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1130-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Nov 13, Saturday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Byron Walden & Brad Wilber
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 62m 10s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. 1960s sitcom character with the catchphrase "I see nothing!" : SGT SCHULTZ
“Hogan’s Heroes” is a sitcom that ran in the late sixties and early seventies. The show starred Bob Crane as the ranking prisoner in a German POW camp during WWII. The four major German roles were played by actors who all were Jewish, and who all fled from the Nazis during the war. In fact, the Sergeant Schultz character was played by John Banner, who spent three years in a concentration camp.

11. Kvetch : CRAB
The word "kvetch" of course comes to us from Yiddish, with "kvetshn" meaning "to complain" or "squeeze".

15. Pitchblende, e.g. : URANIUM ORE
Pitchblende is made up of the mineral uraninite, and is found in black pitch-like deposits. Pitchblende is a major source of uranium and radium.

16. Disney title character surnamed Pelekai : LILO
"Lilo & Stitch" was released by Disney in 2002. Compared to other Disney feature-length cartoons, "Lilo & Stitch" was relatively cheaply produced, using the voices of lesser-known actors. One interesting change had to take place in the storyline during production, when Lilo was meant to fly a Jumbo Jet through downtown Honolulu in one sequence. This was replaced with a sequence using a spaceship instead, as the producers were sensitive to public sentiment after the September 11 attacks.

21. Lose one's place? : SHOW
In the world of betting, “to place” means finishing 1st or 2nd. “To show” means finishing 1st, 2nd or 3rd.

22. Itches : YENS
The word "yen", meaning "urge", has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word "yin" imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium!

23. Places gowns are worn, for short : ORS
Operating Rooms (ORs)

26. Elated outpouring : PAEAN
A paean is a poem or song that expresses triumph or thanksgiving. “Paean” comes from the ancient Greek “paian” meaning "song of triumph”.

28. Hercules type : HE-MAN
The Twelve Labors of Hercules is actually a Greek myth, although Hercules is the Roman name for the hero that the Greeks called Heracles. The first of these labors was to slay the Nemean Lion, a monster that lived in a cave near Nemea. Hercules had a tough job as the lion's golden fur was impenetrable to normal weapons. One version of the story is that Hercules killed the lion by shooting an arrow into its mouth. Another version says that Hercules stunned the monster with a club and then strangled him with his bare hands.

29. Result of some fermentation : BIOGAS
Biogas is mixture of methane and carbon dioxide resulting from the breakdown of organic matter by anaerobic bacteria. Biogas is used as a renewable energy source, as it is produced from recycled waste.

33. Ingredient in Worcestershire sauce : TAMARIND
The fruit of the tamarind tree is a little sour to be eaten raw, but it is used a lot in savory dishes. Famously, tamarind is a component of Worcestershire sauce.

Worcestershire Sauce is a variant of a fermented fish sauce that has been around since the days of the Roman Empire. The modern sauce was developed and marketed by Messrs. Lea and Perrins in the city of Worcester, then in the county of Worcestershire, hence the name. We vegans aren't supposed to touch it, as it contains anchovies! Oh, and "Worcestershire" is pronounced "wooster-sheer" ...

38. Second baseman in both of the Dodgers' 1980s World Series : STEVE SAX
Steve Sax is a former second baseman who played most of his career with the LA Dodgers. Sadly, Sax had a particularly bad 1983 season and had problems making routine throws to first base. As a result, the phrase “Steve Sax Syndrome” is now part of baseball parlance, and is used when a second baseman has trouble throwing to first.

40. Like South Carolina vis-à-vis North Carolina, politically : REDDER
On political maps, red states are Republican and blue states Democrat. The designation of red and blue states is a very recent concept, only introduced in the 2000 presidential election by TV journalist, the late Tim Russert. In retrospect, the choice of colors is surprising, as in other democracies around the world red is usually used to describe left-leaning socialist parties (the reds under the bed!), and blue is used for conservative right-wing parties. In election cycles, swing/battleground states are often depicted in purple.

41. Storied abductee : HELEN
In Greek mythology, Helen of Sparta was the daughter of Zeus and Leda. She became known as Helen of Troy, as the Trojan War started when she was abducted by Paris and taken from Sparta to Troy.

42. Sports mascot who's a popular bobblehead figure : MR MET
Mr. Met is the mascot of the New York Mets. He is a guy with a large baseball as a head, and has been elected to the Mascot Hall of Fame.

46. Comfort's partner : AID
Aid and comfort (to the enemy, for example).

47. "The X-Files" project, for short : SETI
SETI is the name given to a number of projects that are searching for extraterrestrial life. The acronym stands for “search for extraterrestrial intelligence”. One of the main SETI activities is the monitoring of electromagnetic radiation (such as radio waves) reaching the Earth in the hope of finding a transmission from a civilization in another world.

"The X-Files" is a very successful science fiction show that aired on the Fox network from 1993 to 2002. The stars of the show are David Duchovny (playing Fox Mulder) and the very talented Gillian Anderson (playing Dana Scully). By the time the series ended, it was the longest running sci-fi show in US broadcast history.

51. Verb in the world's first telegraph message : HATH
The first telegraph message in the US was sent by Samuel Morse from the US Capitol in 1844. The message was received by a B&O railroad depot in Baltimore, Maryland. The message content was the words “WHAT HATH GOD WROUGHT”, which is a quotation from the Book of Numbers in the Bible.

52. Watergate units: Abbr. : APTS
The Watergate scandal is so named because it involved a break-in at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters in the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. The Watergate complex is made up of five units, three of which are apartment buildings, one an office building, and one a hotel-office building (which housed the DNC headquarters).

54. Embroidery loop : PICOT
A picot is a loop of thread, either for function or for decoration, at the edge of some knitted or tatted material.

55. Brand once pitched by Garfield : ALPO
Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with "Alpo" being an abbreviation for "Allen Products". Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

58. Relative of aloha or shalom : CIAO
"Ciao" is the Italian for "'bye". "Arrivederci" is more formal, and translates better as "goodbye".

The Hawaiian word "Aloha" has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently "aloha" has come to mean "hello" and "goodbye", but only since the mid-1800s.

“Shalom” is a Hebrew word meaning “peace” that is also used to mean “hello” and “goodbye”.

59. Home of the WNBA's Silver Stars : SAN ANTONIO
The San Antonio Silver Stars are a team playing in Women’s National Basketball Association. The team was founded as the Utah Starzz in 1997, and relocated to Texas in 2003.

60. Transcendental aesthetic developer : KANT
Immanuel Kant was an 18th-century, German philosopher. Kant published "Perpetual Peace" in 1795, laying out what he believed were conditions for ending all wars and creating a lasting peace. The good news for us is that one of these conditions was to have a world full of constitutional republics, so it seems that we are on the right track here in the US!

61. Accent for plus fours, often : ARGYLE SOCK
The argyle pattern is based on the Campbell tartan. The Campbell clan is based in the Argyll region (note the spelling) in the west of Scotland, giving the Argyle pattern its name.

Plus fours are so called because the traditional design extends four inches in the leg longer than knickerbockers. You can also get hold of plus twos, plus sixes and plus eights should you be interested.

Down
3. Tarte ___ (French apple dessert) : TATIN
Tarte Tatin is a upside-down apple tart that is very popular in France. The dessert is named for the Hotel Tatin in Lamotte-Beuvron (about 100 miles south of Paris), where it was invented.

5. What César awards honor : CINE
“Cine” is the French for “cinema”.

The César Award is the national film award of France. The first César was awarded in 1975, named after the French sculptor César Baldaccini. The awards themselves are reproductions of an actual Baldaccini sculpture.

9. "Star Trek: T.N.G." role : TROI
Deanna Troi is a character on "Star Trek: The Next Generation" who is played by the lovely Marina Sirtis. Sirtis is a naturalized American citizen and has what I would call a soft American accent on the show. However, she was born in the East End of London and has a natural accent off-stage that is more like that of a true Cockney.

10. Literary wife in "Midnight in Paris" : ZELDA
Zelda Fitzgerald, the wife of F. Scott Fitzgerald, was a novelist in her own right. Zelda’s one and only novel is "Save Me the Waltz", a semi-autobiographical account of her life and marriage.

The 2011 Woody Allen movie called “Midnight in Paris” is a real gem in my opinion. I’ve never liked Woody Allen films, to be honest, mainly because I’m not a fan of Woody Allen as an actor. “Midnight in Paris” is very much a Woody Allen script, with Owen Wilson playing the role that Allen would usually reserve for himself. Wilson plays a much better Woody Allen! Highly recommended ...

11. Nearly set? : CLUSTERED
Marty (in a comment below) explained this one for me. Things that are "nearly set", things set near to each other, are "clustered".

14. Early riser? : BOY WONDER
A kind blog reader explained this answer to me. A "boy wonder" is someone who rises through the ranks early in his career.

23. Locales that may be well-supplied? : OASES
The most famous oasis in the US is ... Las Vegas, in the middle of the Mojave Desert.

25. Digs on a slope : CHALET
"Digs" is short for "diggings" meaning "lodgings", but where "diggings" came from, no one seems to know.

26. Recognition not sought by Benjamin Franklin : PATENT
Benjamin Franklin was a prolific inventor, coming up bifocal glasses and the flexible catheter (!) among other things. Franklin never filed for patents for his creations, and wrote:
"... as we enjoy great advantages from the inventions of others, we should be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours; and this we should do freely and generously."

27. Rapper with the 2012 album "Life Is Good" : NAS
The rap artist Nas used to go by another stage name, Nasty Nas, and before that by his real name, Nasir bin Olu Dara Jones. Nas released his first album "Illmatic" in 1994, and inventively titled his fifth studio album “Stillmatic”, released in 2001. Not my cup of tea, I would say ...

