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1001-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Oct 13, Tuesday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Joel Fagliano
THEME: Geese Migration … today’s grid is replete with letters V, and all those Vs are arranged in a V-formation, just like migrating geese:
18A. With 50-Across, it's represented by 15 squares in an appropriate arrangement in this puzzle : GEESE
50A. See 18-Across : MIGRATION
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 12m 12s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Tennessee team, for short : VOLS
The Tennessee Volunteers (the Vols) is the name given to the men's sports teams at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. The women's teams are called the Lady Volunteers.

Tennessee uses the nickname "Volunteer State" as during the War of 1812 volunteer soldiers from Tennessee fought with valor, especially during the Battle of New Orleans.

10. Pole or Czech : SLAV
The Slavic peoples are in the majority in communities covering over half of Europe. This large ethnic group is traditionally broken down into three smaller groups:
- the West Slavic (including Czechs and Poles)
- the East Slavic (including Russians and Ukrainians)
- the South Slavic (including Bulgarians and Serbs)

16. ___ mind : HIVE
“Hive mind”, “group mind” and “social mind” are all alternative terms for “collective consciousness”. Collective consciousness is a set of shared ideas that act as a unifying force in a society.

17. Blue-skinned race in "Avatar" : NA’VI
In the James Cameron epic “Avatar”, the “blue people” are the Na’vi, the indigenous species that lives on the lush moon called Pandora. The main Na’vi character featuring in the film is the female Neytiri. According to Cameron, Neytiri was inspired by the Raquel Welch character in the movie “Fantastic Voyage” and the comic book character Vampirella.

18. With 50-Across, it's represented by 15 squares in an appropriate arrangement in this puzzle : GEESE
(50A. See 18-Across : MIGRATION)
Apparently geese fly in a V-formation for a couple of reasons. One is that it makes for efficient flight and conserves energy. The leading bird gets no advantage, but every following bird gets to "slipstream" a little. It has been noted that the lead bird drops to the back of the formation when he/she gets fatigued. It's also thought that the flock can stick together more easily when in formation, so it is more difficult to lose someone along the way.

19. Some Monopoly purchases: Abbr. : AVES
The street names in the US version of Monopoly are locations in or around Atlantic City, New Jersey.

20. French pupil : ELEVE
French for school is “école”, and French for pupil is “élève”.

22. Grandpa on "The Simpsons" : ABE
In the animated TV show called “The Simpsons”, Grampa Abe Simpson is voiced by Dan Castellaneta, the same actor who provides the voice for Homer.

26. N.F.L. player with a black helmet : RAVEN
The Baltimore football team's name "the Ravens" has a literary derivation. Baltimore was the home of the writer Edgar Allen Poe, and so the team took its moniker from his most famous poem, "The Raven". The name was selected in a fan contest.

28. Hebrew month when Hanukkah starts : KISLEV
Kislev is the ninth month of the Hebrew calendar. It is also the month when Hanukkah starts.

30. Richard Branson's airline company : VIRGIN
Virgin Group is a huge multinational company that operates in the arenas of travel, entertainment and lifestyle. The company was started by Richard Branson and a partner as a record shop in 1970. The founders chose the name “Virgin” as they considered themselves “virgins” in the business world.

33. Hundred Acre Wood resident : OWL
Hundred Acre Wood is where Winnie the Pooh lives with his friends. According to a map illustrating the books by A. A. Milne, Hundred Acre Wood is part of a larger forest, with Owl's house sitting right at the center.

34. Place to hear fire and brimstone : REVIVAL
In the Christian tradition, a revival meeting is a series of religious services that are intended to inspire active church members and to attract new converts.

41. David of "The Pink Panther" : NIVEN
The great British actor David Niven is perhaps best known for playing Phileas Fogg in “Around the World in 80 Days” and Sir Charles Litton in “The PInk Panther”. I enjoy so many Niven movies, but my favorite has to “Separate Tables” from 1958, for which he was awarded the Best Actor Oscar. Niven even played the iconic role of James Bond, in the 007 spoof film “Casino Royale” released in 1967.

42. Rear half of a griffin : LION
The legendary creature called a griffin has the body, tail and back legs of a lion, and the head, wings and front feet/talons of an eagle.

43. Writer Katherine ___ Porter : ANNE
Katherine Anne Porter was a journalist, novelist and political activist from Indian Creek, Texas. One of Porter’s most famous works is her one and only novel “Ship of Fools”, which was the best-selling novel in the US in 1962.

45. Iams competitor : ALPO
Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with "Alpo" being an abbreviation for "Allen Products". Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

Iams dog food was first produced by the animal nutritionist Paul Iams. Iams felt that household pets were suffering somewhat by being fed a diet of table scraps, so he developed a dry dog food that he thought was more nutritious and suitable for pet dogs. He founded the Iams company, now part of Procter & Gamble, in 1946.

46. 1943 penny material : STEEL
During WWII there was a shortage of copper, so the US Mint switched to zinc-coated steel for production of one-cent coins in 1943. The coins had all sorts of problems in circulation, so the mint had to change again for the 1944-46 production, using a brass/copper alloy. For obvious reasons, the 1943 coin is called a "steelie", and is the only coin ever issued by the US mint that can be picked up by a magnet.

48. Suffix with meth- or prop- : -ANE
Alkanes are organic compounds. The “smaller” alkanes are gases and are quite combustible. Methane (CH4) is the main component of natural gas with ethane (C2H6) being the second largest component. Propane (C3H8) is another component of natural gas and is heavy enough to be readily turned into a liquid by compression for ease of transportation and storage. Butane (C4H10) is also easily liquefied under pressure and can be used as the fuel in cigarette lighters or as the propellant in aerosol sprays. The heavier alkanes are not gases, and instead are liquids and solids at room temperature.

56. Pronoun for Miss Piggy : MOI
The Muppet called Miss Piggy has a pretentious air, and so refers to herself as “moi”. In 1998, Miss Piggy even released her own perfume called “Moi”.

57. Rodeway ___ : INN
The chain of economy motels called Rodeway Inn started in Phoenix, Arizona in 1962. Rodeway Inn was the fastest growing chain in the hotel industry in 2007.

61. Ship sinker : TORPEDO
The naval weapon called a torpedo is named for the group of electric rays of the genus “Torpedo”. The name of the fish comes from the verb “torpere”, Latin for “to be stiffened, paralyzed”, which is what happens to someone who steps on an electric ray.

Down
1. Revolver with the letters N-E-W-S : VANE
A weather vane shows the direction of the wind, and is usually labelled N (north), E (east), W (west) and S (south).

6. Basketball player who starred in "Kazaam" : O’NEAL
Shaquille O'Neal is one of the heaviest players ever to have played in the NBA (weighing in at around 325 pounds). Yep, he's a big guy ... 7 foot 1 inch tall.

“Kazaam” is a 1996 family movie about a genie who grants three wishes to a young boy. Kazaam is the name of the genie, and is played by basketball legend Shaquille O’Neal. The film was directed by Paul Michael Glaser who played Starsky on “Starsky and Hutch” in the seventies. No one seemed to like the “Kazaam” movie.

7. Commoner : PLEB
Plebe is a slang term for a freshman in the US military and naval academies. Plebe is probably short for "plebeian", the name given to someone of the common class in Ancient Rome (as opposed to a Patrician). "Pleb" is a shortened version of plebeian, and is a term used outside of the military schools.

8. Police stun gun : TASER
Victor Appleton wrote a novel for young adults called "Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle". The company that developed the TASER electroshock weapon named its product as a homage to the novel. The acronym TASER stands for "Thomas A. Swift's Electric Rifle". Interesting, eh?

11. Medical directive : LIVING WILL
A “living will” is more accurately referred to as “advance health care directive”. A living will defines what actions should be taken for a person should he or she no longer be able to make decision due to incapacity. A related document is a “health care proxy” in which a person authorizes another individual to make decisions on their behalf if they become incapacitated.

12. With, on le menu : AVEC
“Avec” is French for “with”.

13. Item under a jacket, maybe : VEST
Here's another word that often catches me out. What we call a vest in the US is a waistcoat back in Ireland. And the Irish use the word "vest" for an undershirt.

25. Roulette bet : EVENS
In the game of roulette, players can bet on odd (“pair” in French) and even (“impair” in French).

The name "roulette" means "little wheel" in French, and the game as we know it today did in fact originate in Paris, in 1796.

27. ___-garde : AVANT
People described as being avant-garde are especially innovative. "Avant-garde" is French for “advance guard”.

28. Caffeine-laden nuts : KOLAS
The nut of the kola tree has a bitter taste, and is loaded with caffeine. Despite the taste, the nut is habitually chewed in some cultures, especially in West Africa where the tree is commonly found in the rainforest. Of course in the US we best know the kola nut as a flavoring used in cola drinks.

35. Experienced through another : VICARIOUS
Our word “vicarious” means “experienced through another”. The term comes from the Latin “vicarius”, meaning “substitute, deputy”.

36. The first Mrs. Trump : IVANA
Ivana Winklmayr was born in Czechoslovakia. Winklmayr was an excellent skier, and was named as an alternate for the 1982 Czech Olympic Team. She was promoting the Montreal Olympics in New York in 1976 when she met Donald Trump. Ivana and Donald's marriage was very public and well-covered by the media, but not nearly so well as their very litigious divorce in 1990.

37. Shakespeare's Antonio and Bassanio, e.g. : VENETIANS
In William Shakespeare’s “The Merchant of Venice”, Antonio is the title character. Bassanio is Antonio’s friend, who is set on wooing the wealthy heiress Portia.

Famously, at the climax of William Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice", Antonio goes on trial because he cannot repay a loan to Shylock of 3,000 ducats. Faced with non-payment, Shylock demands his legal right to "a pound of flesh".

47. British sailors : LIMEYS
“Limey” is a slang nickname for someone from Britain, and is a term used in particular by people from North America and Australia. “Limey” is thought to be short for “lime juicer”, an insulting phrase used to describe Royal Navy sailors who were given lime and lemon juice while at sea to help stave off scurvy.

