CARTER
29A. ___ and the Waves ("Walking on Sunshine" band) : KATRINA
41A. Walt Disney World's ___ Lagoon : TYPHOON
55A. Minor-leaguer whose team is named after a Coney Island roller coaster : BROOKLYN CYCLONE
Air moves in a counter-clockwise direction around the eye of such a storm (in the northern hemisphere), as do the answers in the grid. Across answers in the top half of the grid are written backwards, and down answers in the right side of the grid are written upwards.
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 30m 33s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Fig. mentioned in Miranda warnings : ATT
Attorney (att.)

The Miranda warning is given by US police officers to suspects in order to ensure that any statements made by the suspect can be used at trial. The warning became part of police procedure after a 1966 Supreme Court decision in the case of Miranda v. Arizona. The crux of the court’s decision was that statements made by a suspect during interrogation were only admissible at trial if the defendant was informed of his or her right to consult an attorney, and right to remain silent. The “Miranda” in the case was Ernesto Mirando, who was arrested by the Phoenix PD on suspicion of kidnapping and rape. The Supreme Court decision set aside Miranda’s conviction as his confession was deemed inadmissible. Miranda was rearrested and retried. At the second trial he was convicted without the use of the contested confession.

15. Arabian Peninsula land : OMAN
Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. The capital city of Muscat has a strategic location on the Gulf of Oman and has a history of invasion and unrest. Centuries of occupation by the Persians ended in 1507 when the Portuguese took the city in a bloody attack. The Portuguese held Muscat for much of the next one hundred years until finally being ousted by local Omani forces in 1648. A Yemeni tribe invaded the area in 1741 and set up a monarchy that has been in place in Oman ever since.

16. Lead dancer in a ballet company : ETOILE
In the world of ballet, the étoile is the leading dancer in a company (male or female). "Étoile" is the French word for "star".

17. Exonerated boxer who is the subject of a Bob Dylan song : HURRICANE CARTER
Hurricane Carter was a professional boxer in the sixties. Carter’s career came to an end when he was arrested for homicide in 1966. He was tried and convicted twice, in 1967 and 1976. The second conviction was overturned, and Carter was released after almost 20 years in prison. As a free man, Carter served over ten years heading up the Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convicted. Carter’s experience provided the inspiration for a 1975 song by Bob Dylan called “Hurricane”, as well as a 1999 movie called “The Hurricane” with Denzel Washington in the title role.

21. Tennis's Agassi : ANDRE
Renowned tennis professional Andre Agassi wrote an autobiography called "Open", published in 2009. An amazing revelation in the book is that Agassi's famous head of hair was actually a wig for much of his playing career. Can you imagine how hard it must have been to play tennis at his level with a rug stuck on?

22. Capt. : Navy :: ___ : Army : COL
Our word “colonel” ultimately derives from the Latin “columna” meaning “pillar, column”.

27. Transition : SEGUE
A “segue” is a transition from one topic to the next. "Segue" is an Italian word that literally means "now follows". It was first used in musical scores directing the performer to play into the next movement without a break.

29. ___ and the Waves ("Walking on Sunshine" band) : KATRINA
Katrina and the Waves were a rock band from England whose big hit was 1985’s “Walking on Sunshine”.

31. Superman's dog : KRYPTO
Krypto the Superdog is Superman’s pet dog in the comics. Krypto was Superman’s pet dog on his home planet, but boy and dog were separated when young Superman left his home planet for Earth. Krypto was lost in space for several years until being reunited with “Superboy” on Earth.

33. 2008 recipient of govt. largesse : AIG
AIG is the American International Group, a giant insurance corporation (or I should say, "was"). After repeated bailouts by American taxpayers, the company made some serious PR blunders by spending large amounts of money on executive entertainment and middle management rewards. These included a $444,000 California retreat, an $86,000 hunting trip in England, and a $343,000 getaway to a luxury resort in Phoenix. Poor judgment, I'd say ...

34. Piercing gaze : GIMLET EYE
A “gimlet eye” is a piercing glance. A “gimlet” is a small hand tool with a screw tip that is used for boring holes.

35. Ingredient in a witch's potion : EYE OF NEWT
The witches in Shakespeare's "Macbeth" have some lovely lines as they cast a spell:
Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
Adder's fork, and blind-worm's sting,
Lizard's leg, and howlet's wing,--
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.

39. Address for a G.I. : APO
Army Post Office (APO)

The initials "G.I." stand for "Government Issue" and not "General Infantry" as is often believed. GI was first used in the military to denote equipment made from Galvanized Iron and during WWI, incoming German shells were nicknamed "GI cans". Soon after, the term GI came to be associated with "Government Issue" and eventually became an adjective to describe anything associated with the Army.