29. Clear one's way, in a way : BUSHWHACK
“To bushwhack” is to whack your way through the bush or thick woods.

30. Latin condenser : INTER ALIA
Inter alia means "among other things" in Latin.

45. Medieval merchants' guild : HANSA
The Hanseatic League was a confederation of merchant guilds and market towns that stretched along the Northern European coast from the 13th to the 17th centuries. Also known as the Hansa, the league is remembered today in company names like “Lufthansa” (“Air Hansa”).

47. Grain elevator components : SILOS
Silo is a Spanish word that we absorbed into English, originally coming from the Greek word "siros" that described a pit in which one kept grain.

53. "Up to ___" (1952 game show) : PAAR
Jack Paar was most famous as the host of “The Tonight Show”, from 1957 to 1962. When he died in 2004, “Time” magazine wrote that Paar was “the fellow who split talk show history into two eras: Before Paar and Below Paar”. Very complimentary …

54. Fancy spread : PATE
Pâté is a rich spreadable paste made up of a mixture of ground meat and fat, to which various vegetables, herbs and spices may be added. The most famous version is pâté de foie gras, made from the fattened livers of geese ("foie gras" means "fat liver" in French).

57. Show on Sen. Franken's résumé : SNL
Al Franken is the junior US Senator from Minnesota. Franken won the seat in 2009 after an extremely close race, a race that he eventually won by just 312 votes. Prior to serving in the Senate, Franken was a noted satirist and writer for “Saturday Night Live”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. 1960s sitcom character with the catchphrase "I see nothing!" : SGT SCHULTZ
11. Kvetch : CRAB
15. Pitchblende, e.g. : URANIUM ORE
16. Disney title character surnamed Pelekai : LILO
17. Singles collection? : DATING POOL
18. Hostile : UGLY
19. Malignant acts : SPITE
20. "Not serious!" : I KID!
21. Lose one's place? : SHOW
22. Itches : YENS
23. Places gowns are worn, for short : ORS
24. Setting for many reprises : ACT TWO
26. Elated outpouring : PAEAN
28. Hercules type : HE-MAN
29. Result of some fermentation : BIOGAS
33. Ingredient in Worcestershire sauce : TAMARIND
35. Still in the 17-Across : UNMATED
37. Still : SILENCE
38. Second baseman in both of the Dodgers' 1980s World Series : STEVE SAX
40. Like South Carolina vis-à-vis North Carolina, politically : REDDER
41. Storied abductee : HELEN
42. Sports mascot who's a popular bobblehead figure : MR MET
44. Ring : WREATH
46. Comfort's partner : AID
47. "The X-Files" project, for short : SETI
51. Verb in the world's first telegraph message : HATH
52. Watergate units: Abbr. : APTS
54. Embroidery loop : PICOT
55. Brand once pitched by Garfield : ALPO
56. Where filing work is done : NAIL SALONS
58. Relative of aloha or shalom : CIAO
59. Home of the WNBA's Silver Stars : SAN ANTONIO
60. Transcendental aesthetic developer : KANT
61. Accent for plus fours, often : ARGYLE SOCK

Down
1. Like many drafts : SUDSY
2. Lollipop selection : GRAPE
3. Tarte ___ (French apple dessert) : TATIN
4. Uncooperative moods : SNITS
5. What César awards honor : CINE
6. Stick close to : HUG
7. One paid to make calls : UMPIRE
8. Considers : LOOKS AT
9. "Star Trek: T.N.G." role : TROI
10. Literary wife in "Midnight in Paris" : ZELDA
11. Nearly set? : CLUSTERED
12. Judicious state : RIGHT MIND
13. Minor payment : ALLOWANCE
14. Early riser? : BOY WONDER
23. Locales that may be well-supplied? : OASES
25. Digs on a slope : CHALET
26. Recognition not sought by Benjamin Franklin : PATENT
27. Rapper with the 2012 album "Life Is Good" : NAS
29. Clear one's way, in a way : BUSHWHACK
30. Latin condenser : INTER ALIA
31. Cookware that's often hinged : OMELET PAN
32. Cared : GAVE A HOOT
34. Overcome by mud : MIRED
36. Weir : DAM
39. Blue label : X-RATING
43. Lose : MISLAY
45. Medieval merchants' guild : HANSA
47. Grain elevator components : SILOS
48. Discount, in combination : ECONO-
49. Vodka ___ : TONIC
50. "There, there" : IT'S OK
53. "Up to ___" (1952 game show) : PAAR
54. Fancy spread : PATE
57. Show on Sen. Franken's résumé : SNL


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1129-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 29 Nov 13, Friday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ned White
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 27m 08s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Cartoon canary's bane : PUDDY TAT
Sylvester J, Pussycat was also known as Puddy Tat, and was a character who appeared in “Looney Tunes” and “Merrie Melodies” cartoons. Sylvester was the cat who was often trying to get the better of Tweety Bird, Speedy Gonzales and Hippety Hopper.

“I tawt I taw a puddy tat!” is a famous line uttered by Tweety Bird, the yellow canary in the “Looney Tunes” and “Merrie Melodies” cartoons who is constantly stalked by various cats.

9. Lymph liquid : PLASM
Plasma (sometimes “plasm”) is the clear, yellow-colored liquid component of blood and lymph in which cells are suspended.

Lymph is a fluid that exists "alongside" blood in the body, transported through lymph vessels. One of the functions of the system is to pick up bacteria in the body, transporting them to lymph nodes where they are destroyed by lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell). Lymph can also carry metastatic cancer cells, which can lodge in lymph nodes making lymph nodes a common site where tumors may be found growing.

15. Many a predictable plot : CLICHE
“Cliché” is a word that comes from the world of printing. In the days when type was added as individual letters into a printing plate, for efficiency some oft-used phrases and words were created as one single slug of metal. The word “cliché” was used for such a grouping of letters. It’s easy to see how the same word would become a term to describe any overused phrase. Supposedly, “cliché” comes from French, from the verb “clicher” meaning “to click”. The idea is that when a matrix of letters was dropped in molten metal to make a cliché, it made a clicking sound.

18. Gate announcement, briefly : ETD
Estimated time of departure (ETD)

19. Longtime model Parkinson of "The Price Is Right" : DIAN
Dian Parkinson was a hostess on the game show “The Price is Right” for 18 years, eventually leaving the show in 1993. Famously, Parkinson filed a lawsuit soon after her departure against Barker for sexual harassment. Barker then admitted to a 3-year relationship with Parkinson but denied the harassment charge, and Parkinson dropped the suit.

20. One with a game collection : ARCADE
Our word “arcade” comes from the Latin “arcus” meaning “arc”. The first arcades were passages made from a series of arches. This could be an avenue of trees, and eventually any covered avenue. I remember arcades lined with shops and stores when I was growing up on the other side of the Atlantic. Arcades came to be lined with lots of amusements, resulting in amusement arcades and video game arcades.

21. Home to Bar-Ilan Univ. : ISR
Bar-Ilan University (BIU) is a school in the Tel Aviv District of Israel. BIU opened for classes in 1955.

22. Grp. supported by 17-Acrosses : NRA
(17A. One with a game collection, maybe : HUNTER)
The NRA is the National Rifle Association, an organization that has been around since 1871. The NRA has had some celebrity presidents, including US President Ulysses S. Grant. It's often said that the NRA is the most powerful lobbying group in Washington.

27. Post rival : KELLOGG’S
The Kellogg Company was founded in 1906 by Will Keith Kellogg as the Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company. Will established the enterprise while working with his brother John Harvey Kellogg at his Battle Creek Sanitarium. The brothers created corn flakes as a health food for patients at the sanitarium.

C. W. Post decided to get into the cereal business after visiting the Battle Creek Sanitarium operated by John Harvey Kellogg. Post was interested in the chemistry of digestion and was inspired by the dietary products offered by Kellogg at his sanitarium. The first breakfast cereal Post introduced was Grape Nuts, way back in 1897.

33. What corned beef is often served on : JEWISH RYE
Jewish rye is a variant of rye bread that is seasoned with whole caraway seeds and is glazed with an egg wash. Jewish rye is often served with salted meats such as corned beef and pastrami.

Corned beef is beef that has been cured with salt. “Corn” is an alternative term for a grain of salt, giving the dish its name. Corned beef is also known as “salt beef”, and “bully beef” if stored in cans (from the French “bouilli” meaning “boiled”).

35. Heart-felt thing? : PULSE
One’s “pulse” is the rhythmic throbbing of arteries that is usually detected at the wrist or the neck. The contraction of the heart creates a pressure wave in the blood that moves the arterial walls, which is detected as the pulse.

36. Where to take stock? : BARN
Our word “barn” comes from the Old English “bere aern”, which translates as “barley house”.

37. Lamb accompaniment : MINT JELLY
Mint jelly is the traditional accompaniment for roast lamb in North America. Back in Ireland we serve mint sauce rather than jelly. Mint sauce is made from finely chopped spearmint leaves soaked in vinegar, with a little sugar added. I love mint sauce …

39. Shade similar to bay : COCOA
Bay is a reddish-brown color, usually used to describe the coat of a horse.

41. Least brazen : COYEST
Someone described as “brazen” might also be described as “shameless”. The term “brazen” comes from the Middle English “brasen” meaning “made of brass”. The suggestion is that a shameless person has a hardened, brass-like face.

42. "Eldorado" inits. : EAP
“Eldorado” is an Edgar Allan Poe poem that was first published in 1849. The poem tells of a gallant knight who spends much of his life in search of the legendary “Lost City of Gold” called El Dorado.