49. One of the friends on "Friends" : MONICA
Courteney Cox played Monica Geller on the incredibly successful sitcom "Friends". Before "Friends" she played the girlfriend of Michael J. Fox's character on "Family Ties" for a couple of years in the late eighties. Her role in "Friends" was her biggest success, no question, when she and her fellow female costars became the highest paid TV actresses ever, earning a million dollars per episode.

51. No-show in a Beckett play : GODOT
An Irishman I may be, but I have sat through so many Samuel Beckett plays (the Irish dramatist) and have yet to come away feeling satisfied that I spent my time well. Of course I am in the minority, as his play "Waiting for Godot" was once voted the most significant English language play of the 20th century. Maybe I will try again one day ...

53. Tuxedo shirt button : STUD
The style of men's evening dress called a "tuxedo" was apparently first worn to a country club event in 1886 in New York. The use of a dark dinner jacket without tails became fashionable at the club with the members, and the tradition spread from there. The country club was located in Tuxedo Park, New York, giving the style of dress its name.

54. St. Peter was the first : POPE
According to the Christian tradition, Saint Peter was crucified on the orders of Emperor Nero in Rome. Many hold that he requested to be crucified upside down as he felt that he was unworthy to have the same fate as Jesus Christ.

58. Cabo's peninsula : BAJA
Cabo San Lucas is a major tourist destination at the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula in Mexico. “Cabo” is sometimes referred to as the “Fort Lauderdale of Mexico”.

62. Hawaiian dish : POI
I am a big fan of starch (being an Irishman I love potatoes). That said, I think that poi tastes horrible! Poi is made from the bulbous tubers (corm) of the taro plant by cooking the corm in water and mashing it until the desired consistency is achieved.

64. Blanc or Brooks : MEL
Mel Blanc is known as "The Man of a Thousand Voices". We've all heard Mel Blanc at one time or another, I am sure. His was the voice behind such cartoon characters as Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, Woody Woodpecker, Elmer Fudd and Barney Rubble. And the words on Blanc's tombstone are ... "That's All Folks".

Mel Brooks' real name is Melvin Kaminsky. Brooks is one of very few entertainers (there are only ten) who has won the "Showbiz Award Grand Slam" i.e. an Oscar, Tony, Grammy and Emmy. He is in good company, as the list also includes the likes of Richard Rogers, Sir John Gielgud, Marvin Hamlisch and Audrey Hepburn.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Tennessee team, for short : VOLS
5. Acknowledge as true : COP TO
10. Pole or Czech : SLAV
14. Admit openly : AVOW
15. Often-maligned relative : IN-LAW
16. ___ mind : HIVE
17. Blue-skinned race in "Avatar" : NA’VI
18. With 50-Across, it's represented by 15 squares in an appropriate arrangement in this puzzle : GEESE
19. Some Monopoly purchases: Abbr. : AVES
20. French pupil : ELEVE
22. Grandpa on "The Simpsons" : ABE
23. Boot : EVICT
24. Live it up : REVEL
26. N.F.L. player with a black helmet : RAVEN
28. Hebrew month when Hanukkah starts : KISLEV
30. Richard Branson's airline company : VIRGIN
33. Hundred Acre Wood resident : OWL
34. Place to hear fire and brimstone : REVIVAL
38. Personal question? : WHO?
39. Washing machine contents : LOAD
41. David of "The Pink Panther" : NIVEN
42. Rear half of a griffin : LION
43. Writer Katherine ___ Porter : ANNE
44. Barely adequate : SCANT
45. Iams competitor : ALPO
46. 1943 penny material : STEEL
48. Suffix with meth- or prop- : -ANE
49. What you might buy a flight with : MILES
50. See 18-Across : MIGRATION
53. Place with complimentary bathrobes : SPA
56. Pronoun for Miss Piggy : MOI
57. Rodeway ___ : INN
58. Past the expiration date : BAD
61. Ship sinker : TORPEDO
63. Pep up : ANIMATE
65. "Not my call" : UP TO YOU
66. Words of encouragement : NICE JOB
67. Calls it quits : DESISTS
68. Weatherproofing stuff : SEALANT

Down
1. Revolver with the letters N-E-W-S : VANE
2. Speed skater's path : OVAL
3. Make-out session spot : LOVERS’ LANE
4. Spin, as an office chair : SWIVEL
5. It might be bummed : CIG
6. Basketball player who starred in "Kazaam" : O’NEAL
7. Commoner : PLEB
8. Police stun gun : TASER
9. "I ___ you one" : OWE
10. Barber, at times : SHAVER
11. Medical directive : LIVING WILL
12. With, on le menu : AVEC
13. Item under a jacket, maybe : VEST
21. At any time : EVER
23. Nefarious : EVIL
25. Roulette bet : EVENS
27. ___-garde : AVANT
28. Caffeine-laden nuts : KOLAS
29. "Not gonna happen" : I WON’T
31. Comment made while crossing one's fingers : I HOPE
32. Pitchers' hitless games, in baseball slang : NO-NOS
35. Experienced through another : VICARIOUS
36. The first Mrs. Trump : IVANA
37. Shakespeare's Antonio and Bassanio, e.g. : VENETIANS
40. Judge : DEEM
42. Reclined : LAIN
47. British sailors : LIMEYS
49. One of the friends on "Friends" : MONICA
51. No-show in a Beckett play : GODOT
52. Certain belly button : INNIE
53. Tuxedo shirt button : STUD
54. St. Peter was the first : POPE
55. B.A. part : ARTS
58. Cabo's peninsula : BAJA
59. Lots : A TON
60. Thing often of interest? : DEBT
62. Hawaiian dish : POI
64. Blanc or Brooks : MEL


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0930-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Sep 13, Monday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ian Livengood
THEME: Covert Ops … today’s themed answers contain the hidden word OPS, which links the two words in each answer:
58A. Spy activities ... or a hint to the answers to the six starred clues : COVERT OPS
17A. *Suddenly slam on the brakes : STOP SHORT
26A. *Top 40 music world : POP SCENE
36A. *"NYPD Blue" or "Miami Vice" : COP SHOW
49A. *Tricky tennis stroke : DROP SHOT
3D. *Stolen car destination, maybe : CHOP SHOP
38D. *Opening segment in a newscast : TOP STORY
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 38s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Muslim leader : IMAM
An imam is a Muslim leader, often the person in charge of a mosque or perhaps a Muslim community.

9. Office notes : MEMOS
“Memorandum” means "thing to be remembered" in Latin, from the verb "memorare" meaning "to call to mind".

15. One-named Nigerian singer of "The Sweetest Taboo" : SADE
Sade's real name is Helen Folasade Adu. Although she was born in Nigeria, Sade grew up and lives in the UK. She was the lead vocalist for the English group Sade, and adopted the name of the band. The band’s biggest hits were “Smooth Operator” (1984) and “The Sweetest Taboo” (1985).

20. ___ moss (gardening purchase) : PEAT
When dead plant matter accumulates in marshy areas, it may not fully decay due to a lack of oxygen or acidic conditions. We are familiar with this in Ireland, because this decaying matter can form peat, and we have lots and lots of peat bogs.

23. Dallas hoopster, informally : MAV
The Mavericks is the name of the NBA franchise in Dallas, Texas. The team was founded in 1980, and the Mavericks name was chosen by fan votes. The choice of “Mavericks” was prompted by the fact that the actor James Garner was a part-owner of the team, and Garner of course played the title role in the “Maverick” television series.

24. Corporate jet manufacturer : CESSNA
The Cessna Aircraft manufacturing company was founded in 1911 by Clyde Cessna, a farmer from Kansas. Cessna is headquartered in Wichita and today has over 8,000 employees.

30. Means of music storage : ITUNES
iTunes is a very, very successful software application from Apple. It's basically a media player that works on platforms like the iPad, iPhone and iPod. Of course it connects seamlessly to the iTunes Store, where you can spend all kinds of money.

36. *"NYPD Blue" or "Miami Vice" : COP SHOW
"NYPD Blue" is a police drama that was originally aired in 1993, and ran until 2005. Stars of the show are Dennis Franz, David Caruso, Jimmy Smits and Rick Schroder. The show created a bit of a fuss back in the nineties as it featured a relatively large amount of nudity for broadcast television.

“Miami Vice” is a detective television show that first aired in 1984-1989. Stars of the show are Don Johnson and Philip Michael Thomas. There is a 2006 film adaptation of “Miami Vice” that stars Colin Farrell and Jamie Foxx.

38. Fraternity "T" : TAU
Tau is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet, the letter which gave rise to our Roman "T". Both the letters tau (T) and chi (X) have long been symbolically associated with the cross.

41. Strongman of the Bible : SAMSON
The Biblical figure called Samson was married to Delilah. Delilah was engaged by the Philistines to betray her husband by determining the secret of his great strength. Samson lied to his wife three times, but on the fourth asking he told his wife the truth, that he did not cut his hair. Delilah then convinced Samson to shear his locks and so allowed him to be captured by his enemies. Over the centuries, it has been usual to depict Delilah actually cutting off her husband’s hair, but the Bible actually says that she persuaded Samson to do the job himself.

43. Deluxe Cuban cigar brand : COHIBA
The brand name “Cohiba” is actually used by two cigar manufacturers. The first is produced by Habanos S.A. which is a state-owned tobacco company in Cuba. The second is produced by a US company in the Dominican Republic. The name “cohíba “ means “tobacco”.

46. Eight-armed sea creature : OCTOPUS
The name “octopus” comes from the Greek for “eight-footed”. The most common plural used is “octopuses”, although the Greek plural form “octopodes” is also quite correct. The plural “octopi” isn’t really correct as the inference is that “octopus” is like a second-declension Latin noun, which it isn’t. That said, dictionaries are now citing “octopi” as an acceptable plural.

52. Paul of "Mad About You" : REISER
“Mad About You” is a sitcom from the nineties that stars Paul Reiser and Helen Hunt as a couple living in New York City. Reiser and Hunt did well out of the success of the show, each earning one million dollars per episode for the last series.

54. Gauge showing r.p.m.'s : TACH
The tachometer takes its name from the Greek word "tachos" meaning "speed". A tachometer measures engine revolutions per minute (rpm).

