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1101-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Nov 13, Friday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Brad Wilber
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 32m 10s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Common catch off the coast of Maryland : BLUE CRAB
A live, blue crab gets its color from pigments in the shell, which predominantly result in a blue color. When the crab is cooked, all the pigments break down except for astaxanthin, a red pigment, which is why crab turns up at the dinner table looking very red.

15. Crude alternative : OIL SHALE
Shale oil can be extracted from oil shale (!), although the extraction process is more expensive than that used to produce crude oil.

18. Dickens's Miss Havisham, famously : JILTEE
To "jilt" someone with whom you have a relationship is to drop them suddenly or callously. "Jilt" is an obsolete noun that used to mean "harlot" or "loose woman".

Miss Havisham is a character in “Great Expectations”, the novel by Charles Dickens. Miss Havisham is a wealthy spinster who as a younger woman fell in love with a man named Compeyson. Sadly, Compeyson was a swindler after her riches who defrauded her and left her at the altar.

19. ID clincher : DNA
I've always been fascinated by the fact that the DNA of living things is so very similar across different species. Human DNA is almost exactly the same for every individual (to the degree of 99.9%). However, those small differences are sufficient to distinguish one individual from another, and to determine whether or not individuals are close family relations.

20. Challenge to ambulance chasers : TORT REFORM
The word "tort" is a French word meaning "mischief, injury or wrong". Tort law is generally about negligence, when the action of one party causes injury to another but that action falls outside of the scope of criminal law.

"Ambulance chaser"is a derogatory term for a lawyer. But then again, I thought "lawyer" was a derogatory term in itself ... just kidding!

24. Fiacre, to taxi drivers : PATRON SAINT
Saint Fiacre was an Irish holy man who settled in France, where whiled away his days praying and tending his garden. As such, St. Fiacre is best-known as the patron saint of gardeners. There was a Hotel de Saint Fiacre in Paris at which people would rent carriages to travel to a local hospice. Parisians referred to these hackney carriages as “fiacres”. As a result, Saint Fiacre also became the patron saint of taxi drivers.

30. Nook occupier : EBOOK
The Barnes & Noble electronic-book reader is called the Nook. The Nook accounts for 10-15% of electronic book readers in the world.

31. Toshiba competitor : NEC
NEC is the name that the Nippon Electric Company chose for itself outside of Japan after a re-branding exercise in 1983.

32. Some camcorders : RCAS
During WWI, the US government actively discouraged the loss of certain technologies to other countries, including allies. The developing wireless technologies were considered to be particularly important by the army and navy. The government prevented the General Electric Company from selling equipment to the British Marconi Company, and instead facilitated the purchase by GE of the American Marconi subsidiary. This purchase led to GE forming the Radio Corporation of America that we know today as RCA.

36. Isaac Bashevis Singer settings : SHTETLS
The Yiddish word for "town" is "shtot", and so "shtetl" is the diminutive form meaning "small town".

Isaac Bashevis Singer was a Jewish-American author from Poland who won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1978. As well as being a much-respected author, Singer was a noted vegetarian, and featured the theme of vegetarianism in his some of his works. He was once asked if he had become a vegetarian for health reasons, to which he remarked “I did it for the health of the chicken”.

38. Culmination : ACME
The "acme" is the highest point, coming from the Greek word "akme" which has the same meaning.

39. Only proper noun in the Beatles' "Revolution" : MAO
The Beatles song “Revolution” was written by John Lennon and was released in 1968 as a B-side to “Hey Jude”.

41. "Something to Talk About" singer, 1991 : RAITT
Bonnie Raitt is a blues singer, originally from Burbank, California. Raitt has won nine Grammys for her work, but she is perhaps as well known for her political activism as she is for her music. She was no fan of President George W. Bush while he was in office, and she sure did show it.

43. Classic kitschy wall hanging : VELVET ELVIS
“Kitsch” is a German word, an adjective that means “gaudy, trash”.

47. "Billy Bathgate" novelist : E L DOCTOROW
“Billy Bathgate” is a 1989 novel written by American author E. L. Doctorow. The title character in the story is a teenage boy who becomes the surrogate son of a New York gangster in the days of prohibition. The book was adapted into a movie released in 1991 that starred Loren Dean as Billy, as well as Dustin Hoffman, Nicole Kidman and Bruce Willis.

50. Ex-G.I.'s org. : VFW
The Veterans of Foreign Wars organization (VFW) is the largest association of US combat veterans.

53. Washington State mascot : COUGAR
The mountain lion is found in much of the Americas from the Yukon in Canada right down to the southern Andes in South America. Because the mountain lion is found over such a vast area, it has many different names applied by local peoples, such as cougar and puma. In fact, the mountain lion holds the Guinness record for the animal with the most number of different names, with over 40 in English alone.

54. Pre-W.W. I in automotive history : BRASS ERA
The Brass Era in automotive history was named for the many brass fittings that were placed on the first production cars, such as lights and radiators. The Brass Era lasted from about 1905 until the beginning of WWI. The period before the Brass Era is now called the Veteran Era, and the period after is referred to as the Vintage Era.

57. "If music be the food of love ..." speaker in "Twelfth Night" : ORSINO
The famous quotation about music being the food of love is from William Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night". The opening lines of the play, spoken by the love-smitten Duke Orsino are:
If music be the food of love, play on,
Give me excess of it; that surfeiting,
The appetite may sicken, and so die.

60. Periods of warming ... or cooling off : DETENTES
“Détente” is a French word meaning "loosening, reduction in tension" and in general it is used to describe the easing of strained relations in a political situation. In particular, the policy of détente came to be associated with the improved relations between the US and the Soviet Union in the seventies.

Down
1. M asset : BOND
The character “M” in the “James Bond” stories is the head of Secret Intelligence Service, also called MI6. The name “M” is chosen as a nod to former head of MI5 Maxwell Knight who routinely signed his memos simply as “M”.

2. Royal Arms of England symbol : LION
The Royal Arms of England is the coat of arms that is used as a symbol for the country and for the English monarchy. The design of the coat of arms features three golden lions in a column on a red shield. The first use of the three-lions symbol on a shield goes back to King Richard I, also known as Richard the Lionheart.

3. Bone under a watchband : ULNA
The bone in the arm called the ulna is prismatic in shape, meaning that it is less like a cylinder than it is a prism, having flat sides that are parallel to each other.

4. The Orange Bowl is played on it: Abbr. : EST
The Orange Bowl football game is played annually in Florida on New Year’s Day, which means that the local time is Eastern Standard Time (EST).

The Orange Bowl is one of the three, second-oldest bowl games, first played in 1935 (the Rose Bowl is the oldest, played annually since 1916). In recent years, the game has been sponsored by Fedex, but as of 2010 the official name of the game is the Discover Orange Bowl. Who would have thought it? A credit card company with money to throw at a football game ...

5. Acupuncturist's concern : CHI
In Chinese culture “qi” or “chi” is the life force in any living thing.

6. Croupier's stick material : RATTAN
Rattan is the name of a large number of species of palms, all of which look less like trees and more like vines. The woody stems are used for making cane furniture.

A croupier is someone who conducts a game at a gambling table. In the world of gaming, the original croupier was someone who stood behind a gambler, holding reserves of cash for the person in a game. Before that, “croupier” was someone who rode behind the main rider on a horse. “Croup” was a Germanic word for “rump”. So, a croupier used to be a “second”, as it were.

8. Tab carrier in a bar? : BEER CAN
The oldest method of opening a can with a device included in the can’s design is the pull-tab or ring pull, invented in Canada in 1956. The design was long-lived but it had its problems, so the world heaved a sigh of relief with the invention of the stay-on-tab in 1975. The new design led to less injuries and eliminated all those used pull-tabs that littered the streets.

9. Tourist attraction on Texas' Pedernales River : LBJ RANCH
The LBJ Ranch was the home of President Lyndon B. Johnson. The property is now preserved as Lyndon B. Johnson National Historic Park. Within the bounds of the park are the former president’s birthplace and his final resting place. While President Johnson was in office, the LBJ Ranch was known as the Texas White House.

11. "Champagne for One" sleuth : WOLFE
Nero Wolfe is a fictional detective and the hero of many stories published by author Rex Stout. There are 33 Nero Wolfe novels for us to read, and 39 short stories. There are also movie adaptations of two of the novels: " Meet Nero Wolfe" (1936) which features a young Rita Hayworth, and "The League of Frightened Men" (1937). One of Wolfe's endearing traits is his love of good food and beer, so he is a pretty rotund character.

13. Serena Williams, often : ACER
Serena Williams is the younger of the two Williams sisters playing professional tennis. Serena has won more prize money in her career than any other female athlete.

14. Novel in Joyce Carol Oates's Wonderland Quartet : THEM
Joyce Carol Oates is a remarkable writer, not just for the quality of her work (her 1969 novel "them" won a National Book Award, for example) but also for how prolific is her output. She published her first book in 1963 and since then has published over fifty novels as well as many other written works.

23. "The Avengers" villain, 2012 : LOKI
Loki is a god appearing in Norse mythology. In one story about Loki, he was punished by other gods for having caused the death of Baldr, the god of light and beauty. Loki was bound to a sharp rock using the entrails of one of his sons. A serpent drips venom which is collected in a bowl, and then Loki's wife must empty the venom onto her husband when the bowl is full. The venom causes Loki great pain, and his writhing causes the earthquakes that we poor humans have to endure.