The original El Dorado was a Muisca chief who was covered with gold dust in a tribal ritual and then dove into Lake Guatavita in present-day Colombia. Later, “El Dorado” was adopted as the name for a mythical “Lost City of Gold” that became a quest from many Spanish Conquistadors who explored the Americas.

48. Coastal diver : TERN
Terns are seabirds that are found all over the world. The Arctic Tern makes a very long-distance migration. One Arctic Tern that was tagged as a chick in Great Britain in the summer of 1982, was spotted in Melbourne, Australia just three months later. The bird had traveled over 14,000 miles in over those three months, an average of about 150 miles a day. Remarkable …

49. Sun Devil Stadium's sch. : ASU
Arizona State University (ASU) has a long history, founded as the Tempe Normal School for the Arizona Territory in 1885. The athletic teams of ASU used to be known as the Normals, then the Bulldogs, and since 1946 they’ve been called the Sun Devils.

53. Labor leader? : HERCULES
“The Twelve Labors of Hercules” is actually a Greek myth, although Hercules is the Roman name for the hero that the Greeks called Heracles. The first of these labors was to slay the Nemean Lion, a monster that lived in a cave near Nemea. Hercules had a tough job as the lion's golden fur was impenetrable to normal weapons. One version of the story is that Hercules killed the lion by shooting an arrow into its mouth. Another version says that Hercules stunned the monster with a club and then strangled him with his bare hands.

55. Ray Charles's Georgia birthplace : ALBANY
Ray Charles came up with his stage name by dropping the family name from his real moniker, Ray Charles Robinson. His life was a wild ride, well represented in the excellent biopic called “Ray” released in 2004 and starring Jamie Foxx in the title role. Ray Charles was married twice and fathered 12 children with nine different women. As I said, a wild ride …

57. Inc. magazine topic : REORG
“Inc.” is a business magazine that specializes in articles about growing companies. “Inc.” publishes a list of the 500 fastest-growing private companies in the country each year, calling it the “Inc. 500”. The “Inc 5000” is an expanded list also published by the magazine.

58. Voice of 1-Across : MEL BLANC
Mel Blanc is known as "The Man of a Thousand Voices". We've all heard Mel Blanc at one time or another, I am sure. His was the voice behind such cartoon characters as Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, Woody Woodpecker, Elmer Fudd and Barney Rubble. And the words on Blanc's tombstone are ... "That's All Folks".

Down
4. Detoxing woe : DTS
The episodes of delirium that can accompany withdrawal from alcohol are called Delirium Tremens (the DTs). The literal translation of this Latin phrase is "trembling madness".

5. Bagel source? : YIDDISH
The bagel was invented in the Polish city of Kraków in the 16th century. Bagels were brought to this country by Jewish immigrants from Poland who mainly established homes in and around New York City. The term “bagel” comes from the Yiddish “beygl”, which in term comes from the Old High German word for “ring”.

6. Many a Taiwanese : TAOIST
The Chinese character "tao" translates as "path", but the concept of Tao signifies the true nature of the world.

8. It has eight neighbors: Abbr. : TENN
Tennessee borders eight other states, a record number that is shared with Missouri. The states bordering Tennessee are Kentucky, Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas and Missouri.

10. Tod's sidekick on "Route 66" : LINC
“Route 66” is a classic television show from the early sixties about two young men traveling across the US in a Corvette. The original lead characters were Tod Stiles and Buz Murdock, with Murdock being replaced by a character called Lincoln Case in the third season.

The famous old highway called Route 66 has largely been replaced by modern interstates. It ran from Chicago to Los Angeles, right through the heart of America, and so it was often called the "Main Street of America". The road gained notoriety because of Nat King Cole's song "(Get Your Kicks On) Route 66", and also because of the sixties TV show called "Route 66".

11. Court records : ACTA
Actum (plural "acta") is the Latin word for "deed". "Acta" is used in English to describe many official records, including minutes, proceedings etc.

13. Trivial : MERE
Trivia are things of little consequence. “Trivia” is the plural of the Latin word “trivium” which means “a place where three roads meet”. Now that’s what I call a trivial fact …

15. Delta lead-in : CHARLIE
The NATO phonetic alphabet is also called the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) phonetic alphabet. It goes Alfa, Bravo, Charlie, Delta … Zulu.

23. Jungian principle : ANIMA
The concept of anima and animus is found in the Carl Jung school of analytical psychology. The idea is that within each male their resides a feminine inner personality called the anima, and within each female there is a male inner personality known as the animus.

29. With 27-Down, her last film was "High Society" : GRACE
(27A. See 29-Down : KELLY)
The lovely American actress Grace Kelly led the US delegation to the Cannes Film Festival in 1955 and there she met Prince Rainier III, at a photo-op in the Palace of Monaco. Twelve months later the pair were married and Kelly retired from acting at the age of 26. She suffered a stroke while driving her car in 1982, not long before her 53rd birthday. She died in the resulting car crash but her daughter, Princess Stéphanie, survived the accident.

“High Society” is a musical comedy from 1956 that stars Bing Crosby, Grace Kelly and Frank Sinatra, with music and lyrics by Cole Porter. One of the claims to fame of “High Society” is that it was the last film made by Grace Kelly before she retired from the movies to become Princess Consort of Monaco.

30. Some food festival fare : GYROS
A gyro is a traditional Greek dish, a sandwich made with pita bread containing meat, tomato, onion and tzatziki (a yogurt and cucumber sauce). The meat for gyros is usually roasted on a tall vertical spit and is sliced from the spit as required. The name "gyro" comes from the modern Greek word "gyros" meaning "circle", a reference to the meat turning as it is grilled in a rotating circular motion.

31. French body of law? : SENAT
The French Senate (“Sénat”) meets in the beautiful Luxembourg Palace (“Palais du Luxembourg”) in Paris.

33. Derby favorite : JULEP
If you’d like to make yourself a mint julep, one recipe is:
- 3 oz of Bourbon
- 4-6 sprigs of mint
- granulated sugar to taste
The first Kentucky Derby was run in 1875, and is a race modelled on the Epsom Derby in England and the Grand Prix de Paris (now called the “Prix de l‘Arc de Triomphe”). As such, The Kentucky Derby was run over 1½ miles, although in 1896 this was shortened to 1¼ miles. The winning horse is presented with a very elaborate blanket made of red roses.

35. 10 or 15 yards, say : PENALTY
In football, most penalties result in the loss of 5, 10 or 15 yards.

38. One shot in a cliffhanger : J R EWING
The TV soap "Dallas" revolved around the Ewings family. The series that ran for 13 years was originally intended as a five-part mini-series, with the main characters being newlyweds Bobby and Pam Ewing. But, the devious character in the piece, Bobby's brother J. R., became so popular with audiences that the series as extended with J. R. at the center of the story. Who can remember who shot J.R.? (It was Kristin Shepard: J.R.’s mistress, who was also his sister-in-law).

41. Stall near the stacks : CARREL
A “carrel” is a nook located near the stacks in a library. Usually it is partially partitioned off to allow private study.

43. Designer Geoffrey : BEENE
Geoffrey Beene was an American fashion designer. He had an impressive list of clients that included First Ladies Lady Bird Johnson, Pat Nixon and Nancy Reagan.

45. John Paul II, e.g. : POLE
Pope John Paul II led the Catholic Church from 1978 until 2005, a period of over 26 years. That made him the second longest serving Pope in history, after Pius IX who reigned for over 31 years in the mid 1800s. Paradoxically, John Paul II’s predecessor was John Paul I who only ruled for 33 days. John Paul II was a native of Poland, and was the first non-Italian Pope to lead the church since 1523.

46. ___-call : ROBO
Political calls, including robocalls, are exempt from regulation by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), so we can’t stop them by putting our phone numbers on the “Do Not Call Registry”.

47. Creator of bad apples? : ALAR
The chemical name for Alar, a plant growth regulator and color enhancer, is daminozide. Alar was primarily used on apples but was withdrawn from the market when it was linked to cancer.

48. Hartmann of talk radio : THOM
Thom Hartmann is a radio host and liberal political commentator. “The Thom Hartmann Program” is listened to by almost 3 million listeners every week.

49. Mont. neighbor : ALTA
Alberta is one of Canada's largest provinces, and is about the size of Texas. Alberta is named after Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth child of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Princess Louise also donated her name to Lake Louise, the large glacial lake in the province that lies within the bounds of today's Banff National Park.

51. Grp. with national antidoping rules : USOC
The United States Olympic Committee (USOC) has a federal charter but it doesn't receive any funds from the US government. As such, it has to engage in fundraising just like any other charitable organization.