56. Ancient Greek public square : AGORA
In early Greece the "agora" was a place of assembly. Often the assemblies held there were quite formal, perhaps for the reading of a proclamation. Later in Greek history, things became less formal as the agora evolved into a market place. Our contemporary word "agoraphobia" comes from these agorae, in the sense that an agoraphobe has a fear of open spaces, a fear of "public meeting places".

62. O'Brien of late-night TV : CONAN
Before Conan O'Brien came to fame as a late night talk show host, he was a writer. O'Brien wrote for both "Saturday Night Live" and "The Simpsons".

64. ___ Mountains (Eurasian range) : URAL
The eastern side of the Ural Mountains in Russia is generally regarded as the natural divide between the continents of Europe and Asia.

67. Fire lover, briefly : PYRO
“Pyro-” is the combining form of the Greek word for "fire". A pyromaniac (a "pyro") is someone with an abnormal desire to start fires, or with a general obsession with fire.

Down
1. Faux ___ (blunder) : PAS
The term "faux pas" is French in origin, and translates literally as "false step" (or "false steps", as the plural has the same spelling in French).

3. *Stolen car destination, maybe : CHOP SHOP
After a car is stolen it might be delivered to a “chop shop”, a workshop that can break up the vehicle so that it can be sold for parts.

5. Beatty/Hoffman bomb of 1987 : ISHTAR
I guess "Ishtar" did bomb and was a indeed a disaster, 'cause I've never heard of it. It stars Warren Beatty and Dustin Hoffman as lounge singers working in Morocco! There's a Cold War plot and, thank goodness, it's a comedy. It's so bad apparently, that it never even made it to DVD.

6. Chairman whose figure overlooks Tiananmen Square : MAO
Tiananmen Square is located in the center of Beijing, China. It is the third largest city square in the world, after Merdeka Square in Jakarta, Indonesia and Praça dos Girassóis in Palmas, Brazil. Tiananmen Square can hold up to 600,000 people.

8. D.C.'s subway system : METRO
The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) provides transit service within and around Washington, D.C. The service generally goes by the name “Metro”. The authority’s two main services are Metrorail and Metrobus.

9. Goulash, e.g. : MEAT STEW
Goulash is a soup or stew that is seasoned with spices, especially paprika. It is a national dish of Hungary, and the term “goulash” comes from the Hungarian word “gulyás”, which actually translates as “herdsman”. The original goulash was a meat dish prepared by herdsman.

11. Emmy-winning AMC series set in the 1960s : MAD MEN
If you haven't seen the AMC show "Mad Men" then I urge you to go buy the first season on DVD and allow yourself to get addicted. It is a great series set in the sixties, telling all that goes on in and around the advertising business on Madison Avenue in New York City. It brings you right back to the days of three-martini lunches, office affairs, and chain-smoking of cigarettes. Great stuff ...

12. Gas rating : OCTANE
The difference between a premium and regular gasoline is its octane rating. The octane rating is measure of the resistance of the gasoline to auto-ignition i.e. it's resistance to ignition just by virtue of being compressed in the cylinder. This auto-ignition is undesirable as multiple-cylinder engines are designed so that ignition within each cylinder takes place precisely when the plug sparks, and not before. If ignition occurs before the spark is created, the resulting phenomenon is called "knocking".

13. Kitchen centerpieces : STOVES
Back in the 1500s, a “stove” was a heated room or a bathroom, a place where one could have a steam bath. The term started to be used to describe a device for heating or cooking in the early 1600s.

18. Yemen's capital : SANA
Sana (also Sana’a) is the capital city of Yemen. Within the bounds of today's metropolis is the old fortified city of Sana where people have lived for over 2,500 years. The Old City is now a World Heritage Site.

22. Vice president Agnew : SPIRO
Spiro Agnew served as Vice-President under Richard Nixon, before becoming the only VP in American history to resign because of criminal charges (there was a bribery scandal). Agnew was also the first Greek-American to serve as US Vice-President as he was the son of a Greek immigrant who had shortened the family name from Anagnostopoulos.

25. Source of many Sicilian explosions : ETNA
Mt. Etna is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy. Mt Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius.

27. Cow's chew : CUD
Ruminants are animals that “chew the cud”. Ruminants eat vegetable matter but cannot extract any nutritional value from cellulose without the help of microbes in the gut. Ruminants collect roughage in the first part of the alimentary canal, allowing microbes to work on it. The partially digested material (the cud) is regurgitated into the mouth so that the ruminant can chew the food more completely exposing more surface area for microbes to do their work.

29. Reveille's counterpart : TAPS
"Taps" is played nightly by the US military, indicating "lights out". It's also known as "Butterfield's Lullaby" as it is a variation of an older bugle call named the "Scott Tattoo", arranged during the Civil War by the Union Army's Brigadier General Daniel Butterfield. The tune is called "taps", from the notion of drum taps, as it was originally played on a drum, and only later on a bugle.

“Reveille” is a trumpet call that is used to wake everyone up at sunrise. The term comes from “réveillé”, the French for “wake up”.

33. Brit. military award : DSO
The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a British military award that is usually presented to officers with the rank of Major or higher.

36. Where to get a taxi : CABSTAND
We call cabs “taxis”, a word derived from “taximeter cabs” that were introduced in London in 1907. A taximeter was an automated meter designed to record distance travelled and fare to be charged. The term “taximeter” evolved from “taxameter”, with “taxa” being Latin for “tax, charge”.

37. Mutual of ___ : OMAHA
The insurance and financial services company called Mutual of Omaha was founded in 1909 as Mutual Benefit Health and Accident Association. Famously, Mutual of Omaha sponsored the television show “Wild Kingdom” from 1963 to 1988. “Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom” was resurrected in 2002 and can now be seen on the Animal Planet cable channel.

39. Fit of fever : AGUE
An ague is a fever, one usually associated with malaria.

40. Stalin's land, in brief : USSR
Joseph Stalin was Soviet Premier from 1941 to 1953. Stalin's real name was Ioseb Besarionis dze Jughashvili. Not long after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1903 he adopted the name “Stalin”, which is the Russian word for “steel”.

44. Setting for TV's "Portlandia" : OREGON
“Portlandia” is a satirical sketch show that is aired on the Independent Film Channel (IFC). The show is set in Portland, Oregon and takes its name from a statue called “Portlandia” which sits above the entrance to a building in downtown Portland. The statue is a copper repoussé work, and is second in size in the US only to the Statue of Liberty.

47. Church beliefs : CREEDS
A creed is a confession of faith, or a system of belief or principles. The word "creed" comes from the Latin "credo", meaning "I believe".

57. Arctic explorer John : RAE
John Rae was a Scottish explorer, who took on the task of searching for the ill-fated Franklin Expedition of 1845. The Franklin Expedition was itself searching for the elusive Northwest Passage through the Arctic Ocean connecting the Atlantic to the Pacific. John Rae stirred up much controversy back in England when he reported evidence of cannibalism among the ill-fated Franklin explorers.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Treaty : PACT
5. Muslim leader : IMAM
9. Office notes : MEMOS
14. Sore, as from overexercise : ACHY
15. One-named Nigerian singer of "The Sweetest Taboo" : SADE
16. Pass into law : ENACT
17. *Suddenly slam on the brakes : STOP SHORT
19. Expand, as a building : ADD TO
20. ___ moss (gardening purchase) : PEAT
21. Previously, in old usage : ERST
23. Dallas hoopster, informally : MAV
24. Corporate jet manufacturer : CESSNA
26. *Top 40 music world : POP SCENE
28. Fundamentally : AT HEART
30. Means of music storage : ITUNES
31. Tie the ___ (wed) : KNOT
32. Was gaga about : ADORED
35. Kennel bark : YAP
36. *"NYPD Blue" or "Miami Vice" : COP SHOW
38. Fraternity "T" : TAU
41. Strongman of the Bible : SAMSON
42. Porkers : HOGS
43. Deluxe Cuban cigar brand : COHIBA
46. Eight-armed sea creature : OCTOPUS
49. *Tricky tennis stroke : DROP SHOT
52. Paul of "Mad About You" : REISER
53. Like many workers, after age 65: Abbr. : RET
54. Gauge showing r.p.m.'s : TACH
55. Sunrise direction : EAST
56. Ancient Greek public square : AGORA
58. Spy activities ... or a hint to the answers to the six starred clues : COVERT OPS
62. O'Brien of late-night TV : CONAN
63. Preowned : USED
64. ___ Mountains (Eurasian range) : URAL
65. Struck with a bent leg : KNEED
66. Rules and ___ : REGS
67. Fire lover, briefly : PYRO

Down
1. Faux ___ (blunder) : PAS
2. Circus performance : ACT
3. *Stolen car destination, maybe : CHOP SHOP
4. Prepare for printing : TYPESET
5. Beatty/Hoffman bomb of 1987 : ISHTAR
6. Chairman whose figure overlooks Tiananmen Square : MAO
7. 11-Down extra : AD REP
8. D.C.'s subway system : METRO
9. Goulash, e.g. : MEAT STEW
10. "___ of discussion!" : END
11. Emmy-winning AMC series set in the 1960s : MAD MEN
12. Gas rating : OCTANE
13. Kitchen centerpieces : STOVES
18. Yemen's capital : SANA
22. Vice president Agnew : SPIRO
24. Like some poorly applied makeup : CAKY
25. Source of many Sicilian explosions : ETNA
27. Cow's chew : CUD
29. Reveille's counterpart : TAPS
33. Brit. military award : DSO
34. "Yikes!" : OH NO!
36. Where to get a taxi : CABSTAND
37. Mutual of ___ : OMAHA
38. *Opening segment in a newscast : TOP STORY
39. Fit of fever : AGUE
40. Stalin's land, in brief : USSR
41. Nurse a beverage : SIP
42. Raise, as with a crane : HOIST UP
43. Means of music storage : CD RACK
44. Setting for TV's "Portlandia" : OREGON
45. Definitely a day to run the A.C. : HOT ONE
47. Church beliefs : CREEDS
48. Glum drop : TEAR
50. Come to pass : OCCUR
51. "___ were the days ..." : THOSE
57. Arctic explorer John : RAE
59. Relax, with "out" : VEG
60. 3, 4 or 5 on a golf course : PAR
61. ___-mo replay : SLO


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0929-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Sep 13, Sunday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Norm Guggenbiller
THEME: Overheard in New England … all of today’s themed answers sound like common phrases stated with a New England accent:
24A. A "Star Trek" officer and a physician are going to board a plane? : SPOCKS WILL FLY (sounds like “sparks will fly”)
36A. Atlantic fishery auditors? : COD COUNTERS (sounds like “card counters”)
59A. Work agreeably in a greenhouse? : POT ON GOOD TERMS (sounds like “part on good terms”)
76A. "Happy Birthday" on a cake, e.g.? : GOBBLED MESSAGE (sounds like “garbled message”)
95A. Sexy operators? : HOT SURGEONS (sounds like “heart surgeon”)
112A. Where frogs shop? : HOPPERS’ BAZAAR (sounds like “Harper’s Bazaar”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 31m 07s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. Hidden : CACHED
A “cache” is a secret supply. We imported the term into English from French Canadian trappers in the 17th century. Back then, “cache” was as slang term for a “hiding place for stores”, derived from the French verb “cacher” meaning “to hide”.