“The Avengers” is a 2012 movie that features a whole load of superheroes (Iron Man, Captain America, the Hulk and Thor) battling a supervillain called Loki.

24. Bit of sachet stuffing : PETAL
A sachet is a small packet of perfumed powder left in perhaps a closet or trunk to scent clothes. The word "sachet" is a diminutive of the French word "sac" meaning "bag".

25. Classroom clickers of old : ABACI
The abacus (plural “abaci”) was used as a counting frame long before man had invented a numbering system. It is a remarkable invention, particularly when one notes that abaci are still widely used today across Africa and Asia.

26. Singer who once sang a song to Kramer on "Seinfeld" : TORME
Mel Tormé was a jazz singer, with a quality of voice that earned him the nickname “The Velvet Fog”. Tormé also wrote a few books, and did a lot of acting. He was the co-author of the Christmas classic known as “The Christmas Song”, which starts out with the line "Chestnuts roasting on an open fire …"

27. When "Ave Maria" is sung in "Otello" : ACT IV
Giuseppe Verdi's opera "Otello" was first performed in 1887 at La Scala Theater in Milan. The opera is based on Shakespeare's play "Othello" and is considered by many to be Verdi's greatest work.

28. 1970s pact partly negotiated in Helsinki : SALT I
There were two rounds of Strategic Arms Limitation Talks between the US and the Soviet Union, and two resulting treaties (SALT I & SALT II). The opening round of SALT I talks were held in Helsinki as far back as 1970.

34. Orange garnish for a sushi roll : SMELT ROE
Smelt is the name given to several types of small fish.

35. Fox hunt cry : HALLO!
There is a theory that our greeting “hello” derives from the call of “hollo” that is shouted out in a fox hunt when the quarry is spotted.

37. Bay, for one : TREE
The bay laurel is an evergreen tree or large shrub that is also known as the bay tree, especially in the UK. The aromatic leaves of the bay laurel are the popular “bay leaves” that are often added to pasta sauces.

40. Prompt a buzzer on "The Price Is Right" : OVERBID
“The Price is Right” is a television game show that first aired way back in 1956!

44. Massive, in Metz : ENORME
The city of Metz is in the northeast of France, close to the German border. Given the proximity to Germany, Metz has both a strong German tradition and a French tradition. Metz was handed over to the French following WWI, after nearly 50 years of German rule. It quickly fell back into German hands in 1940 during WWII, with many German officers delighted to have back the city of their birth. Perhaps because of this long association with German, the US Army under General Patton encountered stiff resistance when liberating Metz in 1944.

47. Nobel category: Abbr. : ECON
The Peace Prize is the most famous of the five prizes bequeathed by Alfred Nobel. The others are for Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, and Literature. There is also a Nobel Prize in Economics that is awarded along with the original five, but it is funded separately and is awarded "in memory of Alfred Nobel". Four of the prizes are awarded by Swedish organizations (Alfred Nobel was a Swede) and so the award ceremonies take place in Stockholm. The Peace Prize is awarded by the Norwegian Nobel Committee, and that award is presented in Oslo.

48. Loughlin or Petty of Hollywood : LORI
Lori Loughlin played Rebecca Donaldson-Katsopolis on the sitcom “Full House”. Apparently you can see her now in a spinoff of the TV show “Beverly Hills, 90210” called, inventively enough, “90210”.

Lori Petty is the actress who played the character Kit Keller in the fabulous movie "A League of Their Own". Petty also played the title role in a 1995 science fiction film called “Tank Girl”.

49. Italian actress Eleonora : DUSE
Eleanora Duse was an Italian actress, known professionally simply as “Duse”. There is a theory that our term “doozy” derived from Eleanora’s family name. I guess she was a “doozy”.

55. One of the Ms. Pac-Man ghosts : SUE
The Pac-Man arcade game was first released in Japan in 1980, and is as popular today as it ever was. The game features characters that are maneuvered around the screen to eat up dots and earn points. The name comes from the Japanese folk hero "Paku", known for his voracious appetite. The spin-off game called Ms. Pac-Man was released in 1981.

56. "There is no ___ except stupidity": Wilde : SIN
If you didn't know Oscar Wilde was Irish, you will when you see the name he was given at birth: Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde!

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Common catch off the coast of Maryland : BLUE CRAB
9. Light, in a way : LOW-FAT
15. Crude alternative : OIL SHALE
16. Jewelry box item : BROOCH
17. Like a bout on an undercard : NON-TITLE
18. Dickens's Miss Havisham, famously : JILTEE
19. ID clincher : DNA
20. Challenge to ambulance chasers : TORT REFORM
22. Arcade game prize grabber : CLAW CRANE
24. Fiacre, to taxi drivers : PATRON SAINT
27. "___ reminder ..." : AS A
30. Nook occupier : EBOOK
31. Toshiba competitor : NEC
32. Some camcorders : RCAS
33. Besmirch : TARNISH
36. Isaac Bashevis Singer settings : SHTETLS
38. Culmination : ACME
39. Only proper noun in the Beatles' "Revolution" : MAO
41. "Something to Talk About" singer, 1991 : RAITT
42. Golf commentator's subject : LIE
43. Classic kitschy wall hanging : VELVET ELVIS
46. Slip for a skirt? : FALLEN HEM
47. "Billy Bathgate" novelist : E L DOCTOROW
50. Ex-G.I.'s org. : VFW
53. Washington State mascot : COUGAR
54. Pre-W.W. I in automotive history : BRASS ERA
57. "If music be the food of love ..." speaker in "Twelfth Night" : ORSINO
58. Cry of despair : I'M RUINED
59. Nothing: It. : NIENTE
60. Periods of warming ... or cooling off : DETENTES

Down
1. M asset : BOND
2. Royal Arms of England symbol : LION
3. Bone under a watchband : ULNA
4. The Orange Bowl is played on it: Abbr. : EST
5. Acupuncturist's concern : CHI
6. Croupier's stick material : RATTAN
7. Acknowledges : ALLOWS
8. Tab carrier in a bar? : BEER CAN
9. Tourist attraction on Texas' Pedernales River : LBJ RANCH
10. Face in a particular direction : ORIENT
11. "Champagne for One" sleuth : WOLFE
12. Shot, informally : FOTO
13. Serena Williams, often : ACER
14. Novel in Joyce Carol Oates's Wonderland Quartet : THEM
21. Exasperates : TRIES
22. Cauldron stirrer : CRONE
23. "The Avengers" villain, 2012 : LOKI
24. Bit of sachet stuffing : PETAL
25. Classroom clickers of old : ABACI
26. Singer who once sang a song to Kramer on "Seinfeld" : TORME
27. When "Ave Maria" is sung in "Otello" : ACT IV
28. 1970s pact partly negotiated in Helsinki : SALT I
29. Right hands: Abbr. : ASSTS
32. Arena : REALM
34. Orange garnish for a sushi roll : SMELT ROE
35. Fox hunt cry : HALLO!
37. Bay, for one : TREE
40. Prompt a buzzer on "The Price Is Right" : OVERBID
43. Unoccupied : VACANT
44. Massive, in Metz : ENORME
45. Block : THWART
46. Keep from taking off, as a plane with low visibility : FOG IN
47. Nobel category: Abbr. : ECON
48. Loughlin or Petty of Hollywood : LORI
49. Italian actress Eleonora : DUSE
50. Let it all out : VENT
51. Unoccupied : FREE
52. Rolls of dough : WADS
55. One of the Ms. Pac-Man ghosts : SUE
56. "There is no ___ except stupidity": Wilde : SIN


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1031-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Oct 13, Thursday



Note that solvers working the puzzle online might have to put letters X in the "blank" squares in order to get an "all correct" message when finished.

QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: David Kwong
THEME: Monstrous Reflections … today’s grid has a mirror running down the center. There are also four Halloween creatures (depicted in movies) on the left side of the grid, with three of them reflected (spelled backwards) on the right side of the grid. Dracula is the fourth creature, but as we know, Dracula has no reflection in a mirror. So, instead of Dracula’s reflection, we have blanks:
1A. Universal Studios role of 1941 : WOLF MAN
8A. 1-Across, in 23-Down : NAM FLOW (WOLF MAN “reflected”)

17A. Universal Studios role of 1931 : MONSTER
18A. 17-Across, in 23-Down : RETSNOM (MONSTER “reflected”)

59A. Universal Studios role of 1925 : PHANTOM
61A. 59-Across, in 23-Down : MOTNAHP (PHANTOM “reflected”)

64A. Universal Studios role of 1931 : DRACULA
65A. 64-Across, in 23-Down : [blank!] (DRACULA “not reflected!”)

23D. Things worth looking into? : MIRRORS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 08s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Universal Studios role of 1941 : WOLF MAN
8. 1-Across, in 23-Down : NAM FLOW (WOLF MAN “reflected”)
Lon Chaney, Jr. followed in his father's footsteps as an actor, and most famously played the werewolf in the "The Wolf Man" series of films, starting in 1941. The young actor started his career using his real name, Creighton Chaney, but later adopted the name "Lon Chaney, Jr." getting a boost from his father's reputation. Chaney, Jr. also played Lennie Small in the 1939 film adaptation of the Steinbeck novel “Of Mice and Men”.