54. It might end in "mil" : URL
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

The .mil domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:
- .com (commercial enterprise)
- .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
- .mil (US military)
- .org (not-for-profit organization)
- .gov (US federal government entity)
- .edu (college-level educational institution)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Cartoon canary's bane : PUDDY TAT
9. Lymph liquid : PLASM
14. Launch : INITIATE
15. Many a predictable plot : CLICHE
16. Rests : LIES DOWN
17. One with a game collection, maybe : HUNTER
18. Gate announcement, briefly : ETD
19. Longtime model Parkinson of "The Price Is Right" : DIAN
20. One with a game collection : ARCADE
21. Home to Bar-Ilan Univ. : ISR
22. Grp. supported by 17-Acrosses : NRA
23. Something groundbreaking : A FIRST
27. Post rival : KELLOGG’S
32. "That is so obvious!" : NO DUH!
33. What corned beef is often served on : JEWISH RYE
34. Weights, to a weightlifter : IRON
35. Heart-felt thing? : PULSE
36. Where to take stock? : BARN
37. Lamb accompaniment : MINT JELLY
39. Shade similar to bay : COCOA
40. One getting into briefs? : ATTORNEY
41. Least brazen : COYEST
42. "Eldorado" inits. : EAP
43. Forbid : BAR
44. Urban phenomenon : SPRAWL
48. Coastal diver : TERN
49. Sun Devil Stadium's sch. : ASU
52. Chill : COOL IT
53. Labor leader? : HERCULES
55. Ray Charles's Georgia birthplace : ALBANY
56. A sprinkling : ONE OR TWO
57. Inc. magazine topic : REORG
58. Voice of 1-Across : MEL BLANC

Down
1. Ton : PILE
2. Ton, e.g. : UNIT
3. Quit running : DIED
4. Detoxing woe : DTS
5. Bagel source? : YIDDISH
6. Many a Taiwanese : TAOIST
7. More than bickering : AT WAR
8. It has eight neighbors: Abbr. : TENN
9. Stars and stripes, say : PLURALS
10. Tod's sidekick on "Route 66" : LINC
11. Court records : ACTA
12. Hammer and sickle holder, maybe : SHED
13. Trivial : MERE
15. Delta lead-in : CHARLIE
22. Like many holiday letters : NEWSY
23. Jungian principle : ANIMA
24. In favor of the idea : FOR IT
25. Words before know and care : I DON'T
26. Total : RUN TO
27. See 29-Down : KELLY
28. Sarcastic "I can't wait" : OH BOY!
29. With 27-Down, her last film was "High Society" : GRACE
30. Some food festival fare : GYROS
31. French body of law? : SENAT
33. Derby favorite : JULEP
35. 10 or 15 yards, say : PENALTY
38. One shot in a cliffhanger : J R EWING
39. Inner ear? : CORN COB
41. Stall near the stacks : CARREL
43. Designer Geoffrey : BEENE
44. Evidence of damage : SCAR
45. John Paul II, e.g. : POLE
46. ___-call : ROBO
47. Creator of bad apples? : ALAR
48. Hartmann of talk radio : THOM
49. Mont. neighbor : ALTA
50. Wrapped (up) : SEWN
51. Grp. with national antidoping rules : USOC
54. It might end in "mil" : URL


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1128-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Nov 13, Thursday



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Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Loren Muse Smith & Jeff Chen
THEME: Snakes on a Plane … reminding us of the movie “Snakes on a Plane”, today’s themed answers are snakes/asps at the end of across-answers placed in the grid on “planes”, also at the end of across-answers:
14A. Hook's place : CLASP
15A. Joe Louis, to fans : THE BROWN BOMBER (asp on a bomber)

27A. Grate : RASP
34A. One interested in current affairs? : HANG GLIDER (asp on a glider)

40A. Isn't content with the status quo, say : ASPIRES
42A. Gang Green member : NEW YORK JET (asp on a jet)

59A. Door fixture : HASP
61A. Cult classic whose title is depicted four times in this puzzle : SNAKES ON A PLANE (asp on a plane)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 39s (although in my defence, I had just been to a Las Vegas show!)
ANSWERS I MISSED: 4 … BIKO (Bika), ORIBI (aribi), NEW YORK JET (New York Met), AJA (Ama)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Not for the Parti Québécois? : PAS
“Pas” is French for “not”.

The “Parti Québécois” is a political party active in the Canadian province of Quebec who stated goal is the national sovereignty of Quebec.

4. Comcast and CenturyLink, in brief : ISPS
An Internet Service Provider (ISP) is just what the name indicates, a company that provides its customers with access to the Internet. One way that ISPs differentiate themselves from each other is in the way in which end users are connected to the ISP's network. So, there are cable ISPs, DSL ISPs, dial-up ISPs and satellite ISPs. I'd go with cable if I were you, if it's available in your area ...

Comcast is the largest cable company in the United States. Comcast was founded in 1963 as American Cable systems.

CenturyLink is now the third-largest telecom company in the US, after AT&T and Verizon.

8. Terminal info : ETAS
Expected time of arrival (ETA)

13. Org. that fought Napster : RIAA
The Recording Industry of America (RIAA) represents music distributors. It is the RIAA that certifies records that have gone gold and platinum i.e. reached fixed sales thresholds. It’s also the RIAA that goes after individuals who share music illegally online.

In its first and most famous incarnation, Napster was a peer-to-peer file sharing service. Basically, the service allowed people to easily share files over the Internet. What happened was that users opened up mainly their music files for sharing, and as a result there was massive copyright infringement taking place. The music industry sued Napster, and the company went bankrupt in 2002.

15. Joe Louis, to fans : THE BROWN BOMBER
Joe Louis was World Heavyweight Boxing Champion from 1937 to 1949, during which time he defended his title 26 times, a record that stands to this day. Many regard Joe Louis as the first African American to become a national hero in the US. Louis was also a passionate golfer and became the first African American to play a PGA Tour event, teeing off in the San Diego Open in 1952
.
18. Kind of bean : SOYA
What are known as soybeans here in the US are called “soya beans” in most other English-speaking countries. So, I drink soy milk here in America, but when I am over in Ireland I drink "soya milk".

19. Out, in a way : UNDER
To be on the outs is to be under.

21. Flower feature : CALYX
The calyx is the collective name for the sepals of a flower, the outermost whorl that forms the flower (the pretty part!).

23. Anti-apartheid activist Steve : BIKO
Steve Biko was an anti-apartheid activist in the sixties and seventies in South Africa. Biko died in police custody and came to be viewed as a martyr to the anti-apartheid cause. The 1987 movie “Cry Freedom” directed by Richard Attenborough tells Biko’s story, with Denzel Washington playing the lead.

31. Some radios : AMS
The radio spectrum is divided into bands based on frequency. "High band" is composed of relatively high frequency values, and "low band" is composed of frequencies that are relatively low. FM radio falls into the band called Very High Frequency, or VHF. Television signals use frequencies even higher than VHF, frequencies in the Ultra High Frequency band (UHF). AM radio uses lower frequencies that fall into the relatively low bands of Low, Medium and High Frequency (LF, MF, and HF).

36. Host of the 1972 Winter Olympics : SAPPORO
Sapporo is the fourth largest city in Japan, and lies on the island of Hokkaido. The city and surrounding area was home to the first Olympic Games to be held in Asia, the Winter Games of 1972. For the beer drinkers out there, Sapporo is also home to Sapporo Brewery, with the Sapporo beer being one of the more internationally recognizable brand names.

40. Isn't content with the status quo, say : ASPIRES
"Status quo" translates from Latin as "state in which", and in English is used to mean the existing condition or state of affairs.

42. Gang Green member : NEW YORK JET
“Gang Green” is a nickname for the New York Jets football team.

Just like the New York Giants, the New York Jets are based in New Jersey, headquartered in Florham Park. The Jets and the Giants have a unique arrangement in the NFL in that the two teams share Metlife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey. The Jets were an AFL charter team, formed in 1959 as the Titans of New York. The Titans changed their name to the Jets in 1963.

45. Some TV drama settings, for short : ERS
Emergency rooms (ERs)

47. Cottonwoods : ALAMOS
“Alamo” is Spanish for “cottonwood”.

The town of Los Alamos, New Mexico takes its name from the Spanish for "the poplars" or “the cottonwoods”. Famously, it is home to Los Alamos National Laboratory which was founded during WWII to work on the Manhattan Project, the development of the first atomic bomb. The town of Los Alamos didn't exist as such, until it was planned and constructed to support the employees working on development of the bomb.

49. Tennis's Mandlikova : HANA
Hana Mandlikova is a former professional tennis star from Czechoslovakia. Mandlikova won four Grand Slam titles and then retired in 1990, at the ripe old age of 28.

51. Classic toothpaste name : IPANA
Ipana toothpaste was introduced in 1915 and was at the height of its popularity in the forties and fifties. Sales declined in the sixties and the product was withdrawn from the US market in the seventies. Bucky the Beaver was the "spokesman" for Ipana. Bucky the Beaver's slogan was "Brusha... Brusha... Brusha. Get the New Ipana - it's dandy for your teeth!"

59. Door fixture : HASP
The "hasp" of a lock might refer to more than one thing. The u-shape loop protruding from a padlock is often called a "lock hasp", for example.

61. Cult classic whose title is depicted four times in this puzzle : SNAKES ON A PLANE
“Snakes on a Plane” is one of those movies that delivers just what is advertised on the wrapper, namely “snakes on a plane”. Samuel L. Jackson stars in a film about hundreds of snakes released on a plane in a plot to kill a witness who is planning to testify at a trial.

64. Beaker material : PYREX
Pyrex glassware is brand name owned by Corning. As well as being used in bakeware and laboratory glassware, Pyrex is often the material of choice for optics in large telescopes used in astronomy.

65. Mrs. James Joyce : NORA
Nora Barnacle (what a name!) was the wife of Irish author James Joyce. Nora had her first romantic liaison with Joyce on 10 June 1904, a date that Joyce chose as the setting for his “one-day” novel “Ulysses”. June 10th is celebrated in Ireland, and indeed around the world, as Bloomsday.

66. Toon's place : CEL
In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the "cel" its name.

67. Positive principle : YANG
The yin and the yang can be explained using many different metaphors. In one, as the sun shines on a mountain, the side in the shade is the yin and the side in the light is the yang. The yin is also regarded as the feminine side, and the yang the masculine. The yin can also be associated with the moon, while the yang is associated with the sun.

68. Mother of Nike, in Greek myth : STYX
In Greek mythology, Styx was the daughter of Oceanus and Tethys, and the mother of Zelus, Nike, Kratos and Bia (aka Eos).