14. Astronomer Halley : EDMOND
Edmond Halley was an English astronomer who lived at the turn of 17th and 18th centuries. In 1705 he declared that comet sightings recorded in 1456, 1531, 1607 and 1682 were in fact observations of the same comet returning to fly by Earth at regular intervals. He predicted that this comet would return in 1758, and he was right, and so the comet was named after him: Halley’s Comet. Sadly, Halley didn't live long enough to see his prediction come true.

23. Clan garb : TARTANS
Tartan is sometimes called "plaid" over here in the US, a word not used in the same sense outside of this country. In Scotland a "plaid" is a blanket or a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder.

24. A "Star Trek" officer and a physician are going to board a plane? : SPOCKS WILL FLY (sounds like “sparks will fly”)
Leonard Nimoy played the logical Mr. Spock in the original "Star Trek" television series. Spock has to be the most popular character on the show, and he keeps popping up in "Star Trek" spin offs to this day. Nimoy first worked alongside William Shatner (Captain Kirk) in an episode of "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (I loved that show!), with Nimoy playing a bad guy and Shatner playing an U.N.C.L.E. recruit.

Dr. Benjamin Spock owes his fame to his 1946 best-selling book “Baby and Child Care”. For over fifty years, “Baby and Child Care” sold more books than any other, except for the Bible.

27. Cracker topper : PATE
Pâté is a rich spreadable paste made up of a mixture of ground meat and fat, to which various vegetables, herbs and spices may be added. The most famous version is pâté de foie gras, made from the fattened livers of geese ("foie gras" means "fat liver" in French).

29. German Dadaist Hannah : HOCH
Hannah Hoch was a Dada artist from Gotha in Germany. Famously, Hoch was one of the pioneers of the artform that came to be known as “photomontage”.

Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

30. Makes stronger? : LACES
We've used the word "lace" to mean a net or a string since the 1300s, and in the mid-16th century it started to describe an ornamental net pattern. In the mid-17th century, one used "to lace" one's coffee or tea with sugar, the idea being that one was "ornamenting or trimming" the beverage. It wasn't long before "lacing" became reserved for the addition of alcohol to an otherwise "tame" drink.

36. Atlantic fishery auditors? : COD COUNTERS (sounds like “card counters”)
In the British Isles, the most common fish that is used in traditional “fish and chips” is Atlantic cod. Cod has been overfished all over the world, and is now considered to be an endangered species by many international bodies.

39. "Galatea of the Spheres" and others : DALIS
Salvador Dali’s 1952 painting called "Galatea of the Spheres" is a portrait of his wife, Gala. Gala’s image is depicted in a series of spheres that are meant to represent individual atoms. Dali had become interested in nuclear physics after the first atomic bombs were detonated in 1945.

41. Comcast media holding : NBC
Comcast is the largest cable company in the United States. Comcast was founded in 1963 as American Cable systems.

62. It's opposite julio on a calendario : ENERO
In Spanish, January (enero) might appear opposite July (julio) on a calendar (calendario).

64. "Dat ___" (classic jazz song) : DERE
“Dat Dere” is a jazz song by Bobby Timmons and Oscar Brown, Jr. that was first recorded in 1960, by Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers. The song tells the story of a young boy visiting a zoo with his father.

67. Dead-doornail connection : AS A
“As dead as a doornail” is one of older expressions, and dates back at least to the 14th century. You might have seen very old doors in castles or old houses that have large studs all over the front in a regular pattern. The studs are the heads of nails driven through the door, originally for strength, but later for decoration. They are “doornails”.

72. Moon feature : MARE
A “mare” is a large dark area on the moon. “Mare” is the Latin for “sea. Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the Mare Tranquillitatis, the “Sea of Tranquility”.

75. Bacteriologist Julius : PETRI
Julius Richard Petri was a German bacteriologist and was the man after whom the Petri dish is named. The petri dish can have an agar gel on the bottom which acts a nutrient source for the specimen being grown and studied, in which case the dish plus agar is referred to as an "agar plate".

81. Reproductive parts of flowers : OVULES
As we all remember from botany class, an "ovule" is a small structure in many plants that develops into the seed after fertilization. We do remember, don't we?

82. Folk rocker DiFranco : ANI
Ani DiFranco is a folk-rock singer and songwriter. DiFranco has also been labeled a "feminist icon", and in 2006 won the "Woman of Courage Award" from National Organization of Women.

83. Ball game : BOCCE
The Italian bowling game of “bocce” (anglicized as “bocci”) is based on a game played in Ancient Rome. “Bocce” is the plural of the Italian word "boccia" meaning "bowl".

86. Buster Brown's dog, in old comics : TIGE
"Buster Brown" was a comic strip created in 1902 by Felton Outcault. Outcault took his name Buster from the very popular film star at the time, Buster Keaton. Buster's dog Tige, was an American Pit Bull Terrier. Apparently when Tige started to "talk" in the strip, he became the first talking pet in American comics.

87. Verizon competitor : SPRINT
The modern Sprint Corporation, a giant in the telecommunications industry, can trace its roots back to the Brown Telephone Company which was founded in 1899. C.L. and Jacob Brown created their company to provide a telephone service to the rural parts around the city of Abilene, Kansas.

93. Wood-shaping tool : ADZ
An adze (also adz) is similar to an axe, but is different in that the blade of an adze is set at right angles to the tool's shaft. An axe's blade is set in line with the shaft.

94. Reagan attorney general : MEESE
Ed Meese was born in Oakland, California just down the road here and spent 24 years in the office of the Treasurer of Alameda County, the county in which I live. After military service, Meese earned himself a law degree at UC Berkeley. Later, as Chief of Staff for President Reagan, he was instrumental in a famous decision to crack down on student protesters at Berkeley which resulted in one protester dying and a two-week occupation of the city by the California National Guard.

99. Cell part : ANODE
The two terminals of a battery are called the anode and the cathode. Electrons travel from the anode to the cathode creating an electric current.

101. Femmes fatales : MAN-EATERS
A “femme fatale” is a dangerously seductive woman. “Femme fatale” is French for “deadly woman”.

104. Lion portrayer : LAHR
Bert Lahr's most famous role was that of the cowardly lion in "The Wizard of Oz". Lahr had a long career in burlesque, vaudeville and on Broadway. Remember the catch phrase made famous by the cartoon character Snagglepuss, "Heavens to Murgatroyd!"? Snagglepuss stole that line from a 1944 movie called, "Meet the People" in which it was first uttered by none other than Bert Lahr.

112. Where frogs shop? : HOPPERS’ BAZAAR (sounds like “Harper’s Bazaar”)
“Harper’s Bazaar” was first published in 1867, making it the first women’s fashion magazine to hit the newsstands.

115. Religious recluse : EREMITE
The Greek word for "uninhabited" is eremos, which is the root for “eremia” meaning both "desert" and "solitude". The Greek word eremites then means "a person of the desert". This was absorbed into Latin as “ermita”, meaning someone who lived in solitude or in an uninhabited area. We use "eremite" to mean the same thing, although the derivative term "hermit" is more common.

119. Medication for a narcoleptic : RITALIN
Ritalin is a trade name for the drug methylphenidate that is used for treatment of ADHD and narcolepsy. Methylphenidate has a similar structure and similar properties to the drug cocaine, although it is less potent.

120. Cabernet Sauvignon alternative : MERLOT
Merlot is one of the main grapes used to make Bordeaux wines, along with Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot.

The Cabernet Sauvignon grape has been around since the 17th century. It is the result of a chance crossing in southwestern France of the Cabernet franc and Sauvignon blanc grapes.

Down
1. They're probably close: Abbr. : ESTS
Estimates (ests.)

3. Large sport fish : CERO
The cero is a large fish in the mackerel family that typically grow to about 10 lb in weight. The cero is found in relative abundance in the Florida Keys and the West Indies.

5. Hotel amenity : SHAMPOO
Back in the 1760s, the verb “shampoo” was an Anglo-Indian word meaning “to massage”. A century later we started to shampoo our hair.

7. Hitchcock genre : SUSPENSE
Alfred Hitchcock makes a cameo appearance in 39 of his 52 movies. My favorite, and perhaps the most innovative, is in the movie "Lifeboat". In the film, there is a limited cast, just the people in a lifeboat and no extras. Hitchcock managed to make his appearance in a print ad in a newspaper read by one of the survivors in the boat.

10. Grp. in a 1955 merger : CIO
The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was founded in 1886, making it one of the first federations of unions in the country. Over time the AFL became dominated by craft unions, unions representing skilled workers of particular disciplines. In the early thirties, John L. Lewis led a movement within the AFL to organize workers by industry, believing this would be more effective for the members. But the craft unions refused to budge, so Lewis set up a rival federation of unions in 1932 called the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO). The two federations became bitter rivals for over two decades until finally merging in 1955 to form the AFL-CIO.