15. Not yet delivered : IN UTERO
"In utero" is a Latin term meaning "in the uterus". The Latin "uterus" translates as both "womb" and "belly". The Latin word was derived from the Greek "hystera" also meaning womb, which gives us the words "hysterectomy", and "hysterical".

17. Universal Studios role of 1931 : MONSTER
18. 17-Across, in 23-Down : RETSNOM (MONSTER “reflected”)
The classic 1931 film “Frankenstein” stars Colin Clive as Henry Frankenstein, and Boris Karloff as Frankenstein’s monster. The film is of course based on the Mary Shelley novel of the same name. Bela Lugosi was offered the role of Henry Frankenstein first, and then was recast as the Monster. Lugosi tried working with the role but eventually bowed out. Many say that the decision to leave was one of the worst of Lugosi’s career.

19. Gas grade : PREMIUM
The difference between a premium and regular gasoline is its octane rating. The octane rating is measure of the resistance of the gasoline to auto-ignition i.e. it's resistance to ignition just by virtue of being compressed in the cylinder. This auto-ignition is undesirable as multiple-cylinder engines are designed so that ignition within each cylinder takes place precisely when the plug sparks, and not before. If ignition occurs before the spark is created, the resulting phenomenon is called "knocking".

20. D.C. baseballer : NAT
The Washington Nationals baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005 becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series, one being the Mariners and the other the Nats.

21. Young socialite : DEB
Deb is short for "debutante", which translates from French as "female beginner".

22. Rapscallion : IMP
We might call a little imp a rapscallion, an evolution from “rascallion”, which in turn comes from “rascal”.

23. Clusterfist : MISER
A “clusterfist” is a tightwad or miser, someone who tends to be close-fisted, to hold onto his or her money.

25. Carnivorous fish : SKATE
Skates (formally “Rajidae”) are a family of fish in the superorder of rays (formally “Batoidea”). Skates look very similar to stingrays but they lack stinging spines.

33. Shetland Islands sight : LOCH
“Loch” is the Scottish Gaelic word for “lake”.

The Shetland Islands in Scotland have given their name to a few breeds of animals, including Shetland cattle, Shetland ponies, Shetland sheep, Shetland sheepdogs and Shetland geese. The Shetlands lie about 110 miles northeast of the Scottish mainland.

35. "St. Matthew Passion" composer, for short : J S BACH
During the Baroque Period, many composers composed musical settings for the story of the Passion of Christ. Bach himself wrote four or five, although only two survive today. One is the "St. John Passion", but the most famous and most often performed is the "St. Matthew Passion".

37. What some hotel balconies overlook : ATRIA
In modern architecture an atrium (plural “atria” or “atriums”) is a large open space usually in the center of a building and extending upwards to the roof. The original atrium was an open court in the center of an Ancient Roman house. One could access most of the enclosed rooms of the house from the atrium.

39. Low reef : CAY
A "key" (also "cay") is a low island offshore, as in the Florida Keys. Our term in English comes from the Spanish "cayo" meaning "shoal, reef".

40. Like patent leather : GLOSSY
The traditional process that creates the shine on patent leather was developed in 1818 by Seth Boyden. Boyden used a lacquer coating based on linseed oil. Most patent leather today has a plastic coating.

45. Genesis wife : SARAH
In the Bible and the Quran, Sarah is the wife of Abraham and the mother of Isaac.

46. Genesis craft : ARK
The term “ark”, when used with reference to Noah, is a translation of the Hebrew word “tebah”. The word “tebah” is also used in the Bible for the basket in which Moses was placed by his mother when she floated him down the Nile. It seems that the word “tebah” doesn’t mean “boat” and nor does it mean “basket”. Rather, a more appropriate translation is “life-preserver” or “life-saver”. So, Noah’s ark was Noah's life-preserver during the flood.

51. U. of Miami's athletic org. : ACC
Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).

54. "Aladdin" monkey : ABU
Abu is a monkey in the Disney production of "Aladdin". The character is based on Abu, a thief in the 1940 film "The Thief of Baghdad".

59. Universal Studios role of 1925 : PHANTOM
61. 59-Across, in 23-Down : MOTNAHP (PHANTOM “reflected”)
Lon Chaney, Sr. played a lot of crazed-looking characters in the days of silent movies. He did much of his own make-up work, developing the grotesque appearances that became his trademark, and earning himself the nickname "the man of a thousand faces". Most famous of all was his portrayal of "The Phantom of the Opera" in 1925.

63. Comic strip infant : SWEE’PEA
Originally Popeye used the nickname "swee'pea" to address his girlfriend Olive Oyl. Then along comes a baby, found on Popeye's doorstep. Popeye adopts the little guy and raises him, calling him "Swee'Pea".

64. Universal Studios role of 1931 : DRACULA
65. 64-Across, in 23-Down : (DRACULA “not reflected!”)
Bela Lugosi was a Hungarian stage and screen actor, best known for playing the title role in the 1931 film "Dracula" and for playing the same role on Broadway. Lugosi found himself typecast for the rest of his career and almost always played the role of the villain, often in horror movies. When he passed away in 1956, his wife had him buried in the costume he wore playing Count Dracula on Broadway.

Down
3. Crescent shape : LUNE
By definition a "lune" is a figure formed by the intersection of two arcs of two circles. Such an intersection creates the shape of a crescent moon. The name "lune" comes from the Latin word for the moon, "luna".

4. Second-largest city in Ark. : FT SMITH
Fort Smith is the second-largest city in the state of Arkansas (after Little Rock) and lies in the very west of the state, on the border with Oklahoma. Fort Smith was founded as a military post in 1817. The fort was named for General Thomas Adams Smith who was in command of the US Army Rifle Regiment at the time the post was established.

6. "Your 15 minutes of fame ___!" : ARE UP
The expression “15 minutes of fame” was coined by Andy Warhol in 1968. Famously he said, “In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes”.

7. An I.Q. of about 100, e.g. : NORM
Although it is correct these days to say that the abbreviation IQ stands for “intelligence quotient”, the term was actually coined by German psychologist William Stern, so it actually is an abbreviation for the German “Intelligenz-Quotient”.

8. C. S. Lewis setting : NARNIA
“The Chronicles of Narnia” is a series of children’s fantasy novels that were written by C. S. Lewis between 1949 and 1954. Most of the books are about a group of children from the real world in the magical kingdom of Narnia.

10. Nickname for a 2012 presidential candidate : MITTENS
Former Governor of Massachusetts Mitt Romney had the nickname “Mittens”.

11. Ends of some close N.F.L. games: Abbr. : FGS
Field goal (FG)

13. Plains native : OTOE
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

26. Furry folivore : KOALA
The koala really does look like a little bear, but it's not even closely related. The koala is an arboreal marsupial and a herbivore, native to the east and south coasts of Australia. Koalas aren’t primates, and are one of the few mammals other than primates who have fingerprints. In fact, it can be very difficult to tell human fingerprints from koala fingerprints, even under an electron microscope.

A “folivore” is a herbivore that mainly eats leaves.

27. Phoenix or Washington : ACTOR
The actor Joaquin Phoenix is the brother of actress Summer Phoenix and of the late River Phoenix.

34. Crested bird : JAY
The bird known as a “jay” is sometimes called a “magpie”, although the terms are not completely interchangeable.

42. Acupressure technique : SHIATSU
“Shiatsu” is a Japanese word meaning “finger pressure”, and is the name given to a style of massage.

44. Pacific Northwest city : EUGENE
Eugene is the second-largest city in Oregon (after Portland). The city is named for its founder, Eugene Franklin Skinner. Skinner arrived in the area in 1846, after which the settlement he established was called Skinner’s Mudhole. The name was changed to Eugene City in 1852, which was shortened to Eugene in 1889.

46. Barnard grad, e.g. : ALUMNA
An "alumnus" (plural ... alumni) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is "alumna" (plural ... alumnae). The term comes into English from Latin, in which “alumnus” means foster-son or pupil.

Barnard College is private women’s school in New York City. Barnard was founded in 1889 and since 1900 has been affiliated with Columbia University.

53. La mía es la tuya, they say : CASA
In Spanish, with regards tone’s house (casa) they say that mine is yours (la mía es la tuya).

55. Some online communications, briefly : IMS
Even though instant messaging (sending IMs) has been around since the 1960s, it was AOL who popularized the term “instant message” in the eighties and nineties.

57. Start of 19 John Grisham novel titles : THE
"The Firm" is the book that brought John Grisham his first success, although it was the second novel that he wrote. The first was "A Time to Kill", which garnered a lot more attention after "The Firm" took off. Personally, my favorite of his novels is "Runaway Jury".