Down
2. For a specific purpose : AD HOC
The Latin phrase "ad hoc" means "for this purpose".

4. Like some verbs: Abbr. : IRR
Irregular (irr.)

5. Little Bighorn conflict : SIOUX WAR
The Battle of Little Bighorn was the famous engagement between the Lokata, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho Native American peoples against the 7th Cavalry Regiment of the US Army led by General George Custer. Custer was soundly defeated and he and all of his men were killed in the engagement. I had the privilege of visiting the battle site a few years ago, and it was a very memorable experience.

6. Future queen, maybe : PAWN
In the game of chess, the pawns are the weakest pieces on the board. A pawn that can make it to the opposite of the board can be “promoted” to a piece of choice, usually a queen. Using promotion of pawns, it is possible for a player to have two or more queens on the board at one time. However, standard chess sets come with only one queen per side, so a captured rook is often used as the second queen by placing it on the board upside down.

14. Blarney Castle's county : CORK
Blarney is a town in County Cork in the south of Ireland. Blarney is home to Blarney Castle, and inside the castle is the legendary Blarney Stone. "Kissing the Blarney Stone" is a ritual engaged in by oh so many tourists (indeed, I've done it myself!), but it's not a simple process. The stone is embedded in the wall of the castle, and in order to kiss it you have to sit on the edge of the parapet and lean way backwards so that your head is some two feet below your body. There is a staff member there to help you and make sure you don't fall. The Blarney Stone has been labelled as the world's most unhygienic tourist attraction! But once you've kissed it, supposedly you are endowed with the "gift of the gab", the ability to talk eloquently and perhaps deceptively without offending. Sure, I wouldn't know ...

16. Cinderella's soiree : BALL
The folk tale about “Cinderella” was first published by French author Charles Perrault in 1697. The storyline of the tale may date back as far as the days of Ancient Greece. A common alternative title to the story is “The Little Glass Slipper”.

22. Chant from a 32-Down, maybe : YO HO HO!
(32D. See 22-Down : MATEY)
The fictional sea shanty called "Dead Man's Chest" was introduced in Robert Louis Stevenson's great novel, "Treasure Island". In the book, Stevenson only describes the chorus, which goes:
Fifteen men on the dead man's chest--
...Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!
Drink and the devil had done for the rest--
...Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!

24. Small antelope : ORIBI
Oribi are small antelope that inhabit the grasslands of sub-Saharan Africa.

26. 6 letters : MNO
The letters MNO are found on the 6-key of a telephone keypad.

40. Horror film director Alexandre ___ : AJA
Alexandre Aja is a film director from France who is noted for directing horror films, including “High Tension”, “The Hills Have Eyes” and “Piranha 3D”. “Aja” is a pseudonym, formed from the the initial of his real name Alexandre Jouan-Arcady. I don’t do horror …

41. School at which students are collared? : SEMINARY
Originally, a “seminary” was where plants were raised from seeds, as “semen” is the Latin for “seed”. The first schools labelled as seminaries were established in the late 1500s. Those first schools were more likely to be academies for young ladies back then, rather than for trainee priests.

43. Some queens : RANIS
A ranee (also spelled rani) is the female equivalent of a raja in India.

44. "Ah-OO-gah!" horns : KLAXONS
A klaxon is a loud horn, and "klaxon" is one of those words that has taken on the name of a particular brand. The original klaxon was a car horn manufactured and sold by the Klaxon Company.

48. Canadian-born comedian once featured on the cover of Time : SAHL
Mort Sahl is a Canadian-born actor and comedian who moved to the US with his family when he was a child. Sahl became friends with John F. Kennedy. When Kennedy became president, Sahl wrote a lot of jokes for the President's speeches, although he also told a lot of Kennedy jokes in his acts. After the President was assassinated in 1963, Sahl was intensely interested in finding out who was behind the crime and even got himself deputized as a member of one of the investigating teams. He was very outspoken against the results of the Warren Commission report on the assassination, and soon found himself out of favor with the public. It took a few years for him to make his comeback, but come back he did.

50. Kind of card : AMEX
Amex is short for American Express. In dollar terms, there are more transactions conducted in the US using the Amex card than any other card.

52. Antidiscrimination grp. : NAACP
The full name of the NAACP, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, is remarkable in that it actually still uses the old offensive term "colored people". The NAACP was founded in 1909, by a group that included suffragette and journalist Mary White Ovington, wealthy socialist William English Walling, and civil rights activist Henry Moscowitz. Another member of the founding group was W. E. B. Du Bois, the first African American to earn a doctorate at Harvard University.

53. Ed of "Up" : ASNER
Ed Asner is most famous for playing the irascible but lovable Lou Grant on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and on the spin-off drama "Lou Grant". Off-screen, Asner is noted for his political activism. He served two terms as president of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and was very involved in the 1980 SAG strike. When "Lou Grant" was cancelled in 1982, despite decent ratings, there was a lot of talk that the cancellation was a move by the network against Asner personally. In fact one of Asner's activist colleagues, Howard Hesseman (who played Johnny Fever), found that his show "WKRP in Cincinnati" was also cancelled ... on the very same day ...

"Up" is the tenth movie released by Pixar studios, featuring wonderful animation as we have come to expect from Pixar. The film earned itself two Academy Awards. The main voice actor is Ed Asner, whose animated persona as Carl Fredricksen was created to resemble Spencer Tracy in his last film, “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”.

55. "A Day Without Rain" singer : ENYA
Enya's real name is Eithne Patricia Ní Bhraonáin, which can translate from Irish into Enya Brennan. Her Donegal family (in the northwest of Ireland) formed a band called Clannad, which included Enya. In 1980 Enya launched her very successful solo career. She sure does turn up a lot in crosswords!

58. Playing longer than expected, for short : IN OT
In overtime (in OT)

60. One-named sports star who was once the highest-paid athlete in the world : PELE
Pelé is the nickname of Edson de Nascimento, a soccer player who has used the name Pelé for most of his life. Pelé is now retired, and for my money was the world's greatest ever player of the game. He is the only person to have been part of three World Cup winning squads, and is a national treasure in his native Brazil.

63. Bellum's opposite : PAX
In Latin, the opposite to war (bellum) is peace (pax).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. One of the Obama girls : MALIA
6. Like : A LA
9. Kindergarten stuff : ABCS
13. Huskies' sch. : UCONN
14. Heavy work : TOME
16. Word before income or exhaust : DUAL
17. Source of easy money : GRAVY TRAIN
19. Cube ... or certain cubes : DICE
20. Certain : SOME
21. Salon supplies : RINSES
23. "Evita" character : CHE
24. One of a pair in a court : SQUASH RACKET
27. Prickly one : CACTUS
30. Plains Indians : OTOS
31. Suffix meaning "approximately" : -ISH
32. Author Calvino : ITALO
36. Hardly Mr. Cool : NERD
39. Setting for the starts of 17-, 24-, 51- and 64-Across : THANKSGIVING DAY
43. Brontë title heroine : EYRE
44. Cartoon genre : ANIME
45. Not miss a thing on : ACE
46. Lisa with the 1997 hit "I Do" : LOEB
49. Short-sheeting and such : PRANKS
51. Locale for a big mirror : DRESSING ROOM
56. Director Anderson : WES
57. Officers above sarges : LOOIES
58. Noodles in Japanese cookery : SOBA
62. Suffix with Rock : -ETTE
64. Old ragtime dance : TURKEY TROT
66. God with a quiver : EROS
67. Stake on a table : ANTE
68. Many an aria singer, informally : MEZZO
69. Fillet : BONE
70. Short : SHY
71. "That threw me for ___" : A LOOP

Down
1. They may be cast-iron : POTS
2. For a specific purpose : AD HOC
3. "I'm outta here!" : SEE YA!
4. Like some verbs: Abbr. : IRR
5. Little Bighorn conflict : SIOUX WAR
6. Future queen, maybe : PAWN
7. Balloon ballast : SANDBAG
8. Street shader : ELM
9. Keep ___ on : TABS
10. Lost : ASEA
11. Nimble : SPRY
14. Blarney Castle's county : CORK
16. Cinderella's soiree : BALL
17. Human ___ : BEING
22. Chant from a 32-Down, maybe : YO HO HO!
24. Small antelope : ORIBI
26. 6 letters : MNO
28. Hold dear : ADORE
29. Cut : SEVER
30. Voice mail imperative : PRESS
31. Orgs. : ASSNS
32. See 22-Down : MATEY
33. Offspring : SPAWN
35. Object of scrutiny at airport security : LAPTOP
37. Outwit, in a way, with "out" : PSYCH
40. Horror film director Alexandre ___ : AJA
41. School at which students are collared? : SEMINARY
43. Some queens : RANIS
44. "Ah-OO-gah!" horns : KLAXONS
48. Canadian-born comedian once featured on the cover of Time : SAHL
50. Kind of card : AMEX
52. Antidiscrimination grp. : NAACP
53. Ed of "Up" : ASNER
54. Spot : ESPY
55. "A Day Without Rain" singer : ENYA
56. Tip off : WARN
58. Playing longer than expected, for short : IN OT
60. One-named sports star who was once the highest-paid athlete in the world : PELE
62. Party congregation site, maybe : KEG
63. Bellum's opposite : PAX


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1127-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 27 Nov 13, Wednesday



QuickLinks:
Solution to today's crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today's SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jules P. Markey
THEME: Happy Thanksgiving (Eve) … today’s themed answers all start with something associated with Thanksgiving dinner:
17A. Source of easy money : GRAVY TRAIN
24A. One of a pair in a court : SQUASH RACKET
51A. Locale for a big mirror : DRESSING ROOM
64A. Old ragtime dance : TURKEY TROT

39A. Setting for the starts of 17-, 24-, 51- and 64-Across : THANKSGIVING DAY
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 08m 01s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. One of the Obama girls : MALIA
By tradition, the Secret Service code names used for the US President and family all start with the same letter. For the current First Family, that letter is R:
- Barack Obama: Renegade
- Michelle Obama: Renaissance
- Malia Obama: Radiance
- Sasha Obama: Rosebud

6. Like : A LA
The term “in the style of” can be translated in “alla” in Italian and “à la” in French.

9. Kindergarten stuff : ABCS
"Kindergarten" is of course a German term, literally meaning “children’s garden”. The term was coined by the German education authority Friedrich Fröbel in 1837, when he used it as the name for his play and activity institute that he created for young children to use before they headed off to school. His thought was that children should be nourished educationally, like plants in a garden.