40. Weighted fishing nets : SEINES
A seine is a type of fishing net. It is long and thin, with floats along one long edge (the top) and weights along the bottom edge so that it hangs down in the water. A seine is usually paid out into the water from a boat called a seiner, as the vessel moves slowly in a circle driving fish into the center of the net.

41. Walt Disney World's ___ Lagoon : TYPHOON
Typhoon Lagoon is one of two water parks at Walt Disney World in Florida. It is the most visited water park in the world.

48. "___ a Spell on You" (1956 hit) : I PUT
“I Put a Spell on You” is a song written and recorded by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, first released in 1956. A cover version of the song was released in 2010 by Shane MacGowan and Friends, a record that was sold to help Concern Worldwide’s work in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake that killed so many. Included in the list of “friends” was Johnny Depp, playing the guitar.

50. Nevada birthplace of Pat Nixon : ELY
Ely is a city in eastern Nevada. The city was founded as a Pony Express stagecoach station. One of Ely’s former residents was First Lady Pat Nixon, who was born there in 1912.

Pat Ryan was working as a high school teacher in Whittier, California when she met a young lawyer called Richard Milhous Nixon. At the time, the two were amateur actors in a small theater group. “Dick” Nixon asked Pat to marry him on the very first night that the couple stepped out together. As First Lady, Pat Nixon was the most travelled in history, until her record was broken by Hillary Rodham Clinton some 25 years later. One of her trips took her to South Vietnam. This was during the Vietnam War, making Pat Nixon the first First Lady to enter a combat zone.

55. Minor-leaguer whose team is named after a Coney Island roller coaster : BROOKLYN CYCLONE
The Brooklyn Cyclones are a minor league team affiliated with the New York Mets. In 2000, a “name-the-team” contest resulted in the adoption of “Cyclones”. The name was chosen in honor of a famous roller coaster in the Astroland amusement park on Coney Island, which is close to where the Cyclones play.

59. Orangutan locale : BORNEO
Borneo is the third largest island on the planet (after Greenland and New Guinea), and is located north of Australia in Maritime Southeast Asia. Most of the island is part of Indonesia (taking up 73% of the island) with almost all of the remainder being part of Malaysia (26%). The final 1% is home to the sovereign state of Brunei.

Orangutans are arboreal creatures, in fact the largest arboreal animals known to man. They are native to Indonesia and Malaysia, living in the rain forests. Like most species in rain forests these days, orangutans are endangered, with only two species surviving. The word "orangutan" is Malay, meaning "man of the forest".

60. Land with a harp on its coat of arms : EIRE
The state symbol of the Irish government is the harp. The reason for the use of the harp as a symbol seems to have been lost in time, but it has been used for centuries. The actual harp used as a model for the state symbol is called the Trinity College harp, a medieval instrument on display in the university in Dublin.

61. ___ lane : HOV
In some parts of the country one sees high-occupancy vehicle lanes (HOV lanes), but out here in California, we call them carpool lanes.

64. Revolutionary icon : CHE
Ernesto "Che" Guevara was born in Argentina, and in 1948 he started to study medicine at the University of Buenos Aires. While at school he satisfied his need to "see the world" by taking two long journeys around South America, the story of which are told in Guevara's memoir later published as "The Motorcycle Diaries". While travelling, Guevara was moved by the plight of the people he saw and their working conditions and what he viewed as capitalistic exploitation. In Mexico City he met brothers Raul and Fidel Castro and was persuaded to join their cause, the overthrow of the US-backed government in Cuba. He rose to second-in-command among the Cuban insurgents, and when Castro came to power Guevara was influential in repelling the Bay of Pigs Invasion and bringing Soviet nuclear missiles to the island. Guevara left Cuba in 1965 to continue his work as a revolutionary. He was captured by Bolivian forces in 1967, and was executed. Fidel Castro led the public mourning of Guevara's death, and soon the revolutionary was an icon for many left-wing movements around the world.

Down
1. Tenderfoot : TYRO
A tyro (also tiro) is a beginner or a novice. “Tyro” comes into English from Latin, in which "tiro" means "a recruit".

In the late 1800s, city folk in the Eastern US with the romantic notion of the American West created a market for "guest ranches", working ranches that catered for paying guests. Such a guest from back East might be called a "tenderfoot" or a "greenhorn", and the hospitable ranches became known as "dude ranches". To westerners, a "dude" was a well-dressed male, who had never lived outside of the city.