60. Asian electronics giant : NEC
NEC is the name that the Nippon Electric Company chose for itself outside of Japan after a re-branding exercise in 1983.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Universal Studios role of 1941 : WOLF MAN
8. 1-Across, in 23-Down : NAM FLOW (WOLF MAN “reflected”)
15. Not yet delivered : IN UTERO
16. Thank you, in Tokyo : ARIGATO
17. Universal Studios role of 1931 : MONSTER
18. 17-Across, in 23-Down : RETSNOM (MONSTER “reflected”)
19. Gas grade : PREMIUM
20. D.C. baseballer : NAT
21. Young socialite : DEB
22. Rapscallion : IMP
23. Clusterfist : MISER
25. Carnivorous fish : SKATE
28. Through : VIA
29. "I beg to differ" : NOT SO
33. Shetland Islands sight : LOCH
34. Unsettle : JAR
35. "St. Matthew Passion" composer, for short : J S BACH
36. Bit of chicken feed : OAT
37. What some hotel balconies overlook : ATRIA
39. Low reef : CAY
40. Like patent leather : GLOSSY
43. Moon, e.g., to a poet : ORB
44. A, in Austria : EINE
45. Genesis wife : SARAH
46. Genesis craft : ARK
47. Green touches? : PUTTS
48. Calls : DIALS
50. Show age, in a way : SAG
51. U. of Miami's athletic org. : ACC
54. "Aladdin" monkey : ABU
55. Some bait : INSECTS
59. Universal Studios role of 1925 : PHANTOM
61. 59-Across, in 23-Down : MOTNAHP (PHANTOM “reflected”)
62. Starts gently : EASES IN
63. Comic strip infant : SWEE’PEA
64. Universal Studios role of 1931 : DRACULA
65. 64-Across, in 23-Down : (DRACULA “not reflected!”)

Down
1. Namby-pamby : WIMP
2. ___ about (approximately) : ON OR
3. Crescent shape : LUNE
4. Second-largest city in Ark. : FT SMITH
5. Period of focusing on oneself : ME-TIME
6. "Your 15 minutes of fame ___!" : ARE UP
7. An I.Q. of about 100, e.g. : NORM
8. C. S. Lewis setting : NARNIA
9. Fields : AREAS
10. Nickname for a 2012 presidential candidate : MITTENS
11. Ends of some close N.F.L. games: Abbr. : FGS
12. Secure, as a contract : LAND
13. Plains native : OTOE
14. Development site : WOMB
23. Things worth looking into? : MIRRORS
24. Hold up : ROB
25. Trudges (through) : SLOGS
26. Furry folivore : KOALA
27. Phoenix or Washington : ACTOR
28. Brewery fixture : VAT
30. Implied : TACIT
31. Meager : SCANT
32. "That's for sure!" : OH YES!
34. Crested bird : JAY
35. One-two part : JAB
38. Peeve : IRK
41. Glum : SAD
42. Acupressure technique : SHIATSU
44. Pacific Northwest city : EUGENE
46. Barnard grad, e.g. : ALUMNA
47. Stickum : PASTE
49. Intensely stirred up : ABOIL
50. Winter forecast : SNOW
51. Made like : APED
52. Scorch : CHAR
53. La mía es la tuya, they say : CASA
55. Some online communications, briefly : IMS
56. Part of graduation attire : CAP
57. Start of 19 John Grisham novel titles : THE
58. Place to be pampered : SPA
60. Asian electronics giant : NEC


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1030-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Oct 13, Wednesday



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Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Joel Fagliano
THEME: Halloween Dinner … today’s themed answers are types of candy, something that might be eaten for “dinner” by the little ones on Halloween. Each of the candies end with the name of a food that might be served at a “legitimate” item at a Halloween dinner:
18A. Part of a Halloween dinner? : SWEDISH FISH
29A. Part of a Halloween dinner? : JELLY BEANS
35A. Part of a Halloween dinner? : CANDY CORN
46A. Part of a Halloween dinner? : HOT TAMALES
56A. Part of a Halloween dinner? : TOOTSIE ROLL
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 8m 54s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. 1988 Salt-N-Pepa hit : PUSH IT
Salt-n-Pepa are a hip hop trio from New York. Their 1991 song "Let's Talk Sex" created quite a fuss as the lyrics explored the subject of sex, and safe sex in particular. A later version addressed the dangers of AIDS.

14. Washington in D.C., e.g. : AVE
Famously, the layout of the streets in Washington was designed by French-born American architect Pierre Charles L’Enfant. The L’Enfant Plan called for a grid of east-west and north-south streets. This grid was criss-crossed with diagonal avenues. The avenues and streets met at circles and rectangular plazas. Later, the diagonal avenues were named for states of the union.

16. Country on el Mediterráneo : ESPANA
In Spanish, Spain (España) is a country on the Mediterranean (el Mediterráneo).

17. Coastal inlet : RIA
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

18. Part of a Halloween dinner? : SWEDISH FISH
Swedish Fish is a brand of wine gum candy that is shaped like a fish. Believe it or not, Swedish Fish is made in Sweden …

20. Girl in tartan : LASS
Tartan is sometimes called "plaid" over here in the US, a word not used in the same sense outside of this country. In Scotland a "plaid" is a blanket or a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder.

23. Upstate N.Y. college : RPI
The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) is a private school in Troy, New York. The university is named after its founder Stephen Van Rensselaer who set up the school in 1824. The goal of RPI has always been the "application of science to the common purposes of life", an objective set by the founder. Given that, the name for the school's sports teams is quite apt: the Engineers.

24. Soft-shell clam : STEAMER
Soft-shell clams are so called because they have thin calcium carbonate shells that are easily broken. They are known as “steamers”, especially in the New England where they are often served at a clambake.

27. "Prince Igor" composer : BORODIN
“Prince Igor” is an opera by the Russian composer, Alexander Borodin. Borodin died before he had finished “Prince Igor”, so it was completed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and Alexander Glazunov. Music from “Prince Igor” and other Borodin works was used in the American musical “Kismet”.

29. Part of a Halloween dinner? : JELLY BEANS
The candy known as jelly beans are thought to have originated in Boston. It is documented that they were sent by families and friends of soldiers fighting in the Civil War.

33. Breathtaking creatures? : BOAS
Boa constrictors are members of the Boidae family of snakes, all of which are non-venomous. Interestingly, the female boa is always larger than the male.

35. Part of a Halloween dinner? : CANDY CORN
Candy corn is a candy that is seen mainly around Halloween in North America. Candy corn is made to look like kernels of corn, with a yellow base, orange center and white tip. The original candy corn was created by the Wunderle Candy Company in Philadelphia in the 1880s.

38. Pricey violin : STRAD
Generations of the Stradivari family produced violins, the most famous of which were constructed by Antonio Stradivari.

46. Part of a Halloween dinner? : HOT TAMALES
Hot Tamales are a cinnamon candy made by Just Born. They look like red versions of the other Just Born candy called Mike and Ike. That's no coincidence as Hot Tamales were developed as a way to make use of rejected Mike and Ike candy. The dark red color and intense cinnamon flavor was added to the Mike and Ike rejects, masking the original flavor and color.

51. Something found on a chemist's table : ELEMENT
Dmitri Mendeleev was a Russian chemist. When Mendeleev classified elements according to their chemical properties, he noticed patterns and was able to group elements into his famous 1869 Periodic Table. So powerful was his table that he actually predicted the properties of some elements that had not even been discovered in 1869. Element number 101 is mendelevium and was named after Mendeleev.

53. "Battling Bella" of '70s politics : ABZUG
Bella Abzug was one of the leader's of the Women's Movement that founded the National Women's Political Caucus in 1971. She was elected to the US Congress the same year, helped by a famous campaign slogan "This woman's place is in the House - the House of Representatives".

56. Part of a Halloween dinner? : TOOTSIE ROLL
Tootsie Rolls were developed by an Austrian candymaker called Leo Hirschfeld in New York City in 1896. Hirschfeld named the candy after his daughter, who had the nickname “Tootsie”.

62. Stagehand : GRIP
On a film set, grips are lighting and rigging technicians who set up the infrastructure that supports lights, cameras etc. The "key grip" is the leader of the whole team. The first “grips” were technicians that worked in circuses in its early days. The name “grip” possibly comes from the bags called grips. in which the technicians carried their tools.

63. Part of the alloy britannium : TIN
Britannia metal (also called “britannium”) is an alloy made from 92% tin, 6% antimony and 2% copper. Britannia metal is a type of pewter.

64. ___ Peanut Butter Cups : REESE’S
Reese's Peanut Butter Cups were invented by Harry Burnett "H.B." Reese. Peanut Butter Cups were originally called penny cups, reflecting the price at which they were sold. Then inflation took over, and maybe that’s why they were broken into smaller “pieces” ...

65. What a colon represents in an emoticon : EYES
An emoticon is a glyph created using text characters to represent facial features, and usually oriented sideways. The emoticon is designed to indicate emotion or attitude. The classic example is the smiley face :-)

66. Heart chart: Abbr. : ECG
An EKG measures electrical activity in the heart. Back in my homeland of Ireland, an EKG is known as an ECG (for electrocardiogram). We use the German name in the US, Elektrokardiogramm, giving us EKG. Apparently the abbreviation EKG is preferred as ECG might be confused (if poorly handwritten, I guess) with EEG, the abbreviation for an electroencephalogram.

Down
1. Fast-food chain with a smiling star in its logo : CARL’S JR
The Carl’s Jr. fast-food restaurant chain was founded in 1941 by Carl Karcher. Karcher’s first restaurant was a full-service establishment called Carl’s Drive-In Barbeque. He then built on his first success by opening a chain of smaller restaurants with a smaller menu, and called them simply “Carl’s”, which was changed to Carl’s Jr. in 1954.