13. Huskies' sch. : UCONN
The UConn Huskies are the sports teams of the University of Connecticut. I wasn’t able to uncover the derivation of the “Huskies” moniker. Although it is true that “UConn” sounds like “Yukon”, that isn’t the derivation of the “Huskies” nickname as the school didn’t become the University of Connecticut (UConn) until 1939, and the Huskies name has been used since 1933.

14. Heavy work : TOME
“Tome” first came into English from the Latin "tomus" which means "section of a book". The original usage in English was for a single volume in a multi-volume work. By the late 16th century "tome" had come to mean "a large book".

17. Source of easy money : GRAVY TRAIN
The original “riders of the gravy train” were railroad men in the 1920s who were assigned a run that had good pay and little work. Since then, the phrase has come to mean any job that is easy and pays well. The term “gravy” had been slang for easy money since about 1900.

19. Cube ... or certain cubes : DICE
As we all know, the numbers on dice are arranged so that the opposite faces add up to seven. Given this arrangement, the numbers 1, 2 and 3 all meet at a common vertex. Now, there are two ways of arranging the 1, 2 and 3 around the common vertex, a so called right-handed die (clockwise 1-2-3) or a left-handed die (counterclockwise 1-2-3). Traditionally, dice used in Western cultures are right-handed, whereas Chinese dice are left-handed. Quite interesting ...

23. "Evita" character : CHE
"Evita" was the follow up musical to "Jesus Christ Superstar" for Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. Both of these works were originally released as album musicals, and very successful ones at that (I remember buying them when they first came out). For the original album's cast they chose Irish singer Colm Wilkinson (or C. T. Wilkinson, as we know him back in Ireland) to play Che, the narrator of the piece. “Evita” was made into a film in 1996, with Madonna playing the title role.

24. One of a pair in a court : SQUASH RACKET
Squash is a racquet sport that is similar to the more common racquetball (more common here in the US, I think). The game is derived from the older sport of racquets. It was originally called squash racquets as the ball used is very, very squashable and much softer than that used in the parent game.

30. Plains Indians : OTOS
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

32. Author Calvino : ITALO
As well as being an author, Italo Calvino was a famous Italian journalist. He was a supporter of communism and so wasn't very popular in the US nor in Britain.

39. Setting for the starts of 17-, 24-, 51- and 64-Across : THANKSGIVING DAY
The tradition of the US President “pardoning” a Thanksgiving turkey was only formalized in 1989, during the administration of President George H, W. Bush. The pardoned turkey is taken to a farm where is gets to live out its life. Prior to 1989, the tradition was more focused on the presentation of a turkey to the White House, and less on the fate of the bird. President Eisenhower was presented with a turkey in each year of his two terms, and he ate them all …

43. Brontë title heroine : EYRE
"Jane Eyre" is of course the novel written by Charlotte Brontë, under the pen name Currer Bell. Over the years, I've shared here on my blogs that the "Jane Eyre" story line is a little too dark and Gothic for my taste, but a very persuasive blog reader convinced me to look more at the romantic side of the story and give it a second chance. I watched a wonderful 4-hour television adaptation of the novel made by the BBC a while back and I have to say that because I was focused on the relationship between Jane and Rochester, I was able to push past the Gothic influences (that depress me) so I really enjoyed the story. I thoroughly recommend the 2006 BBC adaptation to fans of the novel.

44. Cartoon genre : ANIME
Anime is cartoon animation in the style of Japanese Manga comic books.

The Japanese word "manga" means "whimsical pictures" and is an apt term to describe the Japanese style of comic book. Manga publications are more diverse than American comic books and have a larger audience. Manga cover many subjects including romance, sports, business, horror, and mystery.

46. Lisa with the 1997 hit "I Do" : LOEB
The singer Lisa Loeb was discovered by actor Ethan Hawke, who lived just across the street from her in New York City. Hawke took a demo of her song "Stay (I Missed You)" and gave it to director Ben Stiller, who in turn used it over the ending credits of his 1994 movie "Reality Bites". The movie was a hit, the song went to number one, and Loeb became the first artist ever to hit that number one spot without having signed up with a record label. Good for her!

49. Short-sheeting and such : PRANKS
I remember the first time I fell victim to the prank of "short-sheeting", and very perplexing it is too! The idea is to leave the bottom sheet as is, and tuck the top sheet under the mattress at the head of the bed, just as one would do with a bottom sheet. Then fold the foot of the top sheet back up to the head of the bed, and fold it as one would do normally for a top sheet. Don't tell your Mom it was me who told you how to do it though ...

56. Director Anderson : WES
Wes Anderson's most famous movie is probably "The Royal Tenenbaums", released in 2001, not my favorite film by any stretch. However, his 2007 release "The Darjeeling Limited", that I enjoyed.

57. Officers above sarges : LOOIES
A lieutenant (looie) is higher in rank than a sergeant (sarge).

58. Noodles in Japanese cookery : SOBA
Soba is a thin Japanese noodle made from buckwheat flour. In Japan, the word soba tends to be used to describe any thin noodle, in contrast with the thicker noodles that are called udon.

62. Suffix with Rock : -ETTE
The famous Rockettes can be seen in Radio City Music Hall. They have an amazing schedule during the Christmas season when they perform five high-kicking shows every day, seven days a week. The troupe has been doing this every Christmas for 77 years.

64. Old ragtime dance : TURKEY TROT
The Turkey trot was a dance step popular in the early 1900s, often performed to ragtime music. It gained popularity because it was denounced by the Vatican, as some of the positions assumed were deemed suggestive and offensive.

66. God with a quiver : EROS
Eros was the Greek god of love, and the Greek counterpart of the Roman god Cupid.

68. Many an aria singer, informally : MEZZO
A mezzo-soprano is a female singing voice below a soprano but above a contralto. “Mezzo” is Italian for “half”.

69. Fillet : BONE
“To fillet” is to slice or bone, to make into fillets.

70. Short : SHY
To be “shy” is to be short, lacking. The term originated as gambling slang, meaning to owe money to the pot.

Down
2. Onset of phobia? : ACRO-
Our prefix "acro-" comes from the Greek "akros" meaning "at the top". Examples are “acrophobia” (fear of heights) and “Acropolis” (“city at the top”).

6. Parts of hearts : ATRIA
The heart has four chambers. The two upper chambers (the atria) accept deoxygenated blood from the body and oxygenated blood from the lungs. The atria squeeze the blood into the two lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles), “priming” the pump, as it were. One ventricle pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs, and the other pumps oxygenated blood to the rest of the body.

8. Plain folk : AMISH
The Amish are a group of Christian churches, a sub-group of the Mennonite churches. The Amish church originated in Switzerland and Alsace in 1693 when it was founded by Jakob Ammann. It was Ammann who gave the name to the Amish people. Many Amish people came to Pennsylvania in the 18th century.

10. LaCrosse, for one : BUICK SEDAN
David Dunbar Buick was an inventor working in Detroit, Michigan who founded the Buick Motor Company in 1903. Buick sold his interest in Buick Motors just three years later. He passed away in 1929, practically penniless. Still, over 30 million vehicles have been built that bore the Buick name.

11. Hidden store : CACHE
A “cache” is a secret supply. We imported the term into English from French Canadian trappers in the 17th century. Back then, “cache” was as slang term for a “hiding place for stores”, derived from the French verb “cacher” meaning “to hide”.

12. Cold fall : SLEET
Apparently "sleet" is a term used to describe two weather conditions. One is a shower of ice pellets, smaller than hail, and the second is a mixture of rain and snow, with the snow melting as it falls. It's the second definition that I have always used ...

15. Warm month in South America : ENERO
In Spanish, a year (año) starts in January (enero) and ends in December (diciembre).

18. They may be blind : TRUSTS
A blind trust is one in which those managing the trust’s funds have full discretion in regard to asset allocation, and the beneficiary of the trust has no knowledge of how the assets are allocated. Many politicians put their personal assets into blind trusts so that they avoid any conflicts of interest.

22. Calendar abbr. : SAT
The term “Saturday” comes from “dies Saturni”, which was the Ancient Roman “day of Saturn”.

25. Old Nestlé brand : QUIK
Nestlé Quik was introduced in 1948, and is a flavored powdered milk drink. It was sold in Europe as "Nesquik", and that brand name replaced "Quik" here in the US in 1999. The Nesquik mascot is the Quik Bunny. The Quik Bunny had a large "Q" on a collar around his neck, and with the brand name change this "Q" became an "N", and he is now known as the Nesquik Bunny.