11. "Wag the Dog" actress : HECHE
My favorite movie starring the actress Anne Heche is "Six Days Seven Nights", a romantic comedy in which she plays opposite Harrison Ford. Heche is noted for her difficult private life. She wrote that her father had molested her as a child and gave her a sexually transmitted disease (he later revealed that he was homosexual, and died of AIDS). Heche dated comedian Steve Martin for two years, and then lived with comedian Ellen DeGeneres for three. Soon after breaking up with DeGeneres, she started exhibiting eccentric behavior for a while, claiming that she was the daughter of God, and that she would take everyone back to heaven in her spaceship. Happily, I think things have calmed down for her in recent years.

The 1997 movie "Wag the Dog" is a black comedy starring Dustin Hoffman and Robert De Niro. It tells the story of a fake war that is manufactured by a Washington spin doctor in order to distract the American electorate. It is based on the novel "American Hero" by Larry Beinhart. In the movie the war is fictitious and the president goes unnamed. In the novel, Beinhart uses Desert Storm as the war in his storyline, and George H. W. Bush as the President.

12. Fashion designer Marc : ECKO
Marc Ecko is a fashion designer from New Jersey. Marc was born Marc Milecofsky. In college he became a fan of graffiti and used the name “Ecko” to tag his drawings.

13. Family tree listing: Abbr. : DESC
Descendant (desc.)

14. Prefix with dermis : EPI-
The epidermis is the outermost layer of the skin. The thickest piece of epidermal tissue in humans is on the soles of the feet and the palms, measuring about 1.5 mm. The thinnest measures 0.1 mm, and that would be the human eyelid.

15. Longtime home of the Cotton Bowl : DALLAS
The Cotton Bowl college football game was played from its inception in 1937 until 2009 in Dallas, originally at the Texas State Fair Grounds. The game was moved to Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas in 2010.

16. Reflective material : MYLAR
Mylar is a brand name for a polyester film with many uses, one of which is to make reflective surfaces. Mylar can be used to make reflective solar sails, which are a fascinating form of spacecraft propulsion. Believe it or not, reflecting photons of light each provide a small amount of thrust, and enough of them can propel an object in the vacuum of space.

18. Florida State player, casually : ‘NOLE
Florida State University (FSU) is located in Tallahassee, the state capital of Florida. The school’s athletic teams are known as the Seminoles (sometimes “the ‘Noles”). The team name was chosen in 1947 by the students in a vote, and alludes to the Seminole people who originally lived in the state. Most of the Seminole now live in Oklahoma, after their forced relocation by the US government in the 1840s.

19. Prohibitionists : DRYS
There were concerted efforts to ban the sale of alcoholic beverages in the US from the 1840s right up until the lobbyists achieved success with ratification of the Eighteenth Amendment to the US Constitution in 1919. While there were several factors that influenced legislators at that time, one was the perceived need to take political power away from German-based brewing industry during WWI.

28. Model Carol : ALT
Carol Alt is a model from Queens, New York. Alt’s big break came when was featured on the cover of the 1982 “Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue”.

35. Stronghold : CITADEL
A citadel is a fortress built to protect a town or a city. Both the words “city” and “citadel” come from the Latin word “civis” meaning “citizen”.

36. Tortile : COILED
“Tortile” is a very rarely used term meaning “twisted, coiled”, from Latin “tortilus” meaning “winding”.

37. Italian princely family name : ORSINI
The Orisinis were a very influential Italian noble family in medieval and renaissance times. Included in the Orsini line were three popes: Celestine III (1191-1198), Nicholas III (1277-1280) and Benedict XIII (1724-1730).

40. Bygone Chevrolet : AVEO
The Chevrolet Aveo is a subcompact that has been around since 2002. The Aveo is manufactured by GM Daewoo, the GM subsidiary in South Korea. Although the Aveo name is still used in some markets, here in North America the Aveo has been sold as the Chevrolet Sonic since 2012. By the way, GM Daewoo is the third largest manufacturer of automobiles in South Korea, after Hyundai and Kia.

43. Engine specification: Abbr. : CYLS
Cylinders (cyls.)

50. Footless creature : APOD
Something described as “apod” has no feet. An example of an apod animal would be a snake.

55. Chevron : STRIPE
A chevron is a band that is shaped like an inverted “V”. One example of a chevron is the insignia that indicates rank on a military uniform.

61. 1960s-'70s pitcher Blue Moon : ODOM
Blue Moon Odom’s real name was Johnny Lee Odom, and he was a pitcher for the Oakland Athletics. With the A’s, Odom won three consecutive World Series, from 1972 to 1974.

68. One 60-trillionth of a min. : PSEC
A picosecond is one trillionth of a second, and is correctly abbreviated to “ps” in the SI system of measurements. I guess that's what “psec” is meant to be …

70. Dimwit : CRETIN
“Cretin” is a slang term meaning “idiot”, and is a term that I do not like at all. “Cretin” was a medical term in the 1900s that derived from Alpine French dialect. Congenital hypothyroidism was particularly associated with an area in the French Alps and manifested itself as impaired physical and mental development, a condition known as "cretinism".

71. Charmers : SIRENS
In Greek mythology, the Sirens were seductive bird-women who lured men to their deaths with their song. When Odysseus sailed closed to the island home of the Sirens he wanted to hear their voices, but in safety. He had his men plug their ears with beeswax and then ordered them to tie him to the mast and not to free him until they were safe. On hearing their song Odysseus begged to be let loose, but the sailors just tightened his bonds and and the whole crew sailed away unharmed.

73. Start of a choosing rhyme : EENIE
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

77. "Metamorphoses" poet : OVID
The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso is today known simply as Ovid. Ovid is usually listed alongside the two other great Roman poets: Horace and Virgil.

"The Metamorphoses" is a narrative poem by the Roman poet Ovid that deals with a lofty subject. It describes the history of the world from creation until the "present day", that is Ovid’s “present day”, the era of Julius Caesar. A lot of the storyline makes use of Greek mythology (rather than Roman).

79. Setting of the 2012 film "John Carter" : MARS
"John Carter" is a science fiction film that Disney released in 2012. The movie is based on the Edgar Rice Burroughs novel “A Princess of Mars”. Burroughs wrote a whole series of “Barsoom” novels that featured the character John Carter who was transported from Earth to a dying Mars.

80. Combine name : DEERE
John Deere invented the first commercially successful steel plow in 1837. Prior to Deere's invention, farmers used an iron or wooden plow that constantly had to be cleaned as rich soil stuck to its surfaces. The cast-steel plow was revolutionary as its smooth sides solved the problem of "stickiness".

92. "WKRP in Cincinnati" news director Les ___ : NESSMAN
Les Nessman is a character in the sitcom “WKRP in Cincinatti”. Nessman is the shy balding guy who always wears a bow tie.

The sitcom "WKRP in Cincinnati" was produced by MTM, the production company established by Mary Tyler Moore and her husband for the "The Mary Tyler Moore Show". "WKRP" was a successful enough show when it originally aired, but then became a blockbuster in syndication. It became MTM's most-watched program, even outstripping the original "The Mary Tyler Moore Show".

98. Baseball's Bando : SAL
Sal Bando is a former Major League Baseball player and baseball executive. After retiring as a player, Bando worked for while as a color analyst for NBC, working alongside Bob Costas.

100. Mountainous land : NEPAL
Nepal lies to the northeast of India. Today, the state is known as the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal. In 2008, the Communist Party of Nepal won the country's general election. Soon after, the Assembly voted to change the form of government, moving away from a monarchy and creating a secular republic.

101. Postal symbol, once : MR ZIP
Mr. ZIP is a mascot that was used by the US Post Office in the sixties and seventies. Mr. ZIP’s mission was to encourage the public to use ZIP codes when mailing letters and packages.

105. Uncle of Enoch : ABEL
Enoch was the great-grandfather of Noah, and the great-grandson of Adam. Cain was Enoch’s father and Abel was his uncle.

110. ___ & Carla (1960s duo) : OTIS
The 1960s duo Otis & Carla was made up of Otis Redding and Carla Thomas. The duo’s most celebrated album is 1967’s “King & Queen”.

Otis Redding is often referred to as the "King of Soul", and what a voice he had. Like so many of the greats in the world of popular music it seems, Redding was killed in a plane crash, in 1967 when he was just 26 years old. Just three days earlier he had recorded what was to be his biggest hit, "(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay".

Carla Thomas is a singer from Memphis, Tennessee who is referred to as the Queen of Memphis Soul. Carla’s father was R&B singer Rufus Thomas.

116. Birthplace of the bossa nova : RIO
Rio de Janeiro is the second largest city in Brazil (after São Paulo). “Rio de Janeiro” translates as "January River". The name reflects the discovery of the bay on which Rio sits, on New Years Day in 1502.

Bossa Nova is a style of music from Brazil that evolved from samba. The most famous piece of bossa nova is the song "The Girl from Ipanema".