4. Part of GPS: Abbr. : SYS
Global Positioning System (GPS)

7. Jedi Council leader : YODA
Yoda is one of the most beloved characters in the "Star Wars" series of films. Yoda's voice was provided by the great modern-day puppeteer Frank Oz of "Muppets" fame.

8. Basil-based sauces : PESTOS
The term “pesto” applies to anything made by pounding. What we tend to know as “pesto” sauce is more properly called “pesto alla genovese”, pesto from Genoa in northern Italy.

10. Lotion inits. : SPF
In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun ...

11. Bob and others : HAIRDOS
A "bob cut" is a short hairstyle in which the hair is cut straight around the head, at about the line of the jaw. Back in the 1570s a "bob" was the name given to a horse's tail that was cut short, and about a century later it was being used to describe short hair on humans. The style became very popular with women in the early 1900s (as worn by actress Clara Bow, for example), with the fashion dying out in the thirties. The style reemerged in the sixties around the time the Beatles introduced their "mop tops", with Vidal Sassoon leading the way in styling women's hair in a bob cut again. Personally, I like it ...

13. Pastes used in Middle Eastern cuisine : TAHINIS
"Tahini" is the Arabic name for the paste made from ground sesame seeds. Tahini is a major ingredient in hummus, one of my favorite dishes.

19. Publisher's ID : ISBN
The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) was invented by one Gordon Foster who is now a professor at Trinity College Dublin in Ireland. The code was originally developed for booksellers, so that they had a unique number (and now a barcode) for each publication.

21. Pizzeria owner in "Do the Right Thing" : SAL
"Do the Right Thing" is a Spike Lee movie, released in 1989. Much of the action in the film is centered on a local pizzeria called "Sal's" owned by Italian-American Salvatore Frangione (played by Danny Aiello).

26. Jet : EBON
Ebony is another word for the color black (often shortened to "ebon" in poetry). Ebony is a dark black wood that is very dense, one of the few types of wood that sinks in water. Ebony has been in high demand so the species of trees yielding the wood are now considered threatened. It is in such short supply that unscrupulous vendors have been known to darken lighter woods with shoe polish to look like ebony, so be warned ...

The color “jet black” takes its name from the minor gemstone known as jet. The gemstone and the material it is made of take their English name from the French name “jaiet”.

34. Thick, sweet liqueur : CREME
A crème liqueur is a liqueur that actually contains no cream at all, even though “crème” is the French for “cream”. Instead, a crème liqueur is one in which a lot of sugar has been added in order to create a consistency near to that of syrup. Example of crème drinks are crème de cacao and crème de menthe.

36. "Jeopardy!" column : CATEGORY
"Jeopardy!" first went on the air in 1964, and is another successful Merv Griffin creation. But it took the introduction of Alex Trebek as host in order to bring the show into the big times. Trebek has been host since 1984.

38. First pope : ST PETER
According to the Christian tradition, Saint Peter was the first pope, and was crucified on the orders of Emperor Nero in Rome. Many hold that he requested to be crucified upside down as he felt that he was unworthy to have the same fate as Jesus Christ.

40. Savory deep-fried pastry : RISSOLE
A rissole is a small croquette covered in pastry or breadcrumbs that is baked or deep-fried. The filling may be sweet or savory although is usually some minced meat or fish.

44. Spare wear : G-STRING
The origins of "G-string", the type of revealing underwear, is unclear. However, the term "geestring" has been used since the 1800s and originally referring to the string that held the loincloths worn by Native Americans.

47. Dix + 1 : ONZE
In French, ten (dix) plus one (un) is eleven (onze).

48. Org. with a snake in its logo : AMA
American Medical Association (AMA)

The icon known as the caduceus is a staff around which are twisted two serpents and which has two wings at the top. The caduceus was carried by the Greek god Hermes. The traditional symbol for the medical profession was the rod of Asclepius, a Greek god associated with healing and medicine. The rod of Asclepius is similar to the caduceus, being a staff with a single serpent-entwined. Some medical organizations use the caduceus as a symbol, apparently due to confusion that dates by to the its mistaken use by the US Army Medical Corps in 1902.

50. Billiards trick shot : MASSE
In billiards, a massé shot is one in which the cue ball makes an extreme curve due to the player imparting heavy spin on the ball with his or her cue.

57. "___ So Sweet to Trust in Jesus" : ‘TIS
"'Tis So Sweet to Trust in Jesus" is a Christian hymn with lyrics that were written by Louisa M. R. Stead. Apparently, Stead was inspired to write the words after her faith saw her and her daughter through the misery that followed her husband’s death by drowning, which Stead herself witnessed.

59. Groovy music? : LPS
The first vinyl records designed to play at 33 1/3 rpm were introduced by RCA Victor in 1931, but were discontinued due to quality problems. The first Long Play (LP) 33 1/3 rpm disc was introduced by Columbia Records many years later in 1948, with RCA Victor following up with a 45 rpm "single" the following year, in 1949.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. What quoth the raven? : CAW
4. Moving well for one's age : SPRY
8. 1988 Salt-N-Pepa hit : PUSH IT
14. Washington in D.C., e.g. : AVE
15. Idiot : YO-YO
16. Country on el Mediterráneo : ESPANA
17. Coastal inlet : RIA
18. Part of a Halloween dinner? : SWEDISH FISH
20. Girl in tartan : LASS
22. Moisten, in a way : BASTE
23. Upstate N.Y. college : RPI
24. Soft-shell clam : STEAMER
27. "Prince Igor" composer : BORODIN
29. Part of a Halloween dinner? : JELLY BEANS
31. "Me neither" : NOR I
32. Ways to go: Abbr. : RDS
33. Breathtaking creatures? : BOAS
34. Checks out : CASES
35. Part of a Halloween dinner? : CANDY CORN
38. Pricey violin : STRAD
41. Icicle site : EAVE
42. ___ salad : EGG
45. Bed size : TWIN
46. Part of a Halloween dinner? : HOT TAMALES
49. One pushing the envelope? : POSTMAN
51. Something found on a chemist's table : ELEMENT
52. Certain Halloween costumes, for short : ETS
53. "Battling Bella" of '70s politics : ABZUG
55. State : AVER
56. Part of a Halloween dinner? : TOOTSIE ROLL
60. Man's name that's another man's name backward : ARI
61. Recruit : ENLIST
62. Stagehand : GRIP
63. Part of the alloy britannium : TIN
64. ___ Peanut Butter Cups : REESE’S
65. What a colon represents in an emoticon : EYES
66. Heart chart: Abbr. : ECG

Down
1. Fast-food chain with a smiling star in its logo : CARL’S JR
2. Flew : AVIATED
3. Deceitful sorts : WEASELS
4. Part of GPS: Abbr. : SYS
5. Punch line? : POW!
6. Deli loaf : RYE BREAD
7. Jedi Council leader : YODA
8. Basil-based sauces : PESTOS
9. Walk down the aisle : USHER
10. Lotion inits. : SPF
11. Bob and others : HAIRDOS
12. Give rise to : INSPIRE
13. Pastes used in Middle Eastern cuisine : TAHINIS
19. Publisher's ID : ISBN
21. Pizzeria owner in "Do the Right Thing" : SAL
25. "Whoops" : MY BAD
26. Jet : EBON
28. ___ impulse : ON AN
30. Heretofore : AS YET
34. Thick, sweet liqueur : CREME
35. Tilt : CANT
36. "Jeopardy!" column : CATEGORY
37. 42-Across shape : OVAL
38. First pope : ST PETER
39. Black and blue, say : TWO-TONE
40. Savory deep-fried pastry : RISSOLE
42. Lift : ELEVATE
43. Not brand-name : GENERIC
44. Spare wear : G-STRING
46. Nuns' wear : HABITS
47. Dix + 1 : ONZE
48. Org. with a snake in its logo : AMA
50. Billiards trick shot : MASSE
54. Impulse : URGE
57. "___ So Sweet to Trust in Jesus" : ‘TIS
58. Say "I do" when you don't? : LIE
59. Groovy music? : LPS


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1029-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Oct 13, Tuesday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Robert Cirillo
THEME: Front of House … today’s themed answers are made up from two words, each of which can precede the word HOUSE:
18A. Military muscle : FIREPOWER (firehouse & powerhouse)
20A. Sign of change at the Vatican : WHITE SMOKE (White House & smokehouse)
32A. Functional lawn adornment : BIRDBATH (birdhouse & bathhouse)
40A. Take every last cent of : CLEAN OUT (clean house & outhouse)
54A. "Go" signal : GREEN LIGHT (greenhouse & lighthouse)
57A. Using all of a gym, as in basketball : FULL COURT (full house & courthouse)

37A. Word that can follow both halves of 18-, 20-, 32-, 40-, 54- and 57-Across : HOUSE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 32s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. "Ad ___ per aspera" (Kansas' motto) : ASTRA
The motto of the State of Kansas is "ad astra per aspera", a Latin expression meaning "to the stars through difficulties". Kansas shares the same motto with quite a few other institutions, including an English grammar school, an Australian high school, and even Starfleet, the service to which the USS Enterprise belongs in the "Star Trek" series.

6. Fine pillow stuffing : EIDER
Eiders are large sea ducks. Their down feathers are used to fill pillows and quilts, giving the name to the quilt called an "eiderdown".