2. Hustling is the same as cheating, according to these authorities : THESAURI
The first person to use the term “thesaurus” to mean a “collection of words arranged according to sense” was Roget in 1852, when he used it for the title of his most famous work. Up to that point in time, a thesaurus was basically an encyclopedia. Before being used with reference to books, a thesaurus was a storehouse or treasury, coming from the Latin “thesaurus” meaning “treasury, treasure”.

3. Where to work out : AT THE GYM
Our word “gymnasium” comes from the Greek “gymnasion” meaning “public place where exercise is taken”. The Greek term comes from “gymnos” meaning "naked", as that physical training was usually done unclothed.

4. Its code uses just G, T, A and C : DNA
Nucleobases are molecules that form the backbone of DNA and RNA chains. It is the sequence of these bases in the DNA chain that makes up the so-called "genetic code". In DNA the four bases are adenine (A), guanine (G), thymine (T) and cytosine (C). The same bases are found in RNA, except that thymine is replaced by uracil (U).

5. Four of a decathlon's 10 events : RACES
The decathlon event is a track and field competition, with the name “decathlon” coming from the Greek “deka” (ten) and “athlos” (contest). The ten events in the men’s decathlon are:
- 100 meters
- Long jump
- Shot put
- High jump
- 400 meters
- 110 meters hurdles
- Discus throw
- Pole vault
- Javelin throw
- 1500 meters

6. Enforced silence : OMERTA
Omertà is a code of honor in southern Italian society. The term has been adopted by the Mafia to mean a code of silence designed to prevent a Mafioso from becoming an informer. For example, the famous Joe Valachi was someone who broke the code of silence in 1963, informing on the New York Mafia. Valachi's story was told in the movie "The Valachi Papers", with Charles Bronson playing the lead.

7. Giant Ferris wheel on the Thames : LONDON EYE
London Eye is the name of a very large Ferris wheel that sits right beside the River Thames in London. It is the tallest Ferris wheel in Europe, and was the tallest in the world when it was constructed in 1999. It is the most visited paid tourist attraction in the whole country.

9. Terre in the eau zone? : ILE
In French, an island (île) is a piece of ground (terre) surrounded by water (eau).

11. Name in old graffiti : KILROY
The omnipresent doodle and graffiti “Kilroy was here” dates back to WWII, although the exact origins are in doubt. A similar character exists in other countries, with a different name. In Australia, “Foo was here” and in Britain “Chad was here”. It’s felt that Chad might have been the original, and he probably pre-dated the Second World War.

27. Med. readout : EKG
An EKG measures electrical activity in the heart. Back in my homeland of Ireland, an EKG is known as an ECG (for electrocardiogram). We use the German name in the US, Elektrokardiogramm, giving us EKG. Apparently the abbreviation EKG is preferred as ECG might be confused (if poorly handwritten, I guess) with EEG, the abbreviation for an electroencephalogram.

28. Vast treeless area : STEPPE
A steppe is a grassland, devoid of trees apart from those growing near rivers and lakes. We would likely call such a geographic feature a prairie in this country.

32. "That being said," in textspeak : OTOH
"OTOH" is short for “on the other hand” in text-speak.

36. Mess hall queue : CHOW LINE
"Chow" is an American slang term for food that originated in California in the mid-1800s. "Chow" comes from the Chinese pidgin English "chow-chow" meaning "food".

"Mess" first came into English about 1300 and described the list of food needed for a meal, from the Old French word "mes" meaning a portion of food or a course at a meal. This usage in English evolved into "mess" meaning a jumbled mass of anything from the concept of "mixed food". At the same time, the original usage in the sense of a food for a meal surfaced again in the military in the 1500s when a "mess" was a communal eating place.

42. Unctuous : OILY
A person described as “unctuous” is oily and insincere. “Unctum” is the Latin for “ointment”.

44. Ambassador from the Holy See : NUNCIO
The Latin word for "envoy" is nuntius. The Vatican usednuntius for the title of Papal Nuncio, or more correctly, Apostolic Nuncio, a permanent representative of the Holy See to a particular state or even to an international organization. In 1961, the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations declared that a Papal Nuncio is an ambassador like those from any other country, and affords them the same rights and privileges.

Vatican City is a sovereign city-state that is walled off within the city of Rome. Vatican City is about 110 acres in area, and so is the smallest independent state in the world. With about 800 residents, it is also the smallest state in terms of population. Although the Holy See dates back to early Christianity, Vatican City only came into being in 1929. At that time, Prime Minister Benito Mussolini signed a treaty with the Holy See on behalf of the Kingdom of Italy that established the city-state.