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Boxes up : ENCASES
8. Hidden : CACHED
14. Astronomer Halley : EDMOND
20. Sheer, informally : SEE-THRU
21. Individually : APIECE
22. Not get gratis : PAY FOR
23. Clan garb : TARTANS
24. A "Star Trek" officer and a physician are going to board a plane? : SPOCKS WILL FLY (sounds like “sparks will fly”)
26. Attack, as ramparts : STORM
27. Cracker topper : PATE
29. German Dadaist Hannah : HOCH
30. Makes stronger? : LACES
31. Kind of court : APPELLATE
34. Without ___ in the world : A CARE
36. Atlantic fishery auditors? : COD COUNTERS (sounds like “card counters”)
39. "Galatea of the Spheres" and others : DALIS
41. Comcast media holding : NBC
44. Ones giving their addresses : ORATORS
45. Hedge shrub : PRIVET
47. Dog command : STAY
48. Non-Eur. U.S. ally : ISR
49. Baseball features : SEAMS
53. French article : UNE
54. To boot : AS WELL
56. Minute : LITTLE
59. Work agreeably in a greenhouse? : POT ON GOOD TERMS (sounds like “part on good terms”)
62. It's opposite julio on a calendario : ENERO
63. "No challenge at all" : TOO EASY
64. "Dat ___" (classic jazz song) : DERE
65. Called the shots : DIRECTED
67. Dead-doornail connection : AS A
68. Delicate first-date topic : POLITICS
72. Moon feature : MARE
73. Aristocratic practice : ELITISM
75. Bacteriologist Julius : PETRI
76. "Happy Birthday" on a cake, e.g.? : GOBBLED MESSAGE (sounds like “garbled message”)
80. Naysayer : DENIER
81. Reproductive parts of flowers : OVULES
82. Folk rocker DiFranco : ANI
83. Ball game : BOCCE
85. Québec place name starter : STE
86. Buster Brown's dog, in old comics : TIGE
87. Verizon competitor : SPRINT
90. Positions oneself to hear better, say : LEANS IN
93. Wood-shaping tool : ADZ
94. Reagan attorney general : MEESE
95. Sexy operators? : HOT SURGEONS (sounds like “heart surgeon”)
99. Cell part : ANODE
101. Femmes fatales : MAN-EATERS
102. Bank heist, e.g. : CAPER
104. Lion portrayer : LAHR
107. Word with sea or seasoned : SALT
108. Bar, legally : ESTOP
112. Where frogs shop? : HOPPERS’ BAZAAR (sounds like “Harper’s Bazaar”)
115. Religious recluse : EREMITE
117. Consternation : UNEASE
118. O.K. to serve : EDIBLE
119. Medication for a narcoleptic : RITALIN
120. Cabernet Sauvignon alternative : MERLOT
121. Ran out : LAPSED
122. Immediately : SOONEST

Down
1. They're probably close: Abbr. : ESTS
2. Undiluted : NEAT
3. Large sport fish : CERO
4. Draw : ATTRACT
5. Hotel amenity : SHAMPOO
6. Directional suffix : -ERN
7. Hitchcock genre : SUSPENSE
8. Common aquarium feature : CASTLE
9. Show up : APPEAR
10. Grp. in a 1955 merger : CIO
11. "Wag the Dog" actress : HECHE
12. Fashion designer Marc : ECKO
13. Family tree listing: Abbr. : DESC
14. Prefix with dermis : EPI-
15. Longtime home of the Cotton Bowl : DALLAS
16. Reflective material : MYLAR
17. Unbalanced : OFF-CENTER
18. Florida State player, casually : ‘NOLE
19. Prohibitionists : DRYS
25. Oil source : WHALE
28. Model Carol : ALT
32. Clutch, e.g. : PURSE
33. Recipe amt. : TSP
35. Stronghold : CITADEL
36. Tortile : COILED
37. Italian princely family name : ORSINI
38. Sand ___ (perchlike fish) : DARTER
39. Drab-looking : DINGY
40. Bygone Chevrolet : AVEO
42. Salve : BALM
43. Engine specification: Abbr. : CYLS
46. Drinks now, pays later : RUNS A TAB
47. Make more enticing : SWEETEN
50. Footless creature : APOD
51. Barnyard sound : MOO
52. Enters furtively : STEALS IN
55. Chevron : STRIPE
57. Exhibit fear, in a way : TREMBLE
58. Quarter : LOCALE
60. Green spot : OASIS
61. 1960s-'70s pitcher Blue Moon : ODOM
63. Ticked (off) : TEED
66. Locked? : TRESSED
68. One 60-trillionth of a min. : PSEC
69. "True" : IT IS SO
70. Dimwit : CRETIN
71. Charmers : SIRENS
73. Start of a choosing rhyme : EENIE
74. "Can ___ now?" : I GO
76. "___ light?" : GOT A
77. "Metamorphoses" poet : OVID
78. Sight at many a barbecue : BUG ZAPPER
79. Setting of the 2012 film "John Carter" : MARS
80. Combine name : DEERE
84. Hoarders' problems : CLUTTERS
88. Rinds : PEELS
89. Fourth Arabic letter : THA
91. Go along with : AGREE TO
92. "WKRP in Cincinnati" news director Les ___ : NESSMAN
94. To a greater extent : MORE SO
96. Reduced : ON SALE
97. Got emotional, with "up" : TEARED
98. Baseball's Bando : SAL
100. Mountainous land : NEPAL
101. Postal symbol, once : MR ZIP
102. Bud : CHUM
103. Super-duper : A-ONE
105. Uncle of Enoch : ABEL
106. "I ___ thought" : HAD A
109. Part of a space shuttle's exterior : TILE
110. ___ & Carla (1960s duo) : OTIS
111. Cooped (up) : PENT
113. No longer playing: Abbr. : RET
114. They may improve in crunch time : ABS
116. Birthplace of the bossa nova : RIO


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0928-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Sep 13, Saturday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Joe Krozel
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 39m 14s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Clemson Tigers logo : PAW PRINT
Clemson University was founded in 1889. The school takes its name from the town in which it is located: Clemson, South Carolina. The athletic teams of Clemson University have been called the Tigers since 1896 when a new football coach, Walter Riggs, arrived from Auburn University. Riggs was an admirer of the Princeton Tigers, so he gave his new school the tiger mascot.

17. Mimosas and such : ORNAMENTAL TREES
Some members of the Mimosa genus of plant are capable of rapid movement. For example, if you touch the leaves of the Mimosa pudica, they curl up in less than a second.

20. ___ Day (May 1) : LEI
What’s known as May Day around the world is also called Lei Day in Hawaii. Lei Day started in the twenties and is a celebration of native Hawaiian culture.

21. ___ gratia : DEI
“Dei Gratia” is Latin for “By the Grace of God”. The term is used in the name of a monarch who is said to be ruling by divine right. For example, the full title of the UK’s Queen is “Elizabeth II, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and of Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith”.

23. Florida's ___ National Park : BISCAYNE
Biscayne National Park in Florida is located south of Miami, and is 95% underwater. The park preserves Biscayne Bay and the barrier reefs within it.

25. Rhone feeder : SAONE
The Saône is a river in eastern France that joins up with the Rhône in Lyon.

27. "Look ___" (Vince Gill hit) : AT US
Vince Gill is a country music singer-songwriter. Gill has been honored with 20 Grammy Awards, which is more than any other male country singer.

28. Sauce often served with oysters : MIGNONETTE
Mignonette sauce is traditionally served with raw oysters. The sauce is a condiment made from minced shallots and cracked pepper suspended in vinegar.

33. Beginning of time? : BIG BANG
According to the Big Bang theory, the universe came into being just under 14 billion years ago. According to the theory, the universe started out as a hot and dense mass that began to expand rapidly (in a “big bang”). Within three minutes of the “bang”, the universe cooled so that energy was converted into subatomic particles like protons, electrons and neutrons. Over time, subatomic particles turned into atoms. Clouds of those atoms formed stars and galaxies.

34. Mao's designated successor : HUA
Hua Guofeng was man whom Mao Zedong designated as his successor as paramount leader of the People’s Republic of China and the Communist Party of China. Hua came to power in 1976 and within a few month’s brought Chairman Mao’s Cultural Revolution to an end. However, Hua was deemed to be moving too slowly with his reforms, and so he was forced into early retirement after just a few years in power and Deng Xiaoping took control.

35. Snoop Dogg, to Cameron Diaz [fun fact!] : SCHOOLMATE
According to actress Cameron Diaz, she attended the same high school in Long Beach, California as rapper Snoop Dogg. Snoop Dogg was a year older than Diaz, and she says that claims he actually sold her some marijuana at some point.

37. Kind of check: Abbr. : CERT
Certified (cert.)

38. Coeur ___ : D’ALENE
The city of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho is named for the Coeur d'Alene People, Native Americans who lived in the area when it was first explored by French Canadian fur traders. “Coeur d'Alene” translates from French as “heart of an awl”. The Native American people were given this name as they were perceived as shrewd traders by their Canadian counterparts.

39. Capitale européenne : BERNE
In French, Bern (Berne) is a European capital (capitale européenne).

Bern (also “Berne”) is the capital city of Switzerland. The official language of the city is German, but the language most spoken in Bern is a dialect known as Bernese German.

40. Angry Birds or Tetris, e.g. : TIME SINK
Angry Birds is a video game that was developed for smartphones. Angry Birds is the third most downloaded game, after Tetris and Pac-Man.

Tetris is a very addictive video game, developed in the Soviet Union in 1984. The name Tetris comes from a melding of the prefix “tetra-” (as all the game pieces have four segments) and “tennis” (a favorite sport played by the developer). Since 2005 there have been more than 100 million copies of the game installed on cell phones alone.

43. With 32-Across, study of Hesse and Mann, informally : GERMAN
(32A. See 43-Across : LIT)
Hermann Hesse was not only a novelist, but also a poet and a painter. Hesse’s best known work is probably his 1927 novel "Steppenwolf".

Thomas Mann was a German novelist whose most famous work is probably his novella "Death in Venice", originally published in German in 1912 as "Der Tod in Venedig". The story was famously adapted for the big screen in 1971, in a movie starring Dirk Bogarde.

44. W.W. II battle site, for short : IWO
Iwo Jima is a volcanic island located south of Tokyo that today is uninhabited. There were about a thousand Japanese civilians living on the island prior to WWII. In 1944, there was a massive influx of Japanese military personnel in anticipation of the inevitable US invasion. As the Japanese military moved in, the civilians were forced out and no one has lived there since.

46. 2013 women's singles champ at Wimbledon : BARTOLI
Marion Bartoli is a former professional tennis player from France. Bartoli won her first Wimbledon title in 2013, without even losing one set in the whole tournament. A few weeks later, she announced her retirement from the game.

51. Hardly like the pick of the litter : RUNTIEST
Back around 1500. a runt was an old or decayed tree stump, and by the early 1600s "runt" was being used to describe animals that were similarly old and decayed. Ultimately "runt" came to mean the smallest and often sickest in a litter.

52. "Oh man, that's bad" : SHEESH
“Sheesh” is an interjection used to express annoyance or surprise. It is a euphemism for “Jesus”.

Down
4. Printer rollers : PLATENS
The original platens were flat plates used to press paper against inked type to create an impression in the process of letterpress printing. The term was then used with newer printing machines and typewriters, describing the rollers that pressed paper against printing media.