14. Turkish money : LIRAS
The word "lira" is used in a number of countries for currency. "Lira" comes from the Latin for "pound" and is derived from a British pound sterling, the value of a Troy pound of silver. For example, the lira (plural “lire”) was the official currency of Italy before the country changed over to the euro.

15. Parkinson's treatment : L-DOPA
L-3,4-DihydrOxyPhenylAlanine, thankfully can be shortened to L-DOPA. Swedish scientist Arvid Carlsson won a Nobel Prize for showing that L-DOPA could be used to reduce the symptoms of Parkinson's Syndrome.

20. Sign of change at the Vatican : WHITE SMOKE (White House & smokehouse)
A new pope is elected in a papal conclave, a meeting of the College of Cardinals of the Roman Catholic church. After each round of voting, the individual ballots are burned. If the ballot is inconclusive, then the ballots are burned with a chemical (originally, damp straw was used) so that the resulting smoke is black. The smoke can be seen by crowds gathered near the Sistine Chapel where the conclave is held. If the ballot has resulted in a pope being selected, then the individual ballots are burned on their own so that they give off white smoke.

22. Prell rival : PERT
Prell and Pert are brands of shampoo.

25. RR stop : STN
A railroad (RR) stop is a station (stn.).

26. Chief Norse god : ODIN
In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. Odin's wife Frigg was the queen of Asgard whose name gave us our English term "Friday" (via Anglo-Saxon). Odin's son was Thor, and his name gave us the term "Thursday".

49. One who keeps plugging along : TROOPER
Apparently the phrase "like a real trooper" has diverged in usage over time. Someone who is brave and stalwart might be described as a real "trooper", like a soldier in a troop. Someone who is reliable and a supportive colleague might be described as a real "trouper", like a an actor in a troupe.

45. 10 Downing St. residents : PMS
Prime ministers (PMs)

10 Downing Street is one of the most famous street addresses in the world and is the official London residence of the British Prime Minister. Although it may not look it on television, it's a spacious pad, actually a larger house made by combining three older houses back in the 1700s. Although Number 10 has over one hundred rooms, they are mostly offices and reception rooms and the actual residence itself is quite modest. It was so modest that when Tony Blair came to power he opted to move himself and his family into the more spacious residence next door at Number 11, an apartment traditionally reserved for the Chancellor of the Exchequer (the UK equivalent of the Secretary of the Treasury). The succeeding Prime Minister, David Cameron, seemed to like the idea, because he now lives in Number 11 as well.

60. Network that aired "Monk" : USA
“Monk” is a comedy cop show in which the title character is an ex-San Francisco Police Department detective who is recovering from a nervous breakdown.

61. 007, for one : AGENT
James Bond was of course the creation of the writer Ian Fleming. Fleming “stole” the James Bond name from an American ornithologist. The number 007 was “stolen” from the real-life, 16th century English spy called John Dee. Dee would sign his reports to Queen Elizabeth I with a stylized "007" to indicate that the reports were for “her eyes only”.

63. Fictional detective ___ Archer : LEW
Lew Archer is a character in books by Ross Macdonald. Archer is a private detective based in Southern California. Macdonald chose the name as a homage to the character Miles Archer who was the murdered partner of Sam Spade in Dashiell Hammett’s “The Maltese Falcon”.

64. Like the north side of some rocks : MOSSY
There is a traditionally-held belief that in the northern hemisphere there is a heavier growth of moss on the north-facing side of trees. The assumption is that the sun creates a drier environment on the south side of the tree, an environment that is less conducive to the growth of moss.

65. ___ Park, Colo. : ESTES
Estes Park is a town in a beautiful part of the US, in northern Colorado. Estes Park is home to the headquarters of Rocky Mountain National Park. My fire-fighting brother-in-law was based at that park, so I’ve visited and can attest that it is a gorgeous place to live. He lives in Omaha now. The geography in Omaha is a little different ...

Down
4. Haile Selassie disciple : RASTA
I must admit that I don't really understand Rastafarianism. I do know that a "Rasta", like Bob Marley, is a follower of the movement. Some say that Rastafarianism is a religion, some not. I also know that it involves the worship of Emperor Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia.

Emperor Haile Selassie I ruled Ethiopia until he was removed from power in a revolution in 1974. Selassie died in 1975 under suspicious circumstances and it is widely believed that he was assassinated.

5. Bad-mouth : ASPERSE
To asperse is to spread false charges or make insinuations. The more common expression is "to cast aspersions". "To asperse" comes from the Latin "aspergere" meaning "to sprinkle". So, "to asperse" is also the term used when sprinkling holy water.

6. Actress Jenna of "Dharma & Greg" : ELFMAN
The actress Jenna Elfman is best known for playing Dharma in the sitcom “Dharma & Greg”. Elfman’s most noted role on the big screen is Anna Riley on the 2000 film “Keeping the Faith”.

"Dharma & Greg" is a sitcom that aired from 1997 to 2002 on ABC. Greg and Dharma are a couple that married on their first date, despite being exact opposites in personality and upbringing.

8. Almost any character on "The Big Bang Theory" : DORK
I consider "dork" to be pretty offensive slang. It emanated in the sixties among American students and has its roots in another slang term, a term for male genitalia.

“The Big Bang Theory” is very clever sitcom aired by CBS since 2007. “The Big Bang Theory” theme song was specially commissioned for the show, and was composed and is sung by Canadian band Barenaked Ladies. The theme song was released in 2007 as a single and is featured on a Barenaked Ladies greatest hits album.

9. Fencing blade : EPEE
The épée that is used in today’s sport fencing is derived from the old French dueling sword. In fact, the the sport of épée fencing is very similar to the dualing of the 19th century. The word “épée” translates from French as “sword”.

10. Radio format : RAP
I guess the idea is that rap music might be the programming format chosen by a radio station.

19. Place to get free screwdrivers, say : OPEN BAR
The cocktail called a screwdriver is a mix of fresh orange juice with vodka. Apparently the drink originated with a group of engineers in the late forties who used to spike small cans of orange juice with vodka, and then stir it in with their screwdrivers.

24. Said, as "adieu" : BID
"Adieu" is the French for "goodbye" or "farewell", from "à Dieu" meaning "to God".

28. Regulatory inits. since 1934 : SEC
The US Securities and Exchange Commision (SEC) enforces federal securities laws and regulates the securities industry. The SEC was created by the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The first Chairman of the SEC was Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr., the father of future President Kennedy.

33. Priest's garment : ALB
The alb is the white, neck-to-toe vestment worn by priests, usually with a rope cord around the waist. The term alb comes from "albus", the Latin word for "white".

34. Org. with a prohibited-items list : TSA
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was of course created in 2001, soon after the 9/11 attacks.

41. Yule libation : NOG
It's not really clear where the term "nog" comes from although it might derive from the word "noggin", which was originally a small wooden cup that was long associated with alcoholic drinks.

"Yule" celebrations coincide with Christmas, and the words "Christmas" and "Yule" have become synonymous in much of the world. However, Yule was originally a pagan festival celebrated by Germanic peoples. The name "Yule" comes from the Old Norse word "jol" that was used to describe the festival.

43. Quarantine : ISOLATE
The original use of our word “quarantine” back in the 1500s was as a legal term. A quarantine was the 40 days in which a widow had the legal right to reside in her dead husband’s house.

49. Shore fliers : TERNS
Terns are seabirds that are found all over the world. The Arctic Tern makes a very long-distance migration. One Arctic Tern that was tagged as a chick in Great Britain in the summer of 1982, was spotted in Melbourne, Australia just three months later. The bird had traveled over 14,000 miles in over those three months, an average of about 150 miles a day. Remarkable …

51. "Snowy" wader : EGRET
At one time the egret species was in danger of extinction due to excessive hunting driven by the demand for plumes for women's hats.

52. ___ Valley, German wine region : RHINE
The river running through Germany that we know in English as the Rhine, is called “Rhein” in German.

54. ___ girl : GO-GO
Go-go dancing started in the early sixties. Apparently, the first go-go dancers were women at the Peppermint Lounge in New York City who would spontaneously jump up onto tables and dance the twist. It wasn't long before clubs everywhere started hiring women to dance on tables for the entertainment of their patrons. Out in Los Angeles, the "Whisky a Go Go" club on Sunset Strip added a twist (pun intended!), as they had their dancers perform in cages suspended from the ceiling, creating the profession of "cage dancing". The name "go-go" actually comes from two expressions. The expression in English "go-go-go" describes someone who is high energy, and the expression in French "a gogo" describes something in abundance.

56. Senators Cruz and Kennedy : TEDS
US Senator Ted Cruz served as Solicitor General for the state of Texas before heading to Washington. Cruz was appointed Solicitor General in 2003 at the age of 32, making him the youngest Solicitor General in the country. Famously, Cruz is an opponent of the Affordable Care Act and made a speech in 2013 in the US Senate on the subject that lasted for 21 hours and 19 minutes. It was the fourth longest speech in the history of the Senate.