26. Viet ___ : CONG
The Viet Cong was the name of the political and military organization based in South Vietnam that fought the US and South Vietnamese government during the Vietnam War. It was the Viet Cong, as opposed to the North Vietnamese, who launched the famous Tet Offensive in 1968. The American military referred to the Viet Cong as “the VC”. “VC” could be extended to “Victor Charlie” in the phonetic alphabet, and this was shortened to “Charlie”, which became a military slang term for the Viet Cong and other Communists.

29. Dance from which the Lindy Hop developed : CHARLESTON
The Charleston developed as a dance in African-American communities, but is more closely associated with the flappers of the 1920s.

The Lindy Hop is a dance based on the Charleston and dates back to the twenties and thirties. The name Lindy is a homage to the famous 1927 flight across the Atlantic by Charles Lindbergh.

33. Muslim general : AGA
"Aga" (also "agha") is a title that was used by both civil and military officials in the Ottoman Empire.

34. Jeremy of the N.B.A. : LIN
Jeremy Lin is a professional basketball player with the Houston Rockets. Lin is the first American of Chinese descent to play in the NBA.

37. Pool need : RACK
The more correct name for the game of pool is pocket billiards. The name "pool" arose after pocket billiards became a common feature in "pool halls", places where gamblers "pooled" their money to bet on horse races.

42. "I, Claudius" role : NERO
"I, Claudius" is a 1934 novel penned by Robert Graves, written in the form of an autobiography of Emperor Claudius of Rome. Graves wrote a sequel in 1935 called "Claudius the God". Both books were adapted by the BBC into a fabulous television series that went by the name of the first book "I, Claudius".

47. Subj. for many newcomers : ESL
English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

48. Fauna and flora : BIOTA
The biota of a region is the total collection of flora and fauna found there.

50. Brand from Holland : AMSTEL
Amstel is a Dutch beer and brewery, founded in 1870 in Amsterdam. The brewery takes its name from the Amstel river which runs through the city.

52. Like the Deco look, now : RETRO
Art deco is the name given to a style of design and architecture of the 1920s that actually had its roots in Belgium and then spread throughout Europe before arriving in North America. Celebrated examples of art deco architecture are the magnificent Chrysler Building in New York City completed in 1930, and the GE Building that sits in the middle of Rockefeller Center also in New York City, with the address of "30 Rock".

59. Rice-size pasta : ORZO
Orzo is pasta that has been formed into granular shapes, much like barley. And indeed, "orzo" is the Italian word for "barley".

60. Lamebrain : BOZO
A "bozo" is a man with a low IQ, and one who is usually quite muscular. We've been using the word since the early 1900s and it possibly comes from the Spanish "bozal" that was used to describe someone who speaks Spanish poorly.

65. Sumac native to Peru : YMA
Yma Sumac was a Peruvian soprano. Sumac had a notable vocal range of five octaves.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. One of the Obama girls : MALIA
6. Like : A LA
9. Kindergarten stuff : ABCS
13. Huskies' sch. : UCONN
14. Heavy work : TOME
16. Word before income or exhaust : DUAL
17. Source of easy money : GRAVY TRAIN
19. Cube ... or certain cubes : DICE
20. Certain : SOME
21. Salon supplies : RINSES
23. "Evita" character : CHE
24. One of a pair in a court : SQUASH RACKET
27. Prickly one : CACTUS
30. Plains Indians : OTOS
31. Suffix meaning "approximately" : -ISH
32. Author Calvino : ITALO
36. Hardly Mr. Cool : NERD
39. Setting for the starts of 17-, 24-, 51- and 64-Across : THANKSGIVING DAY
43. Brontë title heroine : EYRE
44. Cartoon genre : ANIME
45. Not miss a thing on : ACE
46. Lisa with the 1997 hit "I Do" : LOEB
49. Short-sheeting and such : PRANKS
51. Locale for a big mirror : DRESSING ROOM
56. Director Anderson : WES
57. Officers above sarges : LOOIES
58. Noodles in Japanese cookery : SOBA
62. Suffix with Rock : -ETTE
64. Old ragtime dance : TURKEY TROT
66. God with a quiver : EROS
67. Stake on a table : ANTE
68. Many an aria singer, informally : MEZZO
69. Fillet : BONE
70. Short : SHY
71. "That threw me for ___" : A LOOP

Down
1. Makes faces : MUGS
2. Onset of phobia? : ACRO-
3. Soil sort : LOAM
4. Stockbroker's advice : INVEST
5. "___ news?" : ANY
6. Parts of hearts : ATRIA
7. Bank department : LOANS
8. Plain folk : AMISH
9. Make sense, with "up" : ADD
10. LaCrosse, for one : BUICK SEDAN
11. Hidden store : CACHE
12. Cold fall : SLEET
15. Warm month in South America : ENERO
18. They may be blind : TRUSTS
22. Calendar abbr. : SAT
25. Old Nestlé brand : QUIK
26. Viet ___ : CONG
27. Footnote, perhaps : CITE
28. Wan : ASHY
29. Dance from which the Lindy Hop developed : CHARLESTON
33. Muslim general : AGA
34. Jeremy of the N.B.A. : LIN
35. Egg: Prefix : OVI-
37. Pool need : RACK
38. Salon supplies : DYES
40. Modernists, informally : NEOS
41. Obtrude : IMPOSE
42. "I, Claudius" role : NERO
47. Subj. for many newcomers : ESL
48. Fauna and flora : BIOTA
50. Brand from Holland : AMSTEL
51. Hardly Mr. Cool : DWEEB
52. Like the Deco look, now : RETRO
53. Nuts and bolts, e.g. : NOUNS
54. Body measurement : GIRTH
55. Enter again, as text : REKEY
59. Rice-size pasta : ORZO
60. Lamebrain : BOZO
61. Opposite of under : ATOP
63. Charlottesville-to-Richmond dir. : ESE
65. Sumac native to Peru : YMA


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

1126-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Nov 13, Tuesday



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CROSSWORD SETTER: Don Gagliardo & Zhouqin Burnikel
THEME: Trademarks … each themed answer today starts with a well-known trademark that has become a generic term over time:
17A. Hiker's snack : GRANOLA BAR
21A. What's being discussed in the National Enquirer or Globe : TABLOID BUZZ
39A. Provision in many a construction contract : ESCALATOR CLAUSE
57A. Poor weight-loss practice : YO-YO DIETING
62A. Intellectual property protection ... or what the starts of 17-, 21-, 39- and 57-Across once were : TRADEMARKS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 08m 41s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. Basic quatrain scheme : ABAB
A quatrain is a group of four lines of poetry. The most common quatrain schemes are AAAA, AABB and ABAB.

14. "Hawaii Five-O" nickname : DANNO
Danny Williams is a character on the TV show “Hawaii Five-O”, both in the original version that first aired in 1968 and in the remake that was first broadcast in 2010. The original, “Danno” is played by James McArthur. In the remake, Danno is played by Scott Caan, son of Hollywood actor James Caan.

15. French 4 + 4 : HUIT
In French, 4 (quatre) + 4 (quatre) is 8 (huit).

16. Olin of "Chocolat" : LENA
The lovely Lena Olin is a Swedish actress, clearly someone who had acting in her blood. Her mother was the actress Britta Holmberg and her father the actor and director Stig Olin. Olin had a very successful career in Sweden, often working with the great Ingmar Bergman. Olin's breakthrough international and English-speaking role was playing opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" released in 1988. Way back in 1974, the lovely Miss Olin was crowned Miss Scandinavia in a beauty pageant for Nordic women held in Helsinki, Finland.

17. Hiker's snack : GRANOLA BAR
The name “Granola” (and “Granula”) were trademarked back in the late 1800s for whole grain foods that were crumbled and baked until crisp. Granola was created in Dansville, New York in 1894.

21. What's being discussed in the National Enquirer or Globe : TABLOID BUZZ
"Tabloid" is the trademarked name (owned by Burroughs, Wellcome and Co,) for a "small tablet of medicine", a name that goes back to 1884. The word "tabloid" had entered into general use to mean a compressed form of anything, and by the early 1900s was used in "tabloid journalism", applied to newspapers that had short, condensed articles and stories printed on smaller sheets of paper.

25. Quick wit : ESPRIT
Our word “esprit”, meaning “liveliness of mind”, comes to us from Latin via French. The Latin “spiritus” means “spirit.

26. Airhead : DODO
A dodo is a foolish person, and dodo is word that comes into English from the Portuguese "doudo". "Doudo" was a slang term used by Portuguese sailors for the extinct bird that we now know as the dodo.

28. Willow twig : OSIER
Most willows (trees and shrubs of the genus Salix) are called just that, willows. Some of the broad-leaved shrub varieties are called sallow, and the narrow-leaved shrubs are called osier. The variety known as osier is commonly used in basketry, as osier twigs are very flexible.

34. Adams in a bar : SAMUEL
Samuel Adams was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, from Boston Massachusetts. Adams followed his father into the family’s malthouse business a few years after young Samuel graduated from Harvard. There were generations of Adams family members who were "maltsters" i.e. those producing malt needed for making beer. Samuel Adams is often described as a brewer, but he was actually a malster. The Samuel Adams brand of beer isn’t directly associated with the Adams family, but it is named in honor of the patriot.

38. Winter woe : FLU
Influenza is an ailment that is caused by a virus. The virus is readily deactivated by the use of soap, so washing hands and surfaces is especially helpful in containing flu outbreaks.

39. Provision in many a construction contract : ESCALATOR CLAUSE
An escalator clause in a contract is a provision dictating that an amount can change under certain conditions. For example, wage rate might be linked with the cost of living index.

42. Asian language with no plural form : LAO
The official name for the country of Laos is the Lao People's Democratic Republic. In the Lao language, the country's name is "Meuang Lao". The French ruled Laos as part of French Indochina, having united three separate Lao kingdoms. As there was a plural of "Lao" entities united into one, the French added the "S" and so today we tend to use "Laos" instead of "Lao".