6. What the French think? : IDEES
In French, an inventor (inventeur) might have a list of ideas (idées).

7. Marxist Andrés and writer Anaïs : NINS
Andreu Nin i Pérez was a Spanish politician who was one of the founders of the Communist Party of Spain, in 1921.

Anaïs Nin was a French author, famous for her journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. Nin also wrote highly regarded erotica and cited D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration. Nin was married to banker and artist Hugh Parker Guiler in 1923. Decades later in 1955, Nin married former actor Rupert Pole, even though she was still married to Guiler. Nin and Pole had their marriage annulled in 1966, but just for legal reasons, and they continued to live together as husband and wife until Nin passed away in 1977.

8. Boom source : TNT
TNT is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

11. Continental abbr. : AFR
Africa (Afr.)

The Carthaginian Republic was centered on the city of Carthage, the ruins of which are located on the coast of modern-day Tunisia. The Latin name for the people of Carthage was “Afri”. When the Romans took over Carthage, they created a province they called “Africa”. That name extended over time to the whole continent.

13. Woodenware : TREEN
Functional household objects made from wood can be referred to as “treen”. The term translates literally as “of a tree”. Examples of treen would be wooden plates and bowls, spoons, shoehorns and chopping boards.

14. Davis of Hollywood : OSSIE
Ossie Davis was a very successful African-American actor, but also a director, poet, playwright and social activist. One of Davis’s better known performances was in the 1993 movie “Grumpy Old Men”, in which he played the owner of the bait shop by the lake.

23. Occupy opponent : BIG BANK
The Occupy movement is a protest directed against economic and social inequality worldwide. The first such protest to garner major attention took place in Wall Street in 2011 and from there similar protests spread around the world.

24. Suffix with hex- : -ANE
A hexane is a hydrocarbon, an alkane with six carbon atoms. Hexanes of varying types are major components of gasoline.

29. Plastic that can be made permanently rigid : THERMOSET
A thermosetting plastic is one that cures with the application of heat. The necessary heat can come from irradiation, from a chemical reaction in the material, or from an external heat source.

33. Braggadocios : BOASTERS
A braggadocio is one who brags. The term was coined by poet Edmund Spenser in his epic poem “The Faerie Queen”. One of the characters in the poem is a comic knight who is prone to bragging, someone Spenser names “Braggadocchio”.

42. Former Israeli president Katsav : MOSHE
Moshe Katsav is a politician from Israel. Katsav served as the country’s president from 2000. He resigned the office in 2007, under the cloud of allegations of rape and sexual harassment. Katsav was subsequently found to be guilty of the charges and is now serving a seven year jail sentence.

43. Adorned, per menus : GARNI
“Garni” is a French word for “garnished”.

46. Something with round parts? : BOUT
A boxing bout is divided into several rounds.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Clemson Tigers logo : PAW PRINT
9. Mistreating : MEAN TO
15. Not left hanging, say : REELED IN
16. Draws : INFERS
17. Mimosas and such : ORNAMENTAL TREES
19. Toddler seats? : POTTIES
20. ___ Day (May 1) : LEI
21. ___ gratia : DEI
22. Become completely absorbed : OBSESS
23. Florida's ___ National Park : BISCAYNE
25. Rhone feeder : SAONE
26. It can be found beneath the lower crust : PIE TIN
27. "Look ___" (Vince Gill hit) : AT US
28. Sauce often served with oysters : MIGNONETTE
32. See 43-Across : LIT
33. Beginning of time? : BIG BANG
34. Mao's designated successor : HUA
35. Snoop Dogg, to Cameron Diaz [fun fact!] : SCHOOLMATE
37. Kind of check: Abbr. : CERT
38. Coeur ___ : D’ALENE
39. Capitale européenne : BERNE
40. Angry Birds or Tetris, e.g. : TIME SINK
43. With 32-Across, study of Hesse and Mann, informally : GERMAN
44. W.W. II battle site, for short : IWO
45. One might be a couple of years old : TOT
46. 2013 women's singles champ at Wimbledon : BARTOLI
47. Shows levelheadedness : LISTENS TO REASON
50. Mobile advertising medium? : T-SHIRT
51. Hardly like the pick of the litter : RUNTIEST
52. "Oh man, that's bad" : SHEESH
53. Words after "say" or before "bad" : IT ISN’T SO

Down
1. Ring accompaniers : PROPOSALS
2. Like stunt pilots' stunts : AEROBATIC
3. Headed toward bankruptcy : WENT SOUTH
4. Printer rollers : PLATENS
5. Release a claim to, legally : REMISE
6. What the French think? : IDEES
7. Marxist Andrés and writer Anaïs : NINS
8. Boom source : TNT
9. Centennial, e.g. : MILESTONE
10. Good at drawing? : ENTICING
11. Continental abbr. : AFR
12. Attention-seeking, say : NEEDY
13. Woodenware : TREEN
14. Davis of Hollywood : OSSIE
18. Put off : ALIENATE
23. Occupy opponent : BIG BANK
24. Suffix with hex- : -ANE
26. Eyeshades? : PIGMENTS
28. Like a customer who may get special notice : MILLIONTH
29. Plastic that can be made permanently rigid : THERMOSET
30. See red? : TURN A LOSS
31. Corroded : EATEN INTO
33. Braggadocios : BOASTERS
36. Inauguration recitation, maybe : ODE
37. Confirmed : CERTAIN
39. Ones above military heads : BERETS
40. Lists : TILTS
41. "Would that it were!" : I WISH!
42. Former Israeli president Katsav : MOSHE
43. Adorned, per menus : GARNI
46. Something with round parts? : BOUT
48. Draw : TIE
49. Part of 8-Down : TRI-


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

0927-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Sep 13, Friday



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Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Peter A. Collins
THEME: Begin to End … today we have what’s being called a “mini-theme”. The across clues “begin” with GERMINATE and “end” with TERMINATE, and the center of the grid refers to this pair of answers:
29A. With 36- and 39-Across, go from 1- to 61-Across : CHANGE
36A. See 29-Across : ONE
39A. See 29-Across : LETTER

1A. Begin : GERMINATE
61A. End : TERMINATE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 21s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. Donizetti heroine : LUCIA
“Lucia di Lammermoor” is an 1835 opera by Gaetano Donizetti, which is loosely based on the historical novel “The Bride of Lammermoor” written by Sir Walter Scott.

16. Magnetron component : ANODE
A magnetron is a vacuum tube that is used to generate microwaves. Magnetrons are used in radar devices and microwave ovens.

20. Things often dropped in Harvard Yard? : ARS
The Boston accent is noted for is broad A, and dropping of the letter R.

Harvard Yard is a large grassy area at the very center of Harvard University.

21. Big name in winter vehicles : SKI-DOO
Ski-Doo is a brand name of snowmobile produced by the Canadian company, Bombardier Recreational Products. The first Ski-Doo went on sale in 1959 and was intended to be named a "Ski-Dog" as the marketing concept was that the personal snowmobile would replace the dogsleds used by hunters and trappers. A painter misread instructions and wrote "Ski-Doo" on the side of the vehicle instead of Ski-Dog, and the name stuck.

25. Birthplace of the Franciscan order : ASSISI
The Italian town of Assisi is in Umbria. Assisi is famous as the birthplace of St. Francis and as the home to the Franciscan religious order. It was also the home to Saint Clare and her order of the Poor Sisters (later known as the Poor Clares).

27. "Before My Birth" collagist, 1914 : ARP
Hans Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn't the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both "Hans" and "Jean" translate into English as "John". In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. He was sent home …

28. ___-yo (cold treat, briefly) : FRO
Frozen Yogurt (Fro-yo)

31. 10-year-old Best Supporting Actress : O’NEAL
Tatum O'Neal is the youngest actress to win a "competitive" Oscar. She won the Best Supporting Actress Award in 1974 when she was just 10 years old, for her role as Addie in "Paper Moon". The youngest person to win an honorary Academy Award was Shirley Temple, who was only 5 years old when she was presented with an Oscar in 1934.

33. Robert W. Service's "The Cremation of Sam ___" : MCGEE
"The Cremation of Sam McGee" is a famous poem penned by Robert W. Service. It tells the story of the cremation of a prospector who froze to death in the Yukon. First published in 1907, the poem became a popular reading around campfires.

37. Robert W. Service output : POEMS
Robert W. Service was an English poet who lived in Canada for many years. Service lived in the Yukon while in Canada, and earned himself the moniker “the Bard of the Yukon”.

50. Ottoman bigwig : AGA
"Aga" (also "agha") is a title that was used by both civil and military officials in the Ottoman Empire.

The Ottoman Dynasty was named for its founder, Osman I. The term “Ottoman” comes from the name “Osman”. The "Ottoman Empire" was really established with the conquest of Constantinople, and that didn't happen until almost 130 years after Osman I died.

51. Tan in a library : AMY
Amy Tan lives not too far from here, in Sausalito just north of San Francisco. Tan is an American writer of Chinese descent whose most successful work is "The Joy Luck Club". "The Joy Luck Club" was made into a movie produced by Oliver Stone in 1993. The novel and movie tell of four Chinese-American immigrant families in San Francisco who start the Joy Luck Club, a group playing Mahjong for money and eating delicious food.

52. Anatomical ring : AREOLA
An areola (sometimes “areole”) in anatomy is a small ring of color, as in the areola surrounding the nipple, and the areola surrounding the pupil of the eye. “Areola” comes from Latin, meaning "small open space", and is a diminutive of the Latin word "area", meaning "open space".

53. Direction de Paris à Nancy : EST
“Est” is the French word “east”.

Nancy is a city in northeastern France.

54. Vegan gelatin substitute : AGAR
Agar is a jelly extracted from seaweed that has many uses. Agar is found in Japanese desserts, and can also be used as a food thickener or even as a laxative. In the world of science it is the most common medium used for growing bacteria in Petri dishes.

58. ___ Montoya, swordsman in "The Princess Bride" : INIGO
“The Princess Bride” is a novel by William Goldman written in 1973. Famously, the book was adapted into a 1987 film of the same name directed by Rob Reiner that has become a cult classic.