47. Onetime sponsor of what is now Minute Maid Park : ENRON
Enron Field, as it was known, is a retractable-roof ballpark that was built next to Houston's old Union Station. Enron paid $100 million to get its name on the field, and then when the world found out what a scam Enron actually was, the Astros bought back the contract for the name, for a mere $2.1 million. The stadium became Astros Field for a few months, until the Coke people paid $170 million for a 28-year contract to christen the stadium Minute Maid Park. A good deal for the Astros, I'd say.

49. Part of an affair to remember? : TRYST
In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting.

52. Latch (onto) : GLOM
“Glom” is a slang term meaning “steal”, although it can also be used to mean “latch onto” when used as “glom onto”. The term probably comes from the Scots word “glam” meaning “to snatch at”.

56. Air Force ___ : ONE
We usually use the term “Air Force One” for the purpose-built military aircraft that transports the president, although any plane can use the call sign, provided the president is aboard. There was an incident in 1953 which a flight carrying President Eisenhower (flight no. Air Force 8610) flew close to commercial airliner (flight no. Eastern 8610). In order to avoid confusion of flight numbers in the future, the special call sign “Air Force One” was created.

57. It means "white" in Hawaiian : KEA
Mauna Kea is a dormant volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii, the peak of which is the highest point in the whole state. Mauna Kea is in effect the tip of a gigantic volcano rising up from the seabed. So, the "real" height of the volcano (ignoring the ocean) is over 33,000 feet, which is significantly "taller" than even Mount Everest, which has an elevation of 29,029 feet above sea level.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Fig. mentioned in Miranda warnings : ATT
4. Feudal V.I.P. : LORD
8. Made ends meet? : RHYMED
14. Your substitute? : THY
15. Arabian Peninsula land : OMAN
16. Lead dancer in a ballet company : ETOILE
17. Exonerated boxer who is the subject of a Bob Dylan song : HURRICANE CARTER
20. Exceedingly : OH SO
21. Tennis's Agassi : ANDRE
22. Capt. : Navy :: ___ : Army : COL
23. Grazeland? : LEA
24. Young 'uns : TOTS
25. Drops : OMITS
27. Transition : SEGUE
29. ___ and the Waves ("Walking on Sunshine" band) : KATRINA
31. Superman's dog : KRYPTO
33. 2008 recipient of govt. largesse : AIG
34. Piercing gaze : GIMLET EYE
35. Ingredient in a witch's potion : EYE OF NEWT
39. Address for a G.I. : APO
40. Weighted fishing nets : SEINES
41. Walt Disney World's ___ Lagoon : TYPHOON
45. Name dropper, often? : BRIDE
46. Get extra value from : REUSE
48. "___ a Spell on You" (1956 hit) : I PUT
50. Nevada birthplace of Pat Nixon : ELY
51. Resident of an elaborate underground "city" : ANT
52. Hidden valleys : GLENS
53. Farm females : EWES
55. Minor-leaguer whose team is named after a Coney Island roller coaster : BROOKLYN CYCLONE
59. Orangutan locale : BORNEO
60. Land with a harp on its coat of arms : EIRE
61. ___ lane : HOV
62. Measure of a man? : INSEAM
63. Falls into decay : ROTS
64. Revolutionary icon : CHE

Down
1. Tenderfoot : TYRO
2. Hustling is the same as cheating, according to these authorities : THESAURI
3. Where to work out : AT THE GYM
4. Its code uses just G, T, A and C : DNA
5. Four of a decathlon's 10 events : RACES
6. Enforced silence : OMERTA
7. Giant Ferris wheel on the Thames : LONDON EYE
8. Easily passed : ACED
9. Terre in the eau zone? : ILE
10. Border : RIM
11. Name in old graffiti : KILROY
12. Be sassy, with "off' : MOUTH
13. Autumnal hue : OCHER
18. Uses sock puppets to talk to a therapist, say : ROLEPLAYS
19. Voting against : ANTI
25. Is suitable for : BEFITS
26. Ogling wolfishly : LEERING AT
27. Med. readout : EKG
28. Vast treeless area : STEPPE
30. Go up, up, up : SOAR
32. "That being said," in textspeak : OTOH
36. Mess hall queue : CHOW LINE
37. Green, juicy fruit : HONEYDEW
38. Ending for a record-breaker : -EST
41. Certain teachers : TUTORS
42. Unctuous : OILY
43. Enlightening experience : EYEOPENER
44. Ambassador from the Holy See : NUNCIO
46. Certain teacher : RABBI
47. Onetime sponsor of what is now Minute Maid Park : ENRON
49. Part of an affair to remember? : TRYST
52. Latch (onto) : GLOM
54. Portentous nights : EVES
56. Air Force ___ : ONE
57. It means "white" in Hawaiian : KEA
58. Instant : SEC


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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