58. Machine part : CAM
Cams are wheels found on the cam shaft of a car's engine (and other machines). The cams are eccentric in shape rather than circular. The rotation of the cams causes the intake and exhaust valves of the cylinders to open and close.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "Ad ___ per aspera" (Kansas' motto) : ASTRA
6. Fine pillow stuffing : EIDER
11. Car with a checkered past? : CAB
14. Turkish money : LIRAS
15. Parkinson's treatment : L-DOPA
16. Egg: Prefix : OVI-
17. Audibly shocked : AGASP
18. Military muscle : FIREPOWER (firehouse & powerhouse)
20. Sign of change at the Vatican : WHITE SMOKE (White House & smokehouse)
22. Prell rival : PERT
23. Ogle : STARE AT
24. Ship slip : BERTH
25. RR stop : STN
26. Chief Norse god : ODIN
28. Saffron and ginger : SPICES
32. Functional lawn adornment : BIRDBATH (birdhouse & bathhouse)
36. Per person : EACH
37. Word that can follow both halves of 18-, 20-, 32-, 40-, 54- and 57-Across : HOUSE
39. Plus : ALSO
40. Take every last cent of : CLEAN OUT (clean house & outhouse)
42. Inflatable safety device : AIRBAG
44. Curt denial : NOT I
45. 10 Downing St. residents : PMS
46. Scoring 100 on : ACING
49. One who keeps plugging along : TROOPER
53. Fade : WANE
54. "Go" signal : GREEN LIGHT(greenhouse & lighthouse)
57. Using all of a gym, as in basketball : FULL COURT (full house & courthouse)
59. Eagle's home : AERIE
60. Network that aired "Monk" : USA
61. 007, for one : AGENT
62. News that may be illustrated by a graph : TREND
63. Fictional detective ___ Archer : LEW
64. Like the north side of some rocks : MOSSY
65. ___ Park, Colo. : ESTES

Down
1. "There oughta be ___!" : A LAW
2. "Alas" and "ah" : SIGHS
3. Curly hair or hazel eyes : TRAIT
4. Haile Selassie disciple : RASTA
5. Bad-mouth : ASPERSE
6. Actress Jenna of "Dharma & Greg" : ELFMAN
7. Moron : IDIOT
8. Almost any character on "The Big Bang Theory" : DORK
9. Fencing blade : EPEE
10. Radio format : RAP
11. Shrink in fear : COWER
12. Deflect : AVERT
13. Word with canal or control : BIRTH
19. Place to get free screwdrivers, say : OPEN BAR
21. Free throw, e.g. : SET SHOT
24. Said, as "adieu" : BID
26. "___ for octopus" : O IS
27. "Yeah, like you have a chance!" : DREAM ON!
28. Regulatory inits. since 1934 : SEC
29. ___ around with : PAL
30. Winter driving hazard : ICE
31. Wide strait : CHANNEL
32. Word of qualification : BUT
33. Priest's garment : ALB
34. Org. with a prohibited-items list : TSA
35. Sharer's opposite : HOG
38. Parisian assent : OUI
41. Yule libation : NOG
43. Quarantine : ISOLATE
45. With 46-Down, quite bad : PRETTY
46. See 45-Down : AWFUL
47. Effect's partner : CAUSE
48. Something acquired by marriage? : IN-LAW
49. Shore fliers : TERNS
50. Shore fixtures : PIERS
51. "Snowy" wader : EGRET
52. ___ Valley, German wine region : RHINE
54. ___ girl : GO-GO
55. Regrets : RUES
56. Senators Cruz and Kennedy : TEDS
58. Machine part : CAM


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1028-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Oct 13, Monday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ed Sessa,
THEME: The Dog at the End … four of today’s themed answer end with common names for dogs, and there is a whimsical line from a children’s song that refers to a dog as well:
30A. *It's a happening place : IN SPOT
34A. *Sophocles tragedy : OEDIPUS REX
43A. *British luxury S.U.V. : RANGE ROVER
45A. *Star-making title role for Mel Gibson : MAD MAX

17A. With 62-Across, question in a children's song : WHERE OH WHERE HAS
62A. See 17-Across : MY LITTLE DOG GONE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 38s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. "I love," to Ovid : AMO
The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso is today known simply as Ovid. Ovid is usually listed alongside the two other great Roman poets: Horace and Virgil.

15. Elaborate architectural style : ROCOCO
The Rococo style is also known as "Late Baroque". Rococo is a very floral and playful style, very ornate.

16. Mineral in thin sheets : MICA
Mica is a mineral, a sheet silicate. Thin sheets of mica are transparent and are used in place of glass in certain applications. This form of mica is called isinglass, and as it has a better thermal performance than glass it is a great choice for "peepholes' in boilers and lanterns. Mica is also used in the electronics industry, making use of its unique electrical and thermal insulating properties.

17. With 62-Across, question in a children's song : WHERE OH WHERE HAS
(62A. See 17-Across : MY LITTLE DOG GONE)
“Oh where, oh where has my little dog gone?” is a children’s song written by 19th-century American songwriter Septimus Winner. The song is also known as “Der Deitcher’s Dog”, and is made up from lyrics by Winner that he set to a German folk tune.
Oh where, oh where has my little dog gone?
Oh where, oh where can he be?
With his ears cut short, and his tail cut long,
Oh where, oh where is he?

20. Seoul's land : KOREA
Seoul is the capital city of South Korea. The Seoul National Capital Area is home to over 25 million people and is the second largest metropolitan area in the world, second only to Tokyo, Japan.

21. Yoko who loved John : ONO
John Lennon and Yoko Ono had a very public honeymoon in a hotels in Amsterdam and then Montreal, when they staged their famous "bed-in" for peace. In answering questions from reporters Lennon found himself often repeating the words "give peace a chance". While still in bed, he composed his famous song "Give Peace a Chance" and even made the original recording of the song in the Montreal hotel room, with reporters present, and with a whole bunch of friends. The song was released later in 1969 and became a smash hit.

23. Yukon S.U.V. maker : GMC
GMC is a division of General Motors (GM) established in 1901 that started out as "GMC Truck".

The GMC Yukon is basically the same vehicle as the Chevrolet Tahoe.

25. Justice Sotomayor : SONIA
Sonia Sotomayor is the first Hispanic justice on the US Supreme Court, and the third female justice. Sotomayor was nominated by President Barack Obama to replaced the retiring Justice David Souter.

34. *Sophocles tragedy : OEDIPUS REX
“Oedipus Rex” (also “Oedipus the King”) is a tragedy penned by the Ancient Greek playwright Sophocles. The play tells the story of Oedipus, a man who becomes king of Thebes. Famously, Oedipus was destined from birth to murder his father and marry his mother.

Sophocles was one of three ancient Greek tragedians whose work has survived. The first of these was Aeschylus, the second Sophocles, and the third Euripides. Sophocles is believed to have written 123 plays, the most famous of which are "Antigone" and "Oedipus the King".

40. Full political assemblies : PLENA
"Plenum" (plural “plena”) is the name given to a complete legislative assembly under the parliamentary system, with the associated term of "quorum" being the minimum number of members required to be present to conduct business.

42. Summer: Fr. : ETE
One might spend the summer (été) under the sun (le soleil) in French-speaking countries.

43. *British luxury S.U.V. : RANGE ROVER
The Range Rover is the luxury version of the famous Land Rover made in England. The first Range Rover was produced in 1970, and the model is now in its fourth generation.

45. *Star-making title role for Mel Gibson : MAD MAX
“Mad Max” is a series of Australian movies starring Mel Gibson in the title role. Well, Gibson played the lead in the first three films and Tom Hardy plays Max in the fourth movie, which is currently in production.

The actor Mel Gibson was born American, and not Australian as many believe. Gibson was born in Peekskill, New York and moved with his family to Sydney, Australia when he was 12 years old.

49. ___ the Cow (Borden symbol) : ELSIE
Elsie the Cow is the mascot of the Borden Company. Elsie first appeared at the New York World's Fair in 1939, introduced to symbolize the perfect dairy product. Elsie was also given a husband named Elmer the Bull. Elmer eventually moved over to the chemical division of Borden where he gave his name to Elmer's Glue.

52. TV forensic series : CSI
The “CSI” franchise of TV shows has been tremendously successful, but seems to be winding down. “CSI: Miami” (the “worst” of the franchise, I think) was cancelled in 2012 after ten seasons. “CSI: NY” (the “best” of the franchise) was cancelled in 2013 after nine seasons. The original “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”, set in Las Vegas, is still going strong, and has been doing so since 2000.

53. Old Olds model : ALERO
The Oldsmobile Alero was the last car made under the Oldsmobile brand. The Alero was produced from 1999 to 2004.

56. TiVo, for one : DVR
TiVo was introduced in 1999 and was the world's first commercially successful DVR (Digital Video Recorder).

67. Extra periods of play, in brief : OTS
Overtimes (OTs)

68. 1970s-'80s sitcom diner : MEL’S
The TV sitcom "Alice" ran from 1976 to 1985, a story about a widow named Alice who takes a job at Mel's Diner. The show was based on a very successful 1974 movie called "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore" directed by Martin Scorsese (his first Hollywood production) and starring Ellen Burstyn and Kris Kristofferson.

69. Secret get-togethers : TRYSTS
In its most general sense, a “tryst” is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting.

Down
1. Dove's opposite : HAWK
The dove is a symbol of peace, and a hawk is a symbol of war.