45. "Live long and prosper" speaker : SPOCK
Leonard Nimoy played the logical Mr. Spock in the original "Star Trek" television series. Spock has to be the most popular character on the show, and he keeps popping up in "Star Trek" spin offs to this day. Nimoy first worked alongside William Shatner (Captain Kirk) in an episode of "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (I loved that show!), with Nimoy playing a bad guy and Shatner playing an U.N.C.L.E. recruit.

47. "Suis" is part of its conjugation : ETRE
The French for “to be” is “être”, and for “I am” is “je suis”.

53. Modern home of the ancient Zapotec civilization : OAXACA
Oaxaca is a state in the southern part of Mexico on the Pacific coast. The state takes the name of Oaxaca, its largest city.

57. Poor weight-loss practice : YO-YO DIETING
Would you believe that the first yo-yos date back to 500 BC? There is even an ancient Greek vase painting that shows a young man playing with a yo-yo. Centuries later Filipinos were using yo-yos as hunting tools in the 1500s. "Yo-yo" is a Tagalog (Filipino) word meaning "come-come" or simply "return".

64. Siouan tribe : OTOE
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

65. Jannings who won the first Best Actor Oscar : EMIL
Emil Jannings, an actor from Switzerland, was the first person to receive an Oscar. He was given the award for Best Actor at the 1929 ceremony for his work on two films: "The Way of All Flesh" and "The Last Command". Interestingly, Jannings did not garner the highest number of votes, but the Academy awarded him the Oscar anyway. The highest number of votes for that first Oscar actually went to Rin Tin Tin, the German Shepherd dog!

Down
1. Mystery prize : EDGAR
The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (the Edgars) are presented annually by the Mystery Writers of America.

2. Friend of Porky and Spanky : DARLA
Alfalfa's love interest in "Our Gang" was Darla, whose real name was Darla Hood. Hood became quite a successful singer after she grew out of the "Our Gang" role.

Hal Roach made a whole series of comedy shorts with "The Little Rascals", also known as "Our Gang". This very likable bunch of kids included Spanky and his kid brother, Porky. Porky had a speech impediment so he couldn't pronounce "Okay, Spanky" very clearly and it came out as "Otay, Panky".

4. Fox News rival : CNN
CNN (Cable News Network) was launched in 1980, and was the first television channel in the world to provide news coverage 24 hours a day.

6. Starbuck's boss : AHAB
Starbucks is a coffee company based in Seattle, Washington. It is the largest coffeehouse company in the world and has over 19,000 stores. In the 1990s, Starbucks was opening one new store every single day! Starbucks is named after the chief mate on the Pequod in the Herman Melville book “Moby Dick”.

7. Change in Russia : RUBLE
The ruble (also “rouble”) is the unit of currency in Russia, as well as several other countries of the former Soviet Union. One ruble is divided into one hundred kopecks.

8. Bye lines? : CIAOS
"Ciao" is the Italian for "'bye". "Arrivederci" is more formal, and translates better as "goodbye".

9. "Dilbert" or "Doonesbury" : STRIP
“Dilbert” is a comic strip written by Scott Adams, a “neighbor” of mine here in the Bay Area. Adams used to own a nice restaurant at the end of my street ...

When cartoonist Garry Trudeau was deciding on a name for his comic strip in 1970, he opted for “Doonesbury”. He combined “doone”, which is slang for a “genial fool”, and the last syllables in “Pillsbury”, the family name of Trudeau’s roommate while he was at Yale.

10. Cover stories : ALIBIS
"Alibi" is the Latin word for "elsewhere" as in, "I claim that I was 'elsewhere' when the crime was committed ... I have an 'alibi'".

12. Animated bug film : ANTZ
"Antz" was the first feature movie released by Dreamworks SKG, the studio founded by Steven Spielberg and two partners in 1994. "Antz" came out in 1998, and has a stellar cast that includes Woody Allen, Sharon Stone, Sylvester Stallone, Gene Hackman and many, many other big names. The cartoon is quite unique in that the facial features of the voice actors are reflected in the animated characters.

13. Singer of many Dylan songs : BAEZ
Joan Baez is an American folk singer and a prominent activist in the fields of nonviolence, civil rights, human rights and environmental protection. Baez has dated some high-profile figures in her life including Bob Dylan, Steve Jobs (of Apple) and Mickey Hart of the Grateful Dead.

As we all know, the real name of singer Bob Dylan is Robert Zimmerman. Zimmerman chose that particular stage name because he was greatly influenced by the poetry of the Welsh poet, Dylan Thomas.

18. Imager of the earth's surface : LANDSAT
Landsat is a series of satellites tasked with imaging the Earth’s surface. The first satellite in the series was launched back in 1972 and the latest, the seventh, in 1999. The eighth satellite went into orbit in 2013.

22. Waggish : DROLL
A “wag” or a “card” is a very amusing person, often quite eccentric.

31. Ones drawn to film? : CELS
In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the "cel" its name.

32. "Hurry!" : ASAP!
As soon as possible(ASAP)

33. Shaggy's dog : SCOOBY-DOO
“Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!” is a series of cartoons produced for Hanna-Barbera Productions, first broadcast in 1969.

Not only is Casey Kasem so closely associated with the radio show "American Top 40", but he is also well known for playing the voice of Shaggy Rogers on the "Scooby-Doo" animated series.

35. Extinct ostrichlike bird : MOA
Moas were flightless birds native to New Zealand that are now extinct. The fate of the Moa is a great example of the detrimental effect that humans can have on animal populations. The Maoris arrived in New Zealand about 1300 AD, upsetting the balance of the ecosystem. The Moa were hunted to extinction within 200 years, which had the knock-on effect of killing off the Haast's Eagle, the Moa's only predator prior to the arrival of man.

37. Transitional zone between plant communities : ECOTONE
An ecotone is a transition area between two different types of land that sit adjacent to each other.

41. Zenith : APEX
In the celestial world, an apsis is a point in an orbit when the orbiting body is at its greatest, or least, distance from it's center of orbit. The farthest and closest points of orbit are known as the apogee and perigee, when talking about bodies orbiting the Earth. The farthest and closest points for bodies orbiting the sun are known as the aphelion and perihelion.

55. NPR news analyst Roberts : COKIE
Cokie Roberts is a great journalist and author, best known for her work with National Public Radio (NPR).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Decree : EDICT
6. Paths of lobs : ARCS
10. Basic quatrain scheme : ABAB
14. "Hawaii Five-O" nickname : DANNO
15. French 4 + 4 : HUIT
16. Olin of "Chocolat" : LENA
17. Hiker's snack : GRANOLA BAR
19. "It must be something ___" : I ATE
20. European peak : ALP
21. What's being discussed in the National Enquirer or Globe : TABLOID BUZZ
23. Mete out : RATION
25. Quick wit : ESPRIT
26. Airhead : DODO
28. Willow twig : OSIER
31. Matter of law : CASE
34. Adams in a bar : SAMUEL
38. Winter woe : FLU
39. Provision in many a construction contract : ESCALATOR CLAUSE
42. Asian language with no plural form : LAO
43. "We're on!" : IT’S A GO!
44. Said "Guilty" or "Not guilty," say : PLED
45. "Live long and prosper" speaker : SPOCK
47. "Suis" is part of its conjugation : ETRE
49. Cranapple juice and others : BLENDS
53. Modern home of the ancient Zapotec civilization : OAXACA
57. Poor weight-loss practice : YO-YO DIETING
60. Buns, e.g. : DOS
61. Winds up : ENDS
62. Intellectual property protection ... or what the starts of 17-, 21-, 39- and 57-Across once were : TRADEMARKS
64. Siouan tribe : OTOE
65. Jannings who won the first Best Actor Oscar : EMIL
66. Didn't go out for dinner : ATE IN
67. Covered club, usually : WOOD
68. Fit to be tried : SANE
69. Neck parts : NAPES

Down
1. Mystery prize : EDGAR
2. Friend of Porky and Spanky : DARLA
3. Unsuited : INAPT
4. Fox News rival : CNN
5. Pretentious, informally : TOO TOO
6. Starbuck's boss : AHAB
7. Change in Russia : RUBLE
8. Bye lines? : CIAOS
9. "Dilbert" or "Doonesbury" : STRIP
10. Cover stories : ALIBIS
11. Stunning : BEAUTIFUL
12. Animated bug film : ANTZ
13. Singer of many Dylan songs : BAEZ
18. Imager of the earth's surface : LANDSAT
22. Waggish : DROLL
24. Inkling : IDEA
27. 17-Across ingredients, often : OATS
29. Otherwise : ELSE
30. Lamented : RUED
31. Ones drawn to film? : CELS
32. "Hurry!" : ASAP!
33. Shaggy's dog : SCOOBY-DOO
35. Extinct ostrichlike bird : MOA
36. Impulse : URGE
37. Transitional zone between plant communities : ECOTONE
40. Fancied : LIKED
41. Zenith : APEX
46. After-hours shop sign : CLOSED
48. Seller of cloth scraps : RAGMAN
50. Casual evenings? : NITES
51. Skin: Prefix : DERMA-
52. Blotch : STAIN
54. One with space to sell, for short : AD REP
55. NPR news analyst Roberts : COKIE
56. Professional grps. : ASSNS
57. "That hurts!" : YEOW!
58. Wise about : ONTO
59. Thumb-twiddling : IDLE
63. ___ glance : AT A


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The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the New York Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, as soon as I am done, usually well before the newsprint version becomes available.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I try to answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Irish Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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