59. Prefixes featured on some maps : AREA CODES
Area codes were introduced in the 1940s. Back then the “clicks” one heard when dialling a number led to mechanical wear on various pieces of equipment. In order to minimize overall mechanical wear, areas with high call volumes were given the most efficient area codes (lowest number of clicks). That led to New York getting the area code 212, Los Angeles 213 and Chicago 313.

60. Baden-Powell of the Girl Guides : AGNES
The scouting movement is generally traced back to a camp for boys held in 1907 by Robert Baden-Powell. Within a short space of time, many girls became interested in the scouting movement, but Baden-Powell deemed that girls should not be allowed in the same organization. So, he founded the Girl Guides in 1910 and put his younger sister Agnes Baden-Powell in charge of the new movement.

Down
1. One known for riding out of gear? : GODIVA
In the legend of Lady Godiva, a noblewoman rode naked through the streets of Coventry in England, basically as a dare from her husband in return for relieving the taxes of his tenants. Lady Godiva issued instructions that all the town’s inhabitants should stay indoors while she made her journey. However, a tailor in the town named Tom disobeyed the instructions by boring holes in the shutters on his windows, and “peeped”. As a result, Peeping Tom was struck blind, and the term “peeping Tom” has been in our language ever since.

4. He'll "talk 'til his voice is hoarse" : MR ED
"Mister Ed" first aired in 1961 and ran for almost five years. It was a very successful show (and even made it to Ireland!). Mister Ed, the talking horse, was a palomino that had the real name of Bamboo Harvester. Mister Ed's "voice" was that of actor Allan "Rocky" Lane, a star of a lot of B-movie westerns from the forties and fifties. In the show, Mister Ed would only talk to the lead (human) character Wilbur, played by Alan Young, leading to some hilarious situations. Mister Ed had a stunt double and stand-in for the show, another horse called Pumpkin. Pumpkin later played the horse that made frequent appearances on the show "Green Acres".

5. The Who's "___ Hard" : IT’S
The English rock band called the Who was formed in 1964, bringing together famed musicians Roger Daltrey, Pete Townshend, John Entwistle and Keith Moon. According to "Rolling Stone" magazine, the Who were the third arm of the holy trinity of British rock, alongside the Beatles and the Rolling Stones.

6. ___ Romanova, alter ego of Marvel's Black Widow : NATALIA
Over the years, Marvel Comics introduced several super heroines named the Black Widow. The Black Widow’s alter egos have included:
- Claire Voyant
- Natalia Romanova
- Yelena Belova
- Monica Chang

7. Landmark anime film of 1988 : AKIRA
“Akira” is a 1988 animated film that is based on a manga story of the same name. “Akira” became a cult classic in Japan.

8. Many pulp heroes, in slang : TECS
“Tec” is slang for a private detective.

9. Picking up skill? : ESP
Extrasensory perception (ESP)

12. Unit charge : CONDO FEE
The words “condominium” and “apartment” tend to describe the one type of residential property, a private living space with facilities shared with others residing in the same building or complex. The difference is that a condominium is usually owned, and an apartment is rented. At least that’s how it is in the US. The word “condominium” comes from the Latin “com” (together) and “dominum” (right of ownership).

13. "&" or "@," but not "and" or "at" : IDEOGRAM
An ideograph or ideogram is pictorial symbol used to represent a concept. A good example would be an emoticon, like a smiley face :o)

26. Drink brand symbolized by a polar bear : ICEE
Icee is the brand name of one of those slushy drinks. Yuk ...

27. 39th vice president : AGNEW
Spiro Agnew served as Vice-President under Richard Nixon, before becoming the only VP in American history to resign because of criminal charges (there was a bribery scandal). Agnew was also the first Greek-American to serve as US Vice-President as he was the son of a Greek immigrant who had shortened the family name from Anagnostopoulos.

30. "The Dark Knight Rises" director, 2012 : NOLAN
Director Christopher Nolan is best known for "rescuing" the floundering Batman movie franchise. He directed "Batman Begins" and "The Dark Knight".

“The Dark Knight Rises” is a 2012 movie in the “Batman” franchise that stars Christian Bale as the superhero. The bad guys that Batman battles are Selina Kyle played by Anne Hathaway and Bane played by Tom Hardy.

31. Grammy category : OPERA
The first Grammy Awards Ceremony was held in 1959 and focused on recognizing outstanding achievement in the recording industry. The idea of a Grammy Award came up when recording executives were working on the Hollywood Walk of Fame project in the fifties. These executives concluded that there were many people in the recording industry deserving of accolades but who would probably never make it to the Walk of Fame. As a result, they founded the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. The Academy considered naming the award the “Eddies” after Thomas Edison, but then opted for “Grammy” after Edison’s invention: the gramophone.

33. "Lordy!" in Lodi : MAMMA MIA!
Lodi is a city in Lombardy in the north of Italy. The inhabitants of Lodi are known as Lodigiani.

42. Pavlova portrayed one over 4,000 times : SWAN
Anna Pavlova was a Russian ballerina who performed in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Pavlova became so successful that she was the first ballerina to pull together her own company and tour the world. Her most famous role was “The Dying Swan” that she danced to the beautiful “Le cygne” from Saint-Saëns’ “Carnival of the Animals”. Pavlova eventually left Russia for good and settled in England.

44. Storied place of worship : PAGODA
Pagodas are tiered (“storied”) towers found in various parts of Asia, usually built for religious purposes.

45. Eastern lodging : IMARET
Imarets were inns or hostels used by pilgrims throughout the Ottoman Empire. The network of imarets was set up to provide food to anyone in need, so also served as “soup kitchens”.

46. "2 Fast 2 Furious" co-star Gibson : TYRESE
Tyrese Gibson is singer-songwriter and actor who is known simply as “Tyrese”. Tyrese is best known for playing the character Roman Pearce in the “Fast And Furious” series of movies.

48. Grand Caravan maker : DODGE
The Dodge Grand Caravan is long-wheelbase version of the Dodge Caravan minivan.

49. Jumbles : OLIOS
“Olio” is a term meaning a hodgepodge or a mixture, coming from the mixed stew of the same name. The stew in turn takes its name from the Spanish "olla", the clay pot used for cooking.

50. One of Jacob's sons : ASHER
In the Book of Genesis, Asher was the second son of Jacob, and the founder of the tribe of Asher. Asher collaborated in the plot to sell his brother Joseph into slavery.

53. Ser, across the Pyrenees : ETRE
The verb “to be” is “ser” in Spanish and “être” in French.

The Pyrénées are a mountain range running along the border between Spain and France. Nestled between the two countries, high in the mountains, is the lovely country of Andorra, an old haunt of my family during skiing season …

56. Piece of the street : GAT
“Gat” is a slang term for a gun that is derived from the Gatling gun, the precursor to the modern machine gun. The Gatling gun was invented by Dr. Richard J. Gatling in 1861. Apparently he was inspired to invent it so that one man could do as much damage as a hundred, thereby reducing the size of armies and diminishing the suffering caused by war. Go figure ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Begin : GERMINATE
10. Donizetti heroine : LUCIA
15. Catches up to : OVERTAKES
16. Magnetron component : ANODE
17. Relative of a spouse : DOMESTIC PARTNER
19. "Just playin'" : I KID
20. Things often dropped in Harvard Yard? : ARS
21. Big name in winter vehicles : SKI-DOO
22. Fixer, perhaps : VET
23. In the way of : A LA
24. Phony blazers : GAS LOGS
25. Birthplace of the Franciscan order : ASSISI
27. "Before My Birth" collagist, 1914 : ARP
28. ___-yo (cold treat, briefly) : FRO
29. With 36- and 39-Across, go from 1- to 61-Across : CHANGE
31. 10-year-old Best Supporting Actress : O’NEAL
33. Robert W. Service's "The Cremation of Sam ___" : MCGEE
36. See 29-Across : ONE
37. Robert W. Service output : POEMS
38. Soothing flora : ALOES
39. See 29-Across : LETTER
41. Bumped into : MET
42. Bumped into : SAW
43. Razor target, maybe : ARMPIT
47. Pack into a thick mass : MAT DOWN
50. Ottoman bigwig : AGA
51. Tan in a library : AMY
52. Anatomical ring : AREOLA
53. Direction de Paris à Nancy : EST
54. Vegan gelatin substitute : AGAR
55. Stopgap supervisor's duty : MINDING THE STORE
58. ___ Montoya, swordsman in "The Princess Bride" : INIGO
59. Prefixes featured on some maps : AREA CODES
60. Baden-Powell of the Girl Guides : AGNES
61. End : TERMINATE

Down
1. One known for riding out of gear? : GODIVA
2. Brings out : EVOKES
3. Sends in : REMITS
4. He'll "talk 'til his voice is hoarse" : MR ED
5. The Who's "___ Hard" : IT’S
6. ___ Romanova, alter ego of Marvel's Black Widow : NATALIA
7. Landmark anime film of 1988 : AKIRA
8. Many pulp heroes, in slang : TECS
9. Picking up skill? : ESP
10. Cheerful early risers : LARKS
11. Preposition on a business-hours sign : UNTIL
12. Unit charge : CONDO FEE
13. "&" or "@," but not "and" or "at" : IDEOGRAM
14. Restricted flight items : AEROSOLS
18. By yesterday, so to speak : ASAP
23. Indication of some oxidation : ASHES
24. Hug or kiss, maybe : GREET
26. Drink brand symbolized by a polar bear : ICEE
27. 39th vice president : AGNEW
30. "The Dark Knight Rises" director, 2012 : NOLAN
31. Grammy category : OPERA
32. What's typical : NORM
33. "Lordy!" in Lodi : MAMMA MIA!
34. Snow job? : CLEARING
35. Been chosen, as for office : GOTTEN IN
40. One-two in the ring? : TAG TEAM
42. Pavlova portrayed one over 4,000 times : SWAN
44. Storied place of worship : PAGODA
45. Eastern lodging : IMARET
46. "2 Fast 2 Furious" co-star Gibson : TYRESE
48. Grand Caravan maker : DODGE
49. Jumbles : OLIOS
50. One of Jacob's sons : ASHER
53. Ser, across the Pyrenees : ETRE
54. Loads : A TON
56. Piece of the street : GAT
57. ___-fi : SCI


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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