2. "If you ask me," in chat rooms : IMHO
In my humble opinion (IMHO)

9. "The Raven" writer : POE
"The Raven" is a narrative poem by Edgar Allen Poe that tells of a student who has lost the love of his life, Lenore. A raven enters the student's bedchamber and perches on a bust of Pallas. The raven can talk, to the student’s surprise, but says nothing but the word “nevermore” (“quoth the raven, ‘Nevermore’”). As the student questions all aspects of his life, the raven taunts him with the same comment, “nevermore”. Finally the student decides that his soul is trapped beneath the raven's shadow and shall be lifted "nevermore" …

10. Pricey watches : OMEGAS
Omega is a manufacturer of high-end watches based in Switzerland. An Omega watch was the first portable timepiece to make it to the moon.

11. Song syllables before "It's off to work we go" : HI-HO
“Heigh-Ho” is one of the best known songs in the classic Disney animated feature “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”. “Heigh-Ho” is sung by the seven dwarfs as they head off to mine diamonds and rubies.

12. Thom ___ shoes : MCAN
Thom McAn footwear was introduced in 1922 by the Melville Corporation (now CVS Caremark). The brand was named after a Scottish golfer called Thomas McCann. The Thom McAn line is epitomized by the comfortable leather casual and dress shoe, so sales have really been hurt in recent decades by the growing popularity of sneakers.

13. "Duck soup" : EASY
The origins of the phrase "duck soup", meaning anything easily done, aren't very clear. However, it does at least date back to 1908.

18. Jackson a k a Mr. October : REGGIE
Former baseball player Reggie Jackson is known as “Mr. October” because of his memorable postseason performances.

24. Gulager of "The Last Picture Show" : CLU
Clu Gulager is a television and film actor. He is most remembered for playing Billy the Kid in the TV show "The Tall Man" in the early sixties, and then as Emmett Ryker in "The Virginian" in the late sixties.

The 1971 coming of age movie "The Last Picture Show" was directed by Peter Bogdanovich, and is based on the semi-autobiographical novel of the same name by Larry McMurtry. There's a famous skinny-dipping scene in the film which caused some controversy soon after release, with the city of Phoenix actually banning the movie citing an Arizona obscenity statute. It took a federal court to determine that the film was not in fact obscene. I recommend this one ...

26. Veto : NIX
The use of "nix" as a verb, meaning "to shoot down", dates back to the early 1900s. Before that "nix" was just a noun meaning "nothing". "Nix" comes from the German "nichts", which also means "nothing".

"Veto" comes directly from Latin and means "I forbid". The word was used by tribunes of Ancient Rome to indicate that they opposed measures passed by the Senate.

27. Rodeo rope : REATA
“Reata” is the Spanish word for “lasso”.

29. "Cómo ___ usted?" : ESTA
"¿Cómo está usted?" is the more formal way of asking, "How are you?" in Spanish.

34. City near Provo : OREM
Orem, Utah was originally known as "Sharon" (a Biblical name), then "Provo Bench", and in 1914 it was given the family name of a local railroad operator called "Orem". Orem gave itself the nickname “Family City USA” and sure enough in 2010, “Forbes” rated Orem the 5th best place in the country to raise a family.

36. Messy Halloween missiles : EGGS
All Saints' Day is November 1st each year. The day before All Saints' Day is All Hallows Eve, better known by the Scottish term "Halloween".

43. Doc's written orders : RXS
There seems to some uncertainty about the origin of the symbol "Rx" that's used for a medical prescription. One explanation is that it comes from the astrological sign for Jupiter, a symbol put on prescriptions in days of old to invoke Jupiter's blessing to help a patient recover.

44. Common Market inits. : EEC
The European Economic Community (EEC) was also called "the Common Market". The EEC was a NAFTA-like structure that was eventually absorbed into today's European Union.

50. Aesop's grasshopper, for one : IDLER
In Aesop’s fable “The Ant and the Grasshopper”, the grasshopper spends the warm months singing and having a good time while the ant toils away storing food. When winter arrives, the grasshopper starts to die from hunger and begs the ant for food. The ant tells the grasshopper that he should have been more sensible instead of singing away all summer, and maybe he should dance through the winter!

51. The "E" in EGBDF : EVERY
In the world of music, EGBDF are the notes on the lines of the treble clef. The notes are often remembered with a mnemonic such as “Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge”.

53. Having two bands, as most radios : AM/FM
The radio spectrum is divided into bands based on frequency. "High band" is composed of relatively high frequency values, and "low band" is composed of frequencies that are relatively low. FM radio falls into the band called Very High Frequency, or VHF. Television signals use frequencies even higher than VHF, frequencies in the Ultra High Frequency band (UHF). AM radio uses lower frequencies that fall into the relatively low bands of Low, Medium and High Frequency (LF, MF, and HF).

54. Apollo plucked it : LYRE
The lyre is a stringed instrument most closely associated with Ancient Greece, and with the gods Hermes and Apollo in particular. According to myth, Hermes slaughtered a cow from a sacred herd belonging to Apollo and offered it to the gods but kept the entrails. Hermes used the entrails to create the first lyre. Apollo liked the sound from the lyre and agreed to accept it as a trade for his herd of cattle.

55. Airline to Israel : EL AL
El Al Israel Airlines is the flag carrier of Israel. The term “el al” translates from Hebrew as “to the skies”.

57. Food label figs. : RDAS
Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

59. "Indiana Jones and the Temple of ___" : DOOM
“Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” is the second in the series of “Indiana Jones” movies, although the story is written as a prequel to the first film, “Raiders of the Lost Ark”.

60. "Do ___ others as ..." : UNTO
The Golden Rule is also known as the ethic of reciprocity, and is a basis for the concept of human rights. A version of the rule used in the Christian tradition is attributed to Jesus: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”.

61. Cuban money : PESO
The coin called a “peso” is used in many Spanish-speaking countries around the world. The coin originated in Spain where the word “peso” means “weight”. The original peso was what we know in English as a “piece of eight”, a silver coin of a specific weight that had a nominal value of eight “reales”.

64. Giant among baseball's Giants : OTT
At 5' 9", Mel Ott weighed just 170 lb (I don't think he took steroids!) and yet he was the first National League player to hit over 500 home runs. Sadly, Ott died in a car accident in New Orleans in 1958 when he was only 49 years old.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Concealed : HID
4. It's wide in a May-December romance : AGE GAP
10. Quaint words of worry : OH ME
14. "I love," to Ovid : AMO
15. Elaborate architectural style : ROCOCO
16. Mineral in thin sheets : MICA
17. With 62-Across, question in a children's song : WHERE OH WHERE HAS
20. Seoul's land : KOREA
21. Yoko who loved John : ONO
22. Hellish suffering : AGONY
23. Yukon S.U.V. maker : GMC
25. Justice Sotomayor : SONIA
27. Entertain in a festive manner : REGALE
30. *It's a happening place : IN SPOT
34. *Sophocles tragedy : OEDIPUS REX
37. Ram's mate : EWE
38. Rants : RAGES
39. Action before crying "You're it!" : TAG
40. Full political assemblies : PLENA
42. Summer: Fr. : ETE
43. *British luxury S.U.V. : RANGE ROVER
45. *Star-making title role for Mel Gibson : MAD MAX
48. Oozed : SEEPED
49. ___ the Cow (Borden symbol) : ELSIE
52. TV forensic series : CSI
53. Old Olds model : ALERO
56. TiVo, for one : DVR
58. Words often after the lowest-priced in a series of items : AND UP
62. See 17-Across : MY LITTLE DOG GONE
65. Sorority's counterpart, for short : FRAT
66. Infuse with oxygen : AERATE
67. Extra periods of play, in brief : OTS
68. 1970s-'80s sitcom diner : MEL’S
69. Secret get-togethers : TRYSTS
70. Oink : pig :: ___ : cow : MOO

Down
1. Dove's opposite : HAWK
2. "If you ask me," in chat rooms : IMHO
3. Thinker's counterpart : DOER
4. Localized charts : AREA MAPS
5. Liquidy gunk : GOO
6. Verbal feedback? : ECHO
7. Fancy dresses : GOWNS
8. Sneezer's sound : ACHOO!
9. "The Raven" writer : POE
10. Pricey watches : OMEGAS
11. Song syllables before "It's off to work we go" : HI-HO
12. Thom ___ shoes : MCAN
13. "Duck soup" : EASY
18. Jackson a k a Mr. October : REGGIE
19. Reason for a game delay : RAIN
24. Gulager of "The Last Picture Show" : CLU
26. Veto : NIX
27. Rodeo rope : REATA
28. Sidled (along) : EDGED
29. "Cómo ___ usted?" : ESTA
31. "Pet" annoyance : PEEVE
32. Possessed : OWNED
33. Tiny bit of crying : TEAR
34. City near Provo : OREM
35. Managed : RAN
36. Messy Halloween missiles : EGGS
40. Forewarns : PRESAGES
41. Cantering : LOPING
43. Doc's written orders : RXS
44. Common Market inits. : EEC
46. Scouts earn them : MERITS
47. Tons : A LOT
50. Aesop's grasshopper, for one : IDLER
51. The "E" in EGBDF : EVERY
53. Having two bands, as most radios : AM/FM
54. Apollo plucked it : LYRE
55. Airline to Israel : EL AL
57. Food label figs. : RDAS
59. "Indiana Jones and the Temple of ___" : DOOM
60. "Do ___ others as ..." : UNTO
61. Cuban money : PESO
63. Tit for ___ : TAT
64. Giant among baseball's Giants : OTT


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This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

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